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UFLAC



Developing the back country.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00000206/00031
Finding Guide: A Guide to the Peter Henry Rolfs Collection
 Material Information
Title: Developing the back country.
Series Title: Writings and Speeches 1891-1920
Physical Description: Unknown
Physical Location:
Box: 1
Divider: Articles, Speeches and Other Writings
Folder: Developing the back country.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: AA00000206:00031

Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Page A-i
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
        Page A-4
        Page A-5
        Page A-6
        Page A-7
        Page A-8
    Foreword
        Page B-i
    Table of Contents
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
    Main
        Page B-3
        Page B-4
        Page B-5
        Page B-6
        Page B-7
        Page B-8
        Page B-9
        Page B-10
        Page B-11
        Page B-12
        Page B-13
        Page B-14
        Page B-15
        Page B-16
        Page B-17
        Page B-18
        Page B-19
        Page B-20
        Page B-21
        Page B-22
Full Text




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Developing the Back Country



"The plow is the key that unlocks the eartr's treasury"

Florida needs farmers p. 3. Article for Fla. Grower.



Great number of settlers coming to FJorida-- the eyes of the whole country

turned toward F-Iorida.


Great quanitites of food stuffs imported that might be produced
poultrr dairy- canned goods


PineJ]as Co. adapted to produce gid crops of veg,,tab]es
fruits
dai trying
ca tt e
1pOu t.ry
etc.


Blackman's creed adapted:








Bulletin 1 April, 1915




University of Florida

Agricultural Extension Work
P. H. Rolfs, Director

Gainesville, Florida






Contents

General Statement .-----------------........-------------------- 3
Report of State Agent....................-------------------------------- 5
Tabulated Report of Demonstration Work ------------------- 8
County Canning Club Agents -------.---------.................------------ 9
Duties of Canning Club Agents ......----....------------....----- 9
List of Agents -------..................----------------------------- 9
Records of Ten Highest Girls---..--------------..----.. 10
Miles Traveled by County Agents--------------..........---------- 10
Number of Demonstrators and Co-operators --------.---------............11
Hog Cholera Treatment...................---------------..-----------------13
Number of Hogs Inoculated during 1914 ---------------------........13
Co-operative Demonstration Work in Hog Cholera ------------.... 14
Silo Construction --------..15
Farmers' Institutes ------------------------------------ 15
















BOARD OF CONTROL FOR THE INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER
EDUCATION

P. K. Yonge, Chairman, Pensacola, Fla.
T. B. King, Arcadia, Fla.
E. L. Wartmann, Citra, Fla.
W. D. Finlayson, Old Town, Fla.
J. G. Kellum, Secretary
F. E. Jennings, Jacksonville, Fla.



FARMERS' CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK

STAFF

A. A. MURPHREE, President of the University
P. H. ROLFS, Director
BRADFORD KNAPP, Special Agent, Co-operative Demonstra-
tion Work, U. S. Department of Agriculture
C. K. McQUARRIE, State Agent
H. E. SAVELY, Field Agent, U. S. Department of Agriculture
A. P. SPENCER, District Agent for Central and South Florida
E. S. PACE, District Agent for North Florida
AGNES E. HARRIS, Assistant State Agent for Girls' Canning
Clubs
BESSIE V. GLOVER, Secretary


, A












CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK


GENERAL STATEMENT
The Board of Control for the University of Florida has enter-
ed into a co-operative agreement with the Secretary of the U.
S. Department of Agriculture, whereby the agricultural extension
work carried on in the State by the University and by the De-
partment of Agriculture is co-ordinated. Dr. Bradford Knapp,
Special Farmers' Co-operative Demonstration Agent of the U. S.
Department of Agriculture, and P. H. Rolfs, Director of the Ex-
tension Work of the University, are entrusted with carrying out
the plans for this work. The University of Florida provides suit-
able office rooms and facilities at the University for headquar-
ters and for handling the clerical work. It also pays one-half the
salaries of the State and District Agents. When the State and
District Agents are traveling exclusively for Farmers' Institute
work all of the expenses are borne from the State funds. The
engagement of all workers under the co-operative arrangement
must be agreeable to both the Department and the University.
The Farmers' Co-operative Demonstration Work, the Boys'
Corn Clubs, and the Girls' Canning Clubs, are under the direction
of Prof. C. K. McQuarrie, who is State Agent for carrying on this
work. The salaries of the County Agents and other local em-
ployees are met in part by funds amounting to about $25,000, ap-
propriated for this purpose by the U. S. Department of Agricul-
ture. These funds are augmented by the appropriation of $5,000
annually by the legislature of Florida. The Farmers' Institute
work is provided for by an annual legislative appropriation of
$10,000. The Smith-Lever Agricultural Extension fund of
$10,000, which became available on July 1, 1914, is used in ex-
tending this work into additional counties.
The District Agent and the Assistant State Agent work un-
der the direction and advice of the State Agent. The State Agent
and District Agents visit the County Agents as frequently as
possible; and, with the County Agents, make visits to the Farm
Demonstrators, the Boys' Corn Clubs, and the Girls' Canning
Clubs. The State Agent and the District Agents are members of
the faculty of the University. The Assistant State Agent is a
member of the faculty of the College for Women.
The State is divided into two sections. All of the Counties








