Diversified Farming, Chautauqua Lecture.

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Diversified Farming, Chautauqua Lecture.
Series Title:
Writings and Speeches 1891-1920
Physical Description:
Unknown
Physical Location:
Box: 1
Divider: Articles, Speeches and Other Writings
Folder: Diversified Farming, Chautauqua Lecture.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00000206:00033


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
AGRICULTURAL EXPERT IENT STATION
GAINESV ILLE


" .t < / .- .... SS ,,








S4 DIVERSIIFED FARMING,



Farming is the mo-st ancient employment for man. We read

in Genesis 9" Chapter "And the Lord drove Adam from the garden of

Eden and made him till the ground from which he came." The Lord saw

clearly that Adam and Eve needed some kind of employment for their

hands. Ever since that time t.ere has been a struggle to get food

and raiment b,- the expenditure of the least amount of labor.

._ Adam had to till for his daily bread, but his descendants, wiser and

,^ probably less scrupulas, h tched their wives to a plow and so es-

caped the drudgery. Later some one discovered thr-t an ox could draw

the plow more successfully than the wife. He told it to his neigh-

bors and thus was held the first farmers' institute. Gentlemen,

(or will I be more correct if I say fellow barbarians) this aspect

of farming is numerous when studied as an abstract past, but it

becomes extensively tragic when we turn the eye on the present.

The real tragedies of today are not those enacted in the dark allies

of our Metropolis. Those are common place. The tragedies that try

the soul and break the heart are enacted in lonely habitations called

a home. It is the wife and daughters that have to bear the heaviest

burdens. Fellow listeners, we still have in our veins much blood of A

that old Adam. We fail to provide the most improved machinery for

the house. The old cook stove that has done service for a decade

is still good enough. The utensil.z fit only for the scrap heap are

still in service. And allow me to touch a still more sore spot..

How much of the income does the wife receive t. do with as pleases

her? You say my wife don't want any money and she would'nt know how

to handle it if she did have it. of course she does'nt want it be-

cause she knows she could'nt get it of course she cant take care





V (2)


of it because you have never given her a chance to learn. 'Why are

Y& wife and your daughters not entitled to as much consideration

as the hired- man? Try it out for five years. If your wife cant

beat you to a stand still in buying for the house, your exeprience

will differ froi mine. Give your girls a monthly allowance and

before five y-ears are qp they will be lending you money that you

would have squandered on things they did'nt need and did'nt want.

How about bthe boys? Well if you don't give him a chance at home he

will leave home and mea do something for himself.

Well gentlemen, (not gentle barbarians this time) you will

say that I am missing mi mark,-Diversified Farming, but I am not,

I am hitting the target square in the bulls eye. Of all th"e crops

we raise on the farm, the crop of "irls and boys is the most impor-

tant. It is the crop that will send our influence for good or for

evil down the ages. It is the crop that has been most neglected and

in spite of this neglect has marked the farm as the source from ,

which the 11ation and State has drawn its strength, its power, yes

its very life blood. Seventy per cent, of out leade-rs in politics

in profession, and in reforms came from the farm and only forty

per cent. of the population live on the farm. Or putting it on the

law of chance, the average country boyj hae more than three opper-

tunities to do something, to one opportunity thqt comes to the

city boy.

The importance, therefore), of rising a crop of God loving

girls and boys that are fearlessly honest, who know right from wrong

by instinct and who will condemn evil wherever met cann.-t be

sufficiently emphasized. If we miss this one point and though we

should have cattle on a thousand hills and barns bursting with
.- ** '- ** i'R
** *. *. '*' *
** *' :''' 1 '.'* *". *




w


I (3)



fodder, our labors will have been for naught. The persuit of wealth

as an end cannot be too strongly condemned but the use of wealth as

a means to better Christians living must be Wup m .Tt

Agricu iture is the basis of cur wealth. The fnrm is the

producer of all we eat and wear. during the time that our soiJ.

