Resolutions, Petitions, Briefs - Miscellaneous, Folder 1

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Title:
Resolutions, Petitions, Briefs - Miscellaneous, Folder 1
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Writings, Speeches, News Clippings, and Miscellaneous Papers
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Box: 23
Folder: Resolutions, Petitions, Briefs - Miscellaneous (Folder 1 of 2)

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Everglades (Fla.)
Okeechobee, Lake (Fla.)
Okeelanta (Fla.)

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00000150:00017

Full Text

W1-D CONTROL iSi-OPIlTAON. pLC-,
A 216 218 COM AU BUILDING
VEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA







STATEMENT RELATIVE TO EVERGTLDES FLOOD CONTROL MATTERS MADE
IIOV. 5, 1929, AT WEST PALIM BELCH, ON BEHALF OF THE FLORIDA FLOOD
CONTROL ASSOCIATION, BY F. L. ILLLJ PRESIDENT.


Page.' INDEX TO SUBJECTS.

1. The EverglaCes compared with a factory needing strengthened
foundation and transportation (flood control and navigation).

2. The interest of the United1 States officially admitted; preco-
d.jnts must be followd'L; prior to enactmrnict of legislation,
revised Engineers Reports are necessary.

2. Engineers reports nonv on file, not yet adopted.

3. Present supplementary report hurriedly prepared, after
193 storms.

3. Items v:hich should be reconsidered or reviewed.

4. Plans, when adopted, binding on Florida as well as U. S.


II. DETAILED RE.SOIIS WHY JETDNENTS ARE SOUGHT.

5.- Now facts; correction of fi,-ures which have bo-un submitted.

5. Navigation promoted by enlargement of canals.

5. Diverse viers of Engineers on levee construction and costs.


III. TTHE WASHIIIGTOU SITUATION.
6. Status of bills pending at last session.

6. The Caloosahatchee project.

6. History of "The Drane Bill".

7. Terms of "The Drane Bill."

7. Precedents.

8. Navigation investments justified.


IV. LOCAL INTERESTS ANALYZED.

8. Interested parties; who are they?

8. Improvements; investments made; public, semi-public and private

0. Port and Harbor improvement investments.

10. Corporate inveatuents in agriculture and utilities.

11. Recapitulation of invurtments for improvements.

11. Lsan ov'nership.

11. Citizens of Everglades and surrounding region.

12, Florida Flood Control Association, representing 125 organi-
zations. Re-dedication, and re-affirmation.


E



















INT IiOAUCi LONI


The present status of Xverglades reclamation and devel-

opment might well be compared to a modern giant factory building,

with all needed raw materials available and with machinery to man-

ufacture that raw material, but standing on a temporary foundation,

and reachable only by foot-paths.

Permanent strenjthenini of the foundation must come from

carefully prepared plans for adequate control of excess_ waters,

faithfully carried out.

adequate transportation will only come from complete

utilization of available water routes.
These are our two objectives, and the best method to

achieve them challenges the most earnest thought and justifies

the utmost efforts of far-seeing thinking men.

Forty million dollars have already been invested in

drainage; millions have bean invested in roads, schools and similar

public improvements; millions have been invested in agricultural

and semi-manufacturing enterprises; additional millions have been

invested in development of ports, largely intended to handle the

commerce of the Everglades.

These investments justify and require installation of

adequate works for control of floods, and enlargement of canals

and waterways to provide transportation from the river. l;:ces to

tidewater.

When these two necessary objectives have been attained,

all South Florida can develop, and probably will develop by leaps

and bounds, and the Everglades will truly be like a great factory

creating new wealth for Florida, out of Florida raw materials.


i.1


I P __ i__ I __~ _





-2-


INTEREST. OF THE UNITED STATES:--For the first time in the history
f the Everglades, the interest of the United States was clearly
brought out at the last session of Congress when, at official hear-
ings, official statements of United States Engineers were made that
the Everglades problem is not a problem for Florida alone to solve
but is to some extent also the problem of the United_.tates. It
was further admitted that financialr.ontribution by the United States
Iin necessary engineeringYxpenditures is justified. Such works as
the United States does share in iwill be based on p3Aqs made by United
States Engineers and under supervision of Unitedtates Engineers.
After this far-reaching admission, Florida interests are justified
in seeking to bring about a f.ir gi.vision of costs between the
United States and local interests.
The extent of financial participation of the United States
will be governed by precedents set in similar cases which have
arisen in the past, and will be based on the merits of the case.
Law and precedent require Congress to consider two things
in connection with appropriation measures. Those two things are:
First: Guiding reports from the Enginjaers for Rivers and
Harbors, setting out the physicaltructures recorm.ended, together
with estimates of costs of such structures, plus recommendations
for division of those costs.
Second: Due Consideration must be given the precedents
already set in similar cases which have arisen in the past.


PENDING REPORTS FROM E2I;PT BS:--The Engineers for Rivers and Harbors
have made two reports which are on file, one dated April 2, 1928, O('.-
and a supplementary report January 31, 1929. The second or supple-(,, t,
mentary report was called for after the storms of September, 1928 --
had made additional studies desirable. Taken together, those reports
will constitute the controlln-GLtide for Congress in engineering
'1mlatters an,'engineering plans, unless amended. Piior to enactment
of legislation, they are subject to review, or revision. Close
study of the case convinces us that some of the work should be
done entirely at the cost of the United States; some should be done
at the joint expense of the United States and local interests. All
future work, however, regardless of the source from which payment
comd~" must be in accordance with plans of the Engineers of the
United States. sak aaw,

PENDING SUPL::-:ll~:2; ? REPORT OF iEGINEERS:--It is no secret that
the second or supplementary report of the Engineers called for on
December 6 and 7, 1928, and filed January 31, 1929, was hurriedly
prepared and the conclusions therein contained were hastily arrived
at.
Before final approval is given these reports by action of
Congress, certain amendments or corrections should be made. This
is of such paramount importance that your Executive Committee feels
that the first step which should be taken is to arrange for promptly
securing such amended plans.















-3-


AIlENDED EUGINEERS REPORTS:--Only certain items of th-so reports
should be reconsidered. Reconsideration can be accomplished without
dulay because a physicalsurvey is notnocssary. Those items which
should be ruconsidorod are as follows:

(a) Expenditurem orjotoforo made by local interests, ro-
sulting in bmnofits to rnaviLetion, flood control, drainago and rec-
lamation, which should properly be taken into account in determining
the amount of credit due for work already done by local interests.

(b) Review of the present physical condition of certain
large drainage canals, including b\est Palm Beach, NevwRiver, Hills-
boro, and M1iami, and estimates of costs and results from their
increased navigability.

(c) Report on a belt-line canal or channel, generally
parallel to the slore of Lake Okeechobee, and its advantages for
navigation when created in connection with levee construction.

(d) Review of the various plans for flood control dikes,
with a view to arriving at some plan and cross-section which wT1l
give adequate protection at a costless than that entailed in
the exceptionally costly-plan proposed by the former Chief of
Engineers, 1.Major G.neral Jadwin.

No valuable time will be lost, for all necessary data
and information is already in the hands of the United States Eng-
ineers, or can be supplied -romptly, so every item enumerate here
can be considered and conclusions drawn for further reports.

Congrps is to convene in regular session on December_l.
In order that action may be expedited, your Executive Committee has
had a suitable resolutiono.repared for passage by the proper Com-
mittee of Congress, and now asks that this action be approved.


UNITED STAi'ES ElGIlNEiRS PLANS MUST BE FINAL PLaNS:--The Legislature
of 1929, in creating the Okeechobee Flood Control District Board,
clearly fixed itu powers and its limitations. A provision of the
very groatcstmraportance is that upon the adoption of Engi~nering
plans by Congress, those plans become the plans of Florida interests.
II.

DETAILED REASONS FOR SEEKING AIfUIDED ENGINEERS REPORT.

HEW FACTS ABOUT LOCAL EIPEIfDITURES:--One important witness offered
at Congressional Cornittee hearings early in the present year to sup-
port Florida's claims for credit for expenditures made testified that
the total chargeable to navigation only amounted to $2 000,000. The
same official, when questioned about those figures sta'i- privately y
that they could be increased to $O000,000. If credit is given for
this amount, local interests will gai_ over $.t000,000 on this item
alone.

Other testimony was given, and the statement repeated, that
total..yxpnditures by localinterusts for all purposes (including
navigation, reclamation, irrigation and flood control) amounted to
/ r u- only j.,0)0,000 as a basis of credit sought. Based on prQgq ent
set by calculations made in a similar case, the correct figure should
have boon stated as being in excess of 35,000,000.
















-4-


If not corroctod, thoso undorstatjomnts will makQo.Decssary
a matjril, incrasce in the sun roquircd. of local intore-sts when
calculating a division of costs of works of floodcontrol, for
cho customary mother of calculating is to determine the totaLp..ost
of the nrojc-ct fror t'h b'.i:mnin; to conleotion. The total cost
of the entire project is theo divi iod It.'Jn par~ es at interest,
U and credit is allowed for wor: already done, in determining the
amount of unpaid balance.


ENLARGETENT OF CaNALS FOR PUrPOSES OF T7AVIGATION:--The improvement
of the West Pall Beach, Hillsboro, NForthL .Tw river, and the Miami
Canal (or one or more of then), .vould enable shiugers around Lake
Okeechobee to rea4li salLtater ports more readily, and vould result
n large savings for shippers.

Local interests will be best served if in such review par-
ticular regard is given first to the subject of N~r:'ia on, ,/ith
Flood Control wor2s created incide.gally, following works of navi-
6ation, instead of putting flood jg rol v;o s ahead of nav tion
interests, and subordinating navigation matters. The reason i~
this order of consider r-aion is this:' Te"" "being the general custom of
the United Stattes to contribute 10% for works of navigation, and a
lesser -ercent for other works (such as flood control works), if
the Undied States will first create the necessary works for naviga-
tion, the sum than necessary for flood control is lessened because
material left after excavation can be uTilized toward the necessary
levees for flood control.

If exception is t,.ken to terms of this final amended en-
gineers report, testi;any can be offered Congressional Committees
to support such claims as are not allowed by the engineers at the
same time as testimony is given on such natters as can only be de-
termined by Congess itself.

OTHER E7lGINE :RING QUESTlON:--Out of a total of $10 740,000 proposed
To be expended by present reports, levec_.onstructlion alone am.cunts
to C01,0 00. T1Le type of construction for proposed levees (cII.
the resulting costs) is a matter which should be considered only by
engineers. On this point, there is a wide difference of opinion
between the Army engineers themselves. Levee construction cost
was first set, according to planss of the Engineering Board of Review
.t q$80'J00; the United States District Engineers modified those
8 plans and revised thom so the cost would be $3. 190,000; next higher
j7 :authority again modified the plans, and revised the cost to $5".Q0,00C
1- On final review by General Jaaij.n in his capacity as Chief of Engin-
eers for Rivers and Harbors, he overQpde the views of all-F.ibordin-
/ itcs and substituted his own plans, aV a propos'ea cost of $9.100.000.
Passing from discussion of the engineering plans, it is
well to review briefly the recent history of Everglades matters
as they have had attention at Washington.















-5-


III

STATUS OF CASE IN WASHINGTON:--All Everglades reliefills which
were pending on The calendar d e.d with the conclusion of the regular
session which adjourned March4, 1929. The special session has
been limited to consideration of certain subjects, and those subjects
could not be made to include Everglades relief.

CALOOSAHATCHEE PROJECT:--On receiving the first report of the En-
gineirs, the Co-iittee for Rivers and Harbors considered its terms,
and inserted in the proposed Rivers and Harbors Bill a clause
authorizing the Caloosahatcheq .oject, which would involve a con-
tribution of $620 000 by the United States. However, no Rivers and
Harbors measure was passed at that session of Congress, and that
authorization was somewhat jeopardized if not entirely lost by the
later introduction of a measure again covering the Caloosahatchee
plus the Evergladogproject which woull'have included that item.
This measure was referred to the Flood Gontrol Comr.ittee.

HISTORY OF THE DRANE BILL:--The Rivers and rbors already had up
an appropriation measure in which the CaloosahatcheeProject re-
ferred to had been recommended for adoption. The Chairman requested
the Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors to make for his
committee an amended or corrected or m.l. completa.eport. This
request was made December 7, 1928, but was preceded on the previous
day (December 6, 1928) by a similar.raquest to the same Board of
Engineers for Rivers and Harbors, from the Chairman of the Senate
Committee on Commerce. The Drano Bill was referred to the House
Committee on Flood Control, insfad of the Rivers and Harbors. The
immediate result was hat no further consideration was given by the
Rivers and Harbors Committee.

,TERTS OF THE DRAKTE BILL:--Out of a total of $106000,000 which was
proposed by the TDan-eBill to be expended for Tuture work, one-half
of that future expenditure was sought from the United States, and
local interests were apparently offering to provide Ta) the other
1alfl, plus (b) the cost of rights-of-way, plus (c) the perpetual
cost of maintegange, and (d) credit would not have been Jt~JT for
large expenditures already made by local interests, beneficial to
the general scheme.

Final analysis shows that this Bill amounted to an ogfer
by localinterests to put in $5000,000 for new work; to make an
annual contribution equal to the int..ust on $4 ~00000, set aside
for that purpose; with no.aredit for approximately 8.U 00,0000 ox-
penditures already made, beneficial to navigation, (plus the cost
of rights-of-way). This would have meant a total localantribution '
equivalent 17 000 to to match j3.00 .00 of the WTT States. '

This sort of a division of costs did not then, nor does it
now, appear to us as even a.proximating in the least degree a proper
and just vision.















-6-


PROCEDET S:--To arrive at a proper division of costs, precedents
muCt be followed. It should be borne in mini that 1 hero Navigation
alone is involved, the Unitjd btatjs generally pays the untirg~o ost.
Full advr.rntagu should be taken of this fact so that credit which is
.secured for work already _dono by local interests may be applied
against the local contribution which is r-ocuired in Flood Control
projects.

NAVIGAT101I INVESTfME7:TS JUSTIFII D:--The engineers official-reports
credit the possible Tocal annual savings to coi-merco afteA: install-
ation of adequate works of navigation and resulting development of
the Evergl ades as being moretian ,.0 00,000 per year. Quoting
from Docuzacnt -., 70th Congress, first session, paragraph 109, C(jWf)
thi statement is made by the District Enginear that:

"The estimate of savings (over $2,000,000 per year) indi-
cates that the United States, together with local interests,
might be justified in exponL ing as much as Q27.000,000 toward
the provision of crosssRtatc navigation for this territory."


IV.

INT5RESTED PARTIES:--In ordor that due regard may be given to the
various local intesrsts to determine stops that will result in the
greatest good for thu greatest number, and to show the magnitude of
investments af-fected, and the wide spread of interests, some analysis
of present investments has been necessary to ltuirmino the question:
"What are those interests?" For that purpose, improvements are
listed in four groups:

1. The general public investment, represented by roads,
bridges, street improvements and public buildings.

2. Public, seni-public and private investments for re-
clamation, drain.ge, sub-drainago and irrigation, which
have been paid for or are a liun against the property
in proportion to its ownership--(except that School Lands
are exempt from all taxation for public improvements).

3. Port and Haibor investments made by local interests
outside the boundaries of the Everglades (plus some con-
tribution made by the United Statos in two instances).

4. Private iand corporate investments in agriculture,
semi-manufacture and public utilities within tl'toEverglades.


INVESTMENTS BY LOCAL INTERESTS, PUBLIC, SEMI-PUBLIC, AN PRIVATE:
Taking only the largest item of such investments, those by counties,
districts and cities, for roads and bridges, street improvements,
schools :Ind other public buildings; investments made by public,
semi-public (such as Everglades Drainage Board), and private or cor-
porate interests, for drainage, sub-drainage, reclamation, irriga-
tion, and engineering works which have reat otontia au for
inland navigation, within the boundaries o -the Everla`es alone,
(but including to their termini roads buiT.Ie to leand
Soujg the Everglades), -th.tol
l -*-**"_V~a *o, ihl h~tbudre o-t? vr1Z-~~aoe













-7-


arrived at from the following calculations:

Hard-surfaced roads, including bridges and
street improvements in towns and cities in-
side tie boundaries of the Everglades; 200
miles at $35,000 per mile,--- ------------- -$7,000,000
Other roads, including bridges and streets
in towns and cities inside the boundaries
of the Eve glades not yet hard-surfaced;
100 miles aW$10,000 per mile,--------------- 1,000,000
Public buildings, such as schools and school
grounds, court-houses, etc., serving only
the people inside the boundaries of the
Everlades, ----------------------------------2,000,000

Engineering works providing drainage, sub-
drainage, irrigation and reclamation; first
cost only, with upkeepsnot included----------82,000,000

Other engineering works primarily intended
tor drainage, but chargeable to navigation
if used for navigation; first cost only,------8,000,000

Total investment in the items mentioned,-----------50,000,000

INVESTMENT IN PORTS AND HARBORS AND ONE WATERWAY:--Nearly
$20,000,000 has been expended in~ improvements to fiveharbors
largely intended to serve as outjts from the Evergladeq.Zegion.
These are: The harbor at Miami, which is reachable from Lake
Okeechobee by the Migl Canal; Port Everglade"located between
Hollywood and Ft. Lauderdale, which is reachable by two canal
routes---one the New River and the New River Canal leading from
Lake Okeechobee; the other, the Hillsboro Canal and the East
Coast Canal; the Port of Palm Beach, at West Palm Beach, which is
reachable from the West Palm Beach Canal leading from Lake Okee-
chobee; Port Sewall at Stuart, which is reachable by the St.
Lucie River and Canal leading from Lake Okeechobee; and the Port
of Fort Piurce, which is reachable from the same canal and river
plus the use of the East Coast Canal, which is shortly to be
purchased by local interests and turned over to the United States
for improvement.

To this investment, the United States has made some contri-
bution for improvement of the Port at MiY4 i, and will zancf 7Tbute
to the enlargement of the East_.fast Canal, but no., uds of the
U United States have ever gone into either of the three remaining
ports or into the canals leading from Lake Okeechobee to these ports.

Drainage canals, easily made useful for navigation, leading
from Lake Okeechobee to those ports for which local interests have
paid (or are in debt) bring up the total investmentfor port facil-
ities and water transportation in the District to $25 000,000.

Utilization of canal and port investments will follow the
adaption of these canals for barge operation. If this is not done,
these portinvestmenbs already made are fujtie insofar as being of
benefit to the Lake Okeechobee_,ection, and the canals are useful
Merely for drainage.

( [( .C ;\-r~ uk V.