4 Agricultural Extension Division

organized east and south of and including Duval, Bradford,
Alachua and Levy are considered as Central and South Florida.
This district is in charge of Prof. A. P. Spencer. The Counties
to the northward and westward of those named and already or-
ganized, are placed in the North Florida District, in charge of
Prof. E. S. Pace. The Assistant State Agent, Miss Harris, being
located at the College for Women, keeps in close touch with the
women's work and brings the County Agents there annually for
instructions. She visits the County Canning Club Agents as fre-
quently as possible.
The value of this co-operative arrangement cannot be easily
over-estimated. The State and District Agents being located at
the University are constantly in close contact with the staff of the
Experiment Station and the professors of the Agricultural Col-
lege. The County Demonstration Agents during their sessions
at the University are enabled to come in contact with the most
recent and fundamental progress that has been made in agricul-
tural education.
Duties of County Agents.-These Agents are appointed for
their special fitness for the work in their particular County. The
tabular statement at the close of the State Agent's report shows
the immense amount of work accomplished by these men. The
Agents visit as many farmers as possible and give direct instruc-
tion.
A demonstrator is a farmer, fruit grower, or trucker who
sets aside a portion of his field to demonstrate the usefulness of
a particular method of procedure. Where all of the field is
handled according to the directions of the County Agent, the per-
son is known as a co-operator.
Every County that has entered the co-operative arrange-
ment has been aided at the rate of $675 annually. The amount
needed above this has been supplied either by the County as a
whole or by private or community aid. The salaries paid County
Agents vary from $800 for the lowest to $2,400 for the highest.
The Counties in which the higher salaries are paid also make
provision for traveling expenses.
The Canning Club work is carried on for only a portion of the
year. The co-operative work allows $300 annually for canning
clubs under the condition that the counties desiring this work
provide at least an equal amount. The Canning Club Agents
visit the different agricultural communities and promote an







Bulletin 1 5

interest in canning and other rural work. These County Canning
Agents receive not less than $75.00 per month for the time em-
ployed.

REPORT OF STATE AGENT

P. H. Rolfs, Director,
Division of University Extension.
SIR: In submitting my Annual Report of the Farmers' Co-
Operative Demonstration Work of the State of Florida, there are
several items to which I should especially like to draw your at-
tention. Some of the items look a little disappointing, such as
the number in the Corn Demonstration Work. This can be ex-
plained from the fact that up to the time of the corn-planting sea-
son last year only 17 Counties were engaged in the work. To off-
set this, other items appear here that are very satisfactory, par-
ticularly along the line of increased and better grades of live
stock.
There were two meetings of the County Agents held during
the year. One was from February 24 to 27, inclusive, at which
17 agents were present. That meeting was very interesting from
every standpoint. It was the first meeting held where so many
agents were present, and the matters discussed were very inter-
esting. Stenographic notes were taken of the whole proceedings,
which were published at a later date under the title of University
Record Vol. 9, No. 1, or Farmers' Institute Bulletin No. 4. The
other meeting was also held at Gainesville, on September 1 to
11, inclusive, with 29 agents present. That meeting differed from
the previous one in that all the agents were required to submit a
paper to be read at the meeting, dealing with some particular
phase of the work. These papers were very interesting and help-
ed to maintain the interest in the meeting all the way through.
They were the means of bringing out some discussions along cer-
tain lines that would otherwise have been omitted. Owing to
lack of funds we were unable to take stenographic notes..
At both meetings, Dr. C. F. Dawson, State Veterinarian of
the State Board of Health, Jacksonville, was present and held
demonstrations in hog cholera inoculation work. Dr. Dawson
made every individual agent do this work under his instruction,
and where a man showed backwardness in the work he was made
to repeat the operation until the doctor was satisfied that he was