was in a virgin state very little attention need Ibe paid to anything
ekre" avori"zA/ Ctik- x
but to sow and to harvest. In those dayo,anyone whofailed in

robbing other men could succeed in robbing the soil. Hence arose

sub epithets as Daddy Ho seed, clod hopper, corn cracker, Hoosiers,

granger, etc. This condition of affairs is rapidly passing into

one of respect vnd admiration. 'We are now entering an Srpa when the"

farmer is the educated nan and the man of influence. That education.

is the main factor in making the lFnd production is show/nf by

such countries as France where agriculture -as been taught for -,bout
#0
a hundred years and supports herAmillions on an area not as large

as Texas. Germany has taught agriculture in her secondary schools

for forty years and supports millions on an area about the .

size of Tex ss. ...

The United States with her millions of square miles of

land 4 unsurpassed fertility is pouring out agricultural N'-ealth

at a rate that the .world has never before known. During the last

fifty years we have been devastating the soil at a rate the would
s r P t i 11 f i : more Ti s' st ate
puit us face to face with starration/T hfY fty years more. This state-

ment is susceptible of easy demonstration. A large portion of our

country, the -Eastern stateshave ben. robbed and the sons of robbers

had to mobe west. The west was robbed a d their sons had to move

west again, until now there is no more virgin land left to rolb.

It is even thus that necessity is the mother of invention. It seems
ta -'n w "h- 1rt r- C a'




FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION;
" I GAINESVILLE


L- i ~


\.^ ^ ^ *--^^^-- { -LL ^






(4)


that we never stop to think until we have to. Po the sons of robbers

finding that there was nothing left for them but hard work set to

thinking. (This reminds me of an anecdote of th!e old gentleman

who was in the habit of hobbling to a seat in the park morn-

ing and then hobbling b-.ck at noon. Finally peoples curiosity was

abused and some one asked him what he did in the park. Well says

the old gentleman, sometimes -r so over and sit and think and then

again I :o over and just sit.) There are too many of us who just

work when we ought to work and think.
0-
While we are deep in tka meditation, mood let us look over

some of the agricultural statistics for the United 'tqtes. The farm

crops for 100S rpchod the astounding bILt incomprehensible amount of

$7,778,000,000, If the price for cotton and hay had been up to the

normal the sum of eight would have been reached. Our foreign

exports amounted to 448 million, the largest ever known. Corn is

the leading crop with 1,615,000,000, Cotton comes in second at

621 millions, and for the first time taking the honors away from

hay.; The dairy cow added 800 millions to the wealth of the ilation.

The hen cackled out 600 millions. It would trke a man fetty years
S ... f,ooo,o oo
to spend w-i m if he turned loose a million dollars a day.

But t';ese figures are simply a jumble of gigantic statements. No man

c-n comprehend them. Let us make comparisons.,






--5--


The entire output of gold in the U. 2. (1907) was 90 million.

The fruit crop of California alone was 101 "



The silver output of the entire world was 107 "

The corn crop of Illinois done was 125 "



The entire output of pig iron in the I. S. was 312 "

The wheat crop alone was 500 "



The gold output for the whole world was 390 "

The hay crop alone was 660 "



The entire oui.tput of coal in the U. S. was 510 ,.

The cotton crop was worth 675 "



The National debt is 1,200 "

The corn crop last year was worth 1,30 "


After traversing figures in the stupenduous let us come

nearer home pnd see what Florida is doing to hald up her end.

In 1898 Florida had 882,062 acres in field and garden

crops. The values of ti crop and live stock products for 1898 was

$17,906,060. The value of the crop and livestock products for

1905 was $40,131,814, or a g'in of 124 per cent, in eight years

while the increase for the whole U. S. in the last 18 years is

only 216 per cent. our increaFsed viue in production per year

for the eight years was 151.1/2 per cent. while for the United

States as whole it was only 12 per cent, for t he last eighteen

years. The most significant fact in Florida's agriculture is that




(6)



It i.s not generally known that our field crops and live-

stock hold so important a place in Awaagriculture.

