Citrus Seminar. October 5, 1920

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Title:
Citrus Seminar. October 5, 1920
Series Title:
Writings and Speeches 1891-1920
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Box: 1
Divider: Articles, Speeches and Other Writings
Folder: Citrus Seminar. October 5, 1920

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.

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University of Florida
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ADDRESS
Dean P. H. Rolfs


Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen, Fellow Citizens, Fridnds, All:

I am extremely glad to be before you this morning and give you

a word of hearty welcome to the attendants on the Citrus Seminar.

You do not know what a fine time I always have during the meeting

of the Citrus Seminar. There isiilt a time in the year, Friends,

when I so thoroughly enjoy myself as I do during the Seminar and

Roundup. I meet so many hearty friends, those men and nomen who

are enthusiastic and whole-hearted on their subject. You have got

to be more than-luke-warm -- even if you come from only 15 or 20

or 30 miles from here to attend meetings of this kind -- when-

you go over the rough roads in part of Marion and Alachua Counties

you really must be in earnest to really enjoy it, and I knoi that you

enjoy it from the fact that I see so i1any ,waW repeaters.

You }-now: what repeaters are; this time, in this sense, the re-

peaters are the fine fello-vs. I see before me 1-nm.. f -rhI .. .0n and

-.Ta,4t .a so._ o@-l and one woman, who were in attendance on the

first Citrus Seminar -t '-.*"?ad '_--Am iii.


versity function. The first one was held, e.i.m. to .. pr..a.eg
: i..*... L=, 10 years ago, this being the Eleventh* I t1l 3 li ..




aal- ;n.-,ae- ygnoowm it a V,- .a, we held o r nainar in the

end of Thomas Hall. The Experiment Station then occupied three floors,.
six 3 o.s 0 UU B A-It3









We were crowded b=.._ .. in the most sort of

way, = = vv e -nQur oi_, altj yet under

those saf j strenuous conditions some of our best scientific

discoveries were made because, E l, t is more in the me af/

than it is in the apparatus whether ypn will make a success or a

failure of aevesrj studies,,a=t ou know it is ,ord in the man

whethere r his grove i going to be a success or failure than it is in

the grove itself. Of course, if you have the right man he isn't

going to choose the wrong g location for hks grove, so, after all, it

"is the nan who is going to make a success of this work.

e had, at that first meeting, a total attendance of 29. M-v

n- imotoe ainattenda oat eo, iwe met around

in the different laoooio, getting chairs and sitting close to one

another. y

The next year we held it in- a a- w our beautiful Experiment

Station building, a- Mmphe & sai.* ,-the finest in Dixie,-and

there we had really an ideal Seminar, where we could gather around

the scientific workers and ask them questions, but o such

a attendance that we had to abandon the laboratories and make

provision for the E. don't want

you to abandon the Seminar; I want you to keep up with the Seminar

Get right next to our Chemist, Dr. Ruprecht; get down and talk to

our Entomologist, Prof. Watson, t-hn we have the Plant Board .

You can get right next to these men andtake hold of them and sAy,

"This is what I want to know, and I have come here to find it out".

So the ideal of the Seminar will be carried on in our work; we will

have these 40aMEg special lectures, *e*d*w=, technical in

addition to our regular old ideal of the Seminar.




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*hM he development in the last ten years, f i
-11 -- h -. .v has been something
M--B-r mi. when we look back on vwhaT "ve knew ten years ago,
9- 0..d..... L.... .- fn.,-n--, there has been a very con-

siderable --x-' -- in what we know about citrus work.
wider
And yet the end is not near. We have got a bigger,/and more
glorious field before us than we evert=ft in the past. You know,
the higherr ye-:- up on the mountain the better is the view jAM e
were twenty-five years ago in our citrus growing,down ih the valley,







Sivesno mor tha a passing

interest to the Faed Scle, question, vWy, f




The higher we get on the' mountain of knowledge, the more clearly
*e see down into the plains below, and we see more to be learned
and those getting the most generous view of the whole field of citrus

groding,-marketing and transportation)see that the whole question of
citrus growing is an immense area that stretches ,iay out4 f..=pi6.anA