6 Agricultural Extension Division

perfect in it. At the February meeting, the single or serum-
alone treatment was given; but at the September meeting the
simultaneous treatment was made the strong point.
The State Board of Health provides serum to the farmers
free of charge up to 1,000 cc, per annum, and the Demonstration
Agents are qualified to treat hogs in the County for hog cholera.
This has given the work quite an impetus in the State, and is one
of the means by which, the farmers and the Agent get close to-
gether. This is verified by the number of hogs inoculated, which
was 24,409 from the first of March to the fifteenth of December.
Early in September the Bureau of Animal Industry appoint-
ed Dr. G. F. Babb as Veterinary Field Agent to conduct educa-
tional and demonstration work in the State, with regard to hog
cholera. Dr. Babb took up this work shortly after his appoint-
ment, and has been giving very efficient service everywhere that
he has been called upon to go. His work is in co-operation with
the County Agents as far as possible, but at the same time he has
been conducting, quite a number of demonstrations on his own
account. I consider this one of the most important moves ever
made by the Department of Agriculture, because it helps to en-
large and strengthen that work in the State.
In July, Prof. C. L. Willoughby was appointed special field
agent in Silo Construction work. Nine weeks of Prof. Willough-
by's time were given to this work. During that time he assisted
in the building of three concrete and five wood silos; and advised
as to the erection of six others to be built later: two of iron, one
of concrete, and three of wood. He also visited, for inspection
and advice as to filling, several silos that had already been built.
The total number of silos visited in the nine weeks' work was 22.
Over and above this he discussed silo construction and silage
crops with the different farmers that he met during that time.
I am confident that Prof. Willoughby's work for that short time
is going to bear fruit in getting a large number of silos built this
year.
At the beginning of the year the number of Counties en-
gaged in the Demonstration Work was 17, and by the end of the
year this number had been increased to 31, with the accession of
4 others pending. During the year there were certain crops that
the Agents were instructed to stress. In February, the matter
of sowing lespedeza in a number of the Counties was taken up,
but owing to the dry spring and early summer the demonstrations







Bulletin 1 7

in this crop were failures. In the fall, the matter of getting an
increased number of farmers to sow winter cover-crops was
stressed, with very gratifying results. The sowing of oats was
increased at least 100 per cent. The sowing of legume crops was
also stressed with good results. These were confined almost en-
tirely to crimson and burr clover, and in some cases hairy vetch.
It is too early to get complete reports from these crops, but the
results seem to be very satisfactory.
The matter of clearing the land of stumps has also been
stressed by our agents, with the result that reports show that
upwards of eight thousand acres in the Demonstration Work
were stumped during the year. The liming of soils was another
very important matter to which our agents have been giving
considerable attention. Quite a number of counties omitted to
report the acreage in this work, which partly explains the low
figure in the report.
The matter of crop diversification among the farmers has
. been stressed right along; and while it is difficult to get the cot-
ton farmer to pay much attention to this work, conditions this
year have been such as to make it almost compulsory for the
cotton farmer to diversify his crops. There are certain crops
which, on account of our soil and climatic conditions, can be
used for cash crops.. Sweet potatoes, hay, and sugar-cane made
into high grade syrup, are three of the crops that could easily
take the place of cotton. In sections where transportation facili-
ties are good, some truck crops could be substituted to great ad-
vantage. This has been done on a small scale in some of the
Counties, and this year it is expected this work will be consider-
ably enlarged.
A number of the farmers of the State have been buying pure
breeds of hogs. This is very gratifying, and in a few years we are
bound to get good results from this work.
Attached hereto please find a tabulated statement of work
done by the County Demonstration Agents.
Very truly yours,
C. K. McQUARRIE,
State Agent










8 Agricultural Extension Division

CONDENSED TABULATED REPORT OF THE FARMERS'
CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK IN
FLORIDA FOR THE YEAR END-
ING DECEMBER 31, 1914.

