Resolutions, Petitions, Briefs - Everglades Land Sales Company

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Resolutions, Petitions, Briefs - Everglades Land Sales Company
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Folder: Resolutions, Petitions, Briefs - Everglades Land Sales Company

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Subjects / Keywords:
Everglades (Fla.)
Okeechobee, Lake (Fla.)
Okeelanta (Fla.)

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University of Florida
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S


Miami, Fla., March 7th, 1909.

The Florida Everglades Land Company,
Colorado Springs, Colorado.


I stayed over three days at Jacksonville, Florida, and waited for the
Governor's party. Decided I could get more valuable information by doing so,
as Governor Broward would head the party. I did not make a mistake in doing
this, as I had some most delightful trips, that I could not possibly have taken
otherwise, with the Governor in the lead. The Governor is a most royal good
fellow-broad-gauged and liberal-and one of the plainest and most practical
men I have met in many years.

We had a most delightful trip through the Everglades and up to the
dredges. The drainage proposition is a most feasible and simple one, but it
is an immense undertaking. There are no finer lands in America and, in my
opinion, will produce almost anything under the sun that can be grown in a tem-
perate or tropical zone.

I saw most wonderful crops of all kinds of vegetables and tropical
fruits growing all in the same fields right along the borders of the Ever-
glade lands. Some of the trees were literally breaking down with grape fruit,
oranges, lemons, etc. I have too much to say about it to attempt to write it.
I will tell you all when I see you. No one can begin to appreciate it until
they see for themselves. Pineapples, bananas, cocoanuts ahd all the real
tropical fruits develop here to perfection. I am going to stay here a few days
more until I get a good lot of letters from prominent people who are reliable
on the various crops produced here. I am going among the actual fruit growers
and truckers to get this data and then I will know I am right.

There are some of the most beautiful homes and orchards in America at
Miami and along the rivers, and this country is practically new in this imme-
diate vicinity.

If enough money is spent, in two years the water in the Everglades out-
side of the canals wouldn't swim a teal duck, in my opinion.

Broward is an absolutely reliable and thoroughly competent man in every
way and his dream will be fully realized and the entire scheme will, beyond
the shadow of a doubt, be a dazzling success. He is the smartest and most prac-
tical man in the State of Florida.
Yours very truly,

A. H. ELLETT.









.


_ ____I_




"if -


N. B. BROWARD
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.



Jacksonville, Fla., May 1, 1909.
Mr. Philip S. Delany,
803-4 Scarritt Building,
Kansas City, Missouri.

Dear Sir:-

In reply to your letter of recent date, will say that the Everglade
Land Sales Co., of Kansas City, Mo., are selling a tract of land that is
now being reclaimed by the State ot Florida. It constitutes a part'of
the land known as the Florida Everglades, which may be described as a
wet prairie, being a strip of land about one hundred and fifty-five miles
16I-0 '-fifty-five miles wide, and lying between the pine and swamp lands
which have grown over two reefs of rock running parallel with each other
from north to south. No rivers penetrate into the 'Glades beyond these
rock reefs on either side, and the land is very level, only about twenty-
one and one-half feet above sea level, being composed chiefly of muck
and sand lying in a basin with a rock bottom. The annual rainfall over
this territory averages nearly sixty inches. It has, for this reason
and because this rainfall Yas no outlet over these reefs, been and is
too wet fnr cultivation. The muck, which overlies the sand and rock,
varies from about two feet on the edges of the 'Glades to a depth of
twenty feet in the mi' F e and would average over the whole territory a
depth of between six and eight feet. The land is free from trees and
stumps and almost free from bushes; the item of clearing being of no
consideration whatever, simply requiring mowing down the grass and burn-
ing it, when the soil is ready to be'tilled-, as soon as the excess waTer
is run off.

The soil as compared with other portions of the country, taking
into consideration its natural richness, location and climate, is more
valuable for agricultural purposes than any that is known, being partic-
ularly adapted to the growth of cane, cotton, Irish potatoes, celery,
tomatoes, cabbages, turnips, beets and in fact any crop will grow well
on these lands, except such as require a colder climate.

The few persons who have as yet cultivated Everglades lands as a
business have found the yield per acre very large, and prices high for
their crops grown there at a'season when they cannot be grown anywhere
else in the United States.

