Agricultural Work in Florida, Budget Justification. May 18, 1914

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Title:
Agricultural Work in Florida, Budget Justification. May 18, 1914
Series Title:
Writings and Speeches 1891-1920
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Physical Location:
Box: 1
Divider: Articles, Speeches and Other Writings
Folder: Agricultural Work in Florida, Budget Justification. May 18, 1914

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.

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University of Florida
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AA00000206:00007


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General Resume of Agricultural

Wor3: done in Florida.


General Statement ........................... 1

State Chemist ............................... 2

Appropriations of 2912 ...................... 3

Persons Employed ............................ 3

Agricultural College .......................

College Faculty ............ ........... 5

j.pprdpriation to several Stations in 1912.... 6

Support of the florida Station .............. 7

Publications .............................

Correspondence .......... .............. 9

Has the Experiment Station made Good?.........10

SHorticultural Law ...................... 1-

DiscoverieA6 lae by Staff .............. 1- 3

Citrus Can:oer ................ .... ..... /

Dlieases of .cale. Insects ..............36

Fertilizer ExperiLents ... .............7

What the State Has Lost ................3 s

Our resent Corps ....................39

What we need for the Station ..........20

Can Florida Stard It? ................2

Experiment Station Staff ..............22


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Farmers' Institutes ....... 23

University Extension Staff ..... 25

Inspector of Nursery Stock -......... 26

State Chemist .............. ...... .. 27

Farmers Cooperative Demonstration Work. 29

Staff .... ... -... *..... **.-** 31

Cominty Demonstration Agents ..... 32










General Statement

The following various departments of the University of Flo-
rida carry on coordinated work in the line of agriculture.
(2) The Agricultural College is maintained entirely from
Federal Funds. The faculty give all of their time to teaching work
at Gqinesville.
(2) The Agricultural Experiment Station receives all of its
funds for running expenses from the Federal Treasury. The staff de-,
votes its time to agricultural investigational work.
(3) The Division of Extension gives all its time to the dif-
fusing of agricultural knowledge ai-ong the people of the State and
in giving instruction-directly to farmers arid horticulturists.
About $20,000 is derived fro.i the Federal Treasury and $5000 is a]pprl-
priated by the State legislature.
(4) The Farmers' Institutes are supported from funds aJppro-

priated by the iea..erJ- Treasury, amounting to ;,'I0,O00 oIn 1913. This
money is spent in holding Farmers' Dnstitutes in various parts of the
state, in running agricultural trains, and work of that kind.
(5) The office of Inspector of Nursery Stock is supported by
appropriation from the State Treasury, of $3,500 for 1913. The duty
of the Nursery Inspector is to visit the nurseries arud give certifi-
cates of inspection to those nurseries that are free from dangerous
insects and diseases.










State Chemist


The State Chemist is not connected directly or indirectly

with the university, but is at the head of a bureau in the Depart-
ment of Agriculture of the State of Florida. He is authorized by
state law to analyze all fertilizers, feeds, food products and con-
diments. >j /1/2. 67 / :- 3.4 ^ /3-7-A-4A'
From the above general statement it will De seen that none

of these different divisions over lap one another, and that there is
abundant field for further extension of any one of them.
















TA F DE

Experiment Statelos ae -30,000
Agricult:ral Col egs (Teaching) one 8o,000

Agrlotltmrl College (Equipment) 5,000 e.

Cooperative D.lon.tation 5,000 3.,000

Ssmers' Institute 7,500

SState Inspector Nursery Stock 3,000 itols
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Persons Employed 1914.


Experiment Stat ion

Agricultural College

Cooperative Demonstration Work-

Farmers' Institute


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Agricultural College



The Agricultural College at the University of PForida is a

separate college in the University. The corps of professorsarehired

for their pepecial fitness for teaching work. They give their entire

time to teaching and are free from any investigational or extension

work. Their duties are confined to the campus of the University.

At times it is possible for certain members of the College of Agri-

culture to take part in the Farmers' Institute work and. in State agri-

cultural meetings, but these can be attended only when the teaching

work.will not be neglected by so doing.
The Agricultural College is maintained entirely on Federal

Funds just for the running expenses. A land grant fund from Congress

in the early sixties formed the basis for the Agricultural College.

From this fund $ 7,%/' ---- are received annually.

The Morrill Fund is another appropriation from the U. S.

treasury, made in 3:S9. This amounted to $25,000 annua33y but it has

to be divided equally between the Agricultural College of the Univer-

sity and the Agricultural College for negrows at Tallahassee.
The Nelson Fund is another appropriation from the U. S. treas-

ury amounting to $25,000, one-half of wnich is set aside for the negro

college and tie other half for the Agricultural College at the Uni-

versity.
The last legislature made an appropriation of $15,000 for the

biennium to equip a stock faarmi laboratoriea, and in other ways improve

the teaching facilities of the Agricultural College.



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College of Agriculture

Faculty


ALBERT A. MURPWREE, A..,LL.D.,
President of the lhiversity

J. J. Vernon, B.Agr.,M.S.A.
Dean of the Co 3ege of Agriculture a d
Professor of Agronomy

W L. FLQYD, .T. S.,
Professor of Horticulture

C, L. WILLOUGHUBY, B.Agr.,
Professor of Animal Husbandry and lDairying

C. K. MOQUARRIE,
Professor of Agricultural Extension

I OD LE, :B...,
Instructor in Botany and Bacteriology

J. P. DUGGAR, JR., B.S.,
Instructor in oil s and. Fertilizers

C. A. MARTINI,
Assistant in Correspondence Courses

JAES8 M. FARR, 1 4 Ph.D.,
Professor of English Language and Literature

E. R. PLINT, B.S., Ph.D., M.D.,
Professor of Chemistry

JAS. N. ANDERSON, M.A., Ph.D.,
Professor of Ancient Languages

C. L. CROW, M.A., P-h.D.,
Professor of Modern Languages

LUTHER LEE BERMARD, Ph.D.,
Professor of History and Economics

H. S. DAVIS, Ph.D.,
Professor of Zoology arnd Entomology

H. G. KEPPEL, A.B., Ph.D.,
Professor of lIathematics and Astronomy




Ct


Coll.of Agr. (cnt.)




MAJOR E. S. WALKER, U.S.A. retired,
Professor of Military Science

JOHN A. THACKS)ON, Pd.M.,Ph.D.,
Professor of Education

HARVEY W. COX, A.M., PhD.,
Professor of Philosophy

L. W. BUCIIHOLZ, A.M.,
Professor of E3Ementary Education, .ethfods & Supervision

A. G. COLCLOUGH,
Farm Foreman
















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Caflfornlf

florida -

S Georgia

-IlliaohLi

ltouisana

Xlesiaslsulppi

Ohti


State App.

34,903.85

185,758.00

None

60.81

171,482.84

24,500.00

33,150.00

193,500.00


Mlse.*

4.457.00,

14,000.00

2,865.00

11,430.36

34,557.49

31,650.16

17,399A89

188,174.85


U.S. App.

30,000

30,000

30,000

30,000

30,000

30,000

30,000

30,000


Total
Tot 1 -i

69,439.81













4 11 675 .. 2 ..:
169,375.00 .



4S,05l.J7 1

336,040.31 '

86,150.1--A

80,549.8a 9

411,675.35 .1
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iso. colun Includes money from sale of farm products,

tax on fertilizer tage, inepeotlon fees and other Items.


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EXPERIMENT STATIONS/ A

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The Agricultura3 Experiment Station was founded by an act of

Congress in 1888. Ti s appropriated toneach State in the Union

$35,000 to ie spent for investigating farm problems. A further

appropriation of $15,000 was later made 1by the Federal treasury. The

funds arising from this source nust be used for investigational work.

They cannot be applied to holding Farmers' Institutes nor for the

carrying on of the Farm Demonstration work, nor for teaching purposes

In the Agricultural College.
The last legislature appropriated $3000 to be used for the

improvement of laboratories, improving the building, and building

roads and fences on the Experiment Station grounds at Gainesvil3e.