Counties having Demonstration Agents, Jan. 1, 1914....................17
Counties having Demonstration Agents, Jan. 1, 1915....................31
Total official visits made by agents during year....................17,241
Miles travelled by rail............................................ 16,728
Miles travelled by team and auto....................................50,035
Total miles travelled by County Agents....................... 66,763
Demonstrations in Number Acres
Corn ......... ... ........ 840 ............... ......... 3,068
n ... ... .............................. 984
Oats ........ ................. 166 ........................ 2,186
Burr Clover ................... 40..... ....................... 76
Crimson Clover ............... 49........................... 70
Other Legume Crops ......... 430............................ 1,341
Citrus Fruits ................. 122............................ (?)
Total ...... ................ 1,929 7,725

Pastures established by Demonstrators and Co-operators ................74
Rotations established by Demonstrators and Co-operators .............. 162
Acres stumped by Demonstrators and Co-operators ..................8,183
Acres limed by Demonstrators and Co-operators ...................... 773
Demonstrators and Co-operators doing fall plowing' ..................1,745
Demonstrators and Co-operators selecting seed corn in field ..........636
Improved farm implements purchased by Demonstrators and Co-oper-
ators ................. ........ ................... ..... 2,334
Average value of implements ....................................... $15
Number of letters written by County Agents ....................... 8,325
Newspaper articles written by County Agents ..................... 493
Bulletins and circulars distributed by County Agents ................21,594
Enrollment of Boys' Corn Clubs ................................... 1,026
Number Completing Work ........................................272
Value of Prizes in Work ..................................... $1,895
Farm-ner? Meetings attended by County Agents .................... 330
Total attendance at same ..................................... 13,280
Purebred hogs purchased by Demonstrators and Co-operators ........ 631
Average value ............... ............. ........ ..... $15
Purebred cattle purchased by Demonstrators and Co-operators ...... ,243
Average value ......... ..................................... $75
Purebred mares purchased by Demonstrators and Co-operators ...... 239
Average value .......... .................................... $175
Number of hogs inoculated by County Agents from July I to Dec. 15..24,409
Dipping vats built in Counties in which Agents are located ........ 23
Silos built in Counties in which Agents are located .................. 23
Farmers' organizations co-operating with County Agent .............. 43









-Bulletin 1


COUNTY CANNING CLUB AGENTS
The Canning Club Agents do their principal work during
late winter, spring and early summer. For the most part these
agents are employed for 6 or 8 months. The principal work is
done among the school children in the direction of canning and
preserving vegetables and'fruits. Incidentally these enthusias-
tic women do much good in the way of advice in better prepara-
tion of food and better arrangements of the home.

DUTIES OF THE CANNING CLUB AGENTS
"The County Agent and the County Superintendent of
Schools plan the work. The County Agent visits as many schools
and homes as possible in the County, explains work, and enrolls
the club members. When unable to visit the school, she writes to
the teachers and asks them to enroll club members."
"In the majority of the Counties in which the Canning Club
work is being conducted in Florida the County Superintendent is
giving material assistance in enrolling club members, planning
the work and constantly co-operating with the County Agent."
"After enrolling the club members the County Agent visits
plots; assists in measuring the plots; gives instructions, in the
planting season; teaches canning and preserving, in the canning
season; and conducts a contest at the end of the club work, for
which the club members bring exhibits, write essays, and have
their record books examined."
(The above quotations are taken from Extension Bulletin No. 2, of the
Department of Home Economics of the Florida State College for Women,
p. 10.)
LIST OF COUNTY CANNING CLUB AGENTS
Miss Lila Fraser Alachua Gainesville, Florida
Miss Lizzie Dowling Baker Taylor, Florida
Mrs. T. E. Waldrup Bradford Lake Butler, Florida'
Miss Lonny Landrum Clay Green Cove Springs, Florida
Mrs. A. J. Henry Columbia Lake City, Florida
Mrs. A. L. Monroe Dade Miami, Florida
Miss Allie Stribbling De Soto Arcadia, Florida
Mrs. Nevada Reddick Holmes Bonifay, Florida
Mrs. Mollie Evers Hillsboro Plant City, Florida
Mrs. J. R. Moorehead Marion Ocala, Florida
Miss Anne B. Carson Osceola Kissimmee, Florida
Miss Verda Thompson Polk Lakeland, Florida
Miss Carrie Post Pasco Dade City, Florida
Miss Jessie Burton Putnam Crescent City, Florida