The quantity of land now reclaimed is very small, perhaps not over
twelve thousand acres, but two other dredges will be put to work within
a few days, and the work of reclamation will be pushed rapidly and by
the middle of the year there should be reclaimed. monthly, from ten to
fifteen thousand acres. The people living on and about this land are
he.a.Lthy. It is free from malaria anadu rers and it is my opinion that
within a few years it will constitute one of the most valuable agricul-
tural areas in the United States.


Very truly yours,


sJ-xc n -"







N. B. BROWAR
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

-.

Jacksonville, Fla., May 1, 1909. *1
Mr. Philip S. Delany,
803-4 Scarritt Building.
Kansas City, Aiseouri.

Dear Sir:-

In reply to your letter of recent date, will say that the Everglade
Land Sales Co., of Kansas City, Mo., are selling a tract of land that is
now being reclaimed by the State of Florida. It constitutes a part of
the land known as the Florida Everglades, which may be described as a
wet prairie, being a strip of land about one hundred and fifty-five miles
long by fifty-five miles wide, and lying between the pine and swamp lands
which have grown over two reefs of rock running parallel with each other
from north to south. No rivers penetrate into the 'Glades beyond these
rock reefs on either side, and the land is very level, only about twenty-
one and one-half feet above sea level, being composed chiefly of muck
and sand lying in a basin with a rock bottom. The annual rainfall over
this territory averages nearly sixty inches. It has, for this reason
and because this rainfall Vas no outlet over these reefs, been and is
too wet for cultivation. The muck, which overlies the sand and rock,
varies from about two feet on the edges of the 'Glades to a depth of
twenty feet in the middle and would average over the whole territory a
depth of between six and eight feet. The land is free from trees and
stumps and almost free from bushes: the item of clearing being of no
consideration whatever, simply requiring mowing down the grass and burn-
ing it, when the soil is ready to be tilled, as soon as the excess water
is run off.

The soil as compared with other portions of the country, taking
into consideration its natural richness, location and climate, is more.
valuable for agricultural purposes than any that is known, being partic-
ularly adapted to the growth of cane, cotton, Irish potatoes, celery,
tomatoes, cabbages, turnips, beets and in fact any crop will grow well
on these lands, except such as require a colder climate.

The few persons who have as yet cultivated Everglades lands as a
business have found the yield per acre very large, and prices high for
their crops grown there at a season when they cannot be grown anywhere
else in the United States.

The quantity of land now reclaimed is very small, perhaps not over
twelve thousand acres, but two other dredges will be put to work within
a few days, and the work of reclamation will be pushed rapidly and by
the middle of the year there should be reclaimed, monthly, from ten to
fifteen thousand acres. The people living on and about this land are
healthy. It is free from malaria and fevers and it is my opinion that
within a few years it will constitute one of the most valuable agricul-
tural areas in the United States.


Very truly yours,

















a. aD xwt.'EC




June 17, 1909.



Everglade Land Sales Company,

Kansas City, Mo.,

Gentlemen:-

Replying to your letter of the 4th inst., will say: The Trustees

of the Internal Im;rovement Fund, having the control and disposition of all

the vacant State lands, granted to the State of Florida, under act of Con-

gress, approved September 28, 13EO, have withdrawn all such lands from the

market, which lie in the Everglades of Florida for the reason that the

Fund is sufficiently equipped to carry on the work of drainage for some

time, and for the further reason that they prefer selling lands behind the

dredges, as they become more valuable as the work progresses.

I cannot say when these lands will be placed on the market.

Doubtless public notice through the press will be given when they are

restored to market.

Yours very truly,




Smissioner of Agriculture.

















Miami, Fla., October 19, 1909.


Everglade Land Sales Company,

Kansas City, Mo.

Gentlemen:-

In reply to your letter of October 14 will state that I have trucked on
muck land with good success for six years. I have grown beans, tomatoes, cucum-
bers, squash and Irish potatoes. I believe that by putting in a smaller area and
tending it carefully one can do better than by planting a larger area, which would
necessarily receive less attention. A man should average on ten acres 300 to 400
crates to the acre in tomatoes, and I have raised as high as 600 per acre.

The muck soil I consider most fertile; it will raise almost anything in
the line of vegetables in large quantities. I much prefer it for trucking to the
pine land.

I have a small grove on an island in the Glades in grapefruit and
oranges, which is only three years old, and yet it is already bearing, whereas as
a rule a grove takes five or six years to come into bearing.