-1905-


Live stock

Field crops

Fruit crop

Vegetable and garden crop

p-oultry products

Dair' pro lucts.

ris rcell neo is


14,731,000

13,632,000

5,423,000

3,900,000

1,169,000.

1,088,000

98 1000.

40,131,000


The -' -.-- ii n in

.. .a.g The statistics later than 1i'05 are not pub-

lished but, ll .






V '/.* *..:; .. **^ ;






--6--


while itt ex t.nding rapidly, the value of our products has risen

1,00 per acre., In vegetables, for instance, the acreage has just a

little more thni doubled in extent, the value and quantity produced

hasFo mote than quadroupled.





o ec

080


~ 0

050








Annual and Animal Products.

Amount.


Cotton upland, (3) 38,900

Corn ~/) 105,885

Oats 1,656

Sugar cane, 19,156

Field peas 3,196

Hay 12,080

peanuts fa-) 37,990

Velvet beans (1) 44,698

Irish potatoes 5,369

Watermelons 10,141

peaches 3,561

Total 282,632


Horses on hand July 1, 62,210 )

mniles on hand July 1, 52,5701 11,N1II,

Worls oxen on hand July 1, 10,325

Stock cattle natives on hand July 1, 112,789 (-)

Cows for milk only, 27,859

Hogs all ages on hand July 1., 15,122

Sheep all ages 68,965-,(.)

Eggs sold and used 6,701

Milk sold and used 41,855--

Butter sold and used A'8,406

Honey 1,466

Wool, Spring clip, 24,937

Beeswax 66.


Total. 433,271

_282,632
715 ,903


Walton Co.


population 1905, 12,269.

Area 1,384


(7)


Name.


Crop


Amount.


1905.

Name.




The production of our tremendous crops carries with it a

S/',/ tremendous loss and terrible danger. Our most fertile states, s ch

/s Illinois, have only enough fertility in their soils to produce

forty to, sixty maximum crops of corn. After that, what then!

Unless we apply exact methods (scientific methods) to our farming

we will be left like t-e Chinese .apire of today. Their teeming

millions are crowded into the flood plains of their large rivers

while t-eir higher lands denuded of forest- and robbed of fertility

are n,,,,j practically Lininhabited where once agriculture flourished.

China, today, has confronting HIer a problem in agriculture fa:-r more

serious than that of national existence. Her so called inexhaust-

able soil, is rel';il a soil that is beinr renewed from yea.r ,, year

by ,ahiingd fro,' tzhe higher lands. So also with India; also .,i t

Egy-pt. Where is their civilization W hen these countries were

deFpoilid of their agriculture they fell an eas;- prey to their

enemy. Shall we continue our head-long career and in two generations

more suffer that worst form of national heart-rot, agricultural

decaydence9 If not, we must diversify our agriculture. We must

build up our soils and not deplete them. We must k-ep on the farm

those crops that ly heavy draft on the soil fertility and dispose of

only such products as do not tax the fertility. Such products as

f eggs, butter, cheese, cotton lint and cane syrup. Keep the

corn, hay, co-tonseed, sweet potatoes, stdmc F.nd roitughage of all

kind. '"ery few of us realize th1-t evtry- ton of cottonseed meal has

a potential v lue of $40.00 tn the farmer and dairy man while it r L









costs mo-re than $30.00. The problem of greatest magnitude for

America today is to discover and practice a system of permanent

agriculture. Florida cannot be permanently prosperous wi /hout a

system of permanent agriculture. The first step in the direction

toward P permanent agriculture is a diversification of crops.

It is impossible for me tu bring the fields tV..- u., and -you

cannot afford the time to go to these fields. so we will do the next

best and bring to you photographs of the fields.