Agricultural Extension Division


Miss Mozelle Durst
Mrs. W. E. Quarterman
Miss Lucia Hudson
Miss Eloise McGriff
Miss Myrtie Warren
Miss Nellie McQuarrie


Seminole
Suwanee
St. Johns
Volusia
Walton
Citrus


Sanford, Florida
Live Oak, Florida
St. Augustine, Florida
DeLand, Florida
De Funiak Springs, Florida
Inverness, Florida


RECORD OF TEN HIGHEST GIRLS

"The following are the names and records of the girls who
made the ten highest records in the State:"




Name County g )




Pettie DeShong, Hillsborough 3,517 200 $ 93.80 $33.35 $60.44
Frankie DeShong, Hillsborough 3,386 190 88.32 31.68 56.64
Mabel Logue, Volusia 2,087 800 127.09 37.75 89.34
Susie Lee Henry, Suwanee 2,693 506 87.93 27.36 60.57
Vida Parker, Marion 2,488 261 93.60 17.43 76.17
Lillie Gay, Bradford 3,263 200 68.00 15.70 52.30
Perdie Farnan, Gadsden 2,764 200 67.60 20.64 46.96
Juanita Broer, De Soto 1,775 285 92.74 22.12 70.62
Ruth Whitworth, Marion 1,991 30 72.00 8.00 64.00
Junia Rodgers, De Soto 2,222 61 64.58 8.72 55.86

(The above quotation and table are taken from Extension Bulletin No.
2, of the Department of Home Economics of the Florida State College for
Women, p. 17.)

MILES TRAVELED BY COUNTY AGENTS SEPTEMBER TO
DECEMBER, INCLUSIVE.

The amount of work done by any one Agent during the
course of a week may seem trivial; yet when we take the com-
bined work of the Agents in the State, we find that it really
amounts to a tremendous figure. Taking the single item of the
number of miles traveled by rail and by conveyance, it amounts to
40,885 miles, a distance greater than one and one-half times
around the world. Even the distance traveled by team and auto-
mobile amounts to 29,345, or more than the distance entirely
around the world.









Bulletin 1


Miles
by
County Agent Miles Team
by or
Rail Auto


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Calhoun
Clay
Columbia
De Soto
Duval
Escambia
Gadsden
Hamilton
Hernando
Hillsborough
Holmes
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Leon
Liberty
Madison
Marion
Orange
Osceola
Pasco
Polk
Santa Rosa
Suwanee
Taylor
Walton
Washington


S. Burgis ...
E. W. Turner 120
B. V. Mathis 660
0. L. Mizell 72
J. E. Yon 30
W. E. Brown 331
J. B. Brown 150
Jos. Crews 626
W. L. Watson 260
S. W. Hiatt 633
M. C. Gardner 478
S. S. Smith 113
J. T. Daniel 768
R. T. Kelley 64
C. A. Fulford 68
G. W. Belser 272
*E. W. Lumpkin ...
D. C. Geiger 221
F. Robinson, (col.) 250
A. W. Turner 625
D. R. McQuarrie 942
S. J. McCully 275
C. H. Baker 260
B. E. Evans 1,058
I. E. Soar 228
A. A. Lewis 342
0. 0. Simmons 743
T. Z. Atkeson 630
tT. H. Stripling 60
J. C. Smith 644
D. G. McQuagge 617


Totals


*Appointed Oct. 1
tAppointed Nov. 1


11,540


Total miles traveled


NUMBER OF DEMONSTRATORS AND CO-OPERATORS IN
FLORIDA COUNTIES

The total number of farmers, demonstrators and co-oper-
ators that are being served by our County Agents amounts $o
3376. Nearly all of these are visited twice a month by the
Agents, and given instruction and such help as is practicable.


2,171
670
964
556
581
782
854
2,008
745
879
1,143
1,110
718
703
536
736
994
763
1,144
684
1,113
1,036
1,063
1,225
734
663
927
457
200
1,509
1,677


29,345

40,895










Agricultural Extension Division


In many cases the demonstrators are visited as frequently as
three and sometimes four times a month. These County Agents,
as our corps of instructors, are teaching agriculture to an as-
semblage of at least 3376 people. The instruction is varied to
suit the needs of the individual farmer. Each one of the farmers
in turn becomes an instructor for his neighborhood, since when-
ever a farmer succeeds above the average with any crop he im-
mediately becomes a center of information for that crop.