I














-8-

CORPORATE InVEST1METS IN AGRICULTURE AND UTILITIES:--Large corporate
investment is represented by the thousands of acres of sugar-cane
now growing, and by sugar mills (one mill being the largest single
unit in the United States), and by other similar corporate invest-
ments in agri.cult'ure; three_ailways, (all leading away from
the- Everglados and nearby tidewater ports instead of toward them);
public utilities, including power and light, telegraph and tele-
phone, and other public utilities. Not including lands, the in-
vestment of settlers and of corporations engaged in agriculture and
semi;ianufacture, plus the investments of utility cerns, within
the boundaries of the Everglades, is not less than $~j0 000,000.

RECAPITULATION OF IVEST.IENTS FOR IIVMROViE?:ETS:--Not including
lands o-r .eal e .esate, ;nvsr.rt in..i aents alone are not
1 4 F h ^ ..-',lQlL.. W The permanent value of this immense in-
vestment is greater or less in proporTion to the successful con-
tLJl of fl2.ds and the enlargement of navigation facilities.

LAND O'JI'TERSHIP:--IIo statement is made as to the value of land in
th. Everglades, for land values are necessarily dependent on com-
plcte protection against flood waters and the enlargement of
transportation facilities by vwaer. These two accomplishments will
naturally be followed by increasedlr clamation, withirrigation.

The subject of land ownership should however, not be
passed over without saying that 8Q_,of the Everglades acreage is
in the hands of private and corporate_ owners (where formerly it
was 100% State-ovwne- and the interest of tho Siate has been re- /J -
duced to a point where it hoq;i only 14 of the area, in trust for 4
application to future reclamation, anT i in trust for the benefit
of the State School Fund.

CITIZENS OF THE EVERGILaES REGION:--There are 40 Q0 people living
in the Evergl-ades who are depeiLant on agriculture, directly or i
indirectly; agri.u3 ture can be carried on successfully in coinoc-
tion with successful protec,-cn from floods. Ths veryA-Uves of
those citizens are undanaxrad by uncontrolled Lood water, as are
also their invest4ants, which usually represent the entire fortunes
of those settlers. Added shipping_ facilities by waterways which
can be made available will be of immense benefit to the development
of the region.

The welfare of nearly 20Q,00 othoeaditizens of the region
who do not live within the boundaries of the Everglades is bound
up--in the developmonm of the Everglades; indeed, the veryproperty
of those outside citizens is subject to a small annual charge for
Everglades development, under the terms of the Florida Flood
Control Act.














-9-


IM CONCLUSION.
FLORIDA FLOOD CONTROL ASSOCIATIOiI:-- As has been shown, the interests
are very large, and varied. Representation of the bulk of these
interests is vested in the Florida Flood Control Association,
Iby resolutions of over 125 of the organizedcbodies in the Ever-
glades region. The Florida Flood Control Association was formed
for the two distinct puposes of (a) securing financial participa-
tion by the UnitodJStos in the project, and (b) of securing the
adoption of a well-balanced and complete program or plan of en-
gineering works. To attain and retain its" sanding as a semi-
official representative---ropresenting no special interest, bu~G
all the various interests---the Association has declined all fi-
nancial sup ort from private_interests, and n-i+s finaaiife u tL


Your Executive Committee fully realizes the sole2nity and
magnUudre of the obligation it has undertaken; no'effort has been
spared, no expenditure of time, and no personal inconvenience, has
been allowed to interfere in the past, nor will it in the future,
in unselfishly seeking to bring about a right and satisfactory
concision of the work undertaken.

When this has been done, we will feel richly rewarded if
by our earnest efforts we have done our bit toward raking of the
Everglades a saf _jlace to live, with a better opportunity for
our citizens to earn the rewards which will surely come with the
developmRnt of the Everglades and the forward stride of Florida.
IOn this basis, and no other, we solicit the approval of our pro-
vious efforts and the endorsement f -our intendedplans as here
stated. --


I II I



















RESOLUTION


At special called meeting of the Florida Flood Control Associa-

tion at West Palm Beach, November 5, 1929, attended by repre-

sentatives from each of the twelve counties bordering on the

Everglades, the following resolution was offered:


"WHEREAS, report of the Florida Flood Control

Association has this day been presented at this meeting, and

discussed freely,

BE IT RESOLVED THAT the report as submitted

and the plans as outlined by the Florida Flood Control Associa-

tion are hereby fully approved and endorsed,

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the officers of the

Association are hereby authorized and instructed to prepare

and present at the proper time and place a resolution asking

for an amended or additional Engineer's report, as outlined

in today's statement,

BE IT RESOLVED FURTHER THAT copies of this report

be furnished,_ach of the 125 organizations which has heretofore

endorsed the aima of the Associgtion; interested newspapers;

each interested Senator and memboX of Congress; and each member

of the Everglades Drainage amd. Okeechobee Flood Control Board."





Upon a vote being taken, the above resolution was adopted unan-

imously.


















PARTIAL LIST OF FORMAL RESOLUTIONS OF ENDO RSEMENT BY ORGAI IZATIONS

ONLY (NOT INCLUDING INDIVIDUAL EMDORSEIENTS) RECEIVED BY THE

FLORIDA FLOOD CONTROL ASSOCIATION NOVEMBER 1, 1929.



Avon Park Chamber of Commerce
Bradenton Chamber of Commerce
Bonita Springs City Government
Boca Raton City Government
Bartow Rotary Club
Canal Point Chamber of Commerce
Canal Point Methodist Church
Coral Gables City Government
Delrpy Beach City Government
Eau Gallie Chamber of Commerce
Everglades City Government
Everglades: Board of Commissioners of Collier County
Everglades Community Church
Eustis City Government
Ft. Lauderdale Chamber of Commerce
Ft. Lauderdale: Broward Drainage District
ft. Lauderdale City Government
Ft. Myers City Government
Ft. Mayors Chamber of Commerce
Ft. Myers Civitans
Ft. Myers Rotary Club
Ft. Myers: Board of Commissioners of Lee County
Ft. Pierce City Govornment
Ft. Pierce Chamber of Commerce
Ft. Pierce Rotary Club
Ft. Pierce. Kiwanis Club
Ft. Pierce: Board of Commissioners of St. Lucie County
Ft. Pierce B. & P. Women's Club
Ft. Pierce Women's Club
Ft. Pierce Parent Teachers' Association
Haines City Chamber of Conmaerce
Haines City City Governmmnt
Hollywood Chamber of Commerce
Key West Chamber of Commerce
Key West: Board of Commissioners of Monroe County
Key West Women's Club
Kissimmee Chamber ao Commerce
LaBelle City Government
LaBelle Chamber of Commerce
LaBelle: Board of Commissioners of Hendry County
Lake Wales Chamber of Commerce
Lake Worth Chamber of Commerce
Lake Worth B. & P. Women's Club
Lako Worth Exchange Club
Lake Worth Rotary Club
Lake Worth Lions Club
Lakeland Lions Club
Lakeland City Government
Leesburg City Governmnit


For balance of list se.e C her- ido ae -hhi sheet.















Page 2---Fla. Flood Control Assn.

Manatee Chamber of Commerce
Manatee City Government
Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce
Miami Boach City Government
Miami Beach Lions Club
Miami Chamber of Commerce
Miami City Government
Miami: Board of Commissioners of Dade County
Miami Civitans
Miami Greater Airport Association
Miami Greater Industrial Association
Miami Advertising Club
Melbourne Chamber of Commerce
Moore Haven City Government
Moore Haven Baptist Church
Moore Haven Masonic Lodge
Moore Haven I.O.O.F. Lodge
Moore Haven Parent Teachers' Association
Moore Haven Women's Club
Moore Haven United American Club
Moore Haven: Board ao Commissioners of Glades County
New Smyrna Chamber of Commerce
Ocala Chamber of Commerce
Ocala Lions Club
Orlando Chamber of Commerce
Orlando City Government
Okeechobee City Government
Okouchobee: Board of Commissioners of Okeechobee County
Punt-t. Gorda City Grov'crrue~nt
Punta Gorda Lions Club
Punta Gorda Rotary Club
Palm Beach City Government
Palm City Drainage Board
Palm City Farms, Fruit & Vegetable Growers Union
Pompano City Government
Stuart Chamber of Commarce
Stuart City Government
Stuart: Board of Commissioners of Martin County
Stuart Izaak Walton Loague
Stuart Civitans
St. Augustine Chamber at Commerce
Sebring Lions Club
Sarasota Chamber of Commerce
Tampa Chamber of Commerce
Tampa Civitans
Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce
Vero Beach City Government
Wauchula Chamber of Commerce
WUauchulG. City Government
Wauchula Lions Club
West Palm Beach:County Real Estate Board
West Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce
West Palm Beach City G ermnent
West Palm Beach: Board of Comrissioners cf Palm Beach Co.
'u st Palm Beach Rotary Club
West Palm Beach Kiwanis Club
West Palm Beach Booster's Club
Winter Haven City Government


- -sr










E LPING OL f.DIS DYwILOPM-N'T AND AGRICULTURAL PR1WA?1ADN'5.

1. AGRICULTURAL PRI2,R3%).WDWS:--
Pressin. need of.-- ile should feed 1) Allies-- 2) Amerioca
peop3 F ( in general)--3)Q1R9fl YES
DaSner of 3OOD WMORTA3a an d STARVATION. ( See enoloaed mose.)
This especially true oD people lirvin out of %tn cans.
We should use all Tavf1.ible land:
Much lind in Se.Fln. used only for winter trucking.
Uan't wgi t for t.li. Must g et busy NOW.
TaU3T ?WR lVSY8GLAD3 ;3.
Upper Gl,1des iin t et condition for use now. nut
two e-ttl-mPnta in typioni saw grass,Vis.,0lndecresr s and uleeln@ ntR.
OladaCrest in difficulties. Okelanntn tih ons most flop-.ful community.
LorG.-ly tV' work of' Ttos.w,;.'lil.LWlO is loe)ad upon. a tri. in-in stny,nafn
leader or cne oomuuni Ly.

. II. \1! 7IT,, ;l3-DO#Ni-
Il 1 '11- T "I IT,!, '1, 3 D ON .:-
1;. 1) js work-c ouju Znj. un-, priotic'o1 Pl-ai o f 'Jettl.,mrnr'-t and
.e Development. Tri, .YruitoreOt -Pln.. )
2) liae pioneTrra.nd in still pioneering~,l tVei very Iheart
of tne Uporr G"lWJi wsaw grasi country. H' 'Ii sor ii tjiioldest innabi-
t-nt. Tuey Iiandle problein peculiar to Vte rr-eapon lt first hLild.
3) Ran conducted jxp.;rimenttil Worvik lis ldr frm'ingcwith
vie- of lernir'i wli':t Lo do n~d how .o do Il.
4) Hs, exp-riaented wiuvi fxr tractcor nnu moIonusry, -.o
e lrn ho- to hnndl-L work in b1g,eff etive wny. It:a nnd grer t *truerl3,
Snu, is no-' seeing lafgit aHead.
5) nns been one ot ian factor. il metdlni uroas-satto ro'ad
Sfroni Painii jeaora to t.fiayeri3.
6) nUo helped mrameriilly ;i ouildin,; up Okeel'nta ettlm'-ntm
Thi-i now; includes, wrinere only saw ir;I.qs was found wiai ne.Do,~Eii):--
Stor ,P.O., HotD., 3che03lTown Hall.Notary Of oic-,c9kre
Shop, nrb-r ShfopT3o,.rding House, Sunday -:onjo.l, Co-per"tiv' As n,,two -nn-
r Tlupruurit Antsa., tractors, ann m-'clhinery,nmid mafln oultivj-td lnnu.
ha88s n-id t hii OomnL.umit'Gy tVLe u;3-i : JRICGHT 3POT .etwa-en
LauderaRle and JLjrk, Oieeohaebaee
7) MS PA.ID X.I.BO'R.0 .YOL 1.1 Ix iCSGHITI-eS 0 L'-N! OUT
S OF 16 CONTRA.CT D YOR. ( Leavlng 5 yet Lo ua p-id for.)

III. TIT '"IL', 1 N7O'? DOING:--Ia pl-'ninlnw to enga-ge,in l;inrge f.dieot-
ive wrly, i actual FOoD- RI31N(;.
1) 1) In dairy line. ( 3ee Dairy folder, na.) In in con-
ere srnce and ocer eapond -no0a witji ;.etiv-,praotlonl dilry and oo'? people,
S aria receiving much encouragemene.
2) L- risnl of staple I;y'b.e;iinjing at unoe. Tal 3
in line wit orali of Presidet o1U..1,and U.IS.Dpt; of ATriculture.
:s ( See as.encloseda.ent to papers tni3 waeekr-- "* Small oWe Pnc ltuine?" )

IV. TH V LU 07 o UCH '7OK:--
1) To tue Peoplme--T'rny must'nrive foAd. Bread riotd nfvs
already occurred. Tuese many boomte noute in thE. douth, e peolally in
lin.,where suplie. :ar~ e so lnr.Y shhipped iji,and fr,3ight o rm moy Lne
*uff'ic. -- Ti 20,000 GladeSs buyoru need nAlp in lea-niiin. nLu' Lo iLniCdlt.
tiinir purcJIasaes.
Q- 2) To tii I.I.5o'ird:









2) tothe .I.$e~dto

on aw r4se 1-dout -on -aesoeand 4*1a tn. 1is4470
-inspet 4ot r ,e ., at-t t t ) lk Aa s oloda grdas


to Knu ne Alosrtono h in ;fLa botag 3od 14


xnw tnalt i don whish- ,bend1%-A%1T aed ral

i suh land.( rtahv at Oakd not Only 1,0 apets u
tn.e Z qp*rd it 9 Af fo Vetn ortl s W Am" f#and," Sw oems
provo- tnil -, I d to Q e a pes td. w. sdigi

d z:vvl opwn t viork#epcalynwi W1R W~Tne r ntma d o
thi a, Inatedt yaeas to ao dry VAle ndreaon: tU4age



ro odr a 'con-tislue- an p hdw1peta fo-Istg.Hr



3 andal ,d -wrea All prjc. th ithi wi 1 rt too wraki Wd
gut. ,n a Oesa l ZU saw !ras *taljmen-t, OX *-Orat mm.
're-o twi weula meaw- s an tmo ara s and, prob"-l~o A*I

Vi Wth tm v 16owever an ti, t oppruiyt otnedvl
PIT;entt rqis i tvl ma b x-pctd

-et --aPsevtlf. a
'Vre' et t 4 tOtt L ih t Amsle pyal baatos

-4) -der;.onstr _sift-ano n es-t e -4w l
ap~~~~~~~~~ ties ausasaoet a ll ll
In the wodste rosayeut Mil proj l ,eu In
Alpaster ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~O ftx ()*Ipdtant4hips$aedeeom elterpQlrise
while~~4 oalo ie94 su p awtit t0 114 01%ato, mnd work animmes
900vn n h aeUpe,1ds thta
IWO'



conr .0, to Y*=n retlne Oh4 _Uh~ai h g nwihtsaegd
N~~~~~~~~~~~e~~~~ XerAGSaesweeM. 1, gd :* 1aeta o




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To Representatives of the U.S.Government,
in washington,D.C.

About twenty years ago,some 20,000 people,scattered all over the United Ste--
er,,bought and paid for Everglades lands.

Upon these lands,and under Florida's sunny skies,many of these buyers--as
assured could be done--planned,soon,to make their permanent homes*

The treatment accorded these intending Home-Builders has been unpardonable.
Reclamationtransportation,and other essentials of rural life,have been with-
held from them till this day.

Save to pay taxes to aid competing interests while,usually,theit own lands
lay untouched,except by devouring wild-fires,their rights,and even their exist-
ence,have been ignored.

In the present,Nationally-aided improvements--Flood-Control and Cros's-State
navigation--the same rule is applied.

nus robber taxes,without benefit,but ever-mounting,have been heaped upon these
people till now,because of recent non-payments,and under laws barring redemptions
their lands are menaced with wholesale seizures.

In consequence,these buyers,for 20 years excluded from their fertile fields,
and deprived of the interest on theltr investments;and plundered by oppressive,
non-beneficial taxes,are now,at last,being despoiled of these very investments
themselves.

Even more ominous,this withdrawal of their lands,by Everglades giants as well
as dwarfs,from the tax-rolls,with inability of State ooards,and unwillingness of
the State Legislature,to pay these ta)es,now menaces the financing of the Flood-
Control plan itself. WHO WILL PAY THE $2,000,000.00?

The bearer,Dr. Thomas Elmer Will,of Belle Glrde,Florida,is an Everglades own-
er of 22 years standing. In 1911,he founded the first Everglades 'arming Asso-
ciation(operating at Davie);and,in 1913,the first planned settlement in the
Upper Glades--Okeelanta. He is a jungle pioneer;and,fr6m the beginning,foremost
champion of the rights and interests of those earlf,neglected buyers.

Likewise,Dr. Will toils tirelessly for Evergl.ade flood-control,reclamation,
transportation,and settlement by Home-Builders. It is to further these ends
that he now goes to washington,D.C .

'7e,the undersigned,hold proxies from many of these old buyers. We hereby in-
troduce Dr. Will to you,and urge that you give him a careful and sympathetic
hearing;that justice may,at- last,be done these long-suffering and deeply-wronged
people;and that Everglades flood-control,navigation,reclamation,settlement and
development,in the interest of all concerned,may not--as now threatened--miser-
ably and finally fail;but$instead,may promptly proceed to a certain and suc-
cessful conclusion.

Yours with respect, (, { I (y $ -

f. /Y/> U' .

S- ------
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"CONSERVATION" EDITOR PREDICTS EARLY

COMPLETION OF DRAINAGE WORK


In a recent interview
Will, editor of the Conservation
glades drainage project.


in the Washington D.C. Post, Dr. Thomas Elmer
Magazine, had the following to say of the Ever-


"When these lands are reclaimed they will be so rich, it is estimated,
the products produced thereon will be large enough to support a population equal
to that of New England, New York and New Jersey.

"The work is being pushed forward at a rapid rate," he said, "and the
engineers in charge say it should be accomplished by January 1, 1912. The recla-
mation plan has been agitated in the State for many years, and the present policy
of drainage is the result of plans formulated by J. 0. Wright, of the United States.
Dredges are at work draining the 'glade and converting them into a veritable
Garden of Eden.

"The forest service also is taking an interest in the work, for it
believes that the eucalyptus tree, which gives one of the most valuable woods in
existence, will grow to perfection in the region to be reclaimed.

"The government has sent Raphael Zon to investigate more thoroughly
the conditions of the soil for the production of this tree, and, that he will
report favorably, I am certain.


"From all over the country, people have visited this
wonderful region for the purpose of learning for themselves its
sibilities. Summer weather prevails continually."














"oo


immense and
wonderful pos-









BULLETIN #4.