"L mow and I plant

I plant and I mow

While the sun h.ricns hot on th. plain

I sow and T reap

I reap and I sow

And I gather the wind and "the grain."


I'd rather lie the wri-ter of those lines (L. H. Bailey)

than president of the U. S. MTr. Bailey is great today, will be

greHter tomorrow rnd will be classed with the epoch makers when

Agriculture shall have a history.









Labor Saving Implements.


1. Disk harrow and three mules, does as much work and better work

than four men with one horse implements.

2. Disk harrow and four mules, does as much work and better work

thn 'men with one horse implements.
PA--

3. Disk cultivator opening bed. Does te work nf three men with

one horse implements.

4. Disk cultivator bedding up, cb es tbe wrk tf three men with one

horse implements.

5. Disk cultivator cultivating sweet potatoes. The most satisfac-

tory implement for this work.

6. The weeder hoeing cotton. Does the work of ten women.

7. Riding cultivator. Does better work and more of it thin can be

done by two men witi' one horse implements.


II. Fodder Srops.

8. T on bean, a new introduction from the Philippines. It rivals the

velvet bean and may surpass it.

9. Velvet bean, young field ready to take care of the ground.

10, Velvet bean, in fall, crop practically made Cost per acre

$3.50 to A5.00 V-lue $30.00 to $60.00

11. Rye Jan. 12, in rotation field.

12. Poorland corn, following corn.

13. Poorland corn, following velvet beans.

14. Sorghum after velvet beans, preceded by corn. Corn 8 bu. per

acre. Sorghum 8t1/2 tons per acre.

15. Silage cutter and silo. Sorghum silage costs us from $3.50 to

$5.00 per ton in the silo. It keeps at least two years and may be

longer. The cheapest dairy roughage we can put up.







6-I

16. Georgia Sallad (Dwarf Essex rape) 16 tons per acte. Cost

$15.00 per acre. In feeding condition January, February and March.

17. Mexican June corn, likes a good deep soil,

18. Teosmthe, a tropical fodder plant, deeds a good deep soil

and more moisture 1t.*.


III. Hay Crops.

19. Natal grass, m-kes 14/2 tons hay per acre, gro -n as crop

after vegetables or with beggarweed.

20. Bale of INatal hay, took first premium at Marion County Fair.

Better than timothy.

21. para grass, made as high as four tons per acre in Texas,

excellent for early summer grazing.

22. Guinea grass, self sown in an abandoned orange grove.

23. Guinea grass, this field made over three tons of hay per acre.

24. Beggarweed showing habits of plant. The hay is as good as

alfalfa.

25. Cutting beggarweed for hay, after a crop of corn.

26. Tubercules on root of beggarweed enables it to gather nitrogen

from the air. The air over every acre of land contains more than a

million dollars worth of nitrogen. We cash checks on this account

by planting legumes.

27. Making crab-grass and beggarweed hay as good as clover and

timothy and grown as a catch crop.

28. Wiregrass bay, a square rod does not grow enough to hide a

Times Union. Requires a cross between a billy goats stomach and a

chemists crucible to digest it.

IV.

29. Milk cows, Marion Co. Fair, December, fed on diversified crops,

or47ton wiregrass.
I









30. ules; one and two-year old raised in Marion Co. by one man.

Premium pen Mrarion Co. Fair, December 1908.

V. Illustration givi ng the wh Ie story in a nutshell.


Ar







DIVERSIFIED FARMING.


Farming is the mst ancient employment for r-in. We read

in Genesis 9" Chapter "And the Lord drove Adam from the garden of

Eden and made him till the ground from which he came." The Lord saw

clearly : that Adam and Eve needed some kind of employment for their

hands. Ever since that time t ere has been a struggle to get food

and raiment bh/ the expenditure of the least amount of labor.