A further sum of $4000 was appropriated for the construction of a

dairy barn.





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The Experiment station up to the present has been maintained

entirely on Federal appropriation. Under this Federal appropriation

there have been published from the Experiment Station 122 bulletins,

23 annual reports and 222 press bulletins. 3 looking over the list

of publications available it is seen that less than 25% of these pub-

lications are now in print. All of them can be-obtained for the ask-

ing. It is needless, therefore, to say that the very best publica-

tions are the ones that go out of print first.


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Correspondence


The amount of correspondence carried on by the force of the

Experiment Station Is enormous. For the past year it has run some-

where in the neighborhood of twenty thousand letters, giving Infor-

nation on direct inquirie regarding some particular phase or phases

of our F3ori.a agriculture. Six years ago it was an easy matter

for one stenographer /to do all of the work and take care of the Sec-

retary's office at the same time. At the present time it seems that

three persons constantly employed are hardly able to keep up with

the wtrk.
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Has the Experiment Station Made Good?

Whatever we may think about it there is no questioning the fact that
fPorlda has the best fertilizer law in existence in the MTilted States,
and that means in the world. There is nowhere else where the con-
sumer has the same protection for his goods that is afforded to the
trade. The Florida fertilizer law permits the grower to have his
goods analyzed free of charge, and this analysis not only gives him

the information but it becomes prima facia evidence in a court of law.
In other words it puts the fellow who sold him the goods on the defen-
sive.
When such conditions exist there must somewhere be a cause for this..

As far back as 1889, before States began to think of regulating the sale

of such goods as fertilizers, the Florida Experiment Station published
in its bulletins the analyses of fertilizers on the Florida market.
Imperfect as this work was when we look at it from our present stand-

point, it gave an unquestioned basis ao which legislation could fornu-
late proper laws. We need not Row inquire into the difficulties
surrounding the passage of this law nor the necessity for further amend-
ing it from legislature to legislature. we only need to know that we
have the best law that exists for all practical purposes, and we need
to know that this was nota an accident, but brought about by basis,
fundamental investigation. Thie early bulletins of the Experiment

Station were frequently regarded as a Joke. It was found, however,
that among these workers were certain persons whose foundations had
been laid in scientific research and who had studied in the b st Unhi-









versities in Europe. These trained scientists gave us a foundation

on which a safe structure could be erected.
In 1900 the Experiment Station published Bulletin #52, giving the

analyses of baking powders in the State'; incidentally the chemist
had investigated other food products. The revelations were so start-

ling that no time was lost In passing a reasonably good regulatory law.

These instances might be multiplied indefinitely, but I wish to call

your attention to these in passing since the mere mention of them will

assure you that there are plenty of other good illustrations.




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Horticultural laws

In 1894 the Horticultural Society appointed H. J. Webber,
P. H. Rolfs and 3. T. Stubbs as a committee to draft a horticultural
law for the State. This law had for its aim the restriction and
control of the whitefly as well as certain diseases known to be of
local distribution and which could readily be cirotmscribed and con-
trolled. The matter was taken up with the legislature and a reason-

ably good working law proposed. The burden of pushing this law in
the legislature was placed on Dudley W. Adams (Proceedings of the
florida State Horticultural Society, 1895, p.. 57). The bill was

never enacted into a law and Florida failed to grasp the opportunity

for making the best out of her great misfortune. The value of such
a law that would have regulated and restricted disease and insect

pests, cannot be over estimated.











Discoveries Made by the Force of the Experiment Station.


Probably the most remunerative and important single piece

of work done was that of studying and introducing the fungi which con-
trol the whitefly of citrus. No other scientists have given more
than passing attention to this phase of the work. The work done by
Dr. Berger in ferreting out the behavior of the whitefly in the field,
the behavior of the fungus and the inter-relation has been printed in
a number of bulletins. It has become so much of a general knowledge
that the average man scarcely knows who is responsible for the basic
and painstaking work that laid the foundation of this investigation.
It is impossible tonestimate the benefits derived from this

work. The value to the State last year nmst be regarded as being not
less than half a million dollars. This can be gotten at somewhat
definitely by knowing the distribution of the whitefly, the amount of
damage it would normally do and then determining the actual damage it
did. Private enterprise Mas stepped in and is supplying the fungi
whenever needed and also treating the groves whenever desired. This
can readily be contracted for at the rate of 2) per tree, and the work
done by private enterprise has been thoroughly satisfactory. To do

as satisfactory work with contact insecticides would require the ex-
penditure of approximately 25/ per tree.









Citrus Canker


All of the citrus growers of the State asould be entirely

familiar with t*h appearance and destructiveness of this new disease,

known as citrus canker.: This was discovered by Dr. E. W. Berger,
State Nursery Inspector, who is not an officer of the Experiment Sta-
tion but is working in close harmony and cooperation with the Experi-

ment Station officers. About a yar ago in making his tour of in-
spection he discovered what appeared to be an unclassified disease.

Specimens were immediately submitted to H. E. Stevens, Plant Patholo-

gist of the Experiment Station, who found the lesions were somewhat
unusual but since it was apparently of no economic importance no
direct attention was paid to it. Specimens were submitted also to the

U. S. Department of Agriculture who likewise seemed to regard the

matter a;s of no great importance. Dr. Berger, however, found on his

later visits. to the nurseries that the matter rea3)y demanded careful
attention. Professor Stevens, therefore, took it up earnestly and

proved after several months work that this disease was transmissible
and very difficult to handle. His later investigations have shown
a
that it is tery e6sisteat -disease and one that spreads with consider-

able rapidity. As soonaas a sufficient amount of exact work had been

done on this disease to warrant drawing conclusions and giving out
information, Bulletin 122 was published. The State Board of Control
immediately authorized Dr. Berger to make a tour of inspection through

Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. The results of this trip

show that the apprehension felt by Professor Stevens in regard to









the seriousness of this disease were well founded. Immediate steps

have been taken to fully suppress this disease. Should these meas-
ures prove successful the value to the citrus industry of the State

will be such as to be many hundreds of times in excess of the cost
of maintgAning the service. Should this fungus be turned loose in

the State the indications are that it will prove even more serious
than the scab or Whiefly,




/6


Diseases and Scale Insects


The red headed fungus which destroys scale insects was dis-

covered by PrOf. T. H. Rolfs iJn 3894 or about that time. This marks
the beginning of a new period in the handling of scale insects in the
Plorida citras grove. Up to that time no attempt had been made to
disseminate the fungi which prove so helpful in the citrus grove.
At that time the red headed fungus was found on San Jose scale. It was
soon discovered that it was transferable to the sca3e insects infesting,
citrus trees. Then followed a period of rapid discovery of the
black fungus and other fungi which attack scale Insects as well as't,-L
whitefly.
The discovery of the fungi which destroys whitefly was made

by Dr. Webber, then working under the direction of the Bureau of Plant
Industry. The development of their use, however, was left to be work-
ed out by the Experiment Station. Later 6ther fungi which infest
whitefly were discovered.
The brown fungus, which is one of the best remedial measures

for the whitefly, had been known for years, however the spore bearing
bodies w:;ich enable the citrus grower to distribute the fungus through

the grove, were not discovered until much more recently. Professor
Fawcett discovered these spores and connected them definitely with
the brown fungus of the whitefly.
The round scale of citrus has proven itself to be a very per-

sistent pest, especially in south Florida. Two years ago Professor
P. H. Rolfs discovered the pink fungus, which proves to be very viru-
lent on this scale insect.









Fertilizer Experiments


The technical work done at the Experiment Station by means

of special apparatus has shown very fully and carefully what is the
fate of the fertilizers applied to the seil. Up to the time that

these experiments were performed a great many theories had been pro-
pounded, but actual knowledge was wanting. The reports to the Flo-

rida Horticultural society and Citrus Seminar by Professors Bair

and Collison on this subject have been models of accuracy and plain

statements of facts as they exist. These investigations give us
the basis for fertilizer work such as cou3d not be accumulated in
scores of years by the ordinary field testing. They show exactly
the amount of.nitrogen, of potash, of phosphoric acid and of lime
that is lost annually per acre through the medium of the water that

leaches through the soil.