Chicago, Jan. 16, 1909,

TO ALL OUR REPRESENTATIVES:- -

We have just closed a sale for a large tract of our land, which will probably
stand out as the most memorable sale in our.entire campaign. The buyer is Mr. C. A.
Walsh, who is the personal representative of William Randolph Hearst, andKo was in
complete charge of the famous National Land Congress recently held in Chea.go, and
which was attended by fully one thousand delegates from all over the Union, including
scores of governors and various other notables, representing the highest talent
throughout the United States.

Mr. Walsh's work in organizing this great Land Congress extended over a perioC
of several months, during which time not less than 1500 or 2000 land propositions were
brought to his attention. At the annual session of the Congress he listened for an en-
tire week to the various appeals and eloquent descriptions of "fertile soil, delightful
climate, etc., etc.," as portrayed by the many representatives from every section of
America.
0
After due consideration of our proposition, which was presented originally in
only a casual way, he decided to make a purchase from our Company,which was in competi-
tion with every other Land Company in the country. IF THERE IS ANY MAN IN THE WORLD WHC
OUGHT TO BE IN A POSITION TO SELECT THE BEST LAND, EITHER FROM THE STANDPOINT OF A HOME
OR AN INVESTMENT, MR. WALSH IS THAT MAN. Too much stress cannot be laid upon the signi-
ficance of his purchase from us.

Nor did Mr. Walsh confine himself to a personal purchase of 40 acres, for
which he paid one-third of a year's payment in advance; he interested his brother-in-law
as well, Mr. H. M. Viele, who has had five years' experience in operating a banana and
sugar plantation in the tropics, and who is fully acquainted with the wonderful soil
fertility and climatic conditions of the Everglades. Mr. Viele purchased 30 acres and
has closed arrangements for an additional 400 acres for his friends, who will join Mr.
Walsh and himself in the operation of a large plantation in the Glades.

I know this will be interesting news to all of you. Mr. Walsh has expressed
* -his willingness to have others know of his purchase, and you are at liberty, therefore,
to inform your prospective buyers accordingly.

Yours sincerely,





Vice President.
(Jan. 16, 1910.)
P. S. We have just been informed that Don Farnsworth who was actively
associated with Mr. Walsh in the management of the National Land Congress, and is also
the chairbgn of the "Ways and Means Committee" of the Chicago Association of Commerce,
has made a large purchase in the Everglades. The Miami Metropolis in reporting the
transaction says: "Mr. Farnsworth is decidedly enthusiastic over the Everglades and
S says he believes that section Will eventually become one of the most productive and
profitable vegetable growi n sections of the world." These arn but examples straws
that show which way the w~Ai is .blowing. Of ALL men Mr. Walsh and Mr. Farnsworth cer-
S t.inly should know the best. ladr buy j!ia .sw.. S. There action in this matter
.peaks louder than any praise ue could J-~tow u\on the Everglades.


















Sedalia, Mo., August 12, 1909.


Mr. A. D. Hart,

Kansas City Mo.

Dear Sir:-

I have just returned from a ten days' trip making a thorough invest-

igation of the Everglades. The proposition is better than your literature

paints it. I have bought five of your contracts and am advising my friends

to do likewise. I have been a civil engineer all my life and am willing to

go on record as saying the drainage is only a question of labor. I would not

give ten acres of improved Everglade land for the best 160 acres in Missouri.

SIf this letter will be of.any assistance in getting some one to

invest $10.00 per month in what I consider the best proposition I ever saw,

you are at liberty to use it.

Yours very truly

C. H. ZOLL.


- '~ "`


.,< I







T. A. WINFIELD,
ORANGE AND GRAPEFRUIT GROVES
AND VEGETABLE FARMS AT
LITTLE RIVER. FLA.


Little River, Fla., March 4, 1909.


Mr. Fred G. Perkins,

Kansas City, Mo.


Dear Sir:-


I have your letter of February 25th, asking a statement of my
experience in farming on the edge of the Everglades.

In the thirteen years that I have farmed here I have never
lost money on a crop but one season. That loss was from a flood in
February. Drainage to lower the water only a few inches would make
that land safe.

The yield per acre and the gross returns have varied greatly
from year to year. In growing tomatoes, my best crop, where I
staked and pruned the vines, was about one thousand crates per acre,
and the best where I did not stake and prune was eight hundred and
twenty-five crates per acre. Under normal conditions I get about
four hundred crates per acre, with gross returns of $1.50 per crate.
The cost of producing, packing azd delivering at the railroad is about
sixty cents per crate, varying, of course, somewhat, with the distance
from the station.

While I have had gross returns from egg plant at the rate of two
thousand dollars per acre, and peppers at about the same, conditions
were unusual, and my average returns on these have been about the
same as tomatoes.

I have a grape fruit grove of thirty-five acres, and find that
on the low lands the trees make the best growth, they are free from
-cale, and make the heaviest and brightest fruit.


Yours truly,


T. A. WINFIELD.





9 4


I






Miami, Fla.
'i-
March 8, 1909.


TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:-
I came to Hollandale Fla. 16 miles north of Miami,
in Dade County, and bought 160 acres of land two years ago.
In 1907 I averaged about 240 crates of tomatoes to the
acre on fifty acres and made a net profit of $13000 on tomatoes
alone.
J. B. WOFFORD.


',t




- ---^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


4 9







Miami, Fla., April 28th, 1909.



Mr. R. J. Bolles,

Colorado Springs, Colo.

Dear Sir:-

Mr. Walter Waldin, of Miami$ is the owner of Fernview Farm, and a
recognized authority here. He is a practical, and one of the most success-
ful, growers on Everglade land here.

I have from time to time made notes of his comments. Here are a
few of them, and you can bank on them as being absolutely correct. He is,
as you know, on a hammock in the 'glades, about six miles from Miami.

On this hammock soil he placed about 18 inches of pure muck. He
mulched this with about 2 inches of Everglade grass, and in it planted 108
pineapple slips. This was in August. Sixteen months after he had a crop
of 96 apples, which averaged four pounds and were the sweetest he had ever
eaten. When the apples were planted he put on a small quantity of cotton
seed meal. Waldin simply planted these apples as an experiment to see if
the muck would produce a good growth.

On seven-elevenths of an acre he planted tomatoes. This tract
gave a yield of 455 crates, netting him $1.97 per crate. On a full acre
this would have netted him $1,391.06. This was in the early winter of 1902.

On a tract of land 30 by 90 feet, Waldin planted lettuce. The
rows were 14 inches apart; the plants 6 inches apart in a row. These
matured plants sold during the tourist season for 75 cents a dozen. This is
at the rate of $3,000 per acre.

On a tract of land 7 by 70 feet, Waldin planted a crop of radish-
es. He got, every twenty-three days, a crop and repeated this five times.
It netted him at the rate of $5,000 per acre.

These are astounding figures, but I am fully satisfied of the
truth of every statement trade by him. These facts should be placed in the
hands of every northern man.

Sincerely yours,

HENRY RUSSELL WRAY.



*





9




Walter Waldin.


Miami, Florida, Dec. 29, 1909.



I. Bates, Esq.

Dear Sir:-I have just picked from less than four acres of beans,

the first picking, 282 crates, netting over $1,000. There will be some

five or six pickings altogether. These lands will be very valuable when

thoroughly drained. I have inspected the land after the dredge has

reclaimed it and in my opinion too much cannot be said in favor of same.

It will take brains.and brawn to improve this immense tract, but

every acre can be made to bring just such crops as I have and that will make

$100 per acre look like 30 cents as a price for this land. In fact, it can

be made to be worth $1,000 per acre with comparatively small effort and in

a very few years.

Mosquitoes are troublesome sometimes in the summer here on the edge

of the Glades, but of late years we have had very few. In fact, they are

getting less and less and I would sooner see all the mosquitoes around me

for a month as we have them here than brave a day's weather such as you

have had this winter.

Our health is of the best, and we have nothing to complain about

except we need some of your bad, rainy, sleety, snowy weather for com-

parison, as ours is so evenly good we just think it must be so always. 1
Very truly yours,


'^TL/^T~e^^


-- ~~L~C~_ ~i* .. liL~I~YLii~*~i*~- ; I









FERNWEW FARM
SWalter Waldin



Miami, Florida, Sept. 6, 1909.

Mr. E. F. Mooney,

Kansas City, Mo.

Dear Sir:-

Rather late to answer your letter of inquiry, but just got back from
my vacation, and am taking up correspondence in rotation as received, so
please pardon the delay.

I have just returned from an extended trip through the Middle West,
covering some ten states, and if I saw anything in weather, soil or agricul-
tural advantages to compare with this county I did not know it; in fact, this
investigation only served to bring out more emphatically than ever the many
really good points we enjoy every day here. Yes, we have the whole U. S.
skinned to death-California included-when it comes to the standpoint of
weather or climate, soil or moisture supply, market facilities, transporta-
tion, and any other of the good things it takes to make life worth living. Why,
we have the only place in the whole U. S. where all kinds of tropical fruits
flourish, such as Cocoanuts, Avacadoes, Mangoes, etc., or where Bananas can
and will be grown on a commercial scale, and where vegetable crops can be
grown without danger of killing frosts.

-It will be hard to estimate just what advantages we possess at the pres-
ent time, the country being yet in its infancy, but with this large body of
rich earth under control as far as water is concerned, with this warm sun-
shine when most of the U. S. is covered with a mantle of ice, with these ex-
cellent transportation facilities, by rail or water, and many other advan-
tages, each of which would be a great inducement to any settler in a northern
country, it is hardly to be wondered that the homeseeker turns in this
direction.

Very truly,


WALTER WALDIN.


-- -. -- i ii...- .-.L





*



.Kansas City, Kas., March 25, 1909.

Mr. Chas. E. Russell,

City.

Dear Sir:-

I have just returned from a trip to South Florida. I have seen with my
own eyes and have availed myself of every opportunity to gain correct in-
formation. I have talked to early settlers, as well as to practical men from
the north and from the west, and as a result of a thorough investigation, have
returned with an unbounded faith in the great prospects of the drained Ever-
glades. I feel some hesitancy in talking about some of the wonderful condi-
tions with which I was confronted for fear-of being classed with Munchausen or
the author of Arabian Nights, and I would rather that all who possibly can
would see for themselves.

Allow me-to touch briefly on a few points: The State of Florida will
vigorously push the digging of canals large enough to successfully and last-
ingly drain the Everglades, and the drained Everglade land produces every-
thing, from a potato, tomato, cabbage, up to oranges, grapefruit, bananas,
etc., and produces abundantly. The truck garden stuff can be raised while or-
chard trees grow to maturity and brings splendid returns. I have no reason
to doubt statements made by people who are now working such lands when they
told me that $500 per acre net are common results and $1,000 to $1,500 per
acre net are not unusual for one crop. The climate is delightful, while the
atmosphere in the Everglades was clear and pleasantly cool; the soil was
plenty warm enough to warrant a splendid growth. I did not discover any mos-
quitoes, nor could I find anybody who had ever heard of malaria in the Ever-
glades.

As another item of interest I shall mention that Miami will soon have a
deep harbor, and that probably within ten months. Fast steamers between that
town and all northern points will give cheaper transportation for all prod-
ucts.

In conclusion, let me state, this new country will be developed
swiftly now by northern and western people. Large interests are now buying
up vast tracts of land for sugar cane plantations, rice fields, etc., so that
in a few years it may be impossible for the man of moderate means to get a slice
of this garden spot, and intelligent people will appreciate the opportuni-
ties now offered to make an investment which wil make fabulous returns in a few
years.
Yours truly,


MART WEISSENBORN.


L_ __ -- _ _i:l





9 0



AltonPark, Tenn., June 5, 1909.
Dreutzer & Le Gro,
State Commissioners,
736 Georgia Ave., City.
Gentlemen:-
I will endeavor to give you a statement of my trip to Southern Florida,
where I went to investigate the RECLAIMED EVERGLADE lands you are now dis-
tributing, and if you think this letter will be of interest to the people of
this city and state you are at liberty to use it.
I first went to Miami, where I spent several days looking over the lands
and talking to the growers; then in company with Mr. D. M. Doty, of Alton
Park, and several other gentlemen from various states, who were there for the
purpose of inspecting the lands, I went to Ft. Lauderdale where we took a
launch and went up one of the canals, for a distance of over seventeen miles,
to where the dredge was at work. I saw the land drained and under cultivation
on both sides of the canal and we got out of the launch and went over on the
land and picked tomatoes and other vegetables, which were growing on the
land but recently reclaimed.
The EVERGLADES are a vast prairie covered with nothing but a growth of
saw-grass and are free from trees, stumps, brush, vines, rocks or any obstacle
against cultivation. The water, which has been overflowing this land (dur-
ing the wet season) is pure, clear as crystal and is constantly on the move.
The soil in the Glades is a rich black muck, unlike the rest of the state,
which is sand and coral rock. All kinds of fruit, such as Oranges, Grape-Fruit,
Lemons, Bananas, and all other kinds.of tropical fruits are raised in abun-
dance, and there is always a good market for all fruits and vegetables at a
good price.
The climate is all that could be desired and I found, even at this time
of the year, that it is much colder than in this section. This is due to the
refreshing ocean breeze which blows continuously across the Glades. One
fact with which I was particularly impressed was that there are no mosqui-
toes, fleas, flies or other objectionable insects to be found in the Glades and
the country is entirely free from malaria. I spent ten days down there and
slept without a mosquito bar and with the windows of my room wide open and
was never once disturbed.
For several years I have been looking for a desirable place to locate
and in my travels have visited different sections of the country, includ-
ing Southern California, but I must confess that nowhere have I found the
climate, soil and general conditions so favorable and enticing as in this
reclaimed section, and as further evidence of my faith in the country I might
add that I have purchased two farms and am now making preparations to take
up my residence there at once.
I certainly wish to thank you for the information which led to my making
this trip and I trust that you will succeed in convincing many others of the
wonderful possibilities which await them if they will heed what you have to
tell them.
] Yours very truly,
PAUL WEISE.


- --" ` "'~U'i "' '~ "Y









GENERAL OFFICE & FACTORY
BANCHES GRAND RAPIDS. MICHIGAN.U.S.A. MRS.M R BISSELL PLElOTn
GR T WWILLIAMS ViCE PRLST
NLW YORK CITY US.A M SHANAHAN. VICE PRLST
LONDON.ENGLAND. CABL AD D R 5"CYC LOI M R SISSELLJR.ViCE PRIEST
N. CABLE ADD R ES CYCLOID R SHANAnAN SvULGlNR
PNIAARAIS FRANCAA. GRAND RAPID OR NEW YORK M OEANAANC TRASURLR
ADDRESS ALLCOMMUNICATONS TO THE COMPANY J WS5HANAHAN. SuPr

_GyJJbrt AB^Jmip A M b June 17, 1909.


Messrs. Hagadone & Lewis,
City.
Gentlemen:-

In answer to your inquiry relative to the possibilities
of the land re-claimed by the drainage of the "Everglades" in Florida,
would say that I have lived at Miami, Fla., in the winter time for the
past right years and occasionally investing in different classes of
property, I necessarily became familiar with the possibilities of the
soil in that portion of the world.

Using rq own Judgment, I regard the drainage of those
lands as one of the most important events that history records when we
contemplate that its completion will add millions of acres of the rich-
est soil of the continent to the available agricultural resources of
the nation.

These lands are capable of producing in luxurious pro-
fusion every species of plant and vegetable growth that is at all in-
digenous to a sub-tropical climate.

If the Investor in those lands will consider the climat-
ic advantages, I am confident that it would be rare if you lost an oppor-
tunity in interesting the party who may investigate. I zado an offer on
1,200 acres of this land before leaving Florida one year ago, but'did not
succeed in closing the sale.

I believe that the completion of this great work will
offer an opportunity for securing homes remunerative as an investment
and surrounded by the advantages of a moderate climate that the wealthy
seek the advantages of and pay enormous prices to obtain.

Wishing you success in this matter, believe me

Very truly,


h 7/m^e^- c^_


_rury~l : -.















Central City, Neb., Feb. 5th, 1909.




Mr. E. A. Kellett,

Minneapolis, Minn.

Dear Sirt-

My trip of investigation, covering a large territory in the Ever-

glades, convinces me that Ex-Governors N. P. Broward and W. S. Jennings are

carrying out a well planned system of drainage that will very shortly reclaim

these lands, which are very rich, producing an endless variety of crops--

pratically anything a man desires to grow, the season being twelve months of

every year. The climate is all that one's heart could wish for, and I was

thoroughly captivated by it and the generous hospitality of the people there.

I predict that the Everglades will be settled up with northern people as

fast as it is reclaimed.

.. Very truly,

JAMES SMITH.








-4*1*










Lamed, San., June 11, '09,

Mr. L. A. Bone,
Wichita, Kan.
Dear Sir:
In my recent trip to Southern Florida in company with 0. Cornell, our mis-
sion was to visit the Everglades and satisfy ourselves with a personal investigation
regarding the probabilities of the drainage of this great tract of land, its agricul-
tural possibilities and the general climatic conditions.
Concerning the drainage my conclusions are that a personal inspection will
convince any reasonable person of the feasibility of the plan and we have the assurance
of Gov. Broward that funds are ample. We made a trip up one of the canals from Fort
Lauderdale to the dredge which is 39 miles north of Miami, this dredge is now working
in the center of this tract of land. The dredge outs a canal 60 feet wide by 10 to 14
feet deep.
The assertion has been made that the Everglades cannot be drained because of
insufficient fall. This is a mistake, as the fall is from 21 to 30 feet, determined
by competent engineers, and can be readily seen with the naked eye. As fast as the
canals are out the water runs out, leaving the land drained for an area of 2 or 3 miles
on either side, and the soil being a loose alluvial loam, the water sinks and leaves
no pools or mud puddles. There are two dredges working directly in this ground. We
found the water to be clear and pure and not stagnant as most generally supposed.
The soil in the Everglades is a rich deposit of decayed vegetation ranging
in depth from 3 to 12 feet, and is shown by the government reports and tests to be the
most productive soil on the globe.
The climate is delightful, healthful, and unknown to killing frost. A cool,
.l w breeze passing over from the east and west coasts with a mean temperature of
,,,- degrees.
We visited several farms on part of the drained ground and found vegetables
and. ffa ,growing in profusion, and the owners told me they cleared from $300 to $1500
per m.rea each year, and on observing their fruit and vegetables I had no reason to doubt
their msgdtions and my visit was made during the most unfavorable season of the year.
74t also visited Miami. We expected to find a small Southern village, but to
our surprfig.we found one of the most up-to-date and beautiful cities in our travel
with almost J9,000 population; the business section has the snap and hustle of the.
paaterri oite.4 The grandeur of the residence portion is beyond description, it is
iiplf py aFg'ge park with the most brilliant flowers and beautiful foliage growing in
profuifon everywhere.
We did not make this trip or visit the ground with any real estate man, but
,tawd-aB trip alone and at our own expense to investigate for our own interests. In
S6it dn6t;f n I would say to my many friends that for the small investor looking for a
o hpA, for the speculator, this country offers inducements that are hard to believe
-''ntil you see what can be grown on this land: the most wonderful variety of tropical
and semi-tropical fruits and any garden product known to man.
Land that can be purchased for $30 per acre that will produce in three
months crops that will market at from $300 to $500 per acre is certainly a record
breaker in land investments.
Yours truly,
C. W. SMITH.