Adam had to till for his daily bread, but his descendants, wiser and

probably less scrupulas, h tched their wives to a plow and so es-

caped the drudgery. Later some one discovered th" t an ox could draw

the plow more successfully than the wife. !e told it to his neigh-

bors and thus was held the first farmers! institute. Gentlemen,

(or will I be more correct if I say fellow barbarians) this aspect

of farming is humerois when studied as an abstract past, but it

becomes extensively tragic when we turn the eye on the present.

The real tragedies of today are not those enacted in the dark allies

of our l-'etropolis. Those are common place. The tragedies that try t

the soul and break the heart are enacted in Ihnely habitations called

a 1-ome. It is the wife and daughters that have to bear the heaviest

burdens. Fellow listeners, we still have in our veins much blood of

that old Adam. We fail to provide the mnst improved machinery" for

the house. The .-Id cook stove that has done service for a decade

is still good enough. The utensil: fit only for the scrap heap are

still in service. And allow me to toiih a still more sore s: ot.,

How much of the income does the wife receive to do with as pleases h

her? You say my wife don't want any money and she would'nt know how

to handle it if she did have it. of course she does'nt want it be-

cause she knows she could'nt get it nf course she cant take care




(2)


of it betiuxp you have never given her a choice to learn. Why are

the wife and your daughters not entitled to as much consideration

as the hiredyman? Try it out for five years. Tf your wife cant

beat you to a stand still in buying for the house, your experience

will differ from mine. Give .our girls a monthly allowance and

before five years are ip they will be lending you money that you

would have squandered on things they did'nt need and did'nt want.

How about the boys? Well if you don't give him a chance at home he

will leave home and make do something for himself.

Well gentlemen, (not gentle barbarians this time) you will

say that I am missing mu mark,-Diversified Farming, but Ianm not,

I am hitting the targAt square in the bulls eye. Of all t te crops

we raise on the farm, the crop of hirls and boys is the most impor-

tant. It is the crop that will send our influence for good or for

evil down the ages. It is the crop that has been most neglected and

in spite of this neglect has marked the farm as the source from

which the Nation and State has drawn its strength, its power, yes

its very life blood. Seventy per cent. of out leaders in politics

in profession, and in reforms came from the farm and only fort

per cent. of the population live on the farm. Or putting it on the

law of chance, the average country boys have more than three opper-

tunitibe to do something, to one opportunity thit comes to the

city boy.

The importance, therefore of raising a crop of God loving

girls and boys that are fearlessly honest, who know right from wrong

by instinct and who will condemn evil wherever met cann-t be

sufficiently emph-asized. If we miss this one point and though we

should have cattle on a thousand hills and barns bursting with









fodder, our labors will have been for naught. The pursuit of wealth

as an end cannot be too strongly c ndemnned but the use of wealth as

a means to better Christianr living must bh condemne.d.

Agriculture is the basis of our wealth. The f..rm is the

producer of all we eat and wear. during the time that our noil.

w-s in a virgin, state very little attention need be paid to anything

but to sow and to harvest. In those day@,anyrone who failed in

robbing othor men could succeed in robbing the noil. Hence prose

sub epithets ns Daddy H fqrf r, clad hoppr,'r corn cracker, Hoo-i ers,

-granger, etc. This condition of affairs is rapidly pass.in. into

one of respect ,nd ardiration.. Te are now entering an area when the

farmer i,-. the ediuc, ted riman nd the man of influence. That education

is the main factor in making the lrnd production-is showing by

Fjuch countries as France where agriculture '.as been taught for -bout

a hundred years .'.nd supports her million,- on an area not v.s largr

as Texas. Germany has taught agriculture in her secrnd-: r:y school.

for forty years and supports fifty millions on an area 'b-shlut the

size of Tex.

The United States with her millions of square miles of

land with unsurpassed fertility is pouring out agricultural 'vnalth

at a. rpt thpit *hatitorld hss never before known. Touring the last

fifty years we have been devastating the soil at a rate that, would

p,'t 1s face to face with starvation in fifty ypars more. This state-

ment in susceptible of easy demonstration. A large portion of our

country, the eastern states have be.n robbed and the sons of robbers

had to mope west. The west was robbed v d thetr sons had to move

west again, until now there is no more virgin .and left to rob.