=, a the horizon is being opened up, stretching to the south ,
and I do not kr.t but that, in another decade, we will have to look


f the eon ind., nd--e-t Erope i dunog,


the,- -". LLIU dt tw4 CG










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'-if c:z:VJ vTe laim 3dt. -.ugja in4ide la Comparatively
few of/us have an opportunity of-viewing this splendid landscape
from the heights and seeing what there s in he field. ,You
remember that the Experiment Station tma was r/vy ihAdequate,
poorly Institution, and we thought if we had just a little
more money, (vwe had $15,000t at time)that if we just had $q15,000
more we could do everything. Well, we got that 1l5,000, but during
the last four years the dollar has depreciated from 100 cents to

less than 50 cents, so we are no better off, financially speaking,
than we were 15 S years ago. Our t force fifteen years
ago was exceedingly limited; we had -1 or 2 men teaching; at the

present time we have six giving their time to the technical side of
jag agriculture. The Extension force was composed entirely of 21 men --
%-now we have something over 100 men and omenn located in about 40 ooua-

ties of the state. The Extension work has grown by leaps and bounds.
Then we- take the students, we th ught thope first few years that
/ tf we had 180 or 200 students that we hada large enrollment.
I re.LLb.oer, in the first few years when we were in the piney *,oods--

this was piney woods; all these rc-is had to be ocnger-otrod, builds
ings had to be constructed and we had a pretty desolate and bleak


At the p~on time hae f meth~n /o comfortabl,,-_an

_gain we rise to where we must push onward o6n seegreat fields ahead
of us to be conquered. the Agricultural College alone we ae an
enrollment of over 200 bt year, and at this date the enrollment has-
not been rad. up, but it has exceeded that of last year. b 9 -








-5-







amd.you will remember how eager everyone Nas to hear the Ihst .iord

and the best word that Professor Stevens could tell us about it
from the laboratory, uo a good many of the citrus growers couldn't

refrain from att touching, or atteL.pting to touch those trees which

had been inoculated. They had been told very carefully before that

they r.-ust not touch those leaves because they '-ofld be (likely to in-

itferee- transfer the as on their hands or their clothing, yet
we had to sit there and take hold of their har.s to keep them off.

Now, that was the right turn of mind, Gentlemen; they wanted to get

right next to it. You aren't going to make a good scientist, a good

citrus gToer unless you have that turn of mind. You want to get
right down and learn the last be- told it

tas worse than touching a red hot needle to touch those trees, because

you could have felt that, but these little bugs, bacteria, you can't

feel, ani if someone hadn't watched, some of those might have been

carried home. 1A. Newell is going to tell you about the Plant Board

ork, especially the Citrus Canker situation.
I have w2ade a few brief, ~Gnlremrks, and I know you want

to egt nW; to the aeint of hear/gi from our good Congressman, Mr.

Sears. I can't quite get to calling him Mr. Sears. -.....
years ago he was in the class room with- me at Lake City inthe

Agricultural College, and I can never get avwTay from thinking of him

in any other way than Joe Sears.







-6-

410M, Ladies and Gentlemen, I bespeak for you the best time, the

finest time that we have ever had in the history of the Citrsu Seminar,

though we can't carry it on for four days, as we .i& afbn e ..e

s .--. the last Congress out the Federal appropriation about

six million dollars, y 1r--. -n the Administration, or rather the

in Congress was not avy favorable to the South ROe y,

izmany things favorable to the South were -out oit, so we have

suffered ad the last Legislature out the Experiment Station something

over three thousand dollars for printing fund, and aa five thousand

dollars additional for experimental work, leaving five thousand dollars

Vo carry on experiments that vea startedA-ow I wantt you to remember

that there are some of us left here, and some of us in the Experiment

Station and Agricultural College, and Extension work bearing the brunt

of it, and standing up under it the best that .we can, and we are going

to see it through.

This j-nb .a hY ", h-ndzn it is a big piece of work,

and we are going to see it through and I know that every man and.

woman with us this morning is right behind us and we are going to see

that much better and amre glorious work that we -wre going to do in

the state. I would like to take te. whole hour that I h:.t: i: sum-
su-
mariziag the work that already; done, but that' ilr n_ o bS of


I know that we are going to hear something from a large number of

people on the program, and we have eome dg the best speakers that

we have ever had on the Seminar program. Dr. Webber, .. o ... is

the master mind on citrus at the present day. Amy--e "- he is just

Oif f the citrus field/,a. Ve is recognized, not only nationally






*<*; .


-7-


.- ..'ut internationally, as the highest authority on many of the citrus

problems, -I have a telegram from Dr. I'"ebber y ...w, saying

that he will arrive at. noon today on the Seaboard, so we will have

Dr. Webber with us tonight.