Fort Lauderdale, Fla., July 24th, 1909.
Mr. T. W. Crowe,
Kansas City, Mo.
Dear Sir:--
Your favor of May 10th came to hand just at the beginning of my tomato pick-
ing and found me too busy to write or to take time to make any investigations on which
to base a letter, and I have been very busy ever since our shipping season closed.
I did, however, take a day and make a trip up each canal as far as the dams
behind the dredges. I will say now that I have NOT had much confidence in the drain-
age scheme and had given it little thought, but since I made my last trip up the
canals I have surely changed my thinking.
I rode up on one of the new power boats and rode on the hurricane deck most
of the way. I also took with me a small telescope that I might see distant objects
clearer. I could see easily and distinctly two and three miles on each side of the
canals and I saw the ground apparently as dry as the prairies of Iowa, Nebraska or
Kansas; as level as the prairies of Northern Illinois or as the surface of a lake.
This surface is cut by many creeks that were before the cutting of the canals the deep
places and outlets from the 'Glades to the rivers flowing into the ocean, and they are
today carrying away surplus water into the canals and out of the way and I cannot see
why one cannot live on these 'Glades just as well and safely as on any of the western
prairies.
I found the "Southwest trade winds" blowing as nicely there as on the ocean,
and there were no signs of mosquitoes and the men on the dredges say they see VERY
FEW. The soil is different from any that I have ever seen anywhere. It is not silt
or any deposit, for there has never been any current there to carry sediment. It is
black to the rock below and as rich as any land on the face of the globe.
I saw farms out as far as eight miles. Many places where winter crops had
been grown were grown up to weeds from five to twelve feet high, which may give you
some idea of the fertility. As near as I could estimate, the surface of the land lay
F*FOUR to SEVEN feet above the water in the canals, and as far as I could judge one
.c6O d drive a loaded wagon anywhere within two miles on each side of the canals.
SDO-W NOW MIND, THIS IS THE WET SEASON. We have our DRY SEASON in the winter,-
Sibbeg in November usually, and the winter-is our farming time I can't see why
antdd there should not yield the largest yield, nor can I imagine any vege-
tl -es would not do well there. The soil is heavy, but porous, and should raise
S agS ti citrus fruits. It is FAR AHEAD of our mucks, marls and "Salt and pepper"
-"-'=lands .t e are farming now and think so much of.
-' Isurely should come and see the land, for no one can write a fitting
descr tonc i4it. While getting an idea of the soil you would also get a taste of
l:i'eiml ti h is also different from any other place in America. If you come in
'yonu will enjoy going around in a straw hat and summer clothes while folks
at h6Be are bundled up and shivering. If you come in the summer time--now for in-
stance--you will find the mercury standing 85 to 88. It has been to 92 one day last
month. An elegant breeze from the ocean, just as cool as the Gulf Stream, which is
but five miles from where I now sit. No sun stroke or heat prostrations. I am a
farmer past sixty and work every day in the sun, which is now only about three degrees
south of this place. June 24th and 30th the sun was north of Havana, Cuba, wnich for
the time being was the equator.
This is my fifth summer here and I enjoy them more than any I have spent in
any other state, and I have lived or traveled in more than half of them. I have not
paper enough to hold all I could say for this country, so I think I had better quit
right here.
Come and see us any way.
Yours truly,
A. J. SNOW.


_ ~~__







HARRY B. SVTEENEY

Independence Truck Gardens

Cabbages. Cantaloupes. Radishes. Onions'
Peas. Beans. Beets. Turnips. Cucumbers, Car-
rots, Squash. Lettuce. Spinach, Parsley. Etc




Congress Heights, D. C., Aug. 5, 1909.

Messrs. Bowen Brothers,

Washington, D. C.

Gentlemen:-

I have just returned from my trip to Miami to investigate the land of-
fered for sale in the Everglades.

I went out to the dredge Miami and spent several hours watching this
powerful machine cutting a canal sixty feet wide and ten feet deep through
the richest land I ever saw. The glades look like a western prairie. The
water is fresh and good to drink. For a long distance on each side, the land
is drained behind the dredges and all you have to do is to burn the saw grass,
plow and plant your crop.

I visited several reclaimed farms on the edge of the glades near Miami
and found that the land was wonderfully productive. The farmers make from
$500 to $1,500 per acre on such crops as lettuce, cabbage, potatoes, peppers,
tomatoes, beans, and celery. I saw a grape fruit orchard of three year old
trees in bearing on Everglade land. The trees were large, strong, and
thrifty, and fully equal to eight year old trees in bearing on sandy land
nearer the coast. In short, I found the land fully up to what you claim for
it, and when the Everglades are fully drained, which is rapidly being done, I
am confident that it will become one of the most populous and prosperous sec-
tions in the United States.

Wishing you great success, I am,
Very truly yours,


HARRY B. SWEENEY.













Chattanooga. Tenn., July 10. '09.
Messrs. Dreutzer and LeGro.,
Chattanooga, Tenn.

Gent2eme:-

After becoming interested in the Florida Everglade Lands which yon are distributing, I con-
eluded to take a trip to Southern Florida to investigate into the merits of your proposition for my
personal benefit, as well as for my friends who have taken contracts andiare contemplating buying.

I arrived in Kiami, Fla.. the prettiest little city I ever set my foot in, on June 27, and
spent the day getting my bearings and admiring the beauties that surrounded me on all sides. On the morn-
ing of June 28, I boarded an auto and vent out to inspect the farms on the Glade land along the Miami
river. We visited several farms, including those of Mr. Walter Waldin and Mr. Bouohard. The magnificent
groves of oranges, grape-fruit and many other varieties of tropical fruits which I found growing on these
farms give ample evidence of what this land is as a fruit producer.

After completing our inspection of these farms we spent the remainder of the day in riding
over the smooth stone roads in many directions throughout the surrounding country, the natural beauty of
which it is impossible for me to describe. On the morning of June 29 I was taken in a launch up the Miami
river to Its headwaters, where the Dredge Miami is literally eating its way into the Glades. After a
thorough investigation of the work of this dredge I was convinced that the reclamation of the Everglades
is assured. While here I ascended the steel observation tower and took a look at the Glades. As far as
I could see I beheld a practically level prairie covered with nothing but a growth of saw grass. Nowhere
oould I see pools or ponds of water.

The next morning I left Miami and went to Dania, four miles south of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.,
where I spent the day talking to the vegetable growers and inspecting the Glade lands in that vicinity.
One of the growers here, Mr. J. M. Holding, showed ae that he had netted $6.000 on ten oares of tomatoes
grown on Everglade land this past season. This is but one of the testimonials of the many vegetable
growers, all of whom are making fortunes on farms of small acreage.

July 1 and 2-I spent in a thorough inspection of the two canals running out from Fort
Landerdale through the north and south forks of the new river into the Everglades. The north canal is
constrooted for a distance of 15 miles and the south canal is out 17 miles. These canals are 60 fest wide
and from 10 to 15 feet deep; the flow of the water in them is from 6 to 8 feet below the surface of the
Glades and the water runs out with a very perceptible current. I took special note of the rise of tide-
and found same to rise about three feet at Fort Lauderdale: at the first dam, about 8 miles into the
Glades on the south oanal. the water here registered a rise of but 6 inches and the level of the Glades
at this point is 6 feet above the water in the canal. I believe that this proves conclusively that the
statement which some of the uninformed have made that the tide waters will overflow the Glades is entirely
untrue and unfounded.

As my trip up the canals was made in a motor-boat, it was easy for one to see the formation of
the land through which the out had been made. I found that the foundation of the Everglades is a coralline
limestone, which is covered with a thin stratum of sand from 6 to 10 inches deep. On the top of the sand
lies a stratum of marl, a very prolific fertilizer, and on top of the marl lies a rich black vegetable
mnck. whih ranges in depth from 2 to 10 feet. One acre of this land looks just like another and every
acre is entirely free from any obstacle against cultivation, being covered with nothing but a growth of
saw grass. This saw grass is very easy to clear, as it dies as soon as the water is drained off.

On my way up the canals I saw the land under cultivation on both sides only a few months
behind the dredges. The orops that are being raised on these farms along the canal are of the very best,
and nowhere is there to be found any healthier plants than on these farms. To my mind this is convincing
beyond doubt that there is no sour land in tha Glades. I spent several bours on the Dredge Okeeohobee,
17 miles into the Glades, and while there I made it a point to find out about the healthfulness of the en
employed. These men have been working on this dredge for over two years, and during this time have always
drunk the Glade water, which is pure, clear and constantly moving. They sleep on the deck of the dredge
in the open air and are never troubled with mosquitoes. I found them to be as healthy a lot of men as I
ever saw and they assured me that there has never been a case of malaria or any other disease among them,
I drank freely of the Glade water, which I found to be good, and I did not see a mosquito or any other
objectionable insect during my stay in the Glades. A refreshing ocean breeze blows constantly across the
Glades, and I found it much cooler there than here.

While in Jaoksonville,Fla.. I had a personal interview with Ex-Oov.Broward and Ex-Gov.Jennings,
who is counsel for the trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund of the state, which body was created
by the legislature for the purpose of managing the improvement of the state's lands. By these gentlemen
proof was shown me of the fact that the trustees have ample means now on hand, regardless of what oomes in
in the future, to thoroughly complete the drainage of the Everglades-and they assured me that the work
would be pushed to its completion as rapidly as machinery, men and money could do it. There are now four
dredges working, three others are being contracted for from the north, and will be put to work in a short
time. & contract has also Just been let for two dredges of the suction type,

I firmly believe that this land will soon be beyond the reach of the man of ordinary meanseand
the holder of contracts in this distribution can congratulate themselves on being in on the cleanest and
most promising proposition of the age.

In addition to the contract I am now carrying, I hope soon to be able to take two more, one
esoh for my two aons.
Yours truly,

(Signed) T. N. SE TER.


'I:



















STATE OF FLORIDA

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT

DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY

R. E. ROSE, STATE CHEMIST



Tallahassee, Fla., Aug. 20th 1909.

Hon. J. M. Barrs,

Jacksonville, Fla.

Dear Sirs-

The lands lying south of Lake Okeechobee, I have been familiar
with since 1882.

These lands are susceptible of perfect drainage, having ample
fall. When so drained, they are exceedingly productive, making fine crops
of corn, rice, fruits and vegetables, and particularly sugar cane a fertile
soil with abundant rainfall, almost continuous sunshine and no frost. Frost
to injure sugar cane has never been known in this locality.

The only thing necessary to make these lands the most productive
in the United States is drainage. No soil will produce larger crops at less
cost than will that of the Everglades, particularly those lands lying south
of Lake Okeechobee, which, owing to their frequent exposure to atmospheric
action by removal of water, have largely decomposed and lost their peaty
character, and have become a rich black mould, requiring drainage only to
make them enormously productive.

Very truly,


R. K. ROSE.






9,












Pompano, Fla., July 15, 1909.



Mr. Jno. T. Walston,

Asheville, N. C.

Dear Sirs-

In reply to your inquiry, I wish to say that on one crop of

t tomatoes, from four and one-half acres, I gathered and sold twelve

hundred and eighty-six crates, which netted me an average of $309.41

per acre. This was on the sand lands; the yield on muck lands is much

greater. I have known as much as twelve hundred crates to be made on

one acre muck. This country offers the best chance for a man to make

money that I know of. If he will come down here and is not afraid to

work he can be independent in a very few years.

Respectfully,

A. N. SAMPLE.





g
THE MINNEAPOLIS
SEVENTH STREET
One Block From Biscayne Bay
M1IAMI, FLA.




May 7, 1909.

Mr. E. A. Kellett,

Minneapolis, Minn.

Dear Sir:-

Mrs. E. A. Russell, who is now and has been during the winter, in Seat-
tle, sent me your letter with the request that I send you some printed matter
in regard to Miami. I send you in this mail a pamphlet with good descriptions
of climate, soil and prospects of this part of the state. I presume you have
the 'Homeseeker'' that is published here monthly. If not, I will gladly
send you some copies.

Mrs. Russell has never spent a summer here. She owns "'The Minneapo-
lis,'' and ran it two winters, when she leased it to Mr. Sawtelle, who has
had the manageemnt of it the last two winters. We have lived in Miami six
years and a half, and can truly say that we know of no place, east or west or
south, that we would like as well for an "all-the-year-round'' home. We
think the summers delightful. Mr. Sawtelle, although a Northern man and not
used to out-door work imtil he came South, does a great deal of work himself
in his grove during the summer. We do not think it any warmer here with the
thermometer at 80 degrees than it is in the 11orth at 72 or 73 degrees, as there
is almost always a beautiful breeze from the bay.

The winters need no description, as everyone in the land of ice and snow
must realize what a comfort it is to be able to sit almost every day upon the
veranda looking out upon green trees and grass, with roses and hibiscus and
other flowers always in bloom. We will be glad to answer any questions you
may like to ask.
Yours respectfully,

MRS. J. P. SAWTELLE.
















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Minneapolis, Minn., April 17, 1909.
Mr. A. D. Hart,
Kansas City, Mo.
Dear Sir:-
Yours of April 15th received asking me as to my impressions, etc., of Southern
Florida and the Everglades. In reply would say that I went from here to Palm Beach,
arriving there just after dark. My object in stopping there was to have a daylight
ride from Palm Beach to Miami. I noticed all along the line, especially as I got some
farther south, great quantities of pineapples, tomatoes, beans, potatoes, and many
Other vegetables that were being grown and shipped.
When I got to Miami I saw one of the commission houses there, and work there
indicated that they were already shipping considerable fruit and vegetables. I took
the trip to the source of the Miami River and went upon the observation tower and looked
out for miles over the Everglades, and it looked to me just about like an Iowa prairie,
with an occasional clump of trees. On these points where you would see the trees, I
am informed, is what they call a hammock--a little raise in the Everglades.
I stopped at Musa Isle Farm, where I saw all kinds of fruits being grown,
and they were also shipping that day; I ate bananas that were raised on this farm.
I made a trip out to Mr. Waldin's farm, which is on the edge of the Ever-
glades, and he certainly has a beautiful place, and has only been a few years bringing
it to its present high state of cultivation, etc. Mr. Waldin told me that his pep-
pers were bringing in at the rate of about $5,000 per acre this year. He told me of
two parties from Minnesota who were farming Everglade land and who recently came there.
I called on one of them, and he was more than pleased with the climate, profits, etc.
He advised me that his tomatoes had netted him over $500 per acre; his beans $600 per
acre; his potatoes $250 per acre.
I then spent some little time in Miami and found it not only a beautiful
little resort place, but a delightful, thriving, bustling business city. Then went up
to Fort Lauderdale and went up one of the canals, passing the second dam, it being
necessary to dam the canals to hold the water to float the dredges on account of the
fall. I also saw land that had water on it about eighteen months ago, and the parties
had gone on to it this winter, cut off the saw-grass, turned over the sod, and were
raising fine crops of potatoes, beans and tomatoes.
There were other truck farms along the road that may have been growing other
vegetables. I did not stop to inquire, but saw them shipping the vegetables down
the river to market. When I saw the black, rich muck lands, and could see the fall
and that they had already been drained, I realized that this land had advantages
that have never been appreciated, especially by the people in Florida. Not only is it
altogether the richest land in Florida, but being farther south, it is not only warmer
in the winter, but cooler in the summer, on account of the land being so narrow at
the southern end of the peninsula that it gets the breeze from the big bodies of water,
being almost surrounded.
It seems strange that the Northerners have not discovered this before, as
there is really no other portion of the United States, in my opinion, that is so well
located from most every standpoint. First, the finest winter climate in the United
States, so far south that you can grow your crops in the winter time, markets almost
at your door. You can go from Jacksonville, Fla., to New York City in about twenty-
four hours. You also have the advantage or water transportation, and I am informed
by some people that they like the summer just about as well as the winter. Tnere is
no extreme warm weather.
The future possibilities of Southern Florida are probably as great, if not
greater, than any other portion in the United States. I am satisfied that the drain-
age of the Everglades is not only practicable, but will be accomplished.
This will give you a little idea of Southern Florida as it appeared to me.
Very truly yours,
L. D. RICHARDSON.


I







olFmicB5, -.CAPITAL $50,000O00 DIEOTORS,
PAU4Is. MOORE. AlialbENT PAUL B.-MooRi E. LINoMAY BROyN
T sB EWER. VIOE-MPESIDENT "BEN "BEWE" A.S. BROWN
.U A L e l ILUK.ANDER b W. O. RUBSELL.
F. J. WILKINuo N. OSrNERAL'mANAGER .' w
aOo. M. ALLEN, IEORETARY WILKINqN"; '.
Sellers of Everythind to Eat, Wear and Labor with
From the Cheapest that's Good to the Best there Is
DEPARTMENT STORE

: CHARLESTON, MO., May 12th.

Mr. Philip S. Delany,
Kansas City, Mo.
Dear Sir:-
I enclose you $10.00 as per within contract for a farm in the
Everglade country. Please send me deed and map of the property and any
.other information you may have, and I will pay cash for the balance o'f
purchase price.' I have hunted in that country nd I know how rich
the soil will be when the .water is off. I tiusf you will locate me to
my satisfaction.
Very respectful








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Tichita, Kansas, Feb. 20th, 1909.


Mr. J. H. English,
Guthrie, Okla.

Dear Sir -

In answer to your request for information in relation to Florida and the
Everglades, I will say:

After reading the articles in Everybody's and Munsey's Magazines for month
of February, 1909, on "Gov. Broward" and "Florida," I at once determined to see this
country, as well as the man so favorably mentioned in these periodicals. So I at once
set out for the Southland, visiting many places of interest as I passed through them.
In Florida I stopped at Jacksonville, at. Augustine, Ormond, Daytona, Palm Beach, Fort
Lauderdale, Miami, and many other places of much interest and wondrous beauty,for this
great state, like California, is one vast flower garden.

I, with a party of other western men, met Governor Broward at Fort Lauder-
dale, and together with Ex-Governor Jennings, we visited the Everglades and canals
being built by the state, for the purpose of draining the Everglades, which is the
richest land in Florida, if not in the world.

