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UFLAC



Florida Livestock.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00000206/00053
Finding Guide: A Guide to the Peter Henry Rolfs Collection
 Material Information
Title: Florida Livestock.
Series Title: Writings and Speeches 1891-1920
Physical Description: Unknown
Physical Location:
Box: 2
Divider: Articles, Speeches and Other Writings
Folder: Florida Livestock.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: AA00000206:00053

Full Text


4 ,,. t' ,, -
AtOtXASTOCK


Nowherain i e United State has there been so muoh
progress made in the development of live stock in the last'
ten years as in Florida. Coincident with the introduction
and rearing of tit purebred stock, has come & large increase
in value of the animals not.only per head, but also in the

Sillence of the animals that have been introduced. The
1y introduction of the purebreds dates back a good many

years. These were the pioneers that blazed the wa&y,,phowing
that purebred stock could be grown in Florida and that the

climate itself was more favorable to the development of live-
stock than anywhere else in the country. The first great step

in advancement taken by the State Government, was the creat-
ing of the State Live Stock Sanitary Board, whose principal
function was that of ridding the State of the Texas fever tick.
This work has been carried forward splendidly and rapid pro-

gress has been made to overoon.e this most serious handicap to
the development of our livestock industry. In addition to the
eradicition of the cattle tick, the Live Stock Sanitary Board

has well justified its existence in the control and eradication
of other cattle and swine diseases.
The formation of Florida State Livestock Association

greatly stimulated the livestock production in Florida. The
formation of the rairy Association, the Swine Breeders Association

and many other associations for the improvement of livestock have
all been very important factors in the introduction and develop-
ment of the whole livestock business in the State.






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.a During the last two years a large number of pure bred
animals have been broUght into the State and offered at public
sale. In every case these animals sold well and were widely
distributed over the State, so that at the present time there
is scarcely a oommualty remaining but has one or more head of
.pure bped animals in it. This is an enormous change from the
.f ..
'o ,'6tions we found ten years ago, when pure bred hogs were
cities in many localities and pure bred cattle were prac-
tically unknown in some of the counties,
It took no small amount of courage for the pioneer in
the pure bred breeding to introduce and offer for public sale
fine livestock and swine. These men however, have been re-
warded most largely in the SbAtifaotion of knowing that it
was good work well done.
The United States Department of Agriculture and the
Florida College of Agriculture have borne their part of the
burden in maintaining agents in the field, not only to assist
the livestock men in handling the animals, but also to final
sources from which pure bred animals might be obtained. We
have now within the State, animals of practically all breeds
of cattle of as fine a breeding as can be found anywhere in tb
world. As a m-atter of fact the south stood out very distinctly

as a leading livestock section at the last Chicago International

Show. The Grand Championship for bulls weht to a south Georgia
firm and the Grand Championship for hogs went to a north Florida
firm. Florida has now within its borders, some of the finest
producers of Guernsey and Jersey breeds as well as aed, of the





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best animals of the Holateib type.
It kas been realized that with the introduction of
pare bred animals there was an increased necessity for the
introduction of now and better forage drops. All forces in
the field have combined to use all their energies in this
direction, so that in the last five years a large number of
n "te~altpromising grasses have been put into the hands
of a large number of livestock men. Napier grass and Marker

grass have been added to our list as soiling crops. Blue Couch

grass, Piper's Carpet grass and a number of others have been
added to the pasture grasses.
According to the Bureau of Crop Estimates the total val-

?S4'& of all livestock in Florida during January 1920 was over

$74,000,000, general livestock leading with more than $25,000,000
worth, swine coming next with over $30,000,000 worth; milk cows
coming next with over $11,000,000 worth and mules and horses
coming in with over $16,000,000 worth. Sheep have shown a

marked tho small increase and are estimated to be worth ovef

one half million dollars. These figures are all very large

when it is considered that the population of rlorida is estimated

at:someh&bag over a million. There is every reason for Bettibing
optimistic as to the future of the livestock work in the State.













UITIED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, -:
BUREiA OF CROP ESTILI~TES.

Office of Field Ag.nt, i Oinesvill,. ..^
.f b 5, 1970.'

LIVE STOCI REP.EFT.
Sam T. Fleming, State Field Agent.

FLORIDA IS FjRGII.;G IT THE FROUIT 1N HUIiUBES AUD VaLUELL OF LIVE Sj

Estimates fjr January lst.. 1920 show that Florida, in relation to the United State:

- has gained rapidly both in numbers and value of farm live stock since the census of 191C.

The statistics which are given' below snow for Florida and for the Unites States the

numnbr and value of each kind of live stc6ck as reported by the l10 census and also give

simili-r figures for January 1st. 119 and 192C) a estimated by this Bureau.