Demon- Co-oper-
County Agent strators ators Both*


S. Burgis
E. W. Turner
B. V. Mathis
0. L. Mizell
J. E. Yon
J. D. Brown
Jos. Crews
W. L. Watson
S. W. Hiatt
S. S. Smith
J. T. Daniel
R. T. Kelley
C. A. Fulford
G. W. Belser
E. W. Lumpkin
D. G. Geiger
F. Robinson (col.)
A. W. Turner
D. R. McQuarrie
S. J. McCully
C. H. Baker
B. E. Evans
I. E. Soar
A. A. Lewis
0. 0. Simmons
T. Z. Atkeson
T. H. Stripling
J. C. Smith
D. G. McQuagge


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Calhoun
Columbia
DeSoto
Duval
Escambia
Hamilton
Hernando
Hillsborough
Holmes
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Leon
Liberty
Madison
Marion
Orange
Osceola
Pasco
Polk
Santa Rosa
Suwanee
Taylor
Walton
Washington


1155 1548 3376*

*Some of the Agents failed to report separately the Demonstrators
and the Co-operators.








Bulletin 1 13

HOG CHOLERA TREATMENT
The State Board of Health furnished, without charge, nearly
all the serum used in the State.
The number of hogs treated by our Demonstration Agents is
very gratifying, especially since many of these Agents had not
really known what serum was when they took up this co-oper-
ative work. Assuming that this work was done correctly, and
that the hogs were treated at the time treatment was needed,
there was a saving to the State of something like 18,000 head of
hogs. This is allowing a much wider latitude for error than
would be the case under expert direction. If we should assume
that the agents were all experts in hog cholera and treated the
hogs under proper conditions, there would have been a saving to
the State of not less than 21,000 hogs. Assuming that this
treatment would not have been administered if the work had
not been taken up by the County Agents, the saving to the State
in hogs alone would have been far greater than the total cost
of the demonstration work. Even assuming that 50 per cent. of
the hogs treated would have been treated in the absence of co-
operation with the County Demonstration Agents, the amount
saved to the State would more than equal the total cost of the
work. Placing the average value of a hog at $5.00 and assuming
that 9,000 hogs were saved by the activities of the agents, we
have to the credit of the Co-operative Demonstration work at
least $45,000. This, however, does not express the real value of
this one part of the work in the State, since hundreds of farmers
will take up the work of hog raising because they know there is
a preventive of hog cholera; and other hundreds of hog raisers
who have been able to save their hogs be means of serum will
continue in the business, whereas otherwise they would have dis-
continued it.

NUMBER OF HOGS INOCULATED DURING 1914 BY COUNTY AGENTS

County Agent Number
Alachua S. Burgis 5000
Bradford 0. L. Mizell 4625
Calhoun J. E. Yon 28
Columbia J. D. Brown 338
Escambia S. W. Hiatt 367
Gadsden M. C. Gardner 1273
Hamilton S. S. Smith 32
Hernando J. T. Daniel 881









14 Agricultural Extension Division

Hillsborough R. T. Kelley 461
Holmes C. A. Fulford 45
Jackson G. W. Belser 3143
Jefferson E. W. Lumpkin 161
Leon F. Robinson (col.) 25
Levy W. E. Brown 2365
Liberty A. W. Turner 11981
Madison D. R. McQuarrie 1392
Marion S. J. McCully 1600
Pasco I. E. Soar 273
Polk A. A. Lewis 141
Santa Rosa 0. 0. Simmons 46
Suwanee T. Z. Atkeson 325
Washington D. C. McQuagge 684

Total 24409

CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK IN HOG
CHOLERA

There follows a statistical report of the work done by Dr.
Geo. F. Babb, Veterinarian, from September to December 31,
1914, under the Extension Division of the University co-operat-
ing with the Bureau of Animal Industry, U. S. Department of
Agriculture.
This was work carried on in addition to the work done by
the County Demonstration Agents. Whenever feasible, Dr.
Babb gave demonstrations in the use of serum; but the work was
directed mainly toward the production of better hogs and improv-
ing the sanitary conditions.
1. Number of counties in which work was conducted from Sep-
tember 1, to December 31, 1914 ......................... 27
2. Number of addresses made ................................. 76
(a) Number illustrated by stereopticon views ............. '12
(b) Total attendance ..................................... 5,252
3. Number of demonstrations of preventive treatment .......... 16
(a) Where serum alone was used ....................... 15
(b) Where simultaneous inoculation was used ............. 1
(c) Number of hogs treated ............................. 459
(d) Total attendance at demonstrations ................ 839
4. Number of visits made to farms for purpose of diagnosing hog
cholera or observing conditions and giving advice .......... 6
5., Number of farmers and hog raisers personally interviewed .... 698
6. Number of persons individually instructed and placed in a po-
sition to properly administer the serum preventive treat-
ment .......... .. ...................................... 16
(a) County Agents ...................................... 6
(b) .Hog owners ............... .... .................... 10