You ask if, in my opinion, the Glades can be successfully drained. I will
answer that the matter of draining this land in the Everglades has passed the opinion
state, and is now a matter of positive knowledge. Every man who has been there, and
observed the water running like a mill race down into the canals and river that lead
to the bay, at once recognizes that the land can be, and is being drained. The only
wonder to me is that this work has not been done years ago, as the expense is compara-
tively nothii.g when the value of the reclaimed land is taken into account. I saw
acres of land in young trees, fruit and vegetables that five months ago were covered
with water from a few inches to two feet deep. We traversed the canals to their end,
and saw the monstrous dredges moving many tons of dirt a minute, and we learned from
Ex-Governore Jennings, and Broward that the state of Florida was doing the work of re-
claiming the land, and that it has many hundred thousand dollars in the treasury at
this time that could be used for that purpose only.

This is the richest land I ever saw, and does not have to be cleared of tim-
ber or brush, and is as level as the plains of Kansas, and also in a land where men
make fabulous wealth from a few acres by raising all kinds of garden truck, not to
speak of the tropical fruits which grow in abundance.

I have the word of many farmers who are farm owners that it was a very com-
mon money yield to take $1,000.00 to $1,500.00 from one acre of ground in vegetables
alone, and that, too, on the space between the young orchard trees; and what is more,
these men positively refused to sell their land at any price.

I am buying a contract in this proposition for myself, my wife, and one for
each of my three children, and I would not miss it if it cost twice the money. I have
been dealing in land and loans for ten years, as an exclusive business, and in that
time I have never found a proposition that equals this one as an investment.

With regards to yourself and family, I am,

Yours truly,

D. R. MOSHER,

____ ___ __ ____^S_ _


M









& SON CO. KM
ERHAlvi
OUTFITTERS FOR MEN




Iola, Kansas, Feb. 8, 1909.
Mr. E. A. Kellett,

Minneapolis, Minn.

Dear Sir and Friend:-

I returned last week from Palm Beach and Miami,Florida, where
I went to investigate the Everglades. I found everything much better than
represented by the Company, and I think it impossible to say too much
in favor of this proposition. I have never done anything other than re-
tail men's and boys' ready-to-wear clothing, but as soon as I returned from
my trip I looked up the Company's agent for this county and bought five con-
tracts, and I trust in the near future to own one or more of those fine orange
groves.

I was surprised to learn from the natives that chills and fevers were
practically unknown in that county. In making my trip into the Everglades
via the enormous canals which the state is dredging, I found the Everglade
water to be clear and pure-the best drinking water. The soil is the richest I
ever saw. I would advise those who have money to invest, and especially
those looking for a home, to go and see this wonderful country, believing they
will agree with me that land in Southern Florida in a few years will be beyond
the ordinary man's means. While my family was all but freezing in Sunny Kan-
sas, I was enjoying the ocean baths, which was one of the greatest enjoyments I
ever experienced. I purchased from Mr. J. A. Roop, owner of the Musa Isle Fruit
Farm, near Miami, a truck full of assorted fruits, which I have on display
in one of my show windows. It has been a great attraction. Iola people can
hardly believe that grape fruit, oranges, lemons, pineapples, etc., ever
grew so large. If the northern people realized the possibilities in Southern
Florida, the Company could not supply the demand for contracts. With best
wishes, I am,
Yours very .truly, .

C. E. PERHAM.






MW .".


SN






OFFICERS: BOARD OF GOVERNORS:
W. W. PROUT. resident. INiANn BOARD OF TRADE W. W. PROUT.
J. C. KELLER. lit Vice-Pre. J. C. KELLER.
J. I. WILSON.
J. L WILSON, 2d Vice-Pr... MIA1I, FLORIDA. I. COHEN.
I. COHEN, Treasirer. J. W. WATSON.
T. V. MOORE.
G. E. BROSSIER. Secretary. S. BOBO DEAN.





July 10th, 1909.
Mr. D. S. Thornburg,
Cherryville, North Carolina.
Dear Sir:-
Referring to your recent favor. The dredges in cutting their way through
the Everglades show clearly the nature and formation of the soil, which is
muck on the surface, ranging from three to six feet in thickness, which in
turn rests on a rich marl from 12 to 18 inches. Under this is about six inches
of sand, and under that the corralline-limestone. The work of dredging is
progressing rapidy and satisfactorily. Land bordering the edge of the 'Glades
is farmed and produces all vegetables grown anywhere else in America. In
fact, we can produce any farm product here that does not need frost to mature.
Your next question as to climate. God undoubtedly left this spot for
his last work. After realizing the faults and drawbacks of all other lati-
tudes, he created this to represent perfection. The only complaint I can make
is that it is perpetually the same, day atfer day-not too hot, no humidity, a
delightful breeze always, no suffocating nights, and few insect plagues. As to
health, that is answered when I say that we have from four to six thousand win-
ter residents here and more than one hundred thousand annual visitors, all due
to our healthful climate. The water is good-it is supplied by eight arte-
sian wells.
We have no swamps here-all the water in the 'Glades is flowing water.
Drainage is simple. The expenditure is in dredges and labor. There are no dif-
ficult engineering feats to overcome-all that is needed are outlets for the
surplus water that collects in the 'Glades from the rainfall. But the best
treat you can give yourself will be to come here and see for yourself. It will
then be hard for North Carolina to hold you when you see what we are doing here
and you grasp what a great country this is going to be in the next few years.
The Government is making a deep harbor here. We are building one of the
finest, most modern cities that brains, energy and money can produce, all
backed by a drainage proposition that is going to give to us the richest re-
claimed soil in the world and the greatest producing district in America, with
ample facilities for handling the products. We have the finest rock roads,
over 300 miles now built; the drainage canals give not only drainage but
transportation and irrigation, but the subject you ask about is not half
told; it is a subject which is inexhaustible. I will ask you to keep your eye
on the Everglades, on Dade County, on Miami, and see us grow.
Yours respectful,
SW. W. PROUT.






W. M. McINTOSH. Secretary t W. Glicrist. Governor,
W Ex-Officio President.
A. C. Croom. Comptroller.
TRUSTEES OF THE w. V. Knott. Stare Treasurer.
W\. H. Ellis, Artorney-General.
INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT FUND B.E. cLin. Cr and Salesman.
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA.


Tallahassee, February 24th, 1909.

Mr. A. G. Jackson,
St. Petersburg, Florida.

Dear Sir: Replying to yours of the 10th inst., I beg to say that the
Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund of the State of Florida have under-
taken the drainage of the Everglades in accordance with approved plans and
ample resources, so far as can be determined in advance, to carry on the
work to completion.

Four powerful dredges have been built especially for this work and
on the southern end the most difficult part of the work in cutting through
solid rock has already been accomplished. The balance of the work on that
route will be through sand and muck, principally the latter, which is very
rich and will be wonderfully productive. The part of the canal already
constructed had demonstrated the feasibility and great value of the drainage
work. Another canal will be opened by the new steel hull dredge "Miami"
from the Miami river to connect with the canal from the south. The new steel
hull dredge "Caloosahatchee" will open up the channel of the Caloosahatchee
River on the west, between Lake Okeechobee and the Gulf of Mexico, and other
dredges will go south and east from Lake Okeechobee by the different
routes into the Atlantic Ocean. It is the purpose of the Trustees to push
the work to completion as rapidly as possible and additional dredges will
probably be built and put into commission for that purpose.

You are cordially invited to visit and inspect the work already com-
pleted and to witness the operation of the powerful dredges now at work.
Such inspection will convince any reasonable person of the feasibility of the
plans for drainage, the magnitude of the work and the inestimable value and
utility of the canals and waterways, when completed, both for drainage and
transportation purposes. The plans contemplate a continuous waterway from
the Atlantic Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico, using the Caloosahatchee River
on the west as part of the route and other streams on the east. Lateral
canals of various sizes are now being built and contracted for by various
property owners in the Everglades, and the cultivation of land already
reclaimed is in progress.

In addition to the funds being used by the Trustees for drainage, the
Legislature of 1907 levied a tax of five cents per acre on the land in the
drainage district for drainage purposes, and the U. S. District Court for the
Southern District of Florida decided that the tax was legal and this decision
has been sustained by the U. S. Court of Appeals. The Trustees are not now
offering lands for sale in the drainage district.
Yours very truly,
(Signed) WM. M. McINTOSH, Jr.,
Secretary.





R.FERENCE. BANK OF .A, I.SCATy .. PLA

W. H. MARSHALL
DEALER IN
FLORIDA VEGETABLES
GROWER OF
MIDWINTER AND EARLY VEGETABLES
SPECIAL ATTENTION TO MAIL ORDER TRADE
TERMS IN CAR LOTS-BANK GUARANTEE
FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA.


Dec. 17, 1909
Mr. Henry G. Ralston,
Miami, Fla.
Dear Sir:
Replying to your favor of recent date concerning the possibili-
ties of this Everglade country, will say that I think that my ten
years' experience, and the knowledge which I have acquired during
that time places me in position to know pretty well the possibilities
of this soil.

During the season of 1901-2, I planted only 2900 hills of
tomatoes (2000 hills in an acre). From this I gathered 1015 crates
and then sold the remainder of the crop for $40.00; the net on these
tomatoes was a little more than $1,400.00. Since that time I have
enlarged my farming, and of course could not give the same kind of
attention that I did to the small acreage.

Celery is another item. I am in the brokerage business now,
and there is not one day each month that I have any where near the
celery that I could use. In fact I am almost compelled to tell my
customers that it's not to be had at any price.
*
There are many varieties of vegetables which yield here abundant-
ly, but with the present craze which seems to be mostly on tomatoes,
it is very hard to get just what the trade desires, or the varieties
which should be grown here. At this writing I am paying $2.25 per
crate for peppers, and cannot get more than 10% of what my trade
will take.

I feel as a Citizen of the Everglades, that there is no place
any where else on earth, that a man can get the yield per acre, with
as little effort, as here. Continuous cultivation, with no possible
doubt of the fertility of the soil being exhausted, means that in
time we will have a country of homes and in a climate which grows
the tender vegetables throughout the entire year.

If there is any further information that I can give you, or to
any prospective settler, I shall at all times be glad to answer in
detail all questions which might be to the advancement of our
country.
Yours very truly,



`2H~w^^.


L --








1. B. MORSB, Prewdent J. N. LUMMUS, Becy & Treas


DADE COUNTY

TITLE INSURANCE & TRUST COMPANY

CAPITAL $75,000.00

MIAMI, FLA.


S '- Oct. 21, 1909.
Mr. H. G. Ralston,

City.

Dear Sir:

There have been hundreds of thousands, yes millions, of dollars invested

in these lands within the past few months by men of capital and experience.

The lands that are now drained will show for themselves what they will produce,

a visit to Mr. Walter Waldin's place, as well as various others in the Glade

Section will convince any one that the soil is first class.

I have no country land for sale, but will say I am sorry I did not invest

in the Glade lands when I had an opportunity, as I believe it is going to be a

great success. .__

Yours very truly,

J. N. LUMMUS.


















K ;
*'
: .. .... ,















Mechanicsburg, Pa., February 6th, 1909.



Mr. E. A. Kellett,

Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Dear Sirs-

Complying with your request for my opinion of the reclamation project
in the Florida Everglades, permit me to reply as follows:

The impression which I had held from schoolboy days had been that the
Everglades were swamp land covered with an impenetrable growth of tangled limbs
of trees and bushes, and where every step might land me in quicksand or something
equally dangerous a tract of land unfit for man or beast to attempt to traverse.

I wish that every energetic man, whether he holds a similar belief or
not, might have the opportunity to take a trip to the Everglades and there have
his wrong impression shattered for all time, like I did. Instead of swamp, one
sees an undulating prairie covered in every direction for miles with saw grass
nodding in a steady breeze. In place of stagnant pools of fever-infested water
there trickles over this vast prairie pure limpid water, better to drink than we
have in most cities.

The reclamation project seems gigantic to the uninitiated, but when one
beholds with his own eyes the whole plan becomes simple and thoroughly practical.
The work is done rapidly, thoroughly and economically. No one can doubt the ulti-
mate success of this great project after knowing and seeing the method of doing
the work, after viewing the appreciable fall of the water as it enters the several
canals and the wonderful farms that are being worked right on the land that has
been reclaimed and paying handsome returns every year.

I feel sure that if everybody could spend a day touring the Everglades
they would be captivated with the wonderful climate and marvelous possibilities of
the tract, and the Company would have to buy the whole Everglades to satisfy the
great number of people who would want to buy the land.

Assuring you that it gives me great pleasure to answer your inquiries,
and hoping that I may hear from you again, I am,

Yours truly,


ROBERT A. LILLY.


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Miami, Fla.,

October 20, 1909.


Mr. H. 0. Ralston.

Miami, Fla.

Dear Sirs-


Regarding my opinion of the Everglades project, will say that I believe

this the greatest undertaking and will produce more wealth than any other single

enterprise the State will ever know. I have for several years had charge of a

grove of oranges and grapefruit planted on Glade land at the Miami River end of

the canal. This is the same class of soil found farther out and has been partly

drained for some time. The trees do fine on it and have produced two good crops.

'I 'further think that the Everglades will make fine pasture in the low places that

are only partly drained and that on the dry portions corn, peas, sugar cane and

winter gardens will -flourish.

Bananas will'gr ow wild and with the addition of a small amount of potash

will produce-as fine fruit as reaches the country.

S''- .' Yours truly, : .
I i
-... .


NDTEs This letter was written by a prominent grocer in Miami.



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J. C. LI'NING. Sccreanry. Albert W. Gilchrlst. Governor.
Ex-Officio President.
A. C. Croom. Comptroller.
TRUSTEES OF THE W. V. Knott. State Treasurer.
P. NM.Trammell. Arrorney General
INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT FUND B. E. T cLin.omrnd Salesman
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA.



Tallahassee, January 17, 1910.



Mr. C. H. Slifer,

Abilene, Kansas.

Dear Sir:-

I am in receipt of yours of the 8th inst., addressed to Gov.

A. We Gilchrist, which has been transmitted to me for reply, and in

reply thereto beg to state that it is impossible for me to state at

the present time when the first canal will be completed. The indi-

cations now are that five of them will be completed within the next

thirty months. The Trustees intend to advance the work as fast as

possible and the means they can obtain will allow. No time has been

set for placing the state lands on the market. The bonus system is

being used now.
Very truly yours,








Secretary.
Secretary.

















Kissimmee, Fla., June 18, 1909.


Hon. N. B. Broward,

Jacksonville, Fla.

Dear Governor:-

Referring to the value of the marsh lands reclaimed by the Disston
companies some years ago, I beg to say that I feel that I am a competent judge
thereof, having planted on them for a number of years and having been in charge
of the St. Cloud Sugar Plantation for some months prior to and for a year after
the death of the late Hamilton Disston.

The price at which these lands are held now depends entirely upon
their location, etc., ranging from $25 to $300 per acre. A tract of about fif-
teen acres, with improvements that cost not over $1,500, was sold last week for
$7,000, nearly $400 per acre for the land alone, and while this is considered
one of the best places in this section, yet it is across the lake and is over
t wo miles from the depot, and can only be reached by boat.

So you see it is a hard matter to set a value on these lands, but I
consider that anywhere from $50 to $200 an acre is a fair price for these lands
adapted to growing vegetables.

It is needless for me to state what I think of the value of the lands
to the west of the head of New River after they have been drained, as the two
articles in the "Engineering News", in which I described the drainage of the
Everglades and their sugar and vegetable possibilities, express what I think of
the future of that section.

Any time that I can be of service to you, command me.

Yours truly,

SS. L. LUPFER.


ii_


*" ^ z







S. LANMBRIGHT I. D. 9
Physician and Surgeon
LEES CREEK. OHIO



Lees Creek, 0., July 13, 1909.



Mr. A. D. Hart,

Kansas City, Mo.

Dear Sir:-

Pardon my delay in writing reply to your inquiry. I have been back from
my trip of investigation of the lands you are selling in the Everglades and
the surrounding country, and have been busy ever since in urging my friends
to buy contracts in your colonization scheme which, I am confident, will
bring a realization of Emerson's ideal life, 'Health, peace and competence.'

They will find health, for climatic conditions are vastly more favorable
than those of California; they will find peace because they will have good
health and good living, they will have competence because all nature has con-
spired in a soil of inexhaustible fertility, abundant moisture, an ideal and
healthful climate, absence of insect pests and a sunshine that is the very
spirit of life, to bring the greatest possible returns for the labor of the
husbandman. The proposition is better than your literature shows it to be.
Everyone down there seems to have money, prosperity and happiness.

Yours is an epoch making period for Florida, for the colony you place
upon the tract you are now selling will be the beginning of the development of
the source of more wealth and more prosperity than the State of Florida or any
other State has ever known before. The ultimate benefit to the human race of
the reclamation and utilization of this vast tract of heretofore waste land is
beyond human computation. Wishing you the success your enterprise merits,
I remain,
Very truly,


S. LAMBRIGHT, M. D.


.I i -










Siou City Feb. 15, 1909



Sioux City, Ia., Feb. 15, 1909.


Dr. E. C. Chambers,

Kansas City, Mo.

Dear Sirs-

In reply to your
solicitation of a personal
land.


inquiry
friend,


of recent date, will say that at the urgent
I went to Florida to inspect the (Everglade)


I did not expect to find anything very valuable, for my general im-
pression of the Everglade district was that it consisted of a stagnant swamp.
You may imagine my surprise on finding conditions entirely different from what
I had supposed. The Everglades I found to be practically prairie land, the
unreclaimed portion being submerged from four to eighteen inches with clear,
fresh water, with here and there a small bunch of trees growing on small is-
lands. Where the land is drained, which work the State is now doing, I found
the soil to be a rich black muck from a foot and a half to six feet deep, con-
sisting of the decayed vegetation of ages, It will not wear out in a thousand
years.

I consider the property a very good buy. Have purchased some myself
and expect it to more than double within the next year.