When the Glades have been drained I believe the fruit trees will do
extremely well on muck and grow much faster on muck than on sand.

Ten acres of Glade land, carefully farmed, will provide a handsome in-
come for a man.

I have farmed in several places in Florida, on several different kinds
of land, but I am convinced the muck land of the Glades is the best of all of them
in richness and productivity.

Yours truly,


J. D. LEE.










Miami, Fla. October 20, 1909.
Everglades Land Sales Company,

Kansas City, Mo.

Gentlemen:-

In answer to yours of October 10, will say that I have cropped on all varie-

ties of Glade land in this neighborhood since 1895. I remember the timewhenfour

acres was the largest crop anywhere in the Biscayne Bay section. The year after

the largest single crop was eleven acres.

With fertilization the 'Glade lands will make the heaviest crop of any I

have ever seen anywhere, and I have farmed in the Mississippi Valley, Western

Tennessee and Kentucky.

In my fourteen years' experience here I have had only one comparative

failure, and I have ranged from $80 an acre to as high as $1,300 net. The latter

was an exception. My average net profit was $120 per acre for fourteen years,

and I only cropped for the market during the winter and spring. In the sum-

mer one can raise okra, sweet potatoes, corn and pumpkins. A practical man

with a little care can make a good income on ten acres.

The average the county over on tomatoes will run about 200 crates to the

acre (marketable), and the average price will be from $1.50 to $2, though, of

course, on muck land this is often exceeded, 600 crates being not unusual.

The muck is extremely rich, and I believe it will grow almost anything adapted

to the climate. When the drainage is finished I expect to see there great and

prosperous plantations of bananas, sea island cotton, sugar cane and rice in-

terspersed with smaller farms devoted to vegetables, and on these farms a

happy and prosperous people. A man can begin here with less capital than any-

where else on earth, and with application can soon be independent.

Very truly yours,

E. H. KIRKMAN.

(Mr. Kirkman is successful practical farmer of Dade County and expects to continue planting indefinitely. He has farmed at Cutler, Ken-
dal, Cocoanut Grove, and will farm on the reclaimed Eveiglade land at the head of the Miami River this season, southwest of the canal.)


"" '_ .e _.... ..







The Bank of Bay Biscayne
ESTABLISHED IN 1i89
JOSEPH A. McDONALD J E.LUMMUS JAMES HM.ILMAN
a IeINOET ~vICE PRESIDENT CASHIER

Miami, Florida,


October 21st, 1909.







Everglade Land Sales Co.,
Kansas City, !Jo.
Gentlemen:

In conversation with your 'Jr. Henry G. Ralston
to-day, he asked me to write him what my opinion mws with
reference to the drainage and reclamation of the Everglades.

I have been an advocate of the drainage propo-
sition from the beginning of the work as I believe that the
work is practical and that the lands will be valuable when
drained.

The location of your lands as shown me on the
map by your Mr. Ralston is near the proposed line of the
canals which should make them desirable.

Yours truly,



^^^^L^^^ag




-3 Ars w-


. J.
A. J. I


I IA I. 1LI-tIIII)


Miami, Fla., October 81, 1909.


Everglade Land Sales Company,


Kansas City, Mo.


Gentlemen:-


In answer to your letter of October 10th, I will
outspoken in my support of the drainage of the Everglades.
for some time past, an assured fact, it being now a simple


state that I have been long
This is now, and has been
problem of digging.


Opposition, fostered by many causes, is rapidly disappearing.
many formerly most bitter against it are now anxious for and aiding it,
fully realize the possibilities of the immensely fertile region and the
will arise to Miami and Florida from its development.


In fact,
as they more
benefit which


The possibilities of the Everglades agriculturally are boundless. Their
muck soil is admitted among the richest soils in the world, and will grow almost any-
-_ thing in great quantities; truck of all sorts, sugar cane, rice and fruits (including
many varieties practically unknown in the North); these are a few of the products with
which we expect to see the Glades covered in the next few years. With the incoming
of an industrious, intelligent class from the North, it does not require the eye of a
seer to perceive Miami a large city; an agricultural kingdom at her back; steamship
lines north and south; a canal across the State from Atlantic to the Gulf; a railroad
across the Glades. These things will all come.