It is even thus that necessity is the mother of invention. It seems
that we never stop to think until we hrve to.






(4)

that we never stop to think until we have to. P0 the mses of robbers

finding that tVere was nothing left for them but hard work set to

thinking. (This reminds me of an anecdote of the old gentleman

who was in the habit of hobbling to a seat in the park in the morn-

ing and then hobbling b! ok at noon. Finally peoples curiosity was

aroused and some one asked him what he did in the park. Well, says

the old gentleman, sometimes r go over and sit and think and tlen

again I go over and just sit.) There are too many of us who just

work when we ought to work and think.

While we are deep in the meditation mood let us look over

some of the agricultural statistics for the United states. The farm

crops for 1-08 reached the astounding but incomprehensible amount of

$7,778,000w000. If the price for cotton and hay had been up to the

normal the sum of eight million woUid have been reached. Our foreign

exports amounted to 448 million, the largest ever known. Corn is

the leading crop with 1,615,000,000. Cotton comes in mencond at

621 millions, and for t1he first time taking the honors away from

hay. The dairy cow added 800 millions to the wealth of the Nation.

The hen cackled out 600 millions. It would t.ke a man forty years

to spend this amount if he turned loose a million dollars a day.

But these figures are simply a jumble of gigantic statements. No man

c n comprehend them. Let us make comparisons.





(5)


The entire output of gold in the U. S. (1907) was ,4 million.


The fruit crop of California fiae was 101. "

The silver output of the entire world was 107 B


The corn crop of Ill. alone was %125

The entire output of Pig Iron in the U. S. was 312 "


The wheat crop alone was 500 "

The gold output for the whole world was 390 "


The hay crop alone was 660 "


The entire output of coal in the U. S. was 510 "


The cotton crop was wo rth 675 "

The national debt is 1,200


The corn crop last year was worth 1,350

After traversin,; figures in t'-e stupend pus let us come

nearer home and see what Florida is doing to hold up her end.

In 1898 Florida had 882,062 acres in field and -.rden

crops. The values of the crop and livestock products for 1898 was

$17,906,060.' The value of the crop and livestock products for 1905

was $40,131,814. Or a g-in of 124 pfr cent. in eight years while the

increase for the whole U. S, in the last 18 years is only 216.




(6)


It is not generally known that our field crops and live-

stock hold so important a place in our agriculture.

-19054


Live stock

Field crops

Fruit crop

Vegetable and garden crop

poultry products

Dairy products.

wiscellaneous


14,731,000

13,632,000

5,423,000

3,990,000

1,169,000.

1,088,000

998,000.

40,131,000


The stati; ties show an increase of nearly six million in

value for 1904-1905. The statistics later than l105 are not pub-

lished but will Show *s well into the fifty millions.

For alton County we have
A4









Annual and Animal Products.

Amount.


Cotton upland, 38,900

Corn 105,885

Oats 1,656

Sugar cane, 19,156

Field peas 3,196

Hay 12,080

peanuts 37,990

Velvet beans 44,698

Irish potatoes 5,369

Watermelons 10,141

peaches 3,561

Total 282,632


Horses on hand July 1, 62,210

Iunles on hand July 1, 52,570

Worls oxen on hand July 1, 10,325

Stock cattle natives on hand Ju.,.y 1, 112,789

Cows for milk only, 9 27,859

Hogs all ages on hand July 1, 15,122

Sheep all ages 68,965.

Eggs sold and used 6,701

Milk rold and used 41,855

Butter sold and used 8,406

Honey 1,466

Wool, Spring clip, 24,937

Beeswax (36.


Total.


4353,271

282,632
P 715,905


Walton Co.


population 1905, 12,269.