Bulletin 1


CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK IN SILO CON-
STRUCTION

There follows a general outline of work done by C. L. Wil-
loughby, Professor of Animal Husbandry, from July 1 to Sep-
tember 1, 1914, under the Extension Division of the University
co-operating with the Dairy Division Bureau of Animal Industry,
U. S. Department of Agriculture.
1. J. B. Simonton, Micanopy, 90-ton silo (concrete).
Assistance in constructing and filling.
2. L. S. Harvard, Live Oak, 140-ton silo (concrete).
Assistance in constructing and filling.
3. H. L. Chase, East Palatka, 100-ton silo (stave).
Assistance in constructing and filling.
4. L. B. Means, Gainesville, 90-ton silo (stave).
Constructing a silo from two old ones.
5. C. L. Adams, Jasper, 110-ton silo (stave).
Constructing silo.
6. Ira C. Howell, Pensacola, R. 3, 75-ton silo (stave).
Assistance in filling.
7. John M. Park, East Palatka, 60-ton silo (stave).
Assistance in completing and filling.
S. F. W. Holmes, St. Augustine, 205-ton silo (stave).
Assistance in filling.

In addition to the above, lectures on live stock and allied
subjects were delivered. These are scheduled under the;head of
Farmers' Institutes.


FARMERS' INSTITUTES
SUMMARY FOR THE 6 MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31,
1914.

Total attendance ..................................................13,377
Number of sessions ................................................ 134
Average attendance per session ..................................... 99
Number of addresses from University ............................ 275
Total number of addresses ......................................... 376
The above statistical outline of the Farmers' Institute work
during the past six months, shows a large number of addresses
and a large number of Institutes held. This has been possible
largely through co-operation with the Agricultural Extension
movement in the State. The demonstration work insures a much







16 Agricultural Extension Division

more uniform attendance by the farmers in those Counties where
the demonstration work is being carried on. It also stimulates
the Counties in which no demonstration work is being done; since
they hear, directly or indirectly, of the Farmers' Institute work
in adjoining Counties. Nearly all the Farmers' Institutes have had
to be held on circuits. This is due to the fact that the demand for
this work has increased too greatly. The table shows that the
work done in the first six months was nearly equal to that former-
ly accomplished in a year.











COUNTY DEMONSTRATION AGENTS IN FLORIDA


AGENT


Alach u a
Bay
Breva rd
Calhoun
Citrus
Clay
DeSoto
Duval
Escambia
Gadsden
Hernand o
Hillsboro
Homes
Jackson
Jefferson
LaFayette
Lake
Lecn (white) R.C.Lett
Leon (colored)
Liberty
Madison
Marion
Nassau
Orange *
Osceola
Pasco
Polk
Putman
Santa Rosa
Seminole
St. Lucie
St. Johns
Suwar-nee a
Taylor
V/akul la
Walton
'Washington


N. 5. McLendon
B. V.Mathi s
A.R. Nielsen
J. E. Yon
W. E. Allen
W. E. Brcw.n
Joseph Cze rw--
W. L. Watson
S. W.. Hiatt
J.B.Ball
J. T. Daniel
R. T. Kelley,
R. I. Matthews

M. C. Gardner
D. C. Geiger
Wm. Gomme
Aid4+w .JaCkSO'
Frank Robinson
A. W. Turner
D. R. McQuarrie

James Shaw
C. H. Laker
B. E. Evans
R. T. Weaver
A. A. Lewis
L.Cantrell
0. 0o 8i-1me-a
C. M. Berry
E.S.McLendon
H. C. Lawton