On the Glade land, with a little intelligence and application, a man may get
larger returns on less capital than in any business that I know of anywhere. A truck
farm or a grove handled competently will net a man a splendid income, and in this
section, as far as possibilities go, the surface has not yet even been scratched.


i
44


Yours truly,


Ir


4'e


I'TZLIL4 a! 1 011IU) 1olto nt'Aa' SEC.-TREA.

Til MIAMNI PRINTING COMPANY
IPuInI ANI> .lult P.mnIN(. A i*IPr:(-rl rP I


4%



3*


R






A. J. BUNDLE, PRESIDENT 1896-109 S. OBO DEAN, .-TREA.

V THE MIAMI PRINTING COMPANY tf
PUtrBLBslRs DAILV A ND W'I:EKY NIETROPOTI.s
B OOK .AND .JoB PRINTING A SPECIAIrITY
SILJMnll. FIORIDA


) HNew York, Oct. 23, 1909.


ToWhom it May Concern:
N The land offered to the public by the Everglade Land Sales Company is palt
S.'df a tract of the drained Everglades, and is situated near the town of MLami, Florida,
directly served by two of the State drainage canals, of which si-teen miles at the
north end and six miles of the south terminus have already been finished. Owing to
centuries of accumulation of humus,"black muck, which is decomposed vegetable matter,
it is perhaps the richest and most fertile land in the world.
It requires no work in clearing, but after setting fire to the flag and saw
grass is ready for a crop.
Immediately after the grass is burned off, it can be planted in vegetables
of all kinds, a few of which are mentioned below and which yield a most abundant crop
within four weeks, namely potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, beans, okra, onions, eggplant,
celery, melons of all kinds, and many more.
Also tobacco can be raised easily, but takes longer time and more cultivation.
While such crops are being harvested the fruit trees can be planted, includ-
ing every tropical variety, namely, oranges, grapefruit, mangoes, lemons, avocadoes,
bananas, almonds and nuts of all kinds. Small fruits of every description, such as
strawberries, can be harvested several times a year; in fact, the growing never stops,
hence the returns for the farmer are continuous.
As to the money value of crops from this land, every one with the slightest
experience can easily estimate it, when in potatoes, for instance, from 200 to 400
bushels per acre can be obtained, the quantity depending only upon the good or bad
manner of cultivation.
Freight facilities for such products are good by rail or by water.
An effort is being made to interest the best class of people only, and so far,
this has been successful.
Health conditions are absolutely perfect, neither malaria nor fever prevail-
ing, and insects are no more annoying than in the least troubled parts-of the United
States; the Everglades have no mosquitoes.
The distance from New York to Miami is about forty hours; from Chicago
forty-eight hours by rail.
A peculiar advantage of this country is, that while it rains more or less
all the year round, the rainy season occurs in the summer. Thus the land can be cul-
tivated at all times and early vegetables can be grown and shipped at a time when they
bring the highest prices. From this can be-seen that from two to four crops may be
grown every year on the same land before the northern crop come into market.
The soil of the Everglades is from six to twenty feet deep, of the richest
and most fertile land imaginableF for a generation practically inexhaustible, and
$450.00 per acre yield is a low estimate for this land, properly cultivated. Last
year land rented as high as $20.00 per acre; from yield, as explained, its value oan
be easily computed.
The City of Miami is the southernmost on the eastern mainland of the
-ntted States. It has a population of about 10,000 inhabitants, its harbor is being
dredged by the .Government to accommodate large vessels; it has excellent railroad
facilities; wtr'-a climate superior to that of Cuba, and to my idea, the finest in
the world., .
With such'facilities for shipping and trading, with the most healthy climate
and back of it a pountry4he richest in the world as illustrated by above statement of
facts, it must become a great metropolis of the South, of suoh rapid development as will
astonish the observer.
os truly,
-Mii~


















Miami, Fla., October 29,.1909.

Everglade Land Sales Co.,

Kansas City, Mo.

Gentlemen:-

Three years ago I rented 40 acres of lani (muck and marl), located near

Dania, to J. M. Holding, of that city, on the following plan, namely, furnishing

the land, doing the breaking and preparing and whatever else; plough cultivation

was necessary. I also furnished the seel for the plants for a consideration of

the first 50 crates of tomatoes off of each acre, packed and delivered to the

R. R. station at the tenant's expense. Tomatoes that year brought $2.00 and

$2.25 per crate.