Yes, the drainage of
being only a question of water
around the coast is punctured.
begin this work sooner,


the entire district is perfectly practical,
seeking its own level as soon as the rock rim
The wonder to me is that the State did not


Trusting I have answered all your questions, I am,

Yours very truly,

FRED L. HOAGO


M


~






S9



Zeeland, Mich., June 24, 1909.
Messrs. Hogadone & Lewis,
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Dear Sirs:
Your letter of the 21st inst., requesting me to state some of the
facts of South Florida, received.
I have spent two years in the West, including Southern California. I
have spent the larger part of five years in Southern Florida, and therefore do
not speak of conditions as seen from a car window. The climate of South Flor-
ida far excels that of Oklahoma, Texas and Southern California. The climate of
South Florida is as near perfect as we are able to conceive. There are all
kinds of soil as in any other state, but just now the soil of the Everglades is
drawing the particular attention of large numbers of farmers and investors. This
soil is a rich muck equally as good, if not better, than the soil in the swamp
lands of Michigan, on which our famous celery is raised. This land is being
drained and must be drained if the state of Florida is to retain possession of
same, for this is one of the conditions imposed by the United States Government
when this land was turned over by the Government to the state of Florida. Ex-
Governor Broward is a personal friend of mine, and he tells me the Internal Im-
provement Board has more than ample funds on hand now to complete the work, with
more coming in.
As an illustration of what that soil will do, I can give you my own
experience. My grove is situated on the Miami River, just where one of the
State canals leaves the river, hence on the edge of the Everglades. An acre of
this land lying along the river, and practically the same as Everglade land, was
put into tomatoes last Winter. I picked 550 crates (a crate being nearly a
bushel) and lost about 150 crates because I could not pick them fast enough. I
received from $1.05 to $1.40 per orate from the commission men in Miami. Every
acre of this Everglade land will do equally well.
Transportation will be largely by water; the canals are 60 feet wide
and*have 15 feet of water. I carry all my fruit by launch and deliver it on the
docks of the railroad company.three miles distant at less than three cents a
ton, and make a round trip in about one hour and a quarter. It is the cheapest
transportation known, and can never be monopolized.
Living expenses are less than in Michigan. It cost us an average of
$15.00 a month for a family of three, and we had the best of everything. A
minimum of fuel is needed. We had but two fires in our stove, each of about an
hour's duration, during the entire winter. Our clothing bill is less than half
what it is North.
Miami's schools are second to none, all religious denominations are
represented, and all but one own beautiful church edifices. The roads as well
as the city streets, are all rock, and as smooth as the cement walks of your
own city.
The water is the purest that artesian wells can produce.
Contrary to popular belief, there are no more mosquitoes in Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, than in Western Michigan; there are no more snakes in Dade County,
Florida, than in Kent County. Michigan; there is not nearly as much malaria in
Dade County as in Western Michigan from the fact that the wind ALWAYS BLOWS FROM
THE OCEAN, giving us the same ozone-bearing air that the mariner on the high
seas thrives on so well.
I have crossed the Everglades twice, and all the way across drank
glade water UNBOILED, thereby exploding the popular idea that it is a vast,
stagnant, putrefying and malaria-laden swamp. The water is running water.
abounding in fish, and the purest ever dished up by Nature. The death rate of
Florida is lower than that of any state in the Union, being only six per thou-
sand.
Yours very truly,
A. G. HUIZINGA.






10.000 Acres of Land for Sale ReaOe. 2008 SM. Lousl Avenue
Near Dululh. Minn. Ofe, 215-217 Majoun Bldl.

THEO. IVENS
SIOUX CITY, IOWA

Mr. V. W. Helm, l iamni, 'ov. 28th, 1909.
Majestic Bldg.,
Chicago, Ills.
Dear Sir:

The letter that you gave-me to your vice president, Mr. H. G.
Ralston, I carried for two days before I made myself known to him, for the reason
that I wanted to get the general conditions and thoroughly satisfy myself in regard
to the property of the Everglade Land Sales Company from others before I met your
Mr. Ralston.

Yesterday I visited the Everglades, going in a gasoline launch from
Fort Lauderdale. We visited several Citrus fruit groves on pure-muck -- or Ever-
glade land -- and I saw one of the finest orchards I have ever seen. I was told
that oranges and grape fruit could not be grown on muck soil. I am now in a posi-
tion to say that such statements are absolutely false and misleading. I also, on
my way up the canal, stopped at the home of A. E. Gage, whose farm is between 4 and
5 miles in behind the dredge. He has at this time, I would say, something over an
acre in bananas, sugar cane, grape fruit trees and pine apples. He is very enthus-
iastic. I asked him what he would take for his farm of 20 acres. He said that he
had been offered $75 DO an acre, but at this time he did not care to sell.

I saw several new houses on the banks of the oanal, that have been
built since the dredge passed their farms; also people living in tents. I talked
with Mr. Comfort last night. He informed me that he was going to put out 200 acres
in vegetables this winter and that he would commence putting out his tomato plants
next Tuesday, the 30th.

I have met some of the most enthusiastic fruit growers and truckers 4
that I have ever seen, who told wonderful stories in regard to net profits produced
on these lands from both the fruit and vegetables, ranging from $300 to $1000 per
acre.

In regard to the drainage, I had some doubts before I visited the
Glades. I saw the reclaimed land, and the land before the dredge, the rapid
current in the canals which are 60 feet wide and 8 to 12 feet deep, and having had
5 years of experience in drainage, I do not hesitate to say that they will be
drained. But I knw from experience that I have had that there will have to be some
lateral drains put in after the State canals are in. Your company (Everglade Land
Sales Company) having pledged itself to spend $100,000 in this kind of work, which
is more than twice the amount that the State is spending, is a guarantee to every
person who purchases, whether he purchases 5 acres or 640 acres, that he will get
land that is drained and ready for cultivation. Your contracts have several other
good advantages over contracts that I have seen. *

A large volume could be written on Dade County, and then the half
would not be told. It is a county of unlimited resources. And Miami, the seat of
Dade County, is the most beautiful city of its size that I have ever seen. Every
street is paved, and on every street can be seen all kinds of tropical trees,
plants and flowers, from the smallest plant to the Cocoanut Palm.

In this land of sunshine, free from blizzards and cyclones, I hope
to make my future home just as soon-as I can arrange my business.

Yours truly, 7

jah~hu/L~ .,
























Ojus, Fla., June 11, 1909.



Mr. H. Dale Miller,

Miami, Fla.

Dear Sirs-

In 1909 I planted twenty acres in tomatoes, ten of which were planted

on Everglade land. Owing to the long drouth of last year the glades were dry.

I took the risk and ventured on this land, which ordinarily (prior to starting

re clamation work) was covered with water from one to three feet. On the ten

acres planted on this overflowed land I gathered 1118 crates per acre of as fine

tomatoes as have ever been shipped out of the County. On the ten acres of

ordinary prairie land I only gathered 270 crates per acre. On the prairie land

I used fertilizer and the cultivation cost more than on the overflowed land.

Yours truly,

J. W. IVBS.














Minneapolis, Minn., Feb. 4, 1909.



Mr. A. D. Hart,

Kansas City, Mo.

Gentlemen:-

Replying to yours asking my opinion of the Florida Everglades.

Before visiting Florida for purpose of making inspection of the work

of draining the Everglades, I felt considerable skepticism as to feasibility of

the project and desirability of the locality as a place to live. I expected to

find a tropical swamp teeming with vermin and reptiles which, even if drainable,

could probably not be cleared and subdued except at enormous expense.

The first impression is the simplicity and ease with which the work is

being done -- rapid, economical and effective. No one who views the actual re-

suits, the drainage fall as shown by the water levels and the practical farming

which is actually being done on the lands WHICH HAVE BEEN DRAINED, would doubt

the success of the work. If the public could be made to believe the actual

facts as to value of the lands, perfect climate and other features, the present

allotment which is now for sale would be sold in less than a month.

Very truly,


E. A. KELIZL T.






9


9


Chattanooga, Tenn., May 31, 1909.





Messrs. Dreutzer & Le Gro,

State Commissioners, City.

Gentlemen:-

Waving just returned from a tour of investigation of the Everglade
lands of Southern Florida, which you are offering for allotment, I feel it
my duty to my fellow man and the people of Chattanooga to give to you my
conclusions, arrived at after a through investigation of the lands and your
method of allotment.

I acknowledge I went to Miami, Fla., with very much doubt as to the
truthfulness of the statements and promises of the company you represent. I
am greatly surprised, am converted, and am compelled to acknowledge yours is
the fairest proposition I have ever considered. Your statements as to work
being done, quality of soil, depth of soil, purity cf water, productiveness of
soil, as stated in your descriptive circulars, I find by actual and close
observation to be absolutely correct in every important particular. The dredge
at Miami will reazh the Everglades within ten days. The dredges at Ft. Lauder-
dale are making good headway. The south canal is out 17 miles, the north canal
is out 8 miles.

I have samples of soil, taken on south canal just below dam. The
water at this point is five feet below surface of Everglades. My samples were
taken by actual measurement, and consist of the soil each 12 inches.

The water covering the Everglades, as stated by you, is pure, clear
running water, and used for drinking on the canals. I will gladly show and
explain samples and give all information to any interested parties. In fact, I
am going to Miami again in the very near future to make my home in what I think
the best money-making place in this country today.

Yours truly,

J. E. HARKER.







9


N___


u -"t' .i







Miami, Florida, March 7, 1909.

To Whom It May Concern:-

This is to certify that we, the undersigned, have visited the Everglades
Sof Florida on gasoline launches to the head of the canals where the big dredg-
ing machines are at work draining these lands. There is no question in our
opinion that these lands can and will be drained. The lands are practically
drained behind the dredges as fast as they cut the canals, for several miles
on either side. The canals are about 60 ft. wide and 10 ft. deep and the lands
are dry enough for cultivation in about 90 days behind the dredge.

These Everglades lands are as fertile lands as there are in America and
believe that they will produce anything in the line of fruit, truck and vege-
tables that can be grown in a tropical or semi-tropical zone. We saw beauti-
ful orchards and gardens of oranges, lemons, grape fruit, figs, pineapples,
etc., and every variety of vegetables, growing in the same fields on the very
borders of the Everglades. We were simply visitors here and the guests of Ex-
Governor Napoleon B. Broward, sight-seeing in the State of Florida.

We met some of the most enthusiastic fruit growers and truckers we have
ever seen, and no one can hear them talk with so much enthusiasm of their net
profits of from $300 to $1,000 per acre per year on such things as grape fruit,
pineapples, cauliflower, cabbage, snap beans, tomatoes, potatoes, etc., and
doubt their truthfulness. Almost everything in that line known to man is grow-
ing in profusion on every side and the trees are literally breaking down with
fruit.

Some of the most beautiful homes in America, with every modern conve-
nience, are certainly strong enough evidence to convince anyone that their
statements are absolute facts in regard to the immensely profitably crops they
are growing.


/1 i -


ace

LcQ4 ?im/h0cL4. %9C'L)


111_






9 9




Buffalo, N. Y., Feb. 20th, 1909.

Mr. A. D. Hart,

Kansas City, Mo.

Dear Sir:--

In reply to your inquiry of recent date, regarding the Everglades, will say
I had read the Company's literature and other papers regarding said lands, I became
very much interested, but thinking the papers and literature exaggerated the possibil-
ities and products of that country, I decided to go there and investigate and inspect
said land and surroundings for my own benefit.

I went there from Southern California a skeptic, thinking there was no coun-
try in the United States that could come up with Southern California, but imagine my
surprise on finding conditions entirely different than I expected. Instead of finding
the Everglades a low swampy land and stagnant water, I found it to be practically
prairie land, with here and there a small grove of timber and palm trees and practi-
cally or partly covered with clear fresh water with a slow current southward. I was
informed that the overflow of these lands is caused by rains and overflows of northern
streams and Okeechobee Lake.

I went out to the state dredge boats now in operation and I was surprised
to see the simplicity and ease with which this work is being done. Rapid and effective
is the progress these monster boats are making, lifting five tons of dirt every fifty-
three (53) seconds, working two crews and operating day and night. I spent several
hours on one of these dredges, and was surprised to see the men drink the water out of
these canals of the Everglades. I drank some of it and found it clear, good, fresh
water.

I saw farms and orchards on lands that were reclaimed or drained, adjoining
the Company's lands, that have Southern California bested by far when it comes to
fruits and vegetables, in size, quantity and quality.

But to realize what that county affords, you must see it. The products and
possibilities which that country affords are simply incomprehensible, unless you see
it. It may justly be called the Golden Florida, "the Nation's Garden Spot."

The Everglades Sugar and Land Company, with headquarters in Arizona and
Colorado, and known as the Southwestern Sugar and Land Company of Glendale, Arizona,
have already given orders to commence planting cane to supply a large sugar mill next
year, also Mr. Huyler, one of the largest candy manufacturers in the United States,
with headquarters at New York, is now at Miami making arrangements to put 4,000 acres
in cane this year; also a Mr. Comfort, of New York, a large ice-cream manufacturer,
is making arrangements to put in large crops.

With all these improvements going on, I do not see why these lands should
not double or triple in value within the next year. I would not hesitate to advise my
most intimate friend to invest in these lands, as in my opinion the Everglades are the
richest lands in the United States today not under cultivation. Trusting I have an-
swered all your questions, I am,
Very truly yours,

oa H. G. DEARISG.


J Q"
I .. .. .. .






9 9

Chattanooga, Tenn., June 7, 1909.
Dreuter & Le Gro,
State Commissioners, City.
Gentlemen:-
Complying with your request I take pleasure in submitting a statement of the
result of my investigation of the EVERGLADE lands now being reclaimed by the state of
Florida.
I had the pleasure of being one of a party of nine men, from different
states, who were there to inspect the lands, on a trip from Ft. Lauderdale up one of
the canals to where the dredge was at work. This canal was already completed for a
b distance of over seventeen miles, and is the regulation size, sixty feet wide and from
ten to fifteen feet deep.
As this trip was made in a motor-boat it was very easy to see the nature of
the soil through which the cut had been made. I found this to vary from three feet,
at the beginning of the canal, to a depth of 9 to 10 feet at the point where the
dredge was at work, and I understand that the further one goes into the Glades the
deeper is the soil. It is composed of black muck or loam and is undoubtedly as rich
a soil as can be found anywhere on earth. Underlying this muck is a stratum of marl
from six to eight inches deep; itself a fertilizer. Beneath this marl is a layer of
white sand, and underlying the sand, a coral rock which composes the foundation of
the entire state.
I visited experimental farms along this canal, and found various crops grow-
ing, and in excellent condition. The land through which the dredging has been done is
drained and therefore reclaimed. Was assured that if the large canals were not suf-
ficient to drain the land, that laterals would be dug at sufficient distances apart,
and this process continued until the result was accomplished. This method will prac-
tically put transportation at the door of every man who lives in this area.
Although my visit was made at a time that would correspond with the month of
August in this latitude, I did not find'the heat excessive, but on the contrary; the
air was very pleasant A steady breeze blows constantly over the EVERGLADES. There
is never any frost in this section. The vegetation is intensely tropical and anything
that can be grown anywhere else in the country can be grown here with success, and
that at a time when things cannot be grown any place else in the United States.
I find that this reclamation work will be completed, as per contract,
with reference to the lands that are now being distributed, not later than the latter
part of 1910; however, judging from the progress of the work, it will be completed at
a much nearer date.
Miami is the principal town in Southern Florida and is within six miles of
the lands that are now being distributed. It is thirteen years old, has a summer pop-
ulation of over 8,000 and upwards of 100,000 winter visitors. It has the best hotels
I ever saw and all the other conveniences of an up-to-date city. It fronts on Biscayne
Bay, through which the national government is now dredging a deep water channel to
connect Miami with the ocean (to accommodate ships of 18' or 20' draft).
The roads are perfect, being made of coral rock, at a cost not exceeding
$500 per mile. Hundreds of miles of these rook roads extend through the country in
all directions.
I find the people industrious and enterprising, the climate mild and pleas-
ant, the section particularly healthful, and malaria practically unknown. I saw no
mosquitoes, flies, fleas and understand that there never have been any objectionable
insects in the Glades.
Summing up it must be conceded that Florida has four essentials that will
make it unsurpassed as a farming and fruit growing section. When this reclaimed land
is open it will have the soil, it now has the climate, progressive citizenship, and
transportation facilities. This latter will be greatly augmented, as colonization
proceeds, and other railroad systems build their lines down into the state. I believe
' > that it is safe to predict that this section will, in a few years, be the richest
agricultural area in the United States.
Yours very truly,
D. l. DOTY.


^^^. ^^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^^











A SPECIALTY OF CREAAfI
HARLEM BRANCHES. C/H/NDIVStCAL BRICKS FOR.
/N ND/VUAL C FOFACTORY.
115 w as5E ST CHURCHESRECEPTIONS Erc. FACTORY.
79 w I3 ST ..... .. -. --. 28,30,328 34 NEW CHAMBERS ST.
TELEPHONE. "on' :t"rMmr' W$a ch MADE THROUGH TO
5850 MORNNGSIDE. 50,52, 54 56 ROSE ST.


MAIN OFFICE:
32 834 NEW CHAMBERS ST.
TELEPHONE:
5502 BEEKMAN. / Sept 22, 1909.








Mr.. V. W. Hel,
Chicago, Ill.
Dear Sir:

Yours of the 20th received. Our Canal will reach
about two miles out and we are now turning northward to strike some
higher sand and muck lands commonly called "islands." Te will be
in a position to rent your people acreage along canal line at $15.00
per acre. We will be able to rent lands on these islandsd" (part
sand and part muck) at $10.00 per acre. When you figure a man can
crop 300 to 400 orates per acre this price is very moderate. We
expect to crop from 100 to 200 acres ourselves and we have several
parties who will work large acreage on shares.

Yours very truly,









NOTE.- Mr. Comiort is President of the Read Ice Cream Co.. which manufactures as high as 25.000 gallons of ice
cream daily dunng the summer season. He ia associated with Mr. Huyler. the famouscandy manufacturer. in the ownership
of several thousand acres of Everglade land a few miles east of our property. A considerable portion of the Comforr-Huyler
tract has already been reclaimed, and land. which until a few months ago was partially inundated. is this season being planted
out to grape fruit trees. vegetables and sugar-cane. The above letter was written in response to a request as to whether some
Everglade land could be secured for rental this season. Note prices quoted.
EVERGLADE LAND SALES COMPANY.


r
















University of Chicago.






Dec. 8th, 1906.

Mr. E. A. Waddell,

Miami, Fla.

Dear Sir:-

In response to your inquiry in regard to the vegetation in Miami

and the surrounding country, will say that after spending several months

here and making a careful study of the subject, I find that this is the

only locality in the United States where true tropical vegetation is found.

The presence of this flora shows that frost does not often visit

this section.

HENRY C. COWLES,

Professor of Botany.






THE SHERIDAN GLOVE COMPANY .
MANUFACTURERS OF
COTTON GLOVES AND MITTENS, CANVAS
APRONS AND MUSLIN FLOUR SACKS '
DAILY CAPACITIES:
12.000 Pair Gloves SHERIDAN, IND., U.S. A.
4,800 Canvas Aprons
45,000 Muslin Backs

April 1, 1909.
Mr. F. A. Lindebergh,

Indianapolis, Ind.