What the State has Lost


It is a well known fact raong Experiment Station and Agri-

cultural College workers that the Florida institution is one of the

best training grounds in the united States for young men. A large/

pere-e4tage-of these have received their training here and about the
time they have reached the stage of being able to do valuable work
have been taken to other institutions,-then-aIywhere-elae- in th-

-eountry- In other words it is a fine place to get a good training
but after that training has been secured Florida seems to prefer to
train other young men rather than to keep her useful ones.
Professor Hume was lost from the Florida Experiment Station

to North Carolina, where he went at nearly double the salary he was
working for in Florida.
Prof. H. A. Gossard was lost under similar conditions to Whio

where he has remained continuously Since he left Florida. Prof.

Gossard will be remembered as prominently connected with the whitefly

investigations. He made many valuable contributions also to the in-

vestigations of pecan insects.
Prof2 Blair shortly after delivering his masterly address be-

fore the Horticultural Society was called to the New Jersey Experiment
Station, where he has a position that he will probably keep as long as

he lives.
All of you are familiar with the fact that California took

from us Professor Fawcett, who haad ade himself envious by that State










by his discoveries and excellent work on stem end rot and other dis-
eases of citrus.
A score of less distinguished nen might be named who. received

their training in Florida and just at the point when they were coming
to be productive as investigators they were discovered by other
States and taken away from us.











Our Present Corps


We have at the present time at the Experiment Station the

best trained set of men, when they are taken as a whole, that has
been gotten together. The question for us to decide is whether

we wish to continue our process of educating men for other States,

or shall we by means of State aid be able to pay a sufficiently high

salary to keep .he Ga- e t- Satleno fro, boiag attractive
te-tgeam The men at the Station are -3 working for less money

than has been offered to them at other places, and no man can work
indefinitely under such conditions. It is purely a question of time
until other Stations will have a salary sufficiently high to attract

these men.
B. F. loyd has been with the Experiment Station the longest

of the citrus investigators. He is the best informed man in the

United States on citrus nutrition and malnutrition. In other words

he understands the diseases due to fertility and lack of fertility

better than anyone else t;at could be hired for the work, regardless

of salary.
J. R. Wqtson, successor to E. W. Berger, has made himself

the best informed man on woolly whitefly and thrips and several other

insects. H. E. Stevens has made himself nationally recognized as
the highest authority on melanose and gummosis, ind citrus canker,

S. E. Collison is a specialist in the line of soil fertilization and

chemical constituents Of oranges. P. H. Rolfs has been known for

years to be the best informed authority on withertip and anthracnose.








What We Need t -,- ,/ -


To cope with this situation the Florida Experiment station
needs an annual appropriation of not less than $20,000. The work
in the State is expanding so rapidly that only a very few people
realize what is being demanded. The vegetable industry has increas-
ed 900g in the last 25 years, the citrus industry 400oo and other
fruits have increased 250%. No equal amount of increase in the
money spent for salaries to further the work has occurred.











Can Florida Stand It?


We must answer this question with a decided YES. F3orida

is entering a period of mlparaleled prosperity. No other State east
of the Mississippi River can compare with her and only a few of the
pioneers west of the Mississippi are in her class.
The read justment of taxes in the State allovis the millage

to be reduced by at least one ard probably by two. In other words

Florida is raising more money by her taxation than is needed. No

citrus grower has yet gone into bankruptcy on account of taxation,

but many a man has had to sell out because he could not stand the
everlasting drain placed on his resources by loss from fertilizers,
from insects, from diseases.
Our population increased 42% in the last census decade.

The increase in the present decade will surpass this. The added pop-
ulation call for more attention. If this added population can re-

ceive this instruction from a correct source the increase in value

to the State will be unexcelled. The demands on the Experiment Sta-
tion in the last five years have increased over 500W. It has now
reached the condition where grove inspection and private instruction

is impossible. This condition should not be allowed to continue to

exist.










Experiment Station Staff


P. H. Rolfs, M.S., Director

J. M. Scott, B.S., Animal Industrialist and Assistant Director

B. F. Floyd, A.M., Plant Physiologist

J. R. Watson, A.I., Entomologist

H. E. Stevens, M.S., Plant Pathologist

S. E. Colllson, M.S., Chemist

John Belling, B.Sc, Assistant Botanist and Editor

S. S. walker, M.S,, Assistant Chemist

John Schnabel, Assistant Horticulturist

A. C, Mason, B.S., Laboratory Assistant in Entomolojr

Julius Matz, B.S., Laboratory Assistant in Plant Pathology

R. S. Hollingshead, A.B., Assistant Clemist (temporary)

-Edgar Nelson, A.B., Assistant in Plant Physiology (temporary)

E..G. Shaw, secretary

T. Van Hyning, Librarian '

A. L. Landers, Stenographer

K. H. Graham, Auditor and Bookkeeper

U. Crews, Farm Foreman




2.3


Farmers' Institutes.

Th-,.se were organized about eight years ago and have been
holding Farmers' Institutes in all parts of the State. TDring the

present year Institutes nave been held from places on the shores of
Lake Okechobee to the banks of the PeBdido River. The questions
discussed at these Institutes ,depend entirely upon the desires
of the local constituents. Institutes are held in the smaller
places and for the purpose of instructing the people how to make

farming more profitable. The annual attendance on these institutes
varies anywhere from 4500 people during the first year they were held
up to over 40,000. The amount of good done in this way to tlie agri-
cultural interests may be illustrated by the effect on the corn crop

in Florida. In the first year when the Institutes were held the av-
erage yield of corn was 9.4 bushels per acre, with a total crop of

4,300,000 bushels. Last year the average production was 15 bushels
per acre with a total of 10/25,000 bushels. The average produc-
tion per acre has gradually increased fromyear to year and the amount

of land planted to corn has been extended until now corn stands sec-
ond only to the citrus crop, whereas eight years ago it was generally
regarded as of little importance to the State.
The last legislature appropriated $30,000 a year for this

work, or $20,000 for the biennium. In addition to ti-is z$1,500 a
year was appropriated for a printing fund, or a total of $3,000 for
the biennium.
The value of this work can be understood readily when we re-

member that such questions as the proper handling of the whitefly











the proper handling of scale insects, fertilization of citrus groves

and cultivation of groves are among the topics discussed in the

citrus growing section.







.4. 9


t 7IVERSI' Y EXTENSION


Division. of Tkhivefsity Eltension


Staff


ALBERT A. MURPHRE3, A.M. ,LL.D.,
President -of the University.

P. H.'*OLFS, M.S.,
Director.


0. K.


i .


MCQUARRIE, '
State Agent in Charge of Farmers' Cooperative
Demonstration Work and Assistant in 'armers,
Institutes..


P. SpENCER, M.S.,
Vice Director and District Agent for Central and South
Florida, Farmers' cooperativee Demonstration Work.


E. S. TACE,. -
District Agent for North mForida.

J. J. VERNON, M.B.A.
In Charge-of Agricultura3 Correspondence Courses.

J. A. THACKSTON, Ph.D.
In Charge of correspondence Course for Teachers.


J. M. SCOTT, B.S.,
Lecturer on


Parm crops and Animal JIndustry.


B. F. FLOYD, A.M.,
% Lecturer on Citrus.


J. R. WATSON. A.M.,
Lecturer on

JOHR ; BELLING, B.Sc.
Editor.

B. V. GLOVER,
Secretary.


Insects.


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Inspector of Nursery Stock

Three years ago a 3aw was passed by the legislature empower-

ing the governor to appoint an inspector of nursery stool:. Ths in- *

spector of nursery sock is entirely independent of the Agricultural

College, the Experiment Station, the Farmers' Institute work or the

Cooperative Demonstration work. $3500 annually is appropriated for

this work.