All the work I did on the land, including the growing of the plants,

ploughing, cultivating, etc., I Icntracted at $14.00 per acre, earning a neat

young profit. On ten acres, which Mr. Holding cultivated carefully, he averaged

500 crates per acre (marketable).

Last year I rented the same 40 acres, with the weeds on them, and did

no cultivation, ploughing, or anything else, for $20.00 per acre.

Very truly,


W. L. BURCH.
















Jacksonville, Florida, Nov. 3, 1909.


Mr. H. G. Ralston,
Vice President Everglade Land Sales Company,
Miami, Florida.

Dear Sir:-

In acknowledging receipt of your esteemed favor of October 23rd, will
s ay that I have done a great deal of work in investigating the character and
value of the soil of the Florida Everglades, and that the lands are of uniform
character, without trees, roots or stumps, that the territory is covered by a
strong dense grass, but remains too wet for cultivation, except in isolated
spots. The soil is probably as rich as any soil in the world, and in my
judgment will become as valuable for agriculture as is any land in the United
States. It is my opinion also, that if taken acre by acre or a thousand acres.
by another thousand acres, and so on, it is uniformly fertile--the most fertile
on the continent.

It is true this land must be reclaimed by drainage. The State now
has four large modern dipper dredges at work extending four 60-foot canals
through the Everglades. The Trustees contracted with Mr. Bolles to put on a
fifth dredge, and I understand that they are contemplating the construction of
even a sixth dredge. Just how long it will take to reclaim the territory de-
pends upon the number of dredges and the number of hours that each dredge shall
work in each day of twenty-four hours; but it is a reasonable estimate to say
that six dredges operated day and night would make a large proportion of the
Everglades tenable and cultivable within two years. No one should be invited
or permitted to occupy any but safe lands until the work of reclamation is
sufficiently advanced to prevent any injury to crops from excess rain fall.

s very truly, -








C7^^Z<^%


, I _






9 9








NEW RIVER HOTEL.

P. N. Bryan, Prop.



Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Nov. 25th, 1909.

After a thorough investigation, both at Miami and Fort Lauderdale,
of the proposition of the Everglade Land Sales Company, we believe it is all
that has been represented, and more. We have seen the best grove in Dade
County (oranges and grape fruit), growing on pure muck soil and its close
second on hammock. On pure muck we also saw beautiful palm trees, bamboo,
castor beans, cocoanut trees, bananas, etc., and each of these was flourishing.
We believe the soil is capable of producing almost anything suited to the cli-
mate, and is extremely rich. We saw settlers already moving on lands, which,
before the coming of the canals, were under water most of the time. We saw
the way in which the supplementary canals (which the company will cut) will
permanently reclaim the lands; and we believe the whole proposition feasible
and easy of accomplishment.

We also believe that such lands as these considering the climate
(12 months growing season), the fertility, ease of access to market, variety
of products which may be produced, Improvements to be made by the Company,
etc., are a thoroughly sound and profitable investment -- either for the
homeseeker, or from the investor's standpoint -- and shall report such to
those who await our decision before investing. From the homeseeker's stand-
point, this is clear to all, and as for an investment, muck Everglade lands
are already selling at from $45.00 to $100.00 an acre, the latter being a
profit of over 300% at the present selling prices.

(Signed)

B.B. Gibson, (Wichita, Kansas.)
S.B. Gibson, ( )
Nicholas Hinderer, ( )
Mrs. S. B. Gibson, ( )
J. K. Gordon, (Michigan, N. Dakota.)






















Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

Nov. 27, 1909.

Everglade Land Sales Company,

Miami, Fla.

Gentlemen:-

Replying to yours of Nov. 10th, inquiring as to my success on muck,

the following facts should speak for themselves. I have cropped on muck

lands, up the new river, for 7 years. The first year, two and one half acres

netted $2,500 on one crop of tomatoes. Each year since then, I have made

good money off muck, cropping tomatoes.

Three years ago, my partner and myself netted $1000 apiece off one

and one half acres of muck. The only failure I have made was last year, wherr

I planted on high pure land, and was dried out. If I had stuck to muck, I

would have made my usual good money.