Dear Sir:-

Replying to your inquiry of recent date asking for a statement concern-
ing my visit to the Everglades in Southern Florida, I beg to briefly state my
experience and views as follows:

A party of us, consisting of Dr. A. C. Newby, A. R. Nelson, Q. C. Vickery
and myself, all of this city, arrived at Miami, Fla., March 17th, and at once
took up the matter of looking over this land. West of Miami some five miles
we found the south end of this land adjoining the beautiful fruit and vege-
table farm of Walter Waldin. Mr. Waldin's farm is a fair example of black
land under cultivation, worth $1,000 per acre. Just across the ditch was the
same identical soil not under cultivation. The former land was not for sale;
the latter was "OPPORTUNITY,'' so granted by the great State of Florida,
making it possible for a great land company to turn over to the common people
of smaller means a large tract of land on small margin, yet experiencing
enough profit to justify the rapid sales.

At this, our first view of the great prairie known as the Everglades,
things looked much better than we expected, but when, upon the next day, we
were transported up the South Fork canal from Fort Lauderdale on a government
provision'boat to the scene of the great dredge at work about thirteen miles
into the Everglades, we became convinced beyond all doubt that the project in
its entirety was approaching a complete success.

The soil is very rich, deep and wonderfully productive. We saw absolutely
no trace of surface water on this land, up as far as it has been reclaimed, and
frequently we came across temporary tenants who are paying $5.00 (and upwards)
per acre rent for the use of this land and seemed very happy at the privilege.
Their tomatoes looked the best I ever saw, and were nearly ready for market.

I am satisfied that an energetic farmer could pay $500 per acre for this
land and make splendid interest on his investment. I believe the land will an-
nually double in value during the first five years, for the prices the grower
gets for the crops from this land range from three to eight times greater than
the prices received by the Indiana farmer from the same crop three to five
months later in the season.

Respectfully yours,

,,,. L. D. COX. *


tS






9


tip Grepn rt rr ntt
MRS. M. H. MARCH. Proprietor
MIAMI. FLORIDA


Miami, Florida, June 5, 1909.

Mr. W. D. O'Kell,

Columbus, Ohio.

Dear Friend: -

After a careful inspection of the everglades of Florida, I submit to
you the following account of same: When we arrived here we went in an auto-
mobile to the headwaters of the Miami River, from there on foot to an observa-
tory on the edge of the glades, where we could view the lands as far as the eye
could reach. We also could see dredge Miami at work.
We then proceeded to visit various farms on the edge of the glades, all
of which seemed to be in a prosperous condition, the orange and grape fruit
trees being especially thrifty and in better condition than any we saw any-
where else. We spent some time on Mr. Walter Waldin's farm; had quite a long
talk with him, and from his conversation and the general surroundings we
could not help but believe him when he told us of the large net returns he re-
ceived per acre. We visited several other farms in this locality and found
them in a prosperous condition.
From Miami we went by rail to Fort Lauderdale, where we took a motor
boat up the New River and on up both canals for a distance of about 16 miles.
We examined the soil at different points along the canals, where we saw pota-
toes, tomatoes and corn growing in abundance. We then went up to the dredge
where we spent several hours watching it work. While working steady it moved
about 4 1-2 cubic yards per minute. That they have plenty of fall was demon-
strated by having to dam up the water behind the dredge to float the dredge.
As to the depth of soil it varied from 2 ft. on edge to 10 ft. where the
dredge was at work, the character of which was black vegetable mould due to the
decomposition of the tall grass growing there. The conclusions we arrived at
from our inspection was that the land could all be drained successfully, in
fact, quite a large acreage was already drained, and that the soil surpassed in
fertility any we had ever seen.

Yours respectfully,


T. E. CRAIG.


_ _II_















North Platte, Neb., Feb. 13, 1909.



Mr. E. A. Kellett,

Minneapolis, Minn.

Dear Sir:-

In answer to your inquiry in regard to my trip to Florida in January
and what I found there, will say that I was interested in the literature put
out by the Florida Fruit Lands Company, and after reading what they had to say
thought I would go and see it for myself, for I was a little afraid that it
could not be as good as they represented it.

I was surprised very much, however, to find it much better than they
had represented it. I had always thought that the Everglades were swamps and
it would cost an unlimited amount to clear them, but I was entirely wrong.
Quite a portion of this land is drained and reclaimed now and I found parties
putting in crops on land that had been under water six months ago.

There are three dredges at work now making canals across this land
sixty feet wide and from ten to fourteen feet deep, and there will be three
other dredges put on the work within a short time, which will reclaim ll this
land in a few months.

I talked with several parties on ten and fifteen-acre farms near
this tract on reclaimed land, and when they told me that such land planted to
fruit trees was worth from $1,000 to $2,500 per acre, I decided to invest at
once, and have bought five contracts and want five more if I can see my way
clear.

I consider it the best investment I know of. If I were to advise
you, Mr. Kellett, I would say buy all you can of this proposition, and I am
sure you will never regret it.

By the way, in regard to climate and health, it can't be beat. I
talked with a doctor in Miami who had been there seven years, and he told me
that such a thing as malaria and fever was not known. He also added that
people came there to gain and enjoy good health, not to get sick and die.

PI Trusting I. have given you all the information you desire, I am,

Tours very truly,

W. A. CAUFFIAN.






.9








Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 10, 1909.



Mr. E. A. Kellett,

Minneapolis, Minn.

Dear Sirs-

Replying to your inquiry relative to my trip to Florida, will say
that it gives me pleasure to give you my idea of what I found in that sec-
tion of the country.

In the first place, in a short time after leaving this cold
climate, I found myself in "Sunny" Southern Florida, in one of the most
delightful climates it has ever been my pleasure to visit. I found the
farmers gathering fruits galore, as well as all kinds of vegetables, includ-
ing tomatoes, beans, potatoes and everything else that grows in a garden,
and shipping them to northern markets.

I must admit that I was very skeptical about the practicability
and the plausibility of draining the Everglades, but after I saw those mam-
moth dredging machines taking out the dirt at the rate of five tons per min-
ute, and having traversed the entire length of two canals, which gave me an
idea of the elevation of the Everglade lands (observed from the rapid flow
of the water) all doubt was removed from my mind.

As to soil, I have visited nearly every state in the Union, have
been all over Canada and down into the tropics of Old Mexico, and I have
never before seen such fertility of soil as I found existing in the Everglade
lands. A man who gets ten acres of this land may count himself one of the
fortunate few. If he plants it in fruit, or vegetables, in a few years he
will be independent for life. I would rather have ten acres of the Everglade
lands than own 160 acres of the best land in Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma or
Iowa. It will produce more annually, and produce it easier, than that amount
of land in the North.

I am arranging to buy ten contracts, for myself and different mem-
bers of my family, and expect to build a home in Florida.

With kind regards, I am,

Yours very truly,

E. C. CHAMBERS. -








TE OIPERAL LAUMWY,
C. W. BRIGHT & BROS., Proprietors.
VICTOR 136-PHONES--GRAND 281
ST. Louis, Mo.








Sept. 17, 1909.

Mr. E. F. Mooney,

Kansas City, Mo.

Dear Sir:-

We are in receipt of your letter of the 15th inst., and beg to say in

reply that we own one and one-half sections of Everglades land adjoining the

northeast corner of your tract.

Our land is not for sale at any price. After investigating different

bodies of land in different portions of the United States, including the

widely advertised Brownsville, Texas, district, we purchased this tract in

the Everglades, as we considered it the most wonderful country and most fer-

tile soil we had ever seen, and we intend that this land of ours shall be found

in our estate after we are gone, and meantime we intend to put it under culti-

vation. While the land is now in its raw state, still we consider every acre

of it worth at this time $50.00. However, as above stated, our land is not for

sale.

Wishing your company all the success in the world,

Very truly yours,

C. W. & J. H. BRIGHT.




4*

DRUGS 9 ESTABLISHED 1854
SUNDRIES
PAINTS
GLASS BROWN'S RED CROSS PHARMACY
KODAKS
SPORTING
GOODS EDMOND L. BROWN, PROPRIETOR
POST CARDS



Marshal, Missouri, April 20th, 1909.
Mr. H. H. Smith,.
Moberly, Mo.
Dear Sir:-
In answer to your request for a statement as to my impression of the Ever-
glades, after having visited Florida, will say:
That the I. I. Fund Committee now have available one million two hun-
dred thousand dollars to be spent in draining the 'glades. That the State is
under contract to drive these canals and such cross cuts as may be necessary
to drain the land. There are two dredges working out from Ft. Lauderdale about
fifteen miles; one on the west coast, and the new dredge Miami will start at
the head of the 1liami River in a few days. I was informed that it is purposed
to intsall two more dredges soon.
There is no question in my mind but that the Everglades can be drained
and that it is being done. I went up the Ilew River from Ft. Lauderdale and up
the canal to the dredge and saw it work, and it is wading right along. The
depth and quality of the soil is beyond question and it is all that is
claimed for it. As to what the land has produced and what can be done on re-
claimed land, I would refer you to the statement of Mr. Waldin of Idiami, Fla.
Capt. Fletcher, who has been on the dredge at flew River for two years
and eight months, told me that he had never lost a day from sickness in that
time and that he had not had a man leave the dredge on account of sickness and
that they were not bothered with mos-:uitoes at any time.
One of the leading physicians of Miami made the statement that malaria
was practical unknown in that section. I believe that the Everglades will
not be surpassed by any other section in the world for richness of soil and
productiveness when drained, and taking into consideration the climate
and healthfulness of the country, there is no better place to live the year
round.
At Miami T met Mr. Wray and went out to the Everglades with him west of
Miami. At this point there is oo water on the 'glades just now. Here I saw
the dredge Miami, which will go to work at the head of the Miami River in a few
days.
In Jacksonville I met Ex-Gov. Broward, who answered freely all the
questions I had to ask, and most satisfactorily, confirming the statements
made by Gov. Jennings and others and the many statements published over his
name. He impressed me as being sure in his own opinion that the land can and
will be drained and that the work will be pushed with all possible speed.
Gov. Broward informed me that the state would not sell any more of the
state land now, but would hold its lands and reap the benefit of the advance in
price which would surely come.
I am sorry I haven't time to write you more about the country and what I
think of the proposition. I made the trip in the interest of the contract
holders here, as they wanted to have someone go down and investigate the
holdings of the company and see what the so-called ''swamp'' looked like. I
have told them and they are satisfied.
Yours very truly,
EDMUND L. BROWN.


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F Ma
I.iami, Fla., May .1, 1909.
;. ,* '


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S Mr. Philip S. Delariy. "

Kaisas City, Mo.-

r Dear Sir:- .

In answer to yours of the 5th inst., I will say that I have both

pine land and Everglade muck land on my place, and have lived on same

twelve years, and during that time I have grown pretty much everything

in the line of vegetables, and also made a citrus grove which is beginning

to bear nicely. My. success in both.vegetables and fruit has been on

my muck land. All the truck farmers-that is, the successful ones--

are on-the edge of the glades, and a great many are beginning to see

where the first-class citrus fruit .is to come from. .And I dare say I

am doing today what. no pine land man is doing, and that is packing and

shipping oranges and grape fruit; and both fruits are.of superior

quality. Our governor and others are on my property at present,

sampling some of my fruit.-


Yours truly,



8{^ OWTL^^


Presque Isle Grove.


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Jacksonville, Florida, February 2, 1909.



Mr. Harvie Du Val,
J acksonville, Florida.

Friend Harvie:-

In reply to your inquiry concerning the drainage of the Florida
Everglades, will say that during the past administration of the State
government of which I was executive head, and as one of the Trustees, there
being four others, the Comptroller, State Treasurer, Attorney General and
Commissioner of Agriculture, we built two large modern dredges and commenced
the work of reclaiming the Everglades in July, 1906. Last August we con-
tracted for the construction of two more large modern dredges which are now
about to be completed, one of them to have a trial tomorrow at digging, and
the other one will be completed within a few days. One of them was built
for the purpose of extending a canal into the Everglades from the City of
Miaip the other to dig a canal, or rather to enlarge the present canal,
from the head of the Caloosahatchee River into Lake Okeechobee, then to
widen and deepen and further extend to complete a canal running south from
Lake Okeechobee to Short River.

Since these two dredges were ordered built, we entered into a con-
tract with a party buying a large acreage of Everglade lands to construct
another dredge, making five in all and putting the fifth one to work con-
structing a canal in a southerly direction from the south shore of Lake
Okeechobee to connect with the other canal now being constructed in the neigh-
borhood of Fort Lauderdale.

In answer to your question, I will say that the amounts due the
Trustees on sales already made and being paid according to contract on the
first of January of the present year amounted to Twelve Hundred Thousand
Dollars, a sufficient sum of itself to reclaim the whole territory of the
Everglades. Besides this, there are sufficient lands in the funds that would
. provide a good many millions of dollars that can be used under the law if
necessary; and there is no doubt in the world but that the work will be at-
vanced according to the several contracts with all possible speed. The demand
for the land is great and the Trustees know that the people are becoming more
and more impressed with the necessity of the settlement of these lands, and as
the surest means of rapidly developing all of the southern portion of the
,State.

Tours truly,





C ;70 l.


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,


Sedalia, Mo., August 12, 1909.


Mr. A. D. Hart,

Kansas City Mo.

Dear Sirt-

I have just returned from a ten days' trip making a thorough invest-

igation of the Everglades. The proposition is better than your literature

paints it. I have bought five of your contracts and am advising my friends

to do likewise. I have been a civil engineer all my life and am willing to

go on record as saying the drainage is only a question of labor. I would not

give ten acres of improved Everglade land for the best 160 acres in Missouri.

If this letter will be of any assistance in getting some one to

invest $10.00 per month in what I consider the best proposition I ever saw,

you are at liberty to use it.

Yours very truly

C. H. ZOLL.



















"CONSERVATION" EDITOR PREDICTS EARLY

COMPLETION OF DRAINAGE WORK







In a recent interview in the Washington D.C. Post, Dr. Thomas Elmer
Will, editor of the Conservation Magazine, had the following to say of the Ever-
glades drainage project.

"When these lands are reclaimed they will be so rich, it is estimated,
the products produced thereon will be large enough to support a population equal
to that of New England, New York and New Jersey.

"The work is being pushed forward at a Fapid rate," he said, "and the
engineers in charge say it should be accomplished by January 1, 1912. The recla-
mation plan has been agitated in the State for many years, and the present policy
of drainage is the result of plans formulated by J. 0. Wright, of the United States.
Dredges are at work draining the 'glade and converting them into a veritable
Garden of Eden.

"The forest service also is taking an interest in the work, for it
believes that the eucalyptus tree, which gives one of the most valuable woods in
existence, will grow to perfection in the region to be reclaimed.

"The government has sent Raphael Zon to investigate more thoroughly
the conditions of the soil for the production of this tree, and, that he will
report favorably, I am certain.

"From all over the country, people have visited this immense and
wonderful region for the purpose of learning for themselves its wonderful pos-
sibilities. Summer weather prevails continually."
















*.7








BULLETIN #4.

Chicago, Jan. 16, 1909

TO ALL OUR REPRESENTATIVES:-

We have just closed a sale for a large tract of our land, which will probably
stand out as the most memorable sale in our entire campaign. The buyer is Mr. C. A.
Walsh, who is the personal representative of William Randolph Hearst, and who was in
complete charge of the famous National Land Congress recently held in Chicago, and
which was attended by fully one thousand delegates from all over the Union, including
scores of governors and various other notables, representing the highest talent
throughout the United States.

Mr. Walsh's work in organizing this great Land Congress extended over a period
of several months, during which time not less than 1500 or 2000 land propositions were
brought to his attention. At the annual session of the Congress he listened for an en-
tire week to the various appeals and eloquent descriptions of "fertile soil, delightful
climate, etc., etc.," as portrayed by the many representatives from every section of
America.

After due consideration of our proposition, which was presented originally in
only a casual way, he decided to make a purchase from our Company,which was in competi-
tion with every other Land Company in the country. IF THERE IS ANY MAN IN THE WORLD WH(
OUGHT TO BE IN A POSITION TO SELECT THE BEST LAND, EITHER FROM THE STANDPOINT OF A HOME
OR AN INVESTMENT, MR. WALSH IS THAT MAN. Too much stress cannot be laid upon the signi-
ficance of his purchase from us.

Nor did Mr. Walsh confine himself to a personal purchase of 40 acres, for
which he paid one-third of a year's payment in advance; he interested his brother-in-lal
as well, Mr. H. M. Viele, who has had five years' experience in operating a banana and
sugar plantation in the tropics, and who is fully acquainted with the wonderful soil
fertility and climatic conditions of the Everglades. Mr. Viele purchased 30 acres and
has closed arrangements for an additional 400 acres for his friends, who will join Mr.
Walsh and himself in the operation of a large plantation in the Glades.

I know this will be interesting news to all of you. Mr. Walsh has expressed
his willingness to have others know of his purchase, and you are at liberty, therefore,
to inform your prospective buyers accordingly.

Yours sincerely,





Vice President.
(Jan. 16, 1910.)
P. S. We have just been informed that Don Farnsworth who was actively
associated with Mr. Walsh in the management of the National Land Congress, and is also
the chairman of the "Ways and Means Committee" of the Chicago Association of Commerce,
has made a large purchase in the Everglades. The Miami Metropolis in reporting the
transaction says: "Mr. Farnsworth is decidedly enthusiastic over the Everglades and
says he believes that section will eventually become one of the most productive and
profitable vegetable growing sections of the world." These ar. but examples straws
that show which way the wind is blowing. Of ALL men Mr. Walsh and Mr. Farnsworth cer-
tainly should know the best land buy in the U. S. Their action in this matter
speaks louder than any praise we could possibly.bestow upon the Everglades.
Sd







T. A. WINFIELD,
ORANGE AND GRAPEFRUIT GROVES
AND VEGETABLE FARMS AT
LITTLE RIVER, FLA.





Little River, Fla., March 4, 1909.

Mr. Fred G. Perkins,

Kansas City, Mo.

Dear Sir:-

I have your letter of February 25th, asking a statement of my
experience in farming on the edge of the Everglades.

In the thirteen years that I have farmed here I have never
lost money on a crop but one season. That loss was from a flood in
February. Drainage to lover the water only a few inches would make
that land safe.

The yield per acre and the gross returns have varied greatly
from year to year. In growing tomatoes, my best crop, where. I
staked and pruned the vines, was about one thousand crates per acre,
and the best where I did not stake and prune was eight hundred and
twenty-five crates per acre. Under normal conditions I get about
four hundred crates per acre, with-gross returns of $1.50 per crate.
The cost of producing, packing and delivering at the railroad is about
sixty cents per crate, varying, of course, somewhat, with the distance
from the station.

While I have had gross returns from egg plant at the rate of two
thousand dollars per acre, and peppers at about. the same, conditions
were unusual, and my average returns on these have been about the
same as tomatoes.