T. H, Stripling
A. W. Long
J. C. Smith
D. G. McQOu.gge


Ga inesville
Panama C ity
Melbourne
Blcuntstown
Lecanto
Green Cove Springs
Wauchula
Jacksonville
Gonzalez
Quinoy
Brooksvill e
Plant City
Bonifey
Marianna
Monticello
Mayo
Tavare s
Tallahassee
Tallahassee
Bristol
Madison
Berlin
Hilliard
Orland.
Kissimmee
Dade City
Kathleen
Palatka
Botts
Sanford
Ft.Pierce
Hastings
Live Oak
Perry
Sopchoppy
DeFuniak Springs
Chipley


COUNTY


ADDRESS













Best tean records, based


BOSM' COR0 aLUB WORK
fLORIDA
Chart No. S

on 90 few yiel4 and 50% for profit, valuing corn at $1.00 per bun


ceat
per ba.


erbn


Fred Bvere Alafias

Earl Davis Plant City
Palmer Byrt Ohaires

Henry Parker LeRoy
Lewie Lee Mrilby
ftilb -
Coley Meroer Ohitley

Joel Lundy Baker

Reed Mercer Ohipley
Isben OolAing Balm

WNm. Fulton Brooksville


Hillsbere

Rillbure
Leon

Marion

Hernando
Wash ngt
Sam ta Rosa

Washington

Hilluboro

Herando


.15

.12

.18
.16

*42

.54
.29

.54

.16
.55


profit
per aere
$84.05
83.07

67.83
70.56

55.56

59.79

59.80
58.74

65.85

45.28


profit Yield Yield
per eent per acre per cent

50 99.36 f94

49.2 94.4 46\.

40. 2 87.6 48G5

60.8 84 41,7

32.9 96.8 47.6
35.4 90.6 45

35.4 90 44.7

54.8 89 44.2

38.7 77.8 38.6
26.8 100.57 50


Rating

99.4%

96.1%

83.T%

385.5%
80.6%
80.4%

79.5%

79.0%

77.4%
76.8B


Average .......... ................0.194 6.04


90.9








WVr SCa OLB WOK
FLORIDA

CRARs II.


Beat ten yields pr amm


im-

Wa* Palten
Pret EBTrs

Barl Dasla
LewiB Lee
Oteeen Beash

WV. P Irosby

Cole Meroer
Joel LunAdy

Reead Merer
Palmer Byrd


Brooksvitle
Alafia

Plant City

Trilby

Rantinge

Ottra

Ohiploy

BaOker

Ohipley

Ohalires


Osnty

RHemana
Killalboro

Hillsboro
Hornadeo

St. Johns

Mar ion
Washiigton
Swata Rosa
Waehington

leon


Average


....s.........qeg.ae.aee .. 5 sam......s 93.2


%.


Tield

100.57

99.36

94.4

95.8
93.0

92.0

90.6
90.0

89.0
87,6









MW' ORNs OLUB WORE
flORIDA


Beat ten profits, ratftg oean at $1.00 per bushel


Name
frs& Ever

Earl Davis
Henry Parker
Palmer Byrd
IMben Golding
Seorge Parker
Jel Lundy
Ooley Kereer
Porter Bradley
Seed Meroer


Town
Alafia
Plant Oity
Loney
Chairs

Balm
LeRoy
Balbr
Chiplay
Brook r111
Ohipley


Osanty
Rilllabore
llalmboro
Marion


Eillasbro
arnon
Banta Bosa
Washington
Heranmdo
Washington


Average . . e .


$84.45
88.07
70.56
67.88
65. 5
65.15
59.80
59.79
59.67

56.74

$67.41













No. of demonstrators irn corn ... ................ 65.......
Number of acres in demonstrations ............... 6,365
av. yield from demonstration plots per acre ....... 28- bu.


mP w








Corn Statistics for Florida

from U.S.D.A. Yearbooks


No. .of bu.

7,017,000

6,584,000

7,024,000

8,190,000

9,286,000

8,515,000
20,125,000

11,200,000

12,000,000


Aw. per acre

11.3

10.5

12.6


1 .6
13.0

15.0

16.0

15.0


Corn Club Boys Winners

Fred Evers, Alafia, Hillsboro Co. highest percentage 99.36
won prize offered by the State Fed. of Women's Clubs
Wmin. Fult:n, of Brooksville, Hernando Co. largest no. of bu. 100.57


Year

2907

3] 908

J909

3930


1912

29]
1914.

1925


Acreage

62],000

627,000

606.000

630, o00oo

636.000

655,000

675,000

700,000

800,000


W. 22