Dr. E. W. Berger, formerly entomologist to the Experiment

Station was appointed by Governor Gilchrist. It is needless to say

that this sum of money is eitire3y inadequate for carrying on the work

as would be most profitable to the State. The one illustration

used lit another part of this paper shows that the citrus industry

owes more to this office than it can repay in many years.to come.

The duties are those of inspecting the nurseries and determining

whether infectious diseases or insect pasts are present. If a nursery

is found to be free from pests and diseases it is given a certificate

to distribute nursery stock throughout the State. If the nursery

stock is not free from such diseases and pests the certificate is with-

held until such conditions occur. The promulgation of regulations

for citrus stock in entrusted to the Board of Control of the University

of Florida. The office of the State Inspector is located in the

Experiment Station building.





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State Chemist

The state Chemist, Capt. R. E. Rose, and the Commissioner

of Agriculture, in whose department the Division of Chemistry is so-
cated have b. th urged. publicly -and officially that the anount of money
collectedffroml the farmers be returned to them rather than covered
into the general treasury. Mr. MaRae has spoken repeatedly in favor
of using this money for the Experiment Station and Farmers' Institute
he places in wnich he considers it ,oould do the most good. Dapt.
Hose has repeatedly in public utterance and a3so in official papers
recommended tnat this be done. The legislature, however, Iraa not
seen fit to do so. A summary of the budget of the Division of
Cheiistry for 1912 shows the fo3 loving:
Ttig tax for Florida /*t-
rertilizers ............. 55.,356.3
Feed Stuffs ............... 31.6.2
Amount collected for
fertilizers & feeds 8.....~.... 82,820.55
i A313 expenditures for col-
ectlng..... .. ..... ... .. a__ .- .

n+ _Turned Into State Treasury $67,563.14-

The Budget for 1913 wou2d show a greater balance covered into

the State Treasury. It is the farmers and more especially the citrus
growers of the State wvtose 3..oney pays the fertilizer tag tax. There

is no question as to the propriety of regulating the sale of fertiliz-
ers and feed stuffs, and we undoubtedly get flndreds of tim.s the cost
from the law providing for these analyses. The point, however, is
that since the farmers and citrus growers already contribute an











equitable tax to the State Treasury, there is no reason why they
6I > 3. J / .
should contribute this further amount of over $6O000 annually.

A reduction in cost of the tax per ton would in no wise give the

grower cheaper fertilizer, since it now amounts to less than 1 /

per ton.




A i *


Farmers Cooperative Demonstration work

This work is carried on mainly from funds supplied by the
U. S. Department of Agriculture, aided by an appropriation of $5000

annually from the State treasury.

Professor C. K. McQuarrie 1j State Agent in charge of this

'Work. He is appointed by the Department of Agr culture with the
advice and cooperation of the Director of the Extension Division.
The Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration orn: in Florida in-

ciudes the Cooperative Demonstration Agents, the Boys' Corn Clubs,

Girls Camnbnr Clubs and Boys' Pig Clubs.
The work is not connected with the Experiment Station but

wi ith the Extension Division of the tinversity, -tt./2.Pir ~OJtc jl

S- Professor A. P. Spencer is District Agent in charge of the

Counties organized in Centra] and South Florida.

Professor E. S. Pace is District Agent in charge of the

Counties organized in North and West Florida.

Twenty-five counties in the State ha ve been organized.

The State and Federal governments appropriate $675 to each County

and the County mrI es up th remainder of the amount. No County or-

ganization has given less than $175 toward the support of the County
Demonstration Agent. The amount given by the Counties or local comr-
annities varies from $175 for the lowest up to $2500. Sn one county

the 3ocal community has raised enough money to pay the Demonstration

Agent $2400 a year and furnish him with an automobile and traveling

expenses. A number of the Counties pay a salary of b1500 or more

to their Agent, but such Counties receive no more from the state fund









than do the weaker Counties Whose agents receive only $800 per year.
The va3ue of this work can be readily understood from the
fact that it 1-3 so highly appreciated by the different Counties,
some of them raising more than 200% of what is appropriated by tle
State or Federal government. cJ -
This branch of the work was first organized throughout
AMbst an d Midd3e Florida and is there best established. The energies
of these agents are directed toward better farming. The County
Agents make arrangements with certain farmers in the County to carry

out lines of agricultural work under their instructions. They give
special instruction how to plow the land, how to prepare the seed
bed, plant the crop, cultivate it, arid finally how to harvest it.
The effects are showing by the fact that the farmers who cooperate
with the County Agents'averaged 28 bushels of corn to the acre. ast
year while the average yield for the State was 15 bushels.












FARMERS1 COOPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK



Staff



RT S. MURPHREE,
Wr R President of the diversity

P. H. IOLFS,
Director for the University

C. K. MCQUARRIE,
State Agent in Charge for Bureau of Plant Industry,
U. S. Department of Agriculture.

H. E. SAVELY, ,
Field Agent, U.S. Department of Agr culture ,. ,- -

S-A. P. SPENCER,
District Agent for Centra3 and South Florida

E. B. PACE,
District Agent for North Florida

AGNES ELLEN HARRIS,
In Charge of Girls* Canning C3ubs,

BESSIE V. GLOVER,
Secretary





/'EXPERIMENT STATION


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Hae the.Zcperiment Station Made Good?

Whatever we may tnIn about it there is no questioning the fact that

FPorda had.the best fertilizer law in existence in the thited' States,

and that eaans in the world. There is nowhere e3se where the con-

sumer has the same protection for his- goods that is afforded to the

trade. The F8orida fertilizer law permits the grower to have his

goods analyzed free of charge, and this analysis not on3y gives Dim
the Information but it becomes rffta facia evidence In a court of law.

In other word it puts the fe33ow who sold him the goods on.the defen-

sive.
When such coaCitions exist there nust somewhere be a cause for this.

As far back as 3889, before States began to think of regulating the sale

Qf sucn goods as fertlHizers, the Florida fxperirm nt Station publ318ed
in its bulletins the analyses of fertl3 izers on the FJoridf mar3:et.

imperfect as this work was when we 3ook at it from our present stand-

point, it gave an unquestioned basis on wrich 3egis3tlion could fornu-

late proper laws. We need not now inquire into the difficulties

surrounding the passage of this 3ar nor the necessity for further amend-
ing it from legislaturee to 3egis]ature. We only need to know that we

have the best law that exists for a33 practical purposes, and we need

to know that this was not an accident, but brought about by base,

fundamental investigation. The early bulletins of the EMperiment
Station were frequently regarded as a Joke. It was found, however,

that among these workers were certain persons whoae foundations had
been laid in scientific research and who had studied in the b st ITi-








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lenattAin n1. 1 ies tna'ned scientist gave s a faotunl tias


- on sd .m 'a est stUt tuMt oud ie .rated .


M TM900 the .Nia permeh t, Station published ai33etri #5 .. giving tes


Sanaaym of bea3ag oS i ers In the State,; incl~ ental:y Vte chi l at

". A Investig -t Od ote r oot proants. Th6 reveations wqre so asta a -,Lt


I;ane that, ao tUtA wa Jost In psasing a reaednably good ragaUatory rar.


sese instances *a alght be MatUpifle Indefinitely, but I wlanB to Oa31


Your attention to tune In passing einoe the aere mention of them will


aSlare you tnat th re are plenty of other good l33nustrtalins
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P. H. Rolids and J. T. Stfbia ase a ooRmmttee to dratt a hortioultural3

lstg for .the State.. This la f hat for tas aia the restrlctlin and

control of the Whitefly as we3l as certain diseases known -to be of

3oa3 distribution and which could readily be circtoMasribe ahd con._

trolled, .Te matter was taken up with tle legislature and a reason-
-t-
S ably good woI7tozg law proposed. The burden of pushing tthis law in

the 2 lgisl nature was placed on Dudadq W. Mdans (Proceedings of the

F3orida State Horti tura3 society, 1895, P. 57). The bill was

never enacted into a law and F3ordla f ailed to grasp the opport.tiLty

for making the best out of her great misfortune, The value of sich

a law that would have regulated and ristrited disease and insect

posts, cannot be over estimated.
