For the convenience .f those who will not have time to analyze these figures, the

following coinents may be of interest;

ALL FARM ANIMALS.
In 1910, Florida had 0.93% of all farm animals in the Urnted States ana the.r value

was 0.40'a of the value for the United States.. -

In 1920 Florida has 1.34, 7f all farm animals in the United States and their value

is 0.87% of the value for the United States.

Her relative position as to number of farm animals is forty four per cent higher

than it .was ten years ago, and in values is one hundred and eighteen per cent higher.

This is a very noticeable gain in Florida's position, especially as to values, indi-

cating clearly the great improvement that has taken place in the quality of the various

farm animals,.

HORSES.
Horses on farms are on the decrease in the United states and have barely held their

own in Florida in recent years. This condition has been brought

about by the more extensive use of mules and the introduction of tractors.

The value of the average horse continues to increase in Florida but is lower for the

United States.

S. .-.. 5 4ULES. -- .- -
Both the number and value of mules on farms are increasing. The rapid

increase in Florida, aside from imported stock, is due to the transfer of a great many

irom public work to farming operations.

MILCH COWVS.
A steady increase in the number oq milch cows is noticeable over the United States.

"In Flcrida the improvement in quality is also marked, the average milch cow having

.ore than quadrupled in value since 1910, while for the United States the value is about

two and a half times as great.,

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Page 2.

* OTHER CATTLE.
With a slight increase in numbers, Florida has, by the importation of better stock

and by grding upe. increased the average value of her cattle by about ten per cent durir

'the past ye'r. For the United States there has been t

slight decline b..th in numbers and values.

S SHEEP.
The 4T decrease in number of sheep, which is still apparent throughout the Unit

States, has been checked in Fl:,rida during the past vear by a revival of interest in thL

industry of sheep raising ani a slight increase in numbers has taken place.

.Florida values are also increasing although still very much under the average for tl

United States.

SWiRE..
There are about two per cent fewer hogs in the United States than for a year ag- anLi

the.-erage value on January 1st. was fourteen per cent lower.

Florida sh.ws a five per cent increase in number over a year ago and the same Janua.

1st. value per head.

The average Florida hog is worth about six times as much as it was. ten years ago,

while the average for the United States has slightly more than doubled during the same

-eriod.


__ __ IUBERS dA;D VALUES i'F FARM AlIMALS FOR FL-JRID AJlD THE UNITED STnTES.


Farm
Animals

HORSES.


FLOOR IDa..


: _ Value


S i T mh r, .


UIJITLD STATES.


: Value


Tt&al


1920
1919
1910
MULES
1920
1919
1910
MILCH COWS.
1920
1919
1910
OTHER CATTLE.
1920
19L9
1910
SHEEP.
1920
1919
-1910
SWINE,
1920
1919
1910


:: 0,000
: 60,000
:: 45,640

: 40,000
:: 39,000
: 23,333

S 156,000
:: 149,000
: 116,041

: 945,000
:. 936,000
:: 729,147

:: 107,000'
:: 105,000
1:13,701
::
:: 1,588,000
S1,512,000
: 810,069


:$140.00 : $8,400,000


129.00
106.37

196.00
177.00
151.96

72.00
61.00
17.41

27.30
24.80
9.93

S5.20
4.10
2.25


13.00
2.200
2.28


7,740,000
.4,854,699

7,840,000
6,903,000
3,545,821

11,232,000
9,089,000
2,020,547

25,798,500
.23 ,1,, 1,800
7,241,715

556,400
430,500
256,166

20,644,000
19,656,000
1,843,731


21,109,000 :$ 94.39
21,482,000 : 98.45
19,833,000 :108.03

4,995,000 147.10
4,954,000 : 135.83
4,210,000 :120.20

23,717,000 85.13
23,475,000 :78.20
20,625,000 :35.29

44,385,000 43.14
45,0u6, 0j : 44.2&
41,178,000 : 19.07

46,615,000 : 10.52
48,866,000 :11.63
52,448,000 : 4.12

72,909,000 :19.01
74,584,000 : 22.02
58,166,000 : 9.17


:$1,992,542,000
: 2,114,897,000
: 2,142,524,000

: 734,779,000
: 672,922,000
S506,049,000

: 2,021,681,000
: 1,835,770,000
: 727,802,000

: 1,914,575,000
:.1,993,442,4200
: 785,261,000

: 511,654,00C
: 568,265,000
: 216,030,000

: 1,386,212,000
:1,642,598,000
S533,309,000


TOTALS, ALL :: : ::
STOCK, 1920 :2,896,000 : 74,470.'900 ::215,760,000 : 8,561,443,000
a 1919 :: 2 01.00 67,C1,3''C ::216,446,.' : : 8,827,894,00.-'
1910 1,837,931 :19,767,679 ::196,480,000 : 4,910,975,000u


: 1 : M' U Total . -- u - .


.0, UW d l +


ITlmhor Por ~l~~lj ~


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