Yours very truly,

W. J. ROSSIE.


- -- -- -- --- --C





S.jReioie.e 200S St. Louis Avenue
10,000 Acres of Land for SaI *LBe215-217 SPtoun BAdn.
Near Duluth, Minn. OL

THEO. IVENS
SIOUX CITY. IOWA

Mr. V. W. Helm, Miami, Nov. 28th, 1909.
Majestic Bldg.,
Chicago, Ills.
Dear Sir:

The letter that you gave ome to your vice president, Mr. H. G.
Ralston, I carried for two days before I made myself known to him, for the reason
that I wanted to get the general conditions and thoroughly satisfy myself in regard
to the property of the Everglade Land Sales Company from others before I met your
Mr. Ralston.

Yesterday I visited the Everglades, going in a gasoline launch from
Tort Lauderdale. We visited several Citrus fruit groves on pure -uck -- or Ever-
glade land -- and I saw one of the finest orchards I have ever seen. I was told
that oranges and grape fruit could not be grown on muck soil. I am now in a posi-
tion to say that such statements are absolutely false and misleading. I also, on
my way up the canal, stopped at the home of A. E. Gage, whose farm is between 4 and
5 miles in behind the dredge. He has at this time, I would say, something over an
acre in bananas, sugar cane, grape fruit trees and pine apples. He is very enthus-
iastic I asked him what he would take for his farm of. 20 acres. He said that he
had been offered $75 00 an acre, but at this time he did not care to sell.

I saw several new houses on the banks of the canal, that have been
built since the dredge passed their farms; also people living in tents. I talked
with Mr. Comfort last night. He informed me that he was going to put out 200 acres
in vegetables this winter and that he would commence putting out his tomato plants
next Tuesday, the 30th.

I have met some of the most enthusiastic'fruit growers and truckers
that I have bver seen, who told wonderful stories in regard to net profits produced
on these lands from both the fruit and vegetables, ranging from $300 to $lOodier
acre .

In regard to the drainage, I had some doubts before I visited the
Glades. I saw the reclaimed land, and the land before the dredge, the rapid
current in the canals which are 60 feet wide and 8 to 12 feet deep, and having had
5 years of experience in drainage, I do not hesitate to say that they will be
drained. But I kner from experience that I have had that there will have to be some
lateral drains put in after the State canals are in. Your company (Everglade Land
Sales Company) having pledged itself to spend $100,000 in this kind of work, which
is more than twice the amount that the State is spending, is a guarantee to every
person who purchases, whether he purchases 5 acres or 640 acres, that he will get
land that is drained and ready for cultivation. Your contracts have several other
good advantages over contracts that I have seen.

A large volume, could be written on Dade County, and then the half
would not be told. It is a county of unlimited resources. And Hiami, the seat of
Dade County, is the most beautiful city of its size that I have ever seen. Every
street is paved, and on every street can be seen all kinds of tropical trees;
plants and flowers, from the smallest plant to the Cocoanut Palm.

In this land of sunshine, free from blizzards and cyclones, I hope
to make my future home just as soon as I can arrange my business.

Yours truly,










THE DAILY METROPOLIS

VOLUME 7 NUMBER 1 MIAMI, FLORIDA. 12 PAGES


(News Column, Miami Metropolts,
December 1J, 1909.1


STATE RELEASES

MORTGAGE ON

EVERGLADES LAND


TRACT PURCHASED BY DAVIE
REALTY COMPANY HAS BEEN
PAID FOR AND4.COMPANY IS
IN POSITION TO GIVE WAR-
RANTY DEEDS TO ALL PUR-
CHASERS.


The most important legal papers
filed in the office of the clerk of the
circuit court last week, were the
release from the State of Florida to
the Davie Realty Company, of the
$66,666 mortgage on the 80.000 acres
of Everglades land purchased from
the State about a year ago, and a
deed from the Davie Realty Company
to the Everglades Land Company,
conveying 46,080 acres.
This latter tract is in townships 50,
51 and W2, in -ranges 38 and 39 east.
Another deed was recorded conveying
16,960 to the Garden Land Company,
in townships 63 and 54, of the same
range.
The two companies mentioned above
purchased their land from the Davie
Realty Company some time ago, and
have recently made final payments
and secured deeds.
These tracts are considered the best
of Everglades lands, as the Davie
Realty Company was one of the first
land companies to purchase land in
this county, and had the choice of
property.


IEditorial Column, Miami Metropolis,
December 14, 1909.)

AN ITEM OF INTEREST.