I have a grape fruit grove of thirty-five acres, and find that
on the low lands the trees make the best growth, they are free from
scale, and make the heavies-t and brightest fruit.

Yours truly,

T. A. WINFIELD.


-- ~ '























Miami, Fla.

March 8, 1909.



TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:-

I came to Hollandale Fla. 16 miles north of Miami,

in Dade County, and bought 160 acres of land two years ago.

In 1907 I averaged about 240 crates of tomatoes to the

acre on fifty acres and made a net profit of $13000 on tomatoes

alone.


J. B. WOFFORD.


WEEMP- -

















Miami, Fla., April 28th, 1909.



Mr. R. J. Bolles,

Colorado Springs, Colo.

Dear Sir:-

Mr. Walter Waldin, of Miami, is the owner of Fernview Farm, and a
recognized authority here. He is a practical, and one of the most success-
ful, growers on Everglade land here.

I have frmin tim3 to time made notes of his comments. Here are a
few of them, and you can bank cn them as being absolutely correct. He is,
as you know, on a h.amock in the 'glades, about six miles from Miami.

On this harmmci:k soil he placed about 18 inches of pure muck. He
mulched this .ith abcut 2 inches of Everglade grass, and in it planted 108
pineapple slips. This 'aaz in August. Sixteen months after he had a crop
of 96 apples, *rhicf averaged four pounds and were the sweetest he had ever
eaten. When the app1eia aeie planted he put on a small quantity of cotton
seed meal. Waldin simply planted these apples as an experiment to see if
the muck -i;ould produce a good growth.

On seven-elevenths of an acre he planted tomatoes. This tract
gave a yield of 455 :rates, netting him $1.97 per crate. On a full acre
this would have netted him $l,3?91.06. This was in the early winter of 1902.

On a tract of land 30 by 90 feet, Waldin planted lettuce. The
rows were 14 inches apart; the plants 6 inches apart in a row. These
matured plants sold during the tourist season for 75 cents a dozen. This is
at the rate of $3,000 per acre.

On a tract of land 7 by 70 feet, Waldin planted a crop of radish-
es. He got, every twenty-three days, a crop and repeated this five times.
It netted him at the rate of $5,000 per acre.

These are astounding figures, but I am fully satisfied of the
truth of every statement made by him. These facts should be placed in the
hands of every northern man.

Sincerely yours,


HENRY RUSSELL WRAY.


P---,W ---,









FEWRNIEW FARM
Walter Waldin



Miami, Florida, Sept. 6, 1909.


Mr. E. F. Mooney,

Kansas City, Mo.

Dear Sir:-

Rather late to answer your letter of inquiry, but just got back from
my vacation, and am taking up correspondence in rotation as received, so
please pardon the delay.

I have just returned from an extended trip through the Middle West,
covering some ten states, and if I saw anything in weather, soil or agricul-
tural advantages to compare with this county I did not know it; in fact, this
investigation only served to bring out more emphatically than ever the many
really good points we enjoy every day here. Yes, we have the whole U. S.
skinned to death-California included-when it comes to the standpoint of
weather or climate, soil or moisture supply, market facilities, transporta-
tion, and any other of the good things it takes to make life worth living. Why,
we have the only place in the whole U. S. where all kinds of tropical fruits
flourish, such as Cocoanuts, Avacadoes, Mangoes, etc., or where Bananas can
and will be grown on a commercial scale, and where vegetable crops can be
grown without danger of killing frosts.

It will be hard to estimate just what advantages we possess at the pres-
ent time, the country being yet in its infancy, but with this large body of
rich earth under control as far as water is concerned, with this warm sun-
shine when most of the U. S. is covered with a mantle of ice, with these ex-
cellent transportation facilities, by rail or water, and many other advan-
tages, each of which would be a great inducement to any settler in a northern
"country, it is hardly to be wondered that the homeseeker turns in this
direction.
Very truly,


WALTER WALDIN.


I ~_


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1




@




Kansas City, Kas., March 25, 1909.

Mr. Chas. E. Russell,

City.

Dear Sir:-

I have just returned from a trip to South Florida. I have seen with my
own eyes and have availed myself of every opportunity to gain correct in-
formation. I have talked to early settlers, as well as to practical men from
the north and from the west, and as a result of a thorough investigation, have
returned with an unbounded faith in the great prospects of the drained Ever-
glades. I feel some hesitancy in talking about some of the wonderful condi-
tions with which I was confronted for fear of being classed with Munchausen or
the author of Arabian Nights, and I would rather that all who possibly can
would see for themselves.

Allow me to touch briefly on a few points: The State of Florida will
vigorously push the digging of canals large enough to successfully and last-
ingly drain the Everglades, and the drained Everglade land produces every-
thing, from a potato, tomato, cabbage, up to oranges, grapefruit, bananas,
etc., and produces abundantly. The truck garden stuff can be raised while or-
chard trees grow to maturity and brings splendid returns. I have no reason
to doubt statements made by people who are now working such lands when they
told me that $500 per acre net are common results and $1,000 to $1,500 per
acre net are not unusual for one crop. The climate is delightful, while the
atmosphere in the Everglades was clear and pleasantly cool; the soil was
plenty warm enough to warrant a splendid growth. I did not discover any mos-
quitoes, nor could I find anybody who had ever heard of malaria in the Ever-
glades.

As another item of interest I shall mention that Miami will soon have a
deep harbor, and that probably within ten months. Fast steamers between that
town and all northern points will give cheaper transportation for all prod-
ucts.

In conclusion, let me state, this new country will be developed
swiftly now by northern and western people. Large interests are now buying
up vast tracts of land for sugar cane plantations, rice fields, etc., so that
in a few years it may be impossible for the man of moderate means to get a slice
of this garden spot, and intelligent people will appreciate the opportuni-
ties now offered to make an investment which wil make fabulous returns in a few
years.
Yours truly,


MART WEISSENBORN.


---





*



I j Alton Park, Tenn., June 5, 1909. ;
Dreutzer & Le Gro,
State Commissioners,
736 Georgia Ave., City.
Gentlemen:-
I will endeavor to give you a statement of my trip to Southern Florida,
where I went to investigate the RECLAIMED EVERGLADE lands you are now dis-
tributing, and if you think this letter will' be of interest to the people of
this city and state you are at liberty to use it.
I first went to Miami, where I spent several days looking over the lands
and talking to the growers; then in company with Mr. D. M. Doty, of Alton
Park, and several other gentlemen from various states, who were there for the
purpose of inspecting the lands, I went to Ft. Lauderdale where we took a
launch and went up one of the canals, for a distance of over seventeen miles,
to where the dredge was at work. I saw the land drained and under cultivation
on both sides of the canal and we got out of the launch and went over on the
land and picked tomatoes and other vegetables, which were growing on the
land but recently reclaimed.
The EVERGLADES are a vast prairie covered with nothing but a growth of
saw-grass and are free from trees, stumps, brush, vines, rocks or any obstacle
against cultivation. The water, which has been overflowing this land (dur-
ing the wet season) is pure, clear as crystal and is constantly on the move.
The soil in the Glades is a rich black muck, unlike the rest of the state,
which is sand and coral rock. All kinds of fruit, such as Oranges, Grape-Fruit,
Lemons, Bananas, and all other kinds of tropical fruits are raised in abun-
dance, and there is always a good market for all fruits and vegetables at a
good price.
The climate is all that could be desired and I found, even at this time
of the year, that it is much colder than in this section. This is due to the
refreshing ocean breeze which blows continuously across the Glades. One
fact with which I was particularly impressed was that there are no mosqui-
toes, fleas, flies or other objectionable insects to be found in the Glades and
the country is entirely free from malaria. I spent ten days down there and
slept without a mosquito bar and with the windows of my room wide open and
was never once disturbed.
For several years I have been looking for a desirable place to locate
and in my travels have visited different sections of the country, includ-
ing Southern California, but I must confess that nowhere have I found the
climate, soil and general conditions so favorable and enticing as in this
reclaimed section, and as further evidence of my faith in the country I might
add that I have purchased two farms and am now making preparations to take
up my residence there at once.
I certainly wish to thank you for the information which led to my making
this trip and I trust that you will succeed in convincing many others of the
wonderful possibilities which await them if they will heed what you have to
tell them.
Yours very truly,


PAUL WEISE.









FIRRVREW TFARMO
Walter Waldin.


Miami, Florida, Dec. 29, 1909.


I. Bates, Esq.

Dear Sir:-I have just picked from less than four acres of beans,

the first picking, 282 crates, netting over $1,000. There will be some

five or six pickings altogether. These lands will be very valuable when

thoroughly drained. I have inspected the land after the dredge has

reclaimed it and in my opinion too much cannot be said in favor of same.

It will take brains and brawn to improve this immense tract, but

every acre can be made to bring just such crops as I have and that will make

$100 per acre look like 30 cents as a price for this land. In fact, it can

be made to be worth $1,000 per acre with comparatively small effort and in

a very few years.

Mosquitoes are troublesome sometimes in the summer here on the edge

of the Glades, but of late years we have had very few. In fact, they are

getting less and less and I would sooner see all the mosquitoes around me

for a month as we have them here than brave a day's weather such as you

have had this winter.

Our health is of the best, and we have nothing to complain about

except we need some of your bad, rainy, sleety, snowy weather for com-

parison, as ours is so evenly good we just think it must be so always.

Very truly yours,


021.04


I






HARRY B. SWEENEY

Independence Truck Gardens

Cabbages. Cantaloupes. Radishes. Onions*
Peas. Beans, Beets. Turnips. Cucumbers. Car-
rots, Squash. Lettuce. Spinach, Parsley. Etc




Congress Heights, D. C., Aug. 5, 1909.

Messrs. Bowen Brothers,

Washington, D. C.

Gentlemen:-

I have just returned from my trip to Miami to investigate the land of-
fered for sale in the Everglades.

I went out to the dredge Miami and spent several hours watching this
powerful machine cutting a canal sixty feet wide and ten feet deep through
the richest land I ever saw. The glades look like a western prairie. The
water is fresh and good to drink. For a long distance on each side, the land
is drained behind the dredges and all you have to do is to burn the saw grass,
plow and plant your crop.

I visited several reclaimed farms on the edge of the glades near Miami
and found that the land was wonderfully productive. The farmers make from
$500 to $1,500 per acre on such crops as lettuce, cabbage, potatoes, peppers,
tomatoes, beans, and celery. I saw a grape fruit orchard of three year old
trees in bearing on Everglade land. The trees were large, strong, and
thrifty, and fully equal to eight year old trees in bearing on sandy land
nearer the coast. In short, I found the land fully up to what you claim for
it, and when the Everglades are fully drained, which is rapidly being done, I
am confident that it will become one of the most populous and prosperous sec-
tions in the United States.

Wishing you great success, I am,
Very truly yours.


HARRY B. SWEENEY.






M .



Fort Lauderdale, Fla., July 24th, 1909.
Mr. T. W. Crowe,
Kansas City, Mo.
Dear Sir:-- A
Your favor of May 10th came to hand just at the beginning of my tomato pick-
ing and found me too busy to write or to take time to make any investigations on which <
to base a letter, and I have been very busy ever since our shipping season closed.
I did, however, take a day and make a trip up each canal as far as the dams
behind the dredges. I will say now that I have NOT had much confidence in the drain-
age scheme and had given it little thought, but since I made my last trip up the
canals I have surely changed my thinking.
I rode up on one of the new power boats and rode on the hurricane deck most
of the way. I also took with me a small telescope that I might see distant objects
clearer. I could see easily and distinctly two and three miles on each side of the
canals and I saw the ground apparently as dry as the prairies of Iowa, Nebraska or
Kansas; as level as the prairies of Northern Illinois or as the surface of a lake.
This surface is cut by many creeks that were before the cutting of the canals the deep
places and outlets from the 'Glades to the rivers flowing into the ocean, and they are
today carrying away surplus water into the canals and out of the way and I cannot see
why one cannot live on these 'Glades just as well and safely as on any of the western
prairies.
I found the "Southwest trade winds" blowing as nicely there as on the ocean,
and there were no signs of mosquitoes and the men on the dredges say they see VERY
FEW. The soil is different from any that I have ever seen anywhere. It is not silt
or any deposit, for there has never been any current there to carry sediment. It is
black to the rock below and as rich as any land on the face of the globe.
r saw farms out as far as eight miles. Many places where winter crops had
been grown were grown up to weeds from five to twelve feet high, which may give you
some idea or the fertility. As near as I could estimate, the surface of the land lay
from FOUR to SEVEN feet above the water in the canals, and as far as I could judge one
could drive a loaded wagon anywhere within two miles on each side of the canals.
NOW MIND, THIS IS THE WET SEASON. We have our DRY SEASON in the winter,
beginning in November usually, and the winter is our farming time I can't see why
any crop planted there should not yield the largest yield,,nor can I imagine any vege-
tables that would not do well there. The soil is heavy, but porous, and should raise
any kind of citrus fruits. It is FAR AHEAD of our mucks, marls and "Salt and pepper"
lands that we are farming now and think so much of.
You surely should come and see the land, for no one can write a fitting
description of it. While getting an idea of the soil you would also get a taste of
our climate, which is also different from any other place in America. If you come in
the winter you will enjoy going around in a straw hat and summer clothes while folks
at home are bundled up and shivering. If you come in the, summer time--now for in-
stance--you will find the mercury standing 85 to 88. It has been to 98 one day last
month. An elegant breeze from the ocean, just as cool as the Gulf Stream, which is
but five miles from where I now sit. No sun stroke or heat prostrations. I am a
farmer past sixty and work every day in the sun, which is now only about three degrees
south of this place. June 24th and 30th the aun was north of Havana, Cuba, which for
the time being was the equator.
This is my fifth summer here and I enjoy them more than any I have spent in
any other state, and I have lived or traveled in more than half of them. I have not
paper enough to hold all I oouli say for this country, so I think I had better quit
right here.
Come and see ds any way.
Yours truly,
A. J. SNOW.




r 5.....








Central City, Neb., Feb. 5th, 1909.




Mr. E. A. Kellett,

Minneapolis, Minn.

Dear Sir:-

My trip of investigation, covering a large territory in the Ever-

glades, convinces me that Ex-Governors N. P. Broward and W. S. Jennings are

carrying out a well planned system of drainage that will very shortly reclaim

these lands, which are very rich, producing an endless variety of crops--

pratically anything a man desires to grow, the season being twelve months of

every year. The climate is all that one's heart could wish for, and I was

thoroughly captivated by it and the generous hospitality of the people there.

I predict that the Everglades will be settled up with northern people as

fast as it is reclaimed.

Very truly,


JAMES SMITH.





M Ik


Lamed, Kan., June 11, '09.

Mr. L. A. Bone,
Wichita, Kan.
Dear Sir:
In my recent trip to Southern Florida in company with 0. Cornell, our mis-
sion was to visit the Everglades and satisfy ourselves with a personal investigation
regarding the probabilities of the drainage of this great tract of land, its agricul-
tural possibilities and the general climatic conditions.
Concerning the drainage my conclusions are that a personal inspection will
convince any reasonable person of the feasibility of the plan and we have the assurance
of Gov. Broward that funds are ample. We made a trip up one of the canals from Fort
Lauderdale to the dredge which is 39 miles north of Miami, this dredge is now working
in the center of this tract of land. The dredge outs a canal 60 feet wide by 10 to 14
feet deep.
The assertion has been made that the Everglades cannot be drained because of
insufficient fall. This is a mistake, as the fall is from 21 to 30 feet, determined
by competent engineers, and can be readily seen with the naked eye. As fast as the
canals are out the water runs out, leaving the land drained for an area of 2 or 3 miles
on either side, and the soil being a loose alluvial loam, the water sinks and leaves
no pools or mud puddles. There are two dredges working directly in this ground. We
found the water to be clear and pure and not stagnant as most generally supposed.
The soil in the Everglades is a rich deposit of decayed vegetation ranging
in depth from 3 to 12 feet, and is shown by the government reports and tests to be the
most productive soil on the globe.
The climate is delightful, healthful, and unknown to killing frost. A cool,
balmy breeze passing over from the east and west coasts with a mean temperature of
75 degrees.
We visited several farms on part of the drained ground and found vegetables
'and fruit growing in profusion, and the owners told me they cleared from $300 to $1500
per acre each year, and on observing their fruit and vegetables I had no reason to doubt
their assertions and my visit was made during the most unfavorable season of the year.
We also visited Miami. We expected to find a small Southern village, but to
our surprise we found one of the most up to-date and beautiful cities in our travel
with almost 10,000 population; the business section has the snap and hustle of the
eastern cities. The grandeur of the residence portion is beyond description, it is
simply a large park with the most brilliant flowers and beautiful foliage growing in
profusion everywhere.
We did not make this trip or visit the ground with any real estate man, but
made the trip alone and at our own expense to investigate for our own interests. In
conclusion I would say to my many friends that for the small investor looking for a
home, or for the speculator, this country offers inducements that are hard to believe
until you see what can be grown on this land: the most wonderful variety of tropical
and semi-tropical fruits and any garden product known to man.
Land that can be purchased for $30 per acre that will produce in three
months crops that will market at from $300 to $500 per acre is certainly a record
breaker in land investments.
Yours truly,
0. I. SMITH.


_ ~YI_~






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GENERAL OFFICE & FACTORY
BRANCHLS GRAND RAPIDS. MICHIGAN.U.S.A. TMWWILLIAMS MELL PREST
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SG9 B Pj P.,EABI JJU June 17, 1909.

Messrs. Hagadone & Lewis,
City.
Gentlemen:-

In answer to your inquiry relative to the possibilities
of the land re-claimed by the drainage of the "Everglades" in Florida,
would say that I have lived at Miami, Fla., in the winter time for the
past right years and occasionally investing in different classes of
property, I necessarily became familiar with the possibilities of the
soil in that portion of the world.

Using my own judgment, I regard the drainage of those
lands as one of the most important events that history records when we
contemplate that its completion will add millions of acres of the rich-
est soil of the continent to the available agricultural resources of
the nation.

These lands are capable of producing in luxurious pro-
fusion every species of plant and vegetable growth that is at all in-
digenoue to a sub-tropioal climate.

If the investor in those lands will consider the climat-
ic advantages, I am confident that it would be rare if you lost an oppor-
tunity in interesting the party who may investigate. I made an offer on
1,200 acres of this land before leaving Florida one year ago, but did not
succeed in closing the sale.

I believe that the completion of this great work will
offer an opportunity for securing homes remunerative as an investment
and surrounded by the advantages of a moderate climate that the wealthy
seek the advantages of and pay enormous prices to obtain.

Wishing you sucpeos in t$s matter, belidvb me

Very truly,


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