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tiaon are te one's thaat go ot a of print first







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jern^t S.teott to tnm ,. r To tre p yat year it has run sale-B


*Iere in WtOe a fetgh aIft Ofa, tsety *t Umsna lettersa,giinIg ntor-

natfon wn dr1o#At inqn rife rega ltg some particular phase or phases


ot our BnIorld agrflc1atur? Six years ago it was an easy amatter


for one ateooarapher to ab a3l of tai work and tiA e 'are of he Boo


retary*s offiRc at tWe asae tire., At tht present time it seems that

wtti.s perscs aonstancty ermp3sred are barsly able to 3teop up with


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Disroveries rMae ay the Iore of te erxperluont Station.


Probably the soat reamerative and important single piece
of work done was that of standing and introducing the fumgi which con-

tro3 the white2ly of oaltrus. No other solentista have given aore

than passing attention'to this phase of the work. T'te 7 oXrk done by

wr. Berger In ferreting out the behavor of the whilteny in tie fied,d
the btearior of the fungus and the inter-re3ation has been printed in

a number of bu) 3etins. It has beeoore so icn of a general know3edge

that the average vaan acaroe2y kaiows who is responslb e for tne. basil

and painstakinf work that laid the foumdatlon of this investigation.
Tt la imposaible.to.ietimate the benefits 'ierived from tais

work, The value to the Stat's 3iat year mast be regarded as beingW not

less than half a mii21on dollars., This can be gotten at somewhat

definitely by knowing tie distribution of the hitef3y, the amonmt of

damrae it would normn33y do ain then deternniing tlie actual damage t

did. Private enterprise ha stepped in and' Is upp2ying. ithe fungi

wienever needdl and a3so treating the groves whenever desired. This

can road13iy be contracted for at the rate of 2% per tree, and the work

done by private enterprise has been thoroughly satisfactory. To do
Sa sattlfactory work with contact inseeticides wou3d require the ex-

pendTit ure of approximateLy 25C per tree.






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Otrusa can3ar


A31 of thm ltrusa. growres of the State sl'ould be entirely

family ar with-th appearance and destructivenees of t-ie new disease,

Xnown as citrus oanser. This was discovered by Dr. E. W. Wrger,
State Nursey aIspector, who is not an officer of the fxperiaent Sta-

tion but in work 4St in c3ose harnoy .and cooperation with the Experl-t
Smerit Station officers. About a yoar ago in meaning his tour of in-
Apection he discovered what appeared to be an unc3asdilfied disease.

Speoimens were imxaie ately submitted to H E. Stevens, P3-urt'Pathilo-

gist of the Fxperiment Station, who foimd the lesions wore somewhat
unusual, but aince it was apparently of no economic inqortance no

direct attention was paid to it. 6 pecimens were submitted aM to the

U. 8. Departime t of Agriculture who 21ewise seemed to regard the

matter :Ls of no great importance. Dr. Berger, however, found on his

later visits to the nurseries that the matter reanly demanded careful

attention. Professor Stevens, therefore, took it up earnestly and

proved after several months worK that thiA disease was tranalisaible

and very dlfflcult to handle. His later investigations have sPown
a
that it is very per'jistanttdisease and one that spreads. with eonsidier-

able rapidity. As soonaas a suffelent amount of exact work had been

S done an t; is disease to warrant drawing con3cusions .n1d giving out
information, Bulletin 322 was pub)tO sed. The State Board of control

,i m'.diately authorized Dr. Berger to mace a tour of inop otion through
A3abama, Milssiassppi,' ouisiana and Texas. The results of this trip

show that the apprehension felt by Professor Stevens In -eard. to







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' the, osl s s of this disease were wel founded. uiiediate steps


have teen 'tame to rally strppYss this 41iease. Should these meas.a


-ares prove suoessfrl the Value to the Oltrus industry of the State


will be suoli as to be saw bZrunrede of times in exces of the cot


oi maintit&inng the service Should this fungus be turned loose in


the S tat the In oations are that it wil2 prove een more serious


than the sat or whitefly,




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Diseases and scale Insects


The red heaLeds whngoh destroys scale insects was dis-

ooered ]ay Prof. P. H. Rolfs In 3 89 or about that. tir1e. This nmats

S the begi 1tng of a new period in the' hands3ng of oal3e insects in the
FPorida citzas grove. Up to that -time m attempt Pnd been made to

Sdisseminate the fungi which prove so helpful 1r, the citrus grove.
At that time thered headed fungus vas found on San Jo:3e sca3e. It was
soon discovered tnat it -was tran terableto the scae insects ilnesting

citrus trees. Then Mo.owed a period of rapid discovery of the

b'acr fungus vnd other fungi wrich attack 3ca]3e inects as wo33 a':

ritaefy.
The discovery of the fuigi wlich destcrys.whitef3y was made

by Dr, Webter, then working undeor tVe direction of tlhe Bureau of Plant

dInustry. The development of their use, however, was Jeft to be work-

ed out by the Experiment Station. Later theirr fungi which infest

whitefly were discovered.
The brownl fungus, which Isa ne of the best renedial nensurea

for the witefJy, lha bee, known for years, however the spore boarding

Od ates w ich enable the citrai grower to distribute tie fungus through

the grove. were not discovered until Mach more recently. 'Professor
Pawcett diseovertd these spores and conneot d their: definitely with

the brown fungus of the whitefly.,

Tne round scale of citrus has proven itself to be a very per-

sistenm pest, especially in South Florlda. Two y-ars ago Professor

P. H. Ro3fa discovered the pink fungus, which proves to be very virt-
lent on this scale insect.




, -- ;" : .' -.
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Pertlzlur E xperinenta ,


The techanca3 work done at the Experiment Station- by means

of speoal alpparatou bai. ahon very tU3ly and carefu3ly what Is the
tate of the fertljizsr appltedf to thae s6il. Up to -tie time that'
these exerlments were perrormn a great rnany theories lad been pro-
.
poucned, but actual knowl]edge was wanting. The reports to the Flo-
S rida Hortlc.3 tura3 Society and Citrus Seainar by Proressors Bair
ankd Co3Ison on tris nbjeidt have been oodels of accuracy ani platn
statertents of facts as they exist. These investigations give us
the basia for fertilizer woro such as oou3d not be acmumlilated in
scores of years by the ordinary f1e3 testing. They saow enact3y
the aunount of nitrogen, of potash, of phoaphoric acid and of lime
that is lost annually per aore through trie medium of the water that
Isaches through ite soil,






















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at the State has Zost


It ls a Wa ] 0nao fact Tamog Eperioent Otation an3 Agr1-

cutural o033age vooer C that the f)orida institution is one of the

beat trainti grounds in the tVited States for young man. A larger

percentage of these are received their -training here mnd about the

time they hae reached the stage of being at] e to do valuab3] o wor

have been taken to other- institutions, than vaywterf6 e3se in the

country. In other words it is a fine place to get a good treating

but after that training has been secured Florila ser4ms to prefer to,

train other young eman rather than to Keep jier usefi3 ones.

Professor Rume was lost from the Florda riila x ent Station

to North Carolina, were he we nt at nearly double tie sa3ary he was

working for In F'orida.

Prof. H. A. Gossard was lost under similar conditions to -hio

where he has remained contllrously bince e left Florida. Prof.

Goeard wll3 be remeniered as prcaineantly connected with the wiitefly

rinestigations. Ie ta de many valuable contrilbtions also to the I n-

vestigations of pec.n a insect.
Profl mair isortly after delivering his iasterly addrees be-

fore the Hortiou3tural Society wa.. can ed to the New Jersey Experiment
Station, where he has a position that 'be wl]3 probably keep as long as

he 3ives.
.AJ3 of you are familiar wit. the fact t that Cafornia took

-from ts Professor Famwett, who had uadle himself envious by that ntate














. .
S y hsS. exl ,a ias dPa3t wXc an .stAm and rot ad other ldie

w!geu of aitxue.

A moore ofea i stIngUW4ite a at lg't be. narad who received


their training in s I eida aep aJt at the point Wval4 thMy were coming

to e productive as an-a-eatgators they -were disoov rod y othar


states an taJ~:n away.-ro us,



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Our Pesaent Corps

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We have at the present time at the SEperimlent Station the

best traint set of M. when they are taaen as a whole, that has

been gotten together. 'Me question for us to decide is whether

we w in to continue our process of ,educating men for other States,

S or saba3 we by means of State aid be a 3e to pg a sufficient3y high
salary to Keep the salaries at other St.tions from being attractive

to tnem. .The men at the Station are aJ3 working for 3ess money

thwan has been offered to then at other places, a d no mvi can wPor-

indefinitely urclr such condition. It is purely a question of time

until other Statlons3 vq33 have a sa3lar sufficiently Difh to attract

these rmn.
B F. Foyd has been with the 3r3eriment Station tlh ]Jonrest

of the citrus investigators. Hle is the best informed r.nn in the

United States on citrus nutrition and malnutrition. In other words

he understands V ite diseases due to fertility nid lack of fertility

better than anyone 3lse t .at could be hired for the work, regardless

of -saary.
J. R. Watoon, successor to E, W. Berger, has mioe himself

the best informed 'man on wool3y whitefly and thrips and several other

insects. Ti. Stevens has mael himself nation a3y recognized as

the highest authority. on me3anose and gummotm i, "bad oltrus Canker.

SS. E, Col31son is a speelalit In the line of soil fertilization and

chemical constituents Of oranges. P. H. ~3ofs has been known for

years to be the best Inforned authority on withertip and anthraonose.










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to Oopq wiith tilS. %liMttOi thU Florida tsqeraIst tatiatI



.* eds an w a mma .pr iatti. nt es n tAn o20.00, rT wft



S-w sOtate 1* exanetas so ,W lay t3at only av1y faw people



rMaIe what 8is 'ieng a at. The yvgetaz3 e inaustxy Ias increas-



e 900% 4tn' tit ast 25 yeama,- twe attrus nluftrWy 'o00O% und omeir



fruAts ar" Itnereasd, t5% ira equal amount of Increase in tfe



an' Wpent for s3aries to further the work baa oc u ea.
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can Florida steOa It ?


-We'mst anafar this station with a decided TIr, flortda -

tI entering a, peri'a of uapara3l led prosperity. No other State east
of the Mislsaim l rr an com e with her aa compare wr a only a, fnw of the

pioneers 'west of the idsalssippi are in her cass. .
The read justmient of taxes In- the State a3'rs the ndJ age '

to be reduced by at east one and probably by two. In other wotias

Florida is raising more money ly her taxation than in need. No N

oltanis grower has yet gone into banikrptny on account of taxatdaon,

but many a iail as had to e33 out because he cout1 not stand tfe

drwer3 atnig drain pl2oed on ias resources by')ose from fertillizers,
from insects, from dtiseas s.

our population increased 4 % in the kant o'msus decade.

The increase in the prarehnt dec;ae w1l3 surpass thin. Thle abdeda pop-.-

ulatlon oa33i for more attention. If this added yopuiation can re- A

celvTB this instruction from a correct source the inoreane in value
to tne State wil 'be unexcelled. The dernmds on the Experiment st-

tion in the 3ast five year have increased' over 500%. It mhas now
r-ached the oondition where irove.insfpectlcn [aBd prs-ivte instructions .

Sit Iposrsiibe. This connditiao siot'ld not be af3 Iwed to tozitinue to

exi st. .



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FarmersO Institutes.

Th- se were organized about eight yars- ago and have, been
holding armer.-' Institutes In aW3 parts of the State. ] f:ring the
pnsent year Xnatitutes- ,.av been held from places on the shores of
Lake Cechoabee to the banfs of the Pamlido Rivor. 1Te questions
discussed at these Institutes .deperna entirely uTon the desires
of the 3oca3 constituents. Iostltutes are he3d in the snaler
place and for the purpose of Instruct ng the people how to mane
farrVming ore profitable. The annual attendance on these institutes
varies anywhere from 4500 people during the first year they wero held
up to over 40,000. The at mount of good done in tVi,- way to the agrl-
culturam interests may be illustrated by the effect on the corn crop
in P3orlda, In the first year when tie Institutes were hedt the av-

era.e yie3d of corn was 9.1 bushels per acre, with a tota3 crop of

,300,000 bushes. Last year the average production was 35 bushels
per acre witl a total of 30,25,000 bushels. The average produc-

tion per acre has gradually increased fromyear to year and the amount
of 3and p3canted to corn has been extended until now corn stand a sec-
ond only to the citrus crop, whereas eight years ago it was generally

regarded as of little Importance to the 8tate.
The 3ast legislature appropriated $30,000 a year for this
work, or $204000 for the Mbennium. In addition to tilos $1,500 a

year was appropriated for a printing fimd, o a tota3 of $3,000"for
the biennium.
The value of this work can be understood -readily dien e re-
member that such questions as the proper handling of the whitefly




C::



















** ,
mand aoatllatim of groM4 are ani&g the topics diroused Iin the

alm gran eaasawatunA




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v~nrers ooperat re 2 wlenstration Work

T~hi worX iQ Earnied on ainly from f~el Er supp3~ d If 17 fe
U'. 8, Departrfmnt of Atsoawb3'tura4 id ced by i nappropriatIon of $5000
a, -aally frc- the State treaMuary
Professor GC. Cartrie 1T State Agent in cr~h.rre f V',

rk'ov. iQ iR app&ontad by, te e spartmnent of Agr' nature rith t"e
Sarice and oo-operatlon of the Director of the Extension Difgion.
Th FParmars' Odoperativo Dewontration 7-rkT. in Fnorlda tIn.-
o udes the Cooperative PDefaCmtratji'n &Aents, tbe coya*s Corn Cubbi;,
Glr]s ,.annont C3ubs and Boys' Pig7 C3ubs.
The work is not oonmected wit!. the experirmnt Station but
with the r tii&sio n Divlslon of the inteorsity.
Professor. A. P. Spenrer is District Agent in charge of the
Counties organize d i Central and South Florida,
Professor R. 8. Pace is District Agent In charge of tlhe
Counties orFNirLea in North arnd est P3orira.
T.venty-flrve coiutes in thee State ha ve been organizol.
The State and Federa3 govowrnmnts appropriate $675 to each County
and thle County i~nces up the remainder of the oaount. No county orm
ganization has given less th4n $375 toward te support of the county
-enmonstration Agent, The amnoimt given by the Czntlcs- or 3oca oaom-
Mnalties varies from $375 for the Towest up to $2500o, In. Qn county
the 3o',al conuity has ralsedi eougl money to pay the DonnMstration
Agent $2400 a year and furnish ri with an automobile and traveling

expenrm s. A numibr. of tVhe. GComties pqr a salary of $1500 or .Rore
to their Agent, but such Countias receive no More from the State fun




7" ",
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4. 4
than do the weaker cuimties whose agata rwelve ni3y $800 per year.

Tne.-aliae of thrrf wort can be readily understood from the

efat tiat It isa o highly applecated. .by the different Coomties,

some of them ralIng More than 200~ of what-iis appropriated by the

State or Bedera3 governsaMt.

his bfranon of the wo X was first organized thronugout

West and Ml1dd~ e 3arlda and is thare best established. The energAes

of these agents are directed toward better' araing. The Ccounty

SAgents make arra;geraent with- certain farmers. in the County to carry

out 3 lines o agrlcnltural world uraer their Instructions. They give

special Instructon- how to plow the lana, how to prepare the seed

bed, p3ant the orop, Eultivate it, and fian3y hlo to hartest it.

T rT effects are showing bly the fatt that the farmers who cooperate

Switp tthe County Agents averaged 28 bushel3 of corn to the acre J.asti

year while the average yle3d for the State was 15 bue 3as.


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WJAR 't COfwmATIvE IfOMSffmATION WORK


Staff


AT2EZET 8, tUERPIEB,
President or the Oilveretty

P. H. i O 1F.
Pirie--tor for tre Universi-ty-

n. *. BmCqTIARRT1,
State Agent In tiArge for Burtma of .Plant Inllustry,
YU g. Department of Agritoulttire. ,

H. R. SAVELTY,
3?ie3 0 Ag;ents U.8, Sfepartinent of Agr c tuare

A. P. SPEXNCJR,
District Agent for CentraJ sMnd SaOUth F3orial

E. S. PACS,.
District Age-nt ror North iPorlda

AGQS EIVRN JAPRRIf, '
In Charge of OGrl Cmanning C3ubs,

s5mss V; mtLO'R .
Secretary


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h .v Agricultural .xperaient Station was founded lry an act of

cOnigrnas in 18,18. t. is. approp ltea to :reach. State in '"a t .ion

$35,000 to -s spent for vesar tigating rra prolb3enm. .A urther_

al propryation of $t5000 was 3 after nbae by the FPederal treatsry. h a 4
fund a arising from this source anu t be- used for investigational work.

Th.,y oP snot -e-applied to holding f.rrners' Institutes nor for the

carrying on of the fara Demaonstration work, nor for teaching punrposea .

In the Agricilitura3 College.

TUe last legislature appropriated $3000 to be uned for the

imTrotenent of laboratories, improving the Wbu3dlng, 1nd itlilding

roaas and fences on the.Rxpeirimnit Etat on grodsa at Gainesvil3e. ei

A further sum of $4000 wio appropriated for the conetruItloi: of a :

a ltIy bo=rn.








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-t
erzmatm Station Starf


P, H. Ronr, vi,E.,,Director -.

J. J, Scott4 B.n., Aniniaaa Imastria3.lst and Assistant Dirootor.

B3 P. pJ3oyd, A.M., Plant Wyyo3ostogSat

3J R. aitson, A.1t., itoan3og1i3t

H. E. SteVens, M. ,, Plant Pathologist

8. T. Co33ison, .., Chemlat

Joi Be331ng, 3l,8c., Assistant Botanist and Editor

s. 8.. ;aa3:or, M.S., Assistant Chemist

Jonm Safmaoel. Assistant Horticulturlst

A. C..~asoni, B.,3.. laboratory Assistant in 5Entomlocgy

Julina Hatz, B3.b, labolatory Assistant in Plant Patho3opy

SR. S. ioli3ngsheatB. A.D., Assistant Chemt.st temporaryy)

3Bdgasr Ne]son, A.B3. Assistant In P3ant Physloaoiy (temrporazy)

E. G.. S3hav, Seoretary

T VAt I i mgtag, Lltra.iap.

SA. L. Lanraes Stenographer

K, 4trathnn, .~A Itor and Bookkeeper-

S Crews, Patrm Forema

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fLpertor of mJrasry Stoko

Tlhee years ago a 3wA was passed by the legislature en power-

ing the governor to appoint sa insaector of nursery stock. Thm rIn

Speotor of .nursery took its entirely lnrependent of the Agricu3tural

College, tshe tperiamnt Station, the Fara&ers' I stltute morR or the

cooperatlve Demanatration wor:. $3500 atnmua33y is a- 7ropriated for

this wor:.

Dr. E. W. Berger, formnirly entonoAolmst to the riexptrrinwt.

Station was aTpointed by CGoernor Gi3onrilt. It i19 n ,ed3eas to say

that this sum of rmney is iltir3)y .ina equate for carrrilngt On tOhe woK

as would be -moat inrofitable to the Statea Ti e one 132u3tration

uase in another part of thif paper shows that the oitru3 industry

ower3 rore to this office than It :wan repay in ..-;y yo.rs to cone.

The duties are tlhooa of inspecting the nursgerles i-nd. deternining

Whether Infectious dliseass or insect p-sts are preoset. Tf a nursery

is found to be free from pests nd diseases it is give.i a certificate

Sto f .ittrltbuta -rrse.ry stoco throIughot the State. If the nursery

stock is not free froitm wsch diseases and pests the certificate is 7lth-

he.d until sifnt conditions occur. The promun, Oation of regulations

for citrus stock, in entrastel to tie Board of Control of the University

of Plorida. The office of the State Inspector nl 3ocnted in the

iEperlimnt Station building.









*; A.




-* .- ,--,
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Agrloui Jtra' College



Tho Agricu3tlra Co3le-o at the TWnversity of F3oriea is a

speiraate doll03ro in 'the tiDverlsty Th!e corps of prof s:wors are h red
for tneir pspeolal fitn~noG for teaeling witrk. The'. .1ve their entire

time t tteacingl arnd are free ,rom aM InveetlgationaS or extension

l work.' Their duties are oonfined to the carjua or tre Tnivernity.
At times it 1i posf1bl3e for certain members of tih Co3e.ge of Agri-

cu3tiure to tV1-e part it' the Farmers' Inltittute w r3t a n in State' arxri

cui2tura3 meintn.,',- biut there can be attended on3y when the teaching

worry ,ra13 n6ot be neglected. b so dolinw.

'iThe ^Agricv3tura clao3 e is manntalnel enti'-oly on 1Ve'era3
Lin s ju. t frr the rnuniz aep menGes. A 3]an grant frnd front ConrreaB

in the early sixtlea formed tne iasis for the Agri.cutural Co32lefe.

fron this fund S are received an na.3ly.

The lorrl.13 3lnd is another arrropTriation from the U. s.
treany. me in 1:'9.- This amounted to 25.o000 anmua33y but it has

to be divided equaJ3y between the Agricutura3 .Colleae of the thlver.-

*ity .uan tVi e Agridultura3 Co)31ee for negrows at Ta32ahassee.

The Ne i3on Fund is another approprlatioi front -the TU. 9. treas-
S ury amounitlng to $25,000. one-ha3f of wr Ich Is' set aside for the negro

_fco3ege .QI! tVe other wI3f for tie Agricultura Colle.ge at the phi-
varsity.

The 3ast legialature n ~~ an arproprlatlon' of fl5,000 fr the

blemnilu to equip 'a stock fara 3 laboratories, and Iri other ways linprove

the teaching faclitles of the Agricultura Colle,-e.



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fkLot'EIst


or Of wortiAmtaure


c< iw, z W1aomiw. B*Agr,,
L lrofesstor of Animat 3mbatwary sand air yl

0. aK. mQaRIs, L i'
.-Fofe saor of Atgrtc u trai etens ion

Ih D3, 02I5, 3341l,,
IEastruetor n IotrzY and wisterioalogy

J. 7P,' DMGAPt, Ja., B.s3,
.Instructor fit Sonf anAl rertl 3zear

0. A. WLAJINI,
AsUistaant In 0orrfoena Ince Courses

SAlLSR SI. ,WP1i, A 4. Ph-, -4
Ptrofesaor of WTlish tangtage and4 Literat

E. R.. PLTROI, 3.S..f Ph..D..s U.^D,
Prot''ft-ir or ohemist.y .

JAS. R. AlERSOMlt, NLA., PhD-,D.
-ronfonsor of AnOient T.Iguages


C. L. CROW,- H.AS.
Prof i;s


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~r ofS Modrn la~nguagest


L, nr R L n Rs,- Tllh..*,
Professor of Slstoxy and- teoncintcs

, S. DAVT3, P1t..D.,
Pro nRfor -of 7,00log0y mAd tonm3ootyr

H. 0. KRPP7eiL, A. r4 Psh..D,
Profransor s ?artherttlca ratt Astrrioryr


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-resi^et at' atni *tbtafitaV


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RARWR IL Ox,.C A.Ls Tl3Z,
PaoteseotP- at ShtosoiP y


3n W. MICNIolZ A.flA t
Iroforsor of


A. G, MUMLOTOFR, .
farm votel~a


aamstetay a3uotxtion iLsetbhoda t: Mnperiltsiaon.


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utate- OtvuajO Capt( A.AL aise, and the comran giOsPL

..o Agral tayreo Wl ineas dealertmBnt t Vi MXition or chf istry sla r-
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cti h,. b th2 tr'ot '-. Y, O4 Of towly that the. :to t o.fmoe.

S3.eateatfrom'r< the rairabi bar turned to them mtrer th covered

:ati- the ''gaat~i ate .o .st. e3t, iae a3s e, l mpa Trepate my in rwort

of traing this moaneg for tie BperlarmItet Station ruid farmers' Institute

She piaooes in .w14o?i h QCnmaidee -it would do the rost Mood. pt,

R nose 1s repeatedly In public utteranie aMi al3o in official papers

recorwanred triat this be aone. The .lerilattura, ]orrever, hian not

o;es9n fyt to do aS* A .mwwvay of tne uadget or the DVismon ofr

OChoirdstry for .192 2 rsows te for Jorwing:

Tig t.px for P36rid a
; orti ers ............, 3
ve. s* tare ,..............., ^^ .Sl.

SAzount ol-ftedo for
ferti31ztrs A feed .... ...s.. f 0.55

A 3 exmmati tures 3opr n o3-
3 Octif5t%. ..... .... ... ,.. .t..X, jiJs aL

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|Su. Trnted into State Treaury 667563.0:1-


SThe Ldssget for 1933 IrVmC sto V a agrtetr ba3 ance covered into

the 'tate Treasmurnr. It in th0 franr6 v-3d ftre
growers of e S;tate it ose one prwey tte fertnizer ttrr tax. Thnre

Is no question as t tthe propriety or .rep3 Ai.R t1 Th rplr of feril1t,.

aers and'f crN stuffs., rtn3 we ntisoafted3y got mniAredtv or tit' t.ie ost

flroma the law providing for these analyses. Tho point., however, is

hat aIne the aW ol gwes a r y contribute an


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EZt4Wta tax {to tue State T 7.es42y, there is no

.adt4a contribute this fiwther t*oRtt Of. ove r 6.
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.A raonti n In cost of t ta perJ tan would In n

grower Sflnpor nrtli i E, z ir c: ft nms awmts

.- per ton,

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reafion wtr tZy

,OOOG annually.

Dro WIA3e give the


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1ral tterit
<5merua2i BStnsonit


(5) Tie Inspector Nof tray Stock irs sfppo-rtoda 1j ~ ppropria...

tion from the !tate treasury of $3,5000 for 3913. The duty of the

Nurse y In. eator is to vaoit the nuarerics and give certlfloates of

inspection to those marserfla that are frte frrom d:Mserous insects

and diseases.

(6) 'The State C1exiati, not connected directly or t Alrectly with

the Unlyeralty, but a Bureau of the Department of Agriculture of the


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-lhe vrlroum 4desartlnts of tie Waiversity of 13orix a ortnry

on. coordinated wor? elpetaljy An the ln" of agriculture.

Te Arlti taEra 0o03flege lg Maintained onmtirAy from Pederal



(3). faan3lty BIve wI3 of their time to eduicationa3 17ork.

(2) M3e AgriOulltu ra zxri!ment station rcrl*v. a.3 of its

ftmdei ror runing s exprnses from, the Frleeraa- tren'wry. Thl StEtf dOr-

Vote s t tiLTie to *-vestigatlona3 .or. dvantaneonus the Crlcun-

turists o t e Otate.

(3) The Divirlon of E*Xtnlon In the TUniverRity3 gueo its tL -to

tel (difusinr of aprictnlturtl 1Ino3 dgfe ;rVong the T'eorlo of the ntate

and in g'yvilnP Inntn.ction to Jocnl farmeri3o vri .dortiolturlats.

About $;o0,100 is GeyjiVOd from the Federal Treas riy 1nd 5OOO la appro-

priated by tl-o S.tate 2og ri3aturo.

(1) .The parmer?' In)ttuiteso are suprrortcd froln fund s aplropriatei

by the Peoeral treasury, anounting to o10,O00 in 3913. 'This TInaney

Its spent. I dn IvriL Ject-rooa,. 110ioi.iLg Piaroiter' Institates in varl-

iss parts of the Stte4, In rtunniig agfioultura, trains .-6tr wror2r of

that %-nd.


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$tat* of artd isa s attwnrses y Wftate 1arr to analyse all rerti

S*. r foods, rfoo prao duts ad oandie~ ts.

Front the. atovd genera3 5tatement It will be sen tat no ne

of these different di4#lsir s mover 2%i one another maid' that there la

abfl Aet rie3p for further externstli of any one of taiemn
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ione o t e o. a-y one f them.



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: -E XPE -NT STATIONS.
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OafiLfornia
Florida
Georgia -
Illinoes
Louiatanaa
MissieinLpl
Ohio


U.. 'App.

.30, 000
ao,oo -

o30,000
30, 000

30,000

30,000
30,O00O-.


Total -
69,439.8S :,
169,3715,0 0-
:S3,83.69:
42,0o51.17 4-
236,040.33 -
7J
86,150.1$ :
80,549.89 .
411,675.35 '


Mi41sc, oluni inolutis maonooy from iale- of
tax on fe:tillizr t% a, inspection, foes and other iteIms,


s.r-m products,


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S- ate App.


- .s5,av75s.oo

Wone
620.81
171,482.84
24,500,.00
33,150.00
193,500.00


Miso.*
4, 4?.00

S.,ooo.oo
,8365.co0
11,430.3
.34,5 i7.49
31,8o0. I6
17,339.?
188,174 .5





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- experts .' t t es Non
Agalutteltg Golh- (5nacin ) None

Agrnliatrai C0anlg0r4Atprmen}t 00,O

*pa ratln Pemon sitattoa -. -5 000
Fnarnits.inaTtitute .

tt e Inapeoatoa Nursary, Stock S -. -
ai


S--- ----a"


Perqsonas aij loyd 1. 14.


SExpurtaimnt Station

Agrioailtual. Oiage
Copaeftiva l Deiton-strdte t ;ark
F arm fs Institute


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Odneral Statemrnt

The fol3.vwng Tarioua'epartnents of the t-iivcrsity of F30-

rtda carry on coordinate work In teit line of ar iota turo. *
( ) Thw AgrIona1 tuz l Collaefe is strntalned entirely from
Pederal. E ndea The fwntity givo a2t of their time to teaching rmorl

"' ,tneu e.
S-. (2) The Agrionltura. 1 xnoriment f"tatilon receives a3 o' its i
Tfi.sfor nnng sgtpenaee farom the Pe4OeraL -Treasmy, The ~ ta fr d.e-.
votne itst time to arcicuturas InvBesti atlaIonal w^ortk.
(3) .1e0 DivialOn of Ettension gloves al3 its time 'to tie dif- "
fuaing of a rtgou tural olto3edge runnMg the p'Top3e of the 'tate nnd.
Sin giving itntruction direct3y to farmers ani rorti.culturists.

About $20,000ooo i dertved fro:ii the federal Treasury and A500)0 is capr- a.
prlateW yT thee ..tate legsaature.
(.4) 'Te Parmers' Institutes are minrvolred froin fum's f rl ro-

' printed ly the Vietern3 Treasqpy, lunwoting to ;:3 0,0W in 1933. 'ni8s
roney is penrt in holiling PFarners' [nstitaites in vXrlous parts of the
State, in rnnunin ,: agric3ttura3'ttr.ins, mni6i world: of thit ]:id3. >
(5 ) The dtice o f Inspector of'Nursery Stock i.s supporteU by

appropriat.on from the State Treaflsry of 03,500 for 3 913 ThO duty
of the Uratsery Inspector In to flsit th nnuere -en'id give cortifi-
cataes of insrection to those nur'erler that are free fror dano' rorus
nAocts nd3 disease. .





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State C2emlt ,

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i ,it o- Anricoulture of theO rate nf fPlord a. e is wtl'orlzo lHy a

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