In its news columns yesterday the
Metropolis published an item of con-
siderable interest., both to those who
have opposed the drainage of the
Everglades and to those who favor
the project. The item, briefly recalled,
is this*
On December 6, 1909, there was
filed for record at the Dade county
court bouse a satisfaction, or release
of mortgage, on 46,080 acres of Ever-
glades land, given to the Trustees
of the Internal Improvement Fund
by the Davie Realty Company, of
Colorado Springs. This gave the
Davie Realty Company clear title to
the property. On December 10,
1909. was filed a deed for the same
land to the Everglades Land Com-
pany, of Miami. from the Davie
Realty Company. The title to this
property is thus clearly vested in th%
Everglades Land Company, and the
company entrusted with the sale of
the property (the Everglades Land
Sales Companyj is therefore prepared
to give a warranty deed to its buy-
ers. This action is only a fore-
runner of similar transactions to be
made in the case of each of the land
companies that have bought State
land on deferred payments. Some
time ago the Metrepolis was chal-
lenged by a paper to show the page
of record concerning these land sales.
It was well known that all the
sales of Everglades lands were
made by the State on deferred pay-
ments and that they could not have
a deed to the property until final pay-
ments were made. The Davie Realty
Company Is the first to make com-
plete payment, and therefore the first
to receive clear title-to the lands.

















P. N. Bryan .
i.. Proprietor





4:.: -- .. .
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Dec. 17, 1909:.

NBA f-
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERNt-. .-:

Af ter a thorough investigation of the proposition of the Ever-!.;:. 4

'Ae Land Sales Co. both at Miami and Fort Lauderdale, I believe that it

is everything that the literature of the Company has claimed it to be. I

.be lieve the lands of this Company to be a sound and very profitable in- .

ve Tent, and further, that one who buys at the present prices will be in
_. 1,,
a; position in the next few years, to realize several hundred per cent on

b% 'investment, should he care to sell.

To the homeseeker, this land offers endless possibilities -- t -q

sail seems to grow anything in great quantities; and the climate permits -

t he culture of vegetation and countless products impossible to grow in the

I., :S ort"h.

SL Tradnsportation facilities, extreme fertility of soil and oliat

ib ne to'lke an investment in this laid a ..great opportunity t I
A G

.U5 y I:7 S.
one oom.to. Succe in this

rickert thpn anywhere oe ICo h l itro
,. -....- I S ..A.: -p, :":J)


-. At ,.
ji ~ llseem togro an~hln ingroa quntites;andthe limte eM~ii I '4






1N 513 .
J.F.DOWING,Pn ma, CAPITAL $500,000. '.T. CHI.DS, Assr. CA-snER.
CrJ.i.SUBBmRDVUCNsc rSmtE,. SU RPLUS (EARNED) $700,000. V.K.TUGGLE, AsT. CAsNrER.
GEO.B. HAfIlRISON, JR.,,caPREstm (CASlII:R. G.O..OMOORE,AsaT. CASHNER,



NEW ENGLAND NATIONAL BANK


KANsAS CITY MO. Daec~mber 24, 1909.



TO WHOM PRESENTED:

This is to certify that the Everglade Land

Sales Company, of this city, of which Mr. Phillip S. Delany

is president, is a valued customer of this bank, and is en-

gaged in selling lands in the Evergladss of Florida. They

have already sold quite a large amount of land, and expect

to do a still larger business. We believe this company is

in the hands of responsible men, and that the company will

be able to carry out any contracts it may make. We take

pleasure in commending them to any of our friends.


Sree .






GREEN TREE INN OPEN THROGHOUr THE YEAR MARC LA OPENS DEC lar


THE GREEN TREE INN
M. H. MARCH. PROPRIETOR
MIAMI. FLORIDA





We, the undersigned, have, with Mr. H. G. Ralston, of
the Everglade Land Sales Company, yesterday and today
(Jan. 11-12, 1910) visited the Everglades both by the Miami
Canal and the South Canal at Fort Lauderdale, and from our observ-
ation, think there can be no possible question of the ultimate
success of the drainage operations.
We saw remarkably fine grape-fruit and orange groves on
muck land under circumstances which appear to us to be identical
with those that will exist on ''glade'' land as soon as the
water is off.
The vegetables we saw growing on drained land looked very
fine and we saw some of them on land less than one mile behind
the dredges.
With the possibilities of such a wide range of products,
the climatic conditions that assure almost unfailing good crops,
and the wonderful richness of the soil, it appears to us that
there can be no doubt that people who buy tracts of this re-
claimed land will be sble to realize wonderfully large returns.


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