2=,1 f there is anything I can do for your comfort, help and

satisfaction, kindly command me. I -am at your service. All of our

men are at your service. We want you to have the best time, we want

yoy to get the biggest load of r-r -.e.. e information that you

can during your stay at the University. Thefprogram. is crowded to

bursting, but yeviw we have gotten so used to being crowded and

.t that it doesn't sein very abnormal to us here at the Universiy

'_ a we would feel quite unhappy if every meeting of the day we're

not filled with something of great importance to do, r. .v t


Many people say that we are going through a period of reconstruc-

tion; no, we are not going through reconstruction. Nothing has been

demolished, but we are going into a rapid evolution into a broader,

more perfect line of work, not only in the Citrus Seminar, but in the

work of our Agricultural College as-a x"0&

I thank you for your very courteous attention.








ADDRESS
SDean P. H. Rolfs

I A*
Mr.thirman, Ladie4 ad Gentlemen, Fellow Citizens, Priends, All:
I am Extremfjy glad to be before you this morning and give
you a word of hearty weleoi to the attendants on the Citrus Seminar.
You do not know what a fine time I always have during the meeting of
the Citrus Seminar. There lsn't a time in the year, Friends, When

I so Ihoroly enjoy myself as I to during the Seminar and Roundup.

I meet so many hearty friends, those men and women who are enthusiastic
and whole-hearted on their subject. You have got to be more than

luke-warm -- even if you come from only fifteen or twenty or thirty

miles from here to attend meetings of this kind when you go over
the rough roads in part of Marion and Alachua Countiew you really

must be in earnest to really enjoy it, and I know that you enjoy it
from the fact that I see so many repeaters.
You know what repeaters are; this time, in this sense,

the repeatets are the fine fellows. I see before me three men
and one woman, who were in attendance on the first Citrus Seminar.

This annual event i. a University function. The first

one was held, ten years ago, this being the Eleventh. We held our

first Seminar in the end of Thomas Hall. The Experiment Station
then occupied three floors,- six small rooms, in the end of that

dormitory. We were crowded in the most uncomfortable sort of way,
and yet under those strenuous conditions some of our best scientific

discoveries were made. It is more in the man than it is in the

apparatus whether he will make a success or a failure of his studies.

You know it is more in the man whether his grove is going to be a






falizre "2-

success or failure than it is in the grove itself. Of course, if

you have the right man he isn't going to choose the wrong location for
his grove, so, after all, it is the man that is goAng to make a

suocees of this work. We had, at that first meeting, a total attandanoq
of twenty-nine. We met around in the different laboratories, getting

chairs and sitting lose to'_one another.

!ha next year,with fifty-four in attendance, we held it in

our beautiful Experiment Station building, the finest in Dixie,-

and there we had really an ideal Seminar, where we could gather around

the scientific workers and ask them questions, but before long there

was such a large attendance that we had to abandon the laboratories
and make provision for the larger audience. I don't want you to
abandon the Seminar ideal; I want you to keep up with the Seminar

spirit. Get right next to our Chemist, Dr. Ruprecht; get down and

talk to our Entomologist, Prof. Watson, We also have the Plant Board
staff with us. You can get right next to these men and take hold

of them and say, "This is what I want to know, and I have come here

to find it out." _So the ideal of the Seminar will be carried on in
our work; we will have these special lectures, and technical papers
in addition to our regular old ideal of the Seminar.

The development in the last ten years in the Citrus
industry has been something like a revolution. When we look back

on what we knew ten years ago, there has been a very considerable

evolution in what we know about citrus work.

And yet the end is not near. We have got a bigger, wider

and more glorious field before us than we ever saw in the past. You

know, the higher up on the mountain the better is the view. We

were twenty-five years ago in our citrus growing, down in the valley.








The horticultural press, the reports of the Horticultural Society
and publications from the Experiment Station, were largely concerned
with the control of scale insects and whitefly. Most of us thought
that if we could handle the scales and whitefly the citrus millennium
would be reached. The citrus grower of to-day gives no more than a
passing interest to the Red Scale, and the whitefly question.
The higher we get on the mountain of knowledge, the more clearly

we see down into the plains below, and we see more to e learned ;
and those getting the most generous view of the whole field of

citrus growing,* marketing and transportation, see that the whole
se0 that- te-awhule question of citrus growing is an immense area

that stretches way out. The horizon is being opened up, stretching
to the South, and I do not know but that, in another decade, we will

have to look to see what South America is doing. California and
Europe have been heavy competitors for the American lemo:. market.

Development at the University,

Comparatively few of us from among the twelve thousand

citrus growers have an opportunity of viewing this splendid landscape
from the heights and seeing what there Is in the field. You remember
that the Experiment Station at the meeting of the first Seminar was
a wry inadequate, poorly equipped Institution, and wei thought if
we had just a little more money, (we had $15,000 annually at that
time) that if we just had $15,000 more we could do everything. Well,
we got that $15,000, but during the last four years the dollar has

depreciated from 100 cents to less than 50 cents, so we are no better
off, financially speaking, than we were fifteen years ago. Our technical)
teaching force fifteen years ago was exceedingly li:.ited; we had

li or 2 men teaching; at the present time we have six giving their






-4- ..

time to the technical side of teaching agriculture. The Extension

force was composed entirely of 24 men now we have something over

100 men and women located in about forty counties of the state.

The Extension work has grown by leaps and bounds. When we took the

students, we thought, those first few years that if we had 180 or 200

students at the whole University that we had a large enrollment.

I remember, in the first few years when we were in the piney woods,-

this was piney woods; all thes6roads had to laid out and built,

buildings had to be constructed and we had a pretty desolate and

bleak outlook even ten years ago.
Five years ago we were comfortably situated. Again we rise

to where we must push onward as we see the grat fields ahead of us to

be conquered. In the Agricultural College alone we had an enrollment

of over 200 last year, and at this date the enrollment has not been

made up, but it has exceeded that of last year. The enrollment

in the University is now over seven hundred.

The Plant Board was established five years ago. Its offices

and laboratories are located on the Campus. The staff of that

organization adds very greatly to the scientific work carried out here.

We want you to get better acquainted with them.

Reminiscences on Citrus Canker.

The first artificial infection by Citrus Canker was exhibited

before the Seminar. You will remember how interested everyone was to

hear the last word and the best word that Prof. Stevens could tell

us about it from the laboratory a good many of the citrus growers

couldn't refrain from touching, or attempting to touch those trees
which had been inoculated. They had been told very carefully

before that they must not touch those leaves because they would be





-5-
likely to transfer the disease on their hands or their clothing, yet
we hadto sit there and take hold of their hands to keep them off.

Now, that was the right turn of mind, Gentlemen; they wanted to .get

right next t6 it. You aren't going to make a good scientist, a
good citrus grower unless you have that turn of mind. You want to

get right down ahd learn the last fact in the matter. It was worse
than touching a red hot needle to touch those trees, because you could
have felt that, but these little bugs, bacteria, you can't feel, and
if someone hadn't have watched, some of those might have been carried
home. Dr. Newell is going to tell you about the Plant Board work,
especially the Citrus Canker situation.

I have made a few brief remarks, and I know that you want

to hear from our good Co ressman, Mr. Sears. I can't quite get to :
calling him Mr, Sears. Twenty years ago he was in the class room

with me at Lake City In the Agricultural College, and I never can

get to think of him in any other way than Joe Sears.

Some Curtailment.
Ladies and Gentlemen, I bespeak for you the best time, the
finest time that we have ever had in the history of the Citrus

Seminar, though we can't carry it on for four days, as we have beer
doing. The last Congress out eat the Federal appropriation to the

farmers and fruit growers by about six million dollars, or rather the
majority in Congress was not favorable to the work in th e South.
Many things favorable to the South were out out, so we have suffered.

The last Legislatnrc out the Experiment Station something over three
thousand dollars for printing fund, and five thousand dollars additional

for expert ental work, leaving us five thousand dollars only to carry

on experiments that had been started. I want you to remember that






-6-


there are some of us left here, and some of us in the Experiment
Station and Agricultural College, and Extension work bea)ng the brunt

of it. and standing up under it the best we can, and we are going to

see it thrn.
It is a big piece of work, and we are going to see it thru,

and I know that every man and woman with us this morning is right
behind us and we are going to see that much better and more glorious

work will be done in the state. I would like to take a whole hour to
summarize the work that has already been done, but time forbids.
I know that we are going to hear something from a large

number of people on the program, and we have some of the best speakers

that we have ever had on the Seminar program. Dr. Webber is the master
mind on citrus at the present S&y. He is just leaving the citrus

field. He is recognized, not only nationally but internationally,

as the highest authority on many of the citrus problems. I have a

telegram from Dr. Webber saying that he will arrive at noonto-day on
the Seaboard, so we will have Dr. Webber with us tonight.
If there is anything I can do for your comfort, help and

s atisfatoion, kindly command me. I am at your service. All of

our men are at your service. We want you to have the best time, we

want you to get the biggest load of information that you can during
your stay at the University. The program is crowded to bursting but

w#. have gotten so used to being crowded and congested that it doesn't

seem very abnormal to us here at the University. We would feel quite

unhappy if every meeting of the day were not filled with something of

greAt importance to do.
Many people say that we are going thru a period of reconstructed

no, we are not going thru reconstruction. Nothing has been

demolished, but we are going into a rapid evolution into a broafdr,






-7-s

more perfect line of work, not only in the Citrus Seminar. but in the
work of eur Agrilultural College as in the whole University.

I thank you for year very courteous attention.





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PROGRAM

ELEVENTH ANNUAL CITRUS SEMINAR

Tuesday, October 5th

A. P. Spencer, Chairman.
A. M.

9:00 Invocation Rev. I. 0. Jenkins

Opening Addresses J. 0. Adkins, Mayor
Dr. A. A. Murphree, Pres.
P. H. Rolfs, Dean

9:40 Response Hon. W. J. Sears, M. C.

10:00 Fewer Fertilizer I
Formulae Dr. J. N. Harper,
\ Atlanta, Ga.
10:30 Fertilizer Guarantees
and What They Mean, Dr. R. W. Ruprecht

10:50 Economic Use of Fertilizers
in Grove Culture E. F. DeBusk

11:15 .Potash and Phps. Acid in
Citrus Fertilizers, B. F. Floyd

11:40 Present Prospects in
Nursery Stocks F. M. O'Byrne

12:00 M. Dinner.

The ladies of the Episcopal Church, Gainesville, will
serve dinners, lunches and cold drinks on the campus during
the Citrus Seminar and Livestock Roundup.








I'*



PR G RAM



ELEVENTH ANNUAL

CITRUS SEMINAR



OCTOBER TH & a 6TH, 120.





CONDUCTED BY

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

GAINIBVILLE. IL


A





4.


Tuesday Afternoon, October 5th

Dr. R. W. Ruprecht, Chairman.


X2:00 Control of Rust Mites
in Groves



82:30 Quarantine Inspection Work,

/2:50 Citrus Canker Situation


3:10 Marketing Produce


3t40 Farm Bureau Organization,


W. W. Others, Bureau
of Entomology,
U. S. D. A.

Dr. J. H. Montgomery

Dr, Wilmon Newell,
State Plant Board

L. M. Rhodes, Commissioner
State Marketing Bureau

W. 0. Lassetter, Editor
S, E. Edition,
Progressive Farmer


8:00 Problems of Citrus Culture, Dr. H. J. Webber,
Formerly Director,
California Expt. Sta.

(In Epworth Hall near White House).













Wednesday, October 6th

P. H. Rolfs, Chairman.



9100 An BrIn- Break-Pofr her rru- 6/


9:30 Citrus Nursery Stocks, Dr. H. J. Webber

10:00 Status of the Florida
Experiment Station Work, Dean P. H. Rolfs

10:30 Discussion of Fungus
Parasites of White Fly, Dr. E, W. Berger

11:00 Drainage Practices in
Florida A. 0. Kay, Bureau
of Public Roads,
U. S. D. A.


11530 Parasites that Destroy
Citrus Insects

12t00 Dinner.

Next session 1:45 P. M.


J. R. Watson





Wednesday Afternoon, October 6th

E. F. DeBusk, Chairman.


P. M.


1:45 Some Citrus Problems on
Hammock Soils

,2s15 The Freight Transportation
Situation



2:45 Citrus Fruits in the Hands
of the Housewife


3:15 Some of the Needs of our
State Educational
Institutions,


W. J. Crosby


C. E. Hix, Supt.
of Transportation,
S. A. L. Ry.


Miss S. W, Partridge,
State Home Dem. Agent



C. E, Stewart,
Florida Citrus
Exchange


* .~





Gulf Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.


- Hardie Power Sprayer.
E. H. Hurlebaus


Florida Agricultural Supply Co., Jacksonville, Fla. -
Bean Power Sprayer. C. H. Parker

The Skinner Manufacturing Co., Dunedin, Fla. -
Friend Sprayer. J. H. Horton

Niagara Sprayer Co., Middleport, N. Y. Mr. Donough

Fairbanks Morse Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Two spraying
machines.

Van Fleet Sprayer Co., Winter Haven, Fla.

Alamo Farm Light Co., Omaha Nebr. Exhibited by Holt
Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Exchange Supply Co., Tampa, Fla. Scheu Smokeless
Orchard Heaters. C. W. Scheu


State Plant Board.


In charge of Mr. Frank Stirling


Florida Agricultural Experiment Station. Forage Crops.
J. B. Thompson

Visitors are cordially invited to visit the Dairy and
Stock Barns, the Horticultural Grounds and the Experiment
Station Laboratories; also the University pf Florida Museum,
on the second floor of Science Hall.


EXHIBI TS




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