Area 1,384


w


Name.


Crop


Amount.


1905.

Name.






4 #


--5--


The entire output of gold in the U. S. (190") was 90 million.

The fruit crop of California alone was 101 "


The silver output of the entire world was 107 "

The corn crop of Illinois done was 125 "


The entire output of pig iron in the H. S. was 312 "

The wheat crop alone was 500 "


The gold output ior the whole" world was 390 *

The hay crop alone was 660 *


The entire output of coal in the IT. S. was 510 "

The cotton crop was worth 7:5 *


The National debt is 1,200 "

The corn crop last year was worth 1,350 *

After travorsin n figures in the stupenduous let us come

nearer hoieR and see what Florida i, doing to held up her end,

In 1898 Florida had 882,062 acres in field and garden

crops. The values of te. crop and live took products for 1898 was

$17,906,060. The value of the crop and livestock products for

1905 was $40,131,814, or a ga.in of 124 per cent. in eight years

while t ', increase for thfe whole tJ. S. in the last lo years is

only 216 per cent. our increased vinue in production per year

for the eight years was 15 /ft pr ce nt, wh.le for the United

States as whole it was only 12 per cent. for t e last eighteen

years. The most significant fact in Flairida's agriculture is that





--6--


while is extending rapidly, the value of our products has risen

100, per acre. In vegetables, for instance, the acreage has just a

little more than doubled in extent, the value and quanitr.y produced

has more than quadroupled.

The production of our tremendous crops carries with it a

tremendous loss and R terrible danger. Our most fertile states, sich

as Illinois, have only enough fertility in their soils to produce

forty to sixty maximum crops of corn. After that, what then!

Unless we apply exact, methods (vcietl.ific methods) to our farming

we will be left like t'e Chinese TRapire of today. Their tem-.iing

millions are crowded into the flood plains of their large rivers

while t; ,i.r higher lands denuded of forest' and robbed of fe-rtility.

are now practically uninhabited wh-e r,- once agriculture flourished,

China, today, has confronting her a problem in agriculture far more

serious 'han that of national existence, He r so called inexhaust-

able soil, is merely a soil that is beirn,- renewed from yertr to year

by washings from the higher lands. So also with India; also with

Egypt. Where is their civilization! When these countries were

despoil-id of t-_hei.r agriculture they fell an easy 'r, re to their

enemy. SRhall we continue our head-long career and in two generations

more suffer that worst form of national heart-rot, agricultural

decaydence" If not, we must diversify our Fgrioulture. We must

build up our soils and not deplete them. We must keep on the farm

those crops thap.t la heavy draft on the soil fertility and dispose of

only such products as do not tax the fertility. Such products as

eggs, butter, cheese, cotton lint and cane syrup. Keep at home the

corn, hay, cottonseed, sweet potatoes, stores and roughage of all

kind. Very few of us realize that every ton of cottonseed meal has

a potential v lue of $40.00 to the farmer and dairy man while it Pr -
A




--7--


costs )r4 than $30.00. The problem ot greatest magnitude for

America today is to discover and practice a system of permanent

agriculture. Florida cannot be permanently prosperous without a

system of permanent agriculture. The first step in the direction

toward a permanent agriculture is a diversifi'edtion of crops.

It is impossible for me to bring the fields to you and you

cannot afford the time to go to these fields. no we will do the next

best and bring to you photographs of the fields.



"I mow arid T plant

I plant and I mow

While the sun burns hot on the plain

I sow and I rerp

I reap and I sow

And I gather the wi.n.j and the grain."


I'd rather be the writer of those lines (L. H. Railey)

than president of the U. S. t'r. Bailey is great today, will hbe

greater tomorrow Pnd will. hb c..ased with the epoch makers when

Agriculture shall have a history.




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EB2XNNJS4_4JKWK4 INGEST_TIME 2012-07-30T22:57:27Z PACKAGE AA00000206_00033
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES