Papers re. National Popular Government League and District of Columbia Suffrage League

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Papers re. National Popular Government League and District of Columbia Suffrage League
Series Title:
Writings, Speeches, News Clippings, and Miscellaneous Papers
Physical Description:
Unknown
Publication Date:
Physical Location:
Box: 23
Folder: Papers re. National Popular Government League and District of Columbia Suffrage League

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Everglades (Fla.)
Okeechobee, Lake (Fla.)
Okeelanta (Fla.)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
sobekcm - AA00000150_00014
System ID:
AA00000150:00014

Full Text



REPRINT FROM
86D MIAMI DAILY NEWS, Sunday, June 9, 1946


OUS


T


E


D


GI6


DE'S


EER


DR


S The board of supervisors of the Dade Drainage district feel that the following
report by Carl A. Bock, internationally known civil engineer, is of vital concern
to every person living in Dade county in view of present health conditions. For
that reason, Mr. Bock's report is presented here in full.

Mr. Bock was vice president and assistant to Dr. Arthur Morgan, of the
Morgan Engineering Company, which prepared the original plans for drainage and
water control in the Dade drainage district in 1927. Subsequently, Mr. Back was
assistant chief engineer in charge of design and construction for the Tennessee


Valley Authority and he now is in charge of the Puerto Rico Water Resources
Authority at San Juan, P. R.

The board of supervisors of the Dode Drainage district in publishing this
detailed report, recognize an obligation to the more than 20,000 persons living
within the district, and offer it also as a public service to all of the people of
Dade county, in view of the references to continued development and to the health
conditions of the area.
I Dade Drainage District, T. N. Toms, President.


Drainage facilities have made at a time when the habitable areas a
possible the occupancy and utiliza- of South Florida were more or less t
tion of extensive low lands adja- restricted to the narrow coastal t
cent to Miami. ridge. Agricultural development in s
Digging the drainage outlets and this region then was extremely a
lowering the water table in the limited because the high sand land t
coastal area has permitted a land- appeared to be unsuited to many d
ward incursion of salt. water at kinds of crops, and the adjacent I
depth, and s u r f a c e incursion muck lands were water logged and s
through the drainage canals. inundated too much of the time to e
This slow but persistent en- permit farming. The Everglades s
croachment of salinity has twice hinterland surrounding Miami was a
previously compelled moving the shunned by man as a forbidding
Miami well field, originally located swamp harboring snakes, alliga- a
near tide water, to locations farther tors and mosquitoes, unlivable and c
.removed. Salt contamination now useless to the pioneer immigrants t
again threatens the water supply, who had brought their homes to its r
having been drawn into the wells borders. With the construction of s
from the adjacent Miami Canal. the Miami Canal and other drain- f
age outlets to the ocean, however, t
This situation, coupled with sev- age outlets to the ocean, however,
eral successive years of low rain- came the realization that this back
fall and seasons of drouth; and a country of muck lands had great t
rapid increase in water supply de- agricultural possibilities. The U. S. t
mand due to the phenomenal Department of Agriculture, the U. 1
growth of metropolitan Miami, has S. Army Engineers, and officials of s
caused alarm as to the adequacy the State of Florida, as well as d
of the water supply, and has cre- land owners, became interested in s
ated demands that the well system these agricultural possibilities and i
be protected.' publicized their merits, and sub- v
e protected districts were organized within the i
It has been stated that to push boundaries of the Everglades c
back the salt intrusion or d.or its Drainage District to undertake s
advance it is necessary to place drainage developments. Among s
barriers in the drainage canals and these was the Dade Drainage Dis- t
raise the water table in the land. trict, established with the Miami f
There seems to be some doubt as to Canal as its main outlet to theg
whether these measures would per- south, and the Little River Canal s
manently safeguard the well field, and Biscayne Canal as outlets to u
and some question as to what af- theeast. t
feet such a raising of the water
table may have on the septic tanks Out of such drainage develop-
and on sanitary conditions in the ments have.come the tomato fields
area, of Dania, the immense truck farms t
Rea bordering Lake Okeechobee, the c
Repeated reference to the effect great bean market of Pompano, the t
of lower water tables on salinity sugar cane plantations, and dairy
and continued reference to over- herds of south Florida, and the a
drainage have engendered a popu- muck land citrus groves. Also
lar belief that drainage and flood came a great suburban develop- I
control facilities have been con- ment. A recent inspection of the .
structed far in excess of real need. region disclosed innumerable homes 0
The recent years of subnormal that have been built in the north- i
rainfall and consequent drouth western suburbs of Miami, many f
have contributed support to this small businesses and industries,
belief and have tended to minimize boat works and other developments
the importance of drainage and along the lower Miami Canal, great
flood protection, airports, factories, and air bases t
The Everglades Drainage Distict which have grown up within the
under pressure of these conditions boundaries of the Dade Drainage I
has permitted the Miami Water District. These amazing develop-
Board to construct a salt barrier ments owe their existence in part i
dam in the Miami Canal to protect to other influences than a lowering
the Miami well field. Additional of the water table, but it is diffi-
controls in the canals are proposed cult to conceive of their taking
with a view to raising the minimum place in undrained swamps. The
water table in the vicinity of the measure in which these develop-
field. ments are desirable is outside the
Surface slopes are slight in the scope of this discussion; it is cer-
Everglades and in the canals, and tain that they could not have ma-
a slight raising of water table or terialized so extensively without the
water surface in one location will aid of drainage.
affect these surfaces for great dis- The metropolitan area of Miami,
tances. Raising these levels de- part of which lies within the Dade I
stroys a corresponding storage ca- District, has had phenomenal I
pacity in the ground and in the growth with a winter population a
canal system which is useful in ab- estimated in excess of 300,000, and r
sorbing sudden rains and helps to an increasing industrial develop-
prevent harmful flooding. ment that received considerable im-
While the U. S. Geological Sur- petus during the war period. Such
vey reports indicate that the sug- a population requires living room i
gested controls are necessary to and while the coastal ridge affprds
save the well field, they do not a considerable strip of high ground,
state that it is economically desir- the inevitable result is that homes
able or necessary to save this field. are spreading back in all direc-
They indicate other areas where tions in what was formerly con-
ample and satisfactory water sup- sidered Everglades land. This in-
plies may be obtained. crease in population brings with it
The drainage canals and lowered increased markets and a demand
water tables have been obtained at for land suitable for farming. Much
great cbst and effort on the part of these lands are quite low, 4 to 7
of the property owners. They feet above sea level. Considerable
make possible the human occu- parts of communities such as Hia-
pancy and utilization of extensive leah, Miami Springs, and northwest
low land necessary to Miami's ex- Miami, and the surrounding farm
pending growth and which, with- developments, could not exist with-
out drainage facilities, would re- out drainage-frequent inundations
vert to original swamp and over- would render them unsanitary and
flow conditions. unsafe. It is believed that Miami's
An important question involved growth will continue resistlessly to
in the situation appears to be one press out into the surrounding low
of engineering economics as to lying areas, and that this expansion
whether the problematic saving of will require all of the existing
the present well field is worth sac- drainage outlet facilities in order
rificing a part of the existing to maintain a water table low
drainage and flood control facilities enough to permit such use of the
to the extent required to keep the land. To impair these drainage out-
salt invasion permanently* out of lets and thereby reduce the degree
the field, or whether it would be of protection against flood condi-
preferable to move the field to a tions is to impede the growth for
preferable to move the field which increased water supply be-
safe location adequate to all needs. which increased water supply be-
comes necessary.
In view of these conflicting in- comes necessary.
terests and the apparent need of an A CONFLICT OF INTERESTS
authoritative analysis of the eco- Following this urge for land rec-
nomic problems involved, it is be- lamation there has gradually come
lived that before further action is forward a somewhat contrary urge,
taken a comprehensive s t u d y and a most laudable one; that of
should be made of the economic saving some of the wilderness areas
aspects of the situation by a con- and the wild life of the region apd
potent engineer or board of en- of conserving the unused muck
gineers experienced in the water lands and theft' water resources
control field. in their original state against fu-
Since the situation concerns not ture needs. This conflicting trend
only the metropolitan area of Mi- hasreceived much encouragement
ami but that of Dade County in because of various ill advised
general, it would seem appropriate schemes of unrestrained land de-
for this engineering study to be velopment and certain questionable
made under the auspices of Dade efforts of the State itself to "comn-
County. plete the drainage of the Ever-
glades." The general arguments in
THE DRAINAGE favor of conservation practices in
DEVELOPMENT the abstract are so commendable
The lower Miami Canal was ex- and attractive as to enlist readily
cavated nearly a half century ago a widespread public approbation,


Lnd it is often difficult to reconcile which "would result in prematurely
he various conflicts arising be- drying out unoccupied lands, with
ween different interests in the undesirable fire hazards." Conser-
settlement of a new courftry. Prob- ovation plans are desirable, and
ibly few persons would contend could be furthered by public park
that there should have been no and forest reservations appropria-
drainage development in south ately protected. There is yet a large
Florida; few would have the pre- area of Everglades untouched by
lent developments revert to a wild- drainage canals.. Specific plans
erness swamp; the real question should be developed for conserving
seems to be how far and how fast the water resources of these lands
should such developments go. for future use and for protecting
Americans have been profligate the muck soil itself against oxida-
nd wasteful in their exploitation tion and fires.
of the natural wealth of the coun- Absence of drainage however is
Absence of drainage however is
try. Soil and water are among the not a cure all for the fire menace.
most precious of these natural re- Lack of drainage, and even retard-
lources, and it is well to give care- ing dikes or levees, do not elimin-
ul consideration to the manner of ate the effects of drouth. During
heir utilization, excessively dry periods the rank
A more specific conflict of in- growth of tall grass dries up and
restss has emerged recently will burn fiercely if accidentally
through the water supply needs of lighted. In general the surface
Miami. The last four years in water supply in the Glades comes
south Florida have been unusually directly from rainfall and during
Iry, the need for increased water protracted drouths it is dissipated
service has expanded rapidly dur- by evaporation and transpiration,
ng the war, and discovery of salt by surface runoff and by seepage.
water intrusion into the well area Evaporation and transpiration
n 1939 have combined to cause alone account for the removal of
considerable public alarm over the perhaps three quarters of the entire
situation. Publicity regarding the rainfall. The West Levee forms a
salt incursion, and reports of cur- continuous barrier between the
ailment of service and inadequate lands of the Dade Drainage District
ire protection have tended t6 ag- and the undrained Everglades to
gravate this alarm. Statements the west. This barrier was visited
suggesting that overdrainage has at the north end, at the south end,
unduly lowered the ground water and in the middle portion, early in
table, resulting in salt encroach- May, 1946, and it was found that
nent in the Miami area, and that the water was down to practically
:his situation can be corrected only the same elevation on both sides of
be raising the water table, have the levee; on the Tamiami Trail
caused considerable concern among the water was only a tenth of a
he property owners in the drain- foot-higher on the west side than
age districts. The need for drain- that on the east side of the levee.
age and flood control has had little The Glades to the west were prac-
lotice during the recent years of tically as dry on the surface as the
ow rainfall; public attention has lands east of the levee.
rather been focused on problems
ef water supply, with an apparent Before the confining levees were
increasing emphasis on the con- built around Lake Okeechobee and
lict of interests in water control before the lake level rises were
problems. The public agencies held down by the outlet canals east
mainly concerned in the situation to the ocean and west to the Gulf,
include the Miami Water Board, it is likely that considerable vol-
;he drainage districts, and the umes of water from the lake area
Dade County Commissioners, the at times overflowed southward into
matter board having been given by the Glades during periods of high
recent legislation certain functions water. The extent to which this
in connection with water problems. affected the water levels in the
Glades northwest of Miami is not
DADE DRAINAGE DISTRICT known, but it is doubtful if it would
PLANS make a great difference in water
Following a field inspection of levels there during periods of pro-
the Dade Drainage District and ad- tracted drouth. In any event this
jacent areas April 20-May 3, 1946, source is now cut off, and when the
the writer reviewed the reports of Glades area dries up from lack of
1927 and 1928 which outlined a gen- rain, the presence of dikes can not
eral plan for the District, and also restore surface water levels when
read several reports on investiga- rain is lacking.
tions of water resources in south-
eastern Florida dealing mainlywith It is believed that in periods of
the problem of salinity intrusion in extreme drouth the most effective
he problem of salinity intrusion in method of combatting the fire
the Miami area. The drainage plan i by o at of fi
of tWe Dade Drainage District, asmenace is by a system of vigilant
recommended in the reports df 1927 patrol, by providing an effective
and 1928, was one of progressivefire fighting organization and b
development westerly from what is continuous, sustained publicity and
now N. W. 27th Avenue, and north- education, such as is maintained
erlr from the southernmost boun- by the U. S. Forest Service.
dary (now N. W. 20th Street), us- OVERDRAINAGE
ing the Miami Canal as the main A complaint that is now finding
gravity outlet. It proposed that frequent expression against drain-
the development should progress age efforts- in south Florida, par-
slowly as warranted by actual needs ticularly since the publishing of
and that detailed plans for the re- studies of salinity intrusion in the
mote areas must await the acquisi- Miami area, is that there has been
tion of agricultural experience in too much drainage. In respect tc
the District. The plan contemplated the Dade District, its engineers rec-
the initial development only of that commended that the plan should
portion of the area which lies east provide reclamation for restricted
of the West Levee. The plan called areas, and avoid heavy investment
attention to the need for precau- for incomplete reclamation of large
tions against fires, the undesirabil- areas and for outlet facilities
ity of rapid and unrestrained de- greatly in excess of present needs
velopment, t he subsidence o f The development has proceeded
drained and cultivated muck soil, along these lines; the area planned
and the desirability of conserving for drainage improvement is be.
the waters of the Everglades to lieved to be a reasonable one ir
protect the soil and as a source of view of the development that hai
future irrigation water supply. The occurred in this region, and the out
wisdom of the plan of gradual and let facilities are not in excess ol
limited extension of the drainage the needs of the area. In con.
improvements seems to be indi-sidering the overdrainage criticism
cated by a subsequent elimination in connection with the Dade
from the District of the lands lying District, it may be appropriate t<
west of the West Levee, to be con- recall that, nearly 20 years ago
served in its present undrained when the State administration pro'
state for future utilization. The moted an outstanding scheme of un-
writer is of the opinion, after read- restrained development by author-
ing the reports, that the plan in Izing the expenditure of $20,000,00(
general is still valid, and that the "to complete the drainage of thi
general conclusions presented at Everglades," the supervisors of the
that time still hold. Dade District were among the few
FIRES IN THE GLADES men in Florida who had the cour
Fires are an ever present men; age to publicly oppose this legisla
ace in the Everglades. A suggested tion.
means of combatting this menace The annual rainfall in the Ever
is to conserve the surface water on glades area may vary in some
all lands not in use, and-to drain years by almost a hundred pe
only such areas as can be used cent. The annual losses by evapo
and protected. This idea is not ration, which in some years may ap
new, it was advocated by eminent proximate the average annual rain
engineers some 30 years ago, and fall, also varies due to the effect
the plans of the Dade Drainage of winds, humidity, and tempera
District have recognized the need ture, but is much less variable that
for conserving, the Glades surface the rainfall. Thus it can happen
waters for future irrigation re- in a year of extreme drouth tha
requirements as well as for a pro- the evaporation and transpiration
tection against fires. In a report losses actually exceed the rainfall
of 1927 the engineers for the Dade and result in an extremely lo1
District warned specifically against water table. Such a condition car
unrestrained drainage development occur in areas where there are n


drainage ditches. Drainage causes and provide excellent pasture for
lower water tables-that is its in- cattle. These grasses, especially
tended purpose. "Overdrainage," Para grass, can stand considerable
however, implies too much drain- water and can be grown where the
age, and frequent references to this land is only partially drained.
term are'apt to encourage a belief Feeding cattle on these grasses for
that conditions resulting fro m the market has proved quite prof-
drouth are actually caused by over- table, and this is now rapidly
drainage, instead of being due to a bringing extensive land areas in
lack of rainfall coupled with ex- the Dade District and adjacent dis-
cessive evaporation. tricts into use and into increased
To be fully effective drainage fa- value.
cilities must be capable of remov- While general methods of control
ing surface waters resulting frobn are suggested for the drainage
heavy rains quickly enough to pre- canals, data appears to be lacking
vent harmful flooding. In general as to the number of dams required
it is believed that one of the chief and their location, and the amount
faults of drainage projects in south of increased flow to be provided in
Florida has been not excessive ca- order to maintain the two and a
pacity, but rather inadequacy, in half foot ground water elevation
the drainage outlets. contour east of the wcll field. Ob-
WATER SUPPLY PROBLEMS servations on the water level gage
Since 1939 the U. S. Geological in the Miami Canal on the upstream
Survey has been conducting inves- side of 36th street dam show that
tigations relative to the water re- the water surface in the dry sea-
sources of southeastern Florida. son often goes down a foot or
These studies have provided much more below the top of the barrier.
valuable basic data as to the geol- This indicates that there is not
ogy and the extent of watdr bear- enoughfresh water flow in the
ing formations in the region, and canal to maintain it to the top of
as to the quantity and quality ofthe barrier (2.5) and also that the
the water encountered. The result- water can escape rather freely
ing data has been set out in var- in he
ious reports by members of the around this dam in either direc-
Survey, and it is understood that a tion.
comprehensive report is now in An automatic tide gate at this
preparation. The investigation point, which would permit drain-
was initiated following the appear- age flow and would obstruct the
ance of salty water in the Miami ingress of tide water, would offer


well field.
The studies find that large quan-
tities of potable water (18 per cent
specific yield) exist in the highly
permeable Tamiami formation
which attains a depth of around
100 feet at Miami Springs, grad-
ually lessening in thickness towards
the north and west. The quality of
this ground water is fairly uniform,
subject to slight variations in dif-
ferent locations and subject to
some influence adjacent to the
drainage canals due to the effect
of changes in the water in these
canals.
Salt encroachment occurs in two
ways; penetration at depth due to
the ever present pressure of the
salt water in the ocean, and intru-
sion near the surface caused by the


no appreciable disadvantages to
drainage operations but, on the
other hand, such a barrier would
not be fully effective in prevent-
ing salt water intrusion into the
present well field. Some of the
wells are quite near this barrier
and at a time of heavy pumping in
a dry season, with a cone of de-
pression over the field, a trend of
salt water flow around the bar-
rier would seem inevitable. Pump-
ing from the wells causes a con-
siderable lowering of' the water
table over the well field itself, the
draw down having attained a
depth of as'much a three feet
below sea level Pumping some
80 million gallons a day in the dry
season where there is no rain to


ebb and flow of tide water in the recharge the area and since me
outlet portion of the canals. Pene- formation underlying the bottom
tration at depth is slow and does of the wells is fairly impervious,
not affect surface conditions except means that there must be consid-
for rendering useless for irrigation erable lateral inflow from some
or other purposes the deep wells it other source to replenish the draft,
reaches. It is the salt -water intru-
sion from the Miami Canal that The number and character of
has penetrated the Miami well dams, or other works required to
field, but intrusion at depth may provide sufficient fresh water flow
also reach the wells in time if it is to maintain a water table at not
not arrested. The influence of less than 2.5, at a time when the
drainage canals is indicated by cit- Everglades are dry, might be
ing the fact that before these were such as to seriously impair the
dug perennial fresh water springs present drainage facilities. If such
existed along the western shore of works are to be built it would
Biscayne Bay at elevations of from seem desirable to first study agri-
3 to 5 feet above mean sea level, cultural, industrial and sanitary
situation to be expected, since the requirements along with water
drainage outlets were dredged for supply needs.
the purpose of lowering the
ground water level and making the It is stated that to stop the In-
swamp and overflowed areas suit- trusion of salt water at depth near
able for habitation and farming, the Miami well field requires main-
A large amount of valuable de- training the 2.5 water table contour
tailed data is conveniently set out in a position east of thq field. If
in these reports. The proposed so- the water table is not to drop be-
lution for the salt encroachment low this elevation, then the aver-
problem with reference to the Mi- age, and the maximum due to
ami well field is by tide barriers floods, will be much higher. Main-
and through the control of ground training the ground water table at
water levels by means of regula- a higher elevation than that re-
tion of the drainage canals; speci- quired by the existing drainage
fically by a system of barriers in outlet means sacrificing just that
the Miami Canal and by canal flow much storage capacity in the canal
augmentation and regulation, de- system and in the ground, and
signed to maintain a ground water causing a greater degree of flood-
elevation of not less than two and
a half feet above mean sea level. ing in case of heavy rains. Flood-
ing kills crops quickly, and drain-
ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS age capacity must be adequate to
While such remedial measures remove flood waters promptly to
are considered necessary to prevent make farming possible. The main-
further salt encroachment in the tenance of a water table at not
Mfami well field, the desirability of less than 2.5 feet would result in
attempting to exclude salt from more frequent overflow in some
this area depends on economic fac- areas and might make townsites
tors and engineering problems and homesites practically unten-
which require careful analysis and able in such areas due to the dan-
appraisal. It is believed that be- gerously unsanitary conditions re-
fore the Dade Drainage District from frequent inundation
consents to any impairment of its
main drainage outlets, which have Drainage facilities and a low-
been provided at great cost and ered water table have come- to be
towards which the property owners accepted as a matter of course
have continued to contribute in spe- and during years of low rainfall
cial taxes for many years past, se- the assurance they provide against
rious consideration should be given flooding is apt to be held rather
to the economic justification of lightly. It might be appropriate
such impairment of an existing to recall that a flood problem
public improvement. Attention has r ta a floo problem
public improvement. Attention has still exists in these low lands, and
been called to the rapidity and ex- to suggest consideration of the ex-
tent of suburban expansion into suggest consideration of the ex-
ths region rban growh creates tent to which a permanent raising
this region. Urban growth creates
additional markets, and demands of water tables and obstruction of
a corresponding increase of farm drainage outlets might affect flood
products and increases the need for conditions. In connection with
farm land. An interesting develop- flood possibilities it is suggested
ment in this connection is the dis- that a small amount of work in
cover that certain grasses (Para, bringing up to uniform grade the
Coastal Bermuda and St Augus- low spots existing in the West
tine) -grow well in south Florida, Levee might pay big dividends.


High water passing over these low ing 20 and 30 miles up river In
spots could destroy the levee, and order to be free from the influ-
a flood unrestraining sweeping ence of tide water. The advantages
eastward from the Everglades into to a city of having sea port facili-
the thickly inhabited low areas of ties are not inconsiderable and it
Hialeah, Miami Springs and north- might be advisable to give serious
west Miami might be an unpleas- consideration to the potential eco-
ant experience. nomic value of the Miami River
THE MIAMI WELL FIELD and Canal as a river harbor for
The present Miami well fieldsuitable industrial developments.
The present Miami well fieldOther prospective developments in
was located in an irea which at Other prospective developments in
was located in an area which at the suburban or rural areas, such
that time was largely "uninhabited as those related to air transport,
but has since developed into a may deserve consideration in con-
residential area. Miami has grown section with efforts to raise the
so rapidly that the field is now water table in order to save the
practically surrounded by subur- resent Miami well fiwld. Such
an development, and by countless developments of course can resort
septic tanks occasioned by lack of to pumping their drainage, but
sewers. It is claimed that the such pumping will also lower the
limestone formation in this area water table, and aa greater cost.
has an unusual capacity for puri- ate tal at a gar s
fying water that passes through Finally the data at hand seem
it. Nevertheless any raising of to indicate some doubt as to
the water table in such a low lying whether the proposed measures of
area, and consequent increasing of placing dams in the canals, and
the frequency of flooding, would control devices to augment fresh
not appear to be conducive to the water flow in dry seasons to raise
health and well being of the resi- the ground water table, can be re-
dents, nor likely to improve the lied upon to permanently bar the
quality of the well water. Dams alt invasion from the best well
in the lower reaches of the Miami field. The field is located adja-
Canal which would raise the water celt to the Canal, the surrounding
table in dry seasons, would also formation is quite pervious, and
obstruct the free escape of sewage salt has already penetrated some
from above. Even if it were pos- of the wells. In a low lying area
sible to hold the general water the future efforts of all inhabi-
table at not less than two and a tants, both individually and col-
half feet, there would be an appre- lectively, naturally will be apt to
ciable local depression over the be directed towards maintaining a
well field due to pumping, which low water table rather than a high
would result in, drawing the sew- one, and a few flood experiences
age effluent into the well area. will intensify these efforts.
The salt Intrusion at depth will A WATER PLAN FOR DADE
likely continue to move inland COUNTY
slowly, and eventually may reach
the well field, but probably not be- The main* question in contro-
fore the field is abandoned or other versy appears to be whether the
reasons. In the meantime it will desirability of attempting to pro-
cause the loss of some wells that tect this well field from salt in-
are now used for local irrigation vision justifies the impairment
in coastal areas, but it is not of drainage and flood protection
known how these losses would facilities to the extent required by
compare with the cost of arresting the proposed measures. This ques-
the deep intrusion, tion, however, involves broad en-
The first well field of Miami gineering and economic consider-
wThe first wellid o a half nations which apparently have not
was located only front mile and after had conclusive study and analysis.
penetrated this field a t wae It is complicated by numerous
apenraed this fied and it was factors of relative benefits' and
abandoned in 1925. In retrospectdamages and costs-which must be
t would seem incongruous now I appraised carefully in the best in.
it had at that time been held that appraised carefully in the best in-
Miamiterests of the entire Dade County
the only solution for the Miami area. It is not a simple question of
water supply problem was to push farm drainage and a particular set
back the salt encroachment to pro- of wells; it is one-of adequate water
tect these particular wells. This supply and flood protection and
suggests the question as to sanitation and health, involving
whether, viewed in the light of thethe general welfare of a large
past and prospective growth of growing urban population with
Miami, any premise that the pres- widespread expanding suburban
ent well field must be maintained environment. The plans for meet-
at all costs as the sole source of ing this situation must not be
water supply would in time prove cramped down to present require-
to be equally unsound. Knowing ments, they must not be limited
definitely that the present well to merely saving a water source
field is already threatened it would that is already menaced and in-
seem appropriate to question the adequate. They must be directed
advisability of spending money to toward future needs, toward water
try to maintain it as a continu- supply free from threat of contain-
ing source of supply. .One of the nation and ample for continuing
reports on salt water encroach- growth of population, toward bet-
ment states that a very large quan- ter drainage and toward better
tity of potable ground water ex- flood protection. They should be
ists in an area west of the salt in keeping with the dignity and
threatened zone. If this is so it the resources of a greater forward
might be desirable to acquire a looking Miami and Dade County
portion of such an area in ample whose people are willing and able
extent and remote enough from to demand adequate drainage as
tide water to be free from the salt well as ample water supply, not
water menace, surround it with merely for present conditions but
suitable controls, and, develop in it continually improving for increas-
a well field adequate to the ex- ingly better standards of living.
pending needs of the metropolitan
area of Miami. This would entail Long range planning for such
some expense, but it may be point- important public facilities as ade-
ed out that pumping water for a quate and safe water supply and
municipal supply involves relative- flood protection naturally involve
ly small quantities (the net water many conflicting problems, the
that is consumed) under the con- satisfactory solution of which can
editions of a steady and economical come only through comprehensive
power load. To pump water for study and careful appraisal of all
drainage on the other hand, in- economic considerations affecting
volves very large quantities at ir- the situation. Such an investiga-
regular and undetermined times tion should be made by an en-
and represents an expensive kind gineer or board of engineers with
of power load. Undrained land in specialized and extensive experi-
the Everglades area can still be ence in the field of water control
had for a few dollars an acre, and and utilization. Inasmuch as the
an extensive tract could be ac- water problems of southern Flor-
quired, as a permanent preserve ida are of imminent concern to
for surrounding and .protecting a the residents generally of the en-
future well field, for a moderate tire Dade County area, it would
investment. Rural land which has seem appropriate that such an en-
drainage facilities, such as that in gineering study be made under
the Dade Drainage District, has the sponsorship of Dade County.
attained relatively high values and The foregoing observations are
would be costly to acquire for such based on only a brief inspection
a person. trip and casual reading of such
Pumping a water supply from reports as happened to be at hand.
a distance presents no unusual They are not presented as studied
engineering problems, and is often conclusions, but rather as consid-
resorted to for acquiring an ample ered suggestions to direct atten-
supply free from salinity. An ex- tion to the need for a detailed and
ample of this kind is the recent careful study of the engineering
development at Newport News, and economic aspects of the
which has placed conducts extend- water problems of Dade County.


IF YOU WANT EXTRA COPIES OF THIS REPORT, WRITE SECRETARY, DADE DRAINAGE DISTRICT, 52 W. FLAGLER ST., MIAMI


LOO


GE


F


S












MADISON F. PACETTI
H. ELMO ROBINSON
ASSOCIATES


LAW OFFICES
MANLEY P. GALDWELL
HARVEY BUILDING
WEST PALM BEAOH, FLORIDA


TELEPHONE4949


July 24, 1946


Mr. Ernest R. Graham
Graham's Dairy, Inc.
Hialeah, Florida


Dear Mr. Graham:

Receipt is acknowledged of your letter of.
July 20th regarding the Everglades Drainage District
bond you have presented to the Federal court.

Mr. Sprigg showed me this bond just as I was
leaving Miami last week, and I did not secure complete
data in respect to the matter.

I have written Mr. Sprigg for further informa-
tion, and when I hear from him I will write you again.


SLAL
(?9K
\I
v*" ? t o ,'
^'^-^"


MPC:w


I


_~








IER PW 0n


AN \KLL (D P L -


. .... ...-/ I, .. \ -. .
--. \ i.., t- '-/ *' ,
I !\ -%,,A Y


7
Li


,,, ,, "'"', "* \ \" \ ,,"',- -- ,, ... C,,
. .\;. .." ,.- ,, \ \
; >. \ ,,, ,*" .
,l''' I" l'.-. '
ifi
,, I,,-' : "^^ '. "' ,, *- 1 ^ **"""- "
r t i'i i i,
II *
r --' ~--- L 0r i O V-- A | i I I I I
.... --G L~o 10V >'1 .........
: ... ... --- --~. _. C .... -- .... .

;::i -. "- ~ ... ... ......... < "-


) U r


(r(

th \\jl


-. .---'---
/C-






`iz --.

--] ,, r- re,-
|Tr ," \ \ -- --._- --


. ..f~ (- (B K1, L\.P /' / :..' J


... M I tID


ii L j T-I


D E V 7- A T -e
V aG 7A TF I O/v


-i .._~ _^_... _i~~.~. _~_-r._~- -~ 1-" r


I a%1/si%!M R P










VOTE "YES" IN THE WATER CONTROL ELECTION TUESDAY,DECEMBER 9TH, TO INSURE DADE COUNTY
HAVING ADEQUATE, FRESH WATER THE YEAR-ROUND WITHOUT DISASTROUS FLOODS AND DROUGHTS.,

As You VOTE "YES" YOU PROTECT YOUR FAMILY AND HOME AND TAKE A DEFINITE PART IN DADE
COUNTYIS FUTURE. CERTAIN SELFISH INTERESTS ARE OPPOSED TO THIS ISSUE, THEIR NEGATIVE
VOTE WILL DEPRIVE YOU OF WATER CONSERVATION ADVANTAGES. FOR YOUR OWN HEALTH, WELFARE,
AND ECONOMY VOTE nYES" IN THE WATER CONSERVATION ELECTION TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9TH, THE
ISSUE ON THE VOTING MACHINE READS AS FOLLOWS: -

i'Do YOU APPROVE THE PROVISIONS OF -APTER 24465, LAWS OF FLORIDA, ACTS OF 1947, WHICH
PROVIDE AMONG OTHER THINGS THAT ANY DRAINAGE DISTRICT OWNING LANDS IN DADE COUNTY MAY
ESTABLISH A CERTAIN AREA THEREIN FOR CONSERVATION OF WATER AND SOIL;THAT SUCH DISTRICT
OR ANY LAND-OWNER WITHIN SUCH CONSERVATION AREA MAY DEDICATE FOR SUCH PURPOSE ITS OR
HIS LANDS WITHIN SUCH CONSERVATION AREA; AND EMPOWERING SUCH DISTRICT TO COOPERATE
WITH OTHER PUBLIC AGENCIES AND BODIES, TO CANCEL TAXES OF SUCH DISTRICT AND TAX SALES
CERTIFICATES OF SUCH DISTRICT HELD BY IT, ON LANDS IN THE CONSERVATION AREA, TO RE-
LIEVE LANDS WITHIN THE CONSERVATION AREA OF FUTURE TAXES OF SUCH DISTRICT, TO REDEEM
TAX SALES CERTIFICATES EXISTING ON SUCH LANDS IN SUCH CONSERVATION AREA, TO EXCHANGE
LANDS OUTSIDE THE CONSERVATION AREA FOR LANDS WITHIN SUCH AREA, TO EMPLOY ATTORNEYS
AND PAY THEIR FEES, AND TO DO ALL THINGS NECESSARY TO CONSUMMATE THE PURPOSES OF SUCH
CONSERVATION AREA?"

"IF YOU APPROVE SAID CHAPTER 24465, YOU ,ILL VOTE "YES" ON THE QUESTION. IF YOU
DISAPPROVE SAID CHAPTER 24465 AFORESAID, YOU WILL VOTE "NO" ON THE QUESTION."










/ *

WATER CONSERVATION ELECTION LCELi*BR 9, 1947

ON DECEMBER 9 EVERY REGISTERED VOTER OF DADE COUNTY IS URGED TO PARTICIPATE
IN THE ELECTION TO DECIDE WHETHER OR NOT A WATER CONSERVATION AREA MAY CE ESTABLISHED
IN THIS COUNTY.

OUR WATER PROBLEM IS NOT ENTIRELY A "DRAINAGE" PROBLEM NOR IS IT ENTIRELY .
A "CONSERVATION" PROBLEM. IT IS RATHER A COM3NATI4fN OF- THE TWO AND CAN BE SUMMED UP
UNOER WATER CON RO.' THE PRJPO-lD iCONSCT.VAON C ir W LL STORE WATER FOR USE :N DRY


IT IS A IMUST"1 IF )UAODEL COUNTY S I'C ONYT.,UE TO G;O;WV AND PROS-ER iN FUTURE YEARS.

THE VARIOIJ D-lANAGE DI7R;CTS HAVE CHANGE OF DRAINAGE. THE COUNTY COMMIS-
SION HAS CHARGE OF Wrv, ER CONSE7'X:.A -O J N'Li-HER H.;: ; c OL.'. .'R )HE OTHER AND NONE
HAS GENERAL AUTHOF >-V Ov-_R WATa-R CON'MOLi. CONSTF.TjRN : I 'N e, ;J C JER 10 CO' PL ISH Ai4
OVN:Ek'.L CONrOL '" :-:;.' JCTH DROUTH ArD FLOD l'N:'. CNS CAN E AL.Lr.;Ni C E AND ;N MOST
IN'-.\,:CES Pr;EL-N J, V i: L LEGISLATURE OF FLORIDA A- IYS LAST SESSION PASSE? (:-.-PER
24 ;b', THIS ACT, :F p '-iOVED BY THE VOTERS OF DAuE COUNTY ON DECEMBER q, V1-S` AL rHOR-H
ITV 10 ANY DRAINAGE UDFi': ICT OWNING LANDS IN DADE COUNTY TO SET UP A CONSERVATII AREA,
AND TO DO WHAT MAY BE NECESSARY TO CONTROL THE SITUATION. THIS AREA IS BOUNDED ON rHE
VvESI -,Y THE HIGH LAND NEAR THE DADE-COLLIER COUNTY LINE AND ON THE NORTH DY THE JADE-
BROARED LINE. THE TAMIAMI TRAIL AND KROME AVENUE WILL FORM BOUNDARIES ON THE SO''-
AN) ....ST. THERE HAS ALREADY BEEN AUTHORIZED BY THE VOTERS OF BROWARD COUNTY A CONSER-
VA'-'NS AREA LYING IMMEDIATELY NORTH OF THE ONE PROPOSED FOR DADE COUNTY. THE TWO 10-
GETHlcR WILL FORM A SINGLE UNIT, IN THIS VAST AREA WILL BE IMPOUNDED WATERS TO PREVENT
DROUTH CONDITIONS SUCH AS WE HAD TWO YEARS AGO LAST SUMMER AND FLOOD CONDITIONS SUCH
AS WE HAD THIS SUMMER AND FALL AND ARE STILL HAVING.

THUS BOTH WATER CONSERVATION AND FLOOD CONTROL WILL BE MADE EFFECTIVE.
NEITHER WILL CE DESTROYED. ON THE CONTRARY, A BETTER SYSTEM OF DRAINAGE WILL DE ESTAB-
LISHED FOR IMMEDIATE USE WHENEVER NEEDED. FOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE FLORIDA AROSE FROM
THE BOTTOM OF THE SEAS, WE CAN MORE NEARLY MAINTAIN THE FRESH WATER TABLE WHERE IT
SHOULD BE NEITHER TOO HIGH NOR TOO LOW.

THIS PLAN FITS IN WITH THE ARMY ENGINEERSt OVERALL PLAN OF FLOOD CONTROL
AND WILL FORM AN INTEGRAL PART THEREOF. THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT WILL REQUIRE US, THE
PEOPLE OF DADE COUNTY, TO LAY THE GROUNDWORK, OF WHICH THIS IS AN ESSENTIAL PART.
UNLESS WE DO OUR PART, THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT WILL HAVE NOTHING TO 00 WITH IT.

BEFORE ANYTHING CAN nE DONE, HOWEVER, THE VOTERS OF DADE COUNTY MUST
APPROVE THIS LAW.

WHY A WATER CONSERVATION AREA?

THE AVERAGE ANNUAL RAINFALL FOR THE COUNTY IS ABOUT 59 INCHES AND THIS
SHOULD BE SUFFICIENT TO FULFILL WATER NEEDS FOR ANY FUTURE INCREASES OF AGRICULTURAL,
INDUSTRIAL AND MUNICIPAL REQUIREMENTS IF PROPERLY HANDLED. HOWEVER OUR SUB-TROPICAL
CLIMATE WITH ITS MARKED WET AND DRY SEASONS, AND THE PERSISTENTLY HIGH RATE OF EVAPO-
RATION THROUGHOUT ALL THE YEAR, COMBINE TO PRESENT PROBLEMS OF WATER CONTROL AND
WATER CONSERVATION NOT EXPERIENCED IN OTHER REGIONS.
THEAVRAE NNAL AIFAL ORTH CONT I AOU _9INHE AD HI


















A SIX-MONTH PERIOD EXTENDING FROM MAY THROUGH OCTOrC'R ORDINARILY MAKE UP
THE RAINY SEASON AND FURN SHE'S APPRCXIMA TELv THREE-FOURTHS Of THE YEARLY RAINFALL.
THE MONTHS OF NOVEMBER THROUGH APRIL ARE RELATIVELY DRY,,,FURNISHING ONLY ONE-FOURTH
OF THE YEAR'S RAIN, YET IT IS DURING THIS PERIOD THAT DEMANDS. OR AGRICULTURAL AND
PUBLIC SUPPLY ARE HEAVIEST. FURTHERMORE, EVAPORATION LOSSE' ARE NORMALLY GREATER
THAN RAINFALL DURING THIS PERIOD SO THERE IS A DEFICIT OF WATER DURING THE DRY
SEASON. SUMMED UP, THIS MEANS THAT FOR SOUTH FLORIDA TO HAVE A YEAR-ROUND WATER
SUPPLY, THE SURPLUS RAINFALL DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS MUST VE STORED FOR USE DURING
THE REMAINDER OF THE YEAR.

WATER MAY BE STORED IN TWO WAYS, BY SURFACE STORAGE AS LAKES OR PONDS OR
UNDERGROUND AS GROUND WATER. CITY SUPPLIES ARE ORDINARILY OBTAINED FROM GROUND-WATER
STORAGE BY MEANS OF WELLS, WHILE IRRIGATION FOR CROPS IS OBTAINED FROM SURFACE STORAGE.
FORTUNATELY THE EASTERN HALF OF DADE COUNTY IS UNDERLAIN WITH A LIMESTONE THAT IS
QUITE POROUS AND CAPABLE OF STORING LARGE QUANTITIES OF GROUND WATER. IT IS ESTIMATED
THAT EACH CUBIC FOOT OF THIS POROUS ROCK WILL STORE APPROXIMATELY OMW-AND-A-HALF GAL-
LONS OF FREE WATER. HOWEVER FOR GROUND-WATER STORAGE TO BE MAINTAINEr DURING DROUGHTS
IT IS NECESSARY THAT IT DE RECHARGED BY SEEPAGE FROM SURFACE STORAGE-. 4"

IN ADDITION TO ASSURING THECOUNTY OF YEAR-ROUND WATER SUPPLY RQR ITS FUTURE
AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL NEEDS, THIS WATER CONSERVATION AREA WOULD LARGELY PREVENT
THE OCCURRENCE OF PEAT FIRES WHICH HAVE .EEN ALMOST ANNUAL EVENTS, FURTHERMORE, THE
RETENTION OF THIS WATER IN LAKES AND PONDS THE YEAR AROUND, RATHER THAN ONLY DURING
THE WET SEASON AS FORMERLY OCCURRED, WILL SERVE TO INCREASE AND CONSERVE OUR WILD
LIFE WHICH HAS. DEEN DEPLETED SINCE THE GLADES WERE OVERDRAINED,

STAYING AWAY FROM THE POLLS WILL PERMIT THOSE FEW SELF$S INDDIVIDUALS WHO
WANT THINGS TO CONTINUE AS THEY ARE TO DEFEAT THIS PROPOSITION. THEY ARE WORKING,
AND WORKING HARD TO DEFEAT IT. It YOU WANT THE SITUATION TO CONTINUE AS IT IS IF
YOU WANT FLOODS IN RAINY TIMES AND PARCHED SOIL AND TURNING EVERGLADES AND A THREAT
TO THE GREATER MIAMI WATER SUPPLY IN TIMES OF DROUTH THEN OPPOSE THIS PLAN.-.STAY
AWAY FROM THE POLLS. IF YOU WANT PLENTY OF WATER WHENEVER YOU NEED IT AND -NOTTOO
MUCH AT ANY TIME, THEN GET OUT AND WORK. TELL YOUR FRIENDS ADOUT IT. SEE THAT THEY
AS WELL AS YOU GET TO THE POLLS AND VOTE FOR THIS LAW. VOTE YES. ,

THIS 15 SERIOUS, YOU AS WELL AS EVERY OTHER VOtER MUST NOW GET OUT AND
WORK FOR T,4E HEALTH AND WELFARE OF OUR ENTIRE COMMUNITY, V.r E FOR THIS LAW,
VOTE YES.













--l '__
gC o.













-4---


-i- j


V., 1L


4;;;


i tr


- .; a: I ..


4
/ "/:;


':I'


..\




.'1* *


I-.

I *'
-.7

4-:~


A. '


I^ .

i


~------
-. -.I- -r

/ 5, j (
i

",


'F.


41


V.


-'~

.4 : i


'.4













/I:.


I

*1


''
I?-

2-.;!~ I":


*r

r

I i


IJ



i


1


"iZI


r "












A bill before the House of Representatives in

Tallanassme (House Bill 660) can save Dade county taxpayers $136,000
a year! And at the same time wipe out the entire Everglades Drainage
district tax infour years
Worth thinking about, isn't it?
All property west of 27th ave., is in the Everglades

Drainage Ditriot, one of the fastest growing emotions of Miami and this
district pays..........
$ 78 per cent of the administration tax of the

ENTIRE Iverglades Drainage district!
Let's be more specific. Coral Gables citizens pay

about ONE THIRD of tha ENTIRE administration tax of the Everglades Drainage
District!
This bill ( House Bill 660) which would bring

such savings, would abolise the BOARD of the district and put the collection
of ALL debt service taxes of the district and a tzBeataz payment of all
bonds into the office, of the state treasurer and assign control of the
operation to our county commissioners.
Opponents of this bill have a story too. You should

know that story to you can better judge. Opponents say ALL of Florida
should pay for the Everglades development, on the basis that it's good
for ALL Florida. Successful OIL discovery would be good for all-Florida too,
but that doeest mean that Miamians shcad pay oil company taxesI
S'Dade countians pay about $84,000 in ddht service

taxes and another .052p000 in Ad Valorem taxes to the district. BUT NOW
-MAME WORK HAE BEEN DONE I DADE COUNTY'FOR THE PAST 38 YEARS!


II













WITCH FOR THIl! You'll 0b told, if you haven't been
already, that euch an aat would adversely affect the water conservation

program here. The AaSWLE to that comes from the chief engineer of the
Everglades Draiiinae district. Queetionixed in a hearing in Tallahassee by
Daae county representatives, this chief engineer BAID the proposed reservoir
would have LIT'LE material effect onthe kidaui Water supply.
YOU BE THE JUDGE. If you want this yearly caviib of

4136,000, write or wire your senator and representatives in Tallahassee to
vote FOR House Bill 660.


EEnest A. Graham.






r

i .
i **


.' .,* "" ;, "; "
*. F -"
. .,.,,., 6%: ..: :-'.
". y- '* ":, ". "




.Oes- AA 1,19 ,or' JA 4 ,mpiat e




-the polvegsuer d
F Wrs' wei will paly dub:s i 1 f,3 s- .,,
SaAreA $az ai lAong as &w nt- Wtis. F
F If LB U o is wll $lJ T6 .j .^^-
S- t the debt. -* w .,".. ,a, -.x -t*, **. ot y.Sawe r 4, -L
w. believe it will end i pn tw year.. F
The dp"poW 'I Maia V, t e' to te4t1 l at th' '
s. h o Pe o rt ".at; 1Ta jo o..a .R. ., ie
Sl t E ap bill 14test h lp4 ,zsan ae (w, io l tI
pStatt, o a +t1$.-
.' : ... x ,f j . .' ,. : ,
ftib- -to ardih6 Io vial 0.iroh a r, s`l +h, '; :



it possible th*. .t 7.%' of asAll ri th-' tverglatDg a m g
l.elyh that tn otb. o6ust4ol naeeeiag 41 oakth valtu
lthe t"i rn.ey. fo.r onots titssiit eit. ksef z C..j 'toL 't
wt. r 'bRPtolI. yiou glade Brainage piato t stat t a :ljt .i'nt 4st
,n1id that Ih proposeA resmoenq weob bvfla hfA ttt tt
f o o t i .water s '.; '.. .

P.'., ,a ,blish any Pes l y rc r ., ., .*a .,' ,".:
R. _1 ,0 Pax' So, athe(v ; ;liam a.to.n.g-.,

lv g 'lo Ve number of t "Z -l .a p. ,ol. a o s fl 'a 't "'-.
present Evqrtlatde. Txas -are .aft apanAtil4 a t- a. s-:pt
Da.e county is oasrt e e~ m, .




Si .....
V ... F F, t '1 ,-
' 1 -';. c t '- ",' "-. ' .) '- ... .

_,, .I:L.,,'o .'. .'.
p d.'. J, i











PROPOSED EVERGLADES DRAINAGE DISTRICT ACT

RE CONVEYANCES TO THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENTS


A BILL TO BE ENTITLED


An Act relating to Everglades Drainage District; providing

that the Board of Commissioners of said District shall have power and

authority to convey to the United States, or any department of the

Government thereof, lands of the District, or any interest therein,

upon certain terms and conditions; repealing all laws and parts of

laws in conflict therewith.
BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA:

SECTION 1. The Board of Commissioners of Everglades Drainage

District shall have the poorer and authority to convey and transfer

to the United States, or any department of the Government thereof,

any land any title to which is, or may hereafter be, vested in said

Board of Commissioners, or any interest in or pertaining to any of

said land, upon such terms as may be agreed upon between said Board

and the United States, or any department of the Government thereof,

whenever it shall seem to said Board that to do so"will redound to

the benefit of said Everglades Drainage District; subject, however,

to the provision that said Board may in its discretion require that

the said lands be controlled and operated with due regard to the

obligations and needs of Everglades Drainage District with respect

to drainage, water control, reclamation and conservation.
SECTION 2. If any section, paragraph, clause or provision

of this Act shall for any reason be declared invalid or unconstitu-

tional, nevertheless, the remaining portions of this Act shall re-

main in full force and effect.

SECTION 3. Notice of intention to aunly for the passage of

this Act by the Legislature has been published as required by Sec-

tion 21 of Article III of thq Constitution of Florida, and affidavit

of proof of such publication, together with a true copy of such

notice was duly attached to this Act when the Pill therefore was in-


_ I~~..... ..3...;-~_~_m -


ii
















produced in the Legislature, and accompanied said Bill throughout

the Legislature, as required by Sections 11.02 and 11.03, Tlorida

Statutes, 1941, and the Legislature hercby declares that such

notice and affidavit are sufficient in form and in substance and

that said Section 31 of Article III of the Constitution, and that

said Sections 11.02 and 11.03 have been complied with in every

respect.
SECTION 4. This Act shall take effect and be in full force

from and after its passage and aonroval by the Governor, or upon

becoming a law without such approval.

SECTION 5. All laws and Darts of laws in conflict herewith

be and the same are hereby repealed.




l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l


















A BILL TO BE ENTITLED


AN ACT RELATING TO EVERGLADES DLr.IIL.G[; DISTRICT: PROVIDING THAT
THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF SAID DISTRICT SHALL HAVE POWER
AND AUTHORITY TO CONVEY TO THE UNITED STATES, OR ANY DEPARTMENT
'OF THE GOVERNMENT THEREOF, LANDS OF THE DISTRICT, OR ANY INTEREST
THEREIN, UPON CERTAIN TERMS ANDE CONDITIONS; REELING 2ALL LAWS
I| AND PARTS OF LAWS IN CONFLICT rTiRL,.iTH.

BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA:

Section 1. Tho Board of Commissioners of Everglades Drainage District

shall have the power and authority to convey and transfer to the United States,

t or any department of the Government thoroof, any land, lying within the confines

of that certain area in Palm Beach County, Florida, heretofore designated by said

Board for watwe and soil conservation, to-wit:

Bounded on the north by Township Line L4/45, on
the west by Range Line 39/40, on the south by
Hillsboro Canal and on the east by the western
boundary of Lake vorth Drainage District said
lands being located in Township 45 South, Range
40 East; Hiatus 45/+6 South, Range t0 East. that
part of Township 46 South, Range O0 East, lying
north of Hillsboro Canal; that part of Township
47 South, Range 40 East, lying north of Hillsboro
Canal; Township 45 South, Range hl East; Town-
ship 46 South, Range 41 East; that part of Town-
ship 47 bouth, Range 41 East, lying north of
Hillsboro Canal,

and also any land lying within the confines of the proposed or established Ever-

glades National Park, any title to which is, or may hereafter be, vested in said

Board of Commissioners, or any interest in or pertaining to any of said land, upon

such terms as may be agreed upon between said Board and the United States, or any

department of the Government thereof, whenever it shall seem to said Board. that to

do so will redound to the benefit of said Everglades Drainage District; subject,

however, to the provision that said Board may in its discretion require that the

said lands be controlled and operated with due regard to the obligations and needs

of Everglades Drainage District with respect to drainage, water control, recla-

mation and conservation.
Section 2, If any section, paragraph, clause or provision of this Act

shall for any reason be declared invalid or unconstitutional, nevertheless, the



IIIilll ll IIIIIIIIII1 tt j











Page 2



remaining portions of this Act shall remain in full force and effect.

Section 3. Notice of intention to apply for the passage of this Act

by the Legislature has been published as required by Section 21 of articlee III of

the Constitution of Florida, and affidavit of proof of such publication, together

with a true copy of such notice was duly attached to this Act when the Bill there-

for was introduced in the Legislature, and accompanied said Bill throughout the

Legislature, as required by Sections 11.02 and 11.05, Florida Statutes, 191,

and the Legislature hereby declares that such notice and affidavit are sufficient

in form and in substance and that said Section 21 of Article III of the Constitu-

tion, and that said Sections 11,02 and 11.03 have been complied with in every

respect.

Section h. This Act shs.ll take effect and be in full force from and

after its passage and approval by the Governor, or upon becoming a law without

such approval.

Section 5. All laws and parts of laws in conflict herewith be and the

same are hereby repealed-*

/*







































/,







i-
//


I'
11)


/i3$ a


,--


u ;2~1
i- 6


Q ~ ~


'V

- 2i I


%. t












SUMMARY OF BILL ABOLISHING BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS OF EVERGLADES DRAINAGE
DISTRICT


This bill abolishes the Board of Commissioners of Everglades Drainage

District effective July 1, 1947, and transfers its functions to the respective

boards of county commissioners of the counties lying wholly or partially within

the district. Such counties will continue levying the debt service tax in the

maximum amount now provided according to the zones established in Sections

1530(6A) and 1530(8), Chapter 298, Florida Statutes 1941, the proceeds from

which are to be turned over tob.the State Treasurer who shall place them in a

special Everglades Debt Service Fund. This levy will be discontinued when

sufficient funds are on hand to retire all district obligations outstanding

on July 1, 1947. All other funds of the district shall be transferred to the

State Treasurer on July 1, 1947, and shall become a part of the Everglades

Debt Service Fund. All real estate, title to which has been vested in the

district board for non-payment of taxes, shall be transferred to the State

Treasurer and may be sold on application after publication pursuant to rules

to be promulgated by the State Treasurer, Proceeds of such sale shall become

a part of the Everglades Debt Service Fund.

The State Treasurer may invest in United States Government bonds a

portion of the debt service fund during the period that same shall not be

required for payment of debts and obligations. The State Treasurer from

such funds shall retire and pay all debts and obligations of the district

outstanding on July 1, 1947, as they become due or payable. Thereafter, all

proceeds remaining in the fund shall be returned to the respective counties

in the proportion which the acreage of district lands in each county bears

to the total acreage of district lands as it now exists. The real property

held by the State Treasurer at such time shall be returned to the counties

wherein situate. Effective July 1, 1947, all other assets of the district

are transferred to the respective counties where situate. The counties after

July 1, 1947, shall have the power to levy taxes for the upkeep and maintenance

of the works and facilities of the district within the respective counties

and shall have the power to construct additional works and facilities when

needed, and to levy taxes for the cost thereof,


?


j













A BILL TO BE ER'I7TL D


AN ACN L .! L'7.['G TO TiL r.'EiRGLArS DIAi..E DISTRICT; ABOLIS'HIG THE
.1:;-' 'D." i: ijS I' i F'.H -.' [ST frcT, AND VL T '. ". '. TS, F'.'RS,
])UTIL1, LIAl;dLITT..S, FR(.[ViLi .GCS AND .6V1i'.".ilM N!T[1L FUNCTIONS u' .'H OAi D
.iN TrL .LS0..C" 'VLC B) '? 01 O COUNTY C, i. liJLi.S c -E COi.iT..:;. LiIlIG
.. OLLY OR 1-.'TIAL.Y IN C.I ,STTCTj ATTTX-OIZTI.:' AND DI L.C': ,lG SUCH
.A. DS OF Cu i4TY COr!L.IS IOi.,'.. TO LLVY THE ,'L,.T SERVICE TAX NOW PO-
VIDDED BY L.T7 ON THE LANDS .kN SUCH ...11i NA .'TR.ICT; IROV[I .!',i 7I." ALL
MOi'YS AD 7_ N:U OF ( '.r iATU!-E O' SAID i !AiiA.'E IS'T:ICT NO:', H.,LI'L BY
IT, AND IIJCL I ,ir DEnT SERVICE "4: I''i.OC1 .-.,.3 IS E.F't,. COLL BE PAID AiLm) DELIVi. D TOO TnL STA' T GTEAS'.b;i. C`i TiH... 7ATE O1 fLO- A
WhO Si.A.._L zSTABLISl AND IAIIi'lAlIi A SIX C'iAL EV2- GLADJES ..:'RT S;,RVICE FIPWN
Atli AD!MI1r.S?"f' AD AY Tii '.l;Fr- r M 7"; DEBTS OF S-.1.' TAIT A.T. I ,': -lCT
INCI.P_,J; AND OUTSTAND']I "n ON JULY 1, 1947; PiOVIUJC; ih AUTHOR:-:Y' AND
IjETHO"i "l 'l T SAL' *;D C .TVEY.;,Q', OF JJ~ .i'S OWD Y c-AID '.4.I;,AGE DIS-
T"I.'CT AND [I: POSITION O'F i1'. .S '-! I,- SAlL LEj P-'T' FOR .IiiV.T-
MENTT PY "i-; STAT TR7.ASURER ,.. .' n AiJAGi,: .:ISTR.iC1 .: S; i-f'7I : il FOR
THE DISPOSITICO'i BY :H:. S'TAT.- T...ASJURMd- ?- ALL L UEY'i .AD .1 1-:'S
BELONi ''l TO :C.AD TDjAA' iA,' T:.. )T.CT TO riL -L:TFECTIVT i"!_r.;:.S OF SAID
D.AINA,- iTTT-. ,C' AFT' I- ALL SUCH TST'TICT DEDTS ARE PAID; FTROVI IiNG
'0; 1" ., .. .T-;',T OF 'TITLE TO ALL .CILI'7 rS, '::ORE S AiD I .' Viu l'i' A OF
SAID A.iA:. ISTIICT Ili T:L. CC'i rY .i"' IT AM ARE CC.'.IjCTD
AIJTiO :l;.!.. Ti SEVERAL C(..u.TI.. I SAID i- .i ~'.' '" i~ i .*' LV AND
ITO 0-r Ui oN LAin IN SAIl COUNTY -T AID -f t -.0E -cR.e~ CT A !.'AWNN-
ANCE TAX, AND A S EC.iAL -fA i AGi C.ONSTL UCT'ITf TAX ~ND t' '.SO.'IBING
THE T. .::S, C IT i.S ;u" i' : ( ,T' L i'V'l$" SUCH ''A ._5S Ti '.,ARrIG
T;E OTESR .TON OF ;:ICH t-1 ,3.i.GL FA'; 'Ji 1'.S AND VORTKS TO BE ''.ALID i"7"FTY
PURPO3AS; 1'',.VI'IiI TTIE ;..THO'. C, 'L,.. C.r ON AH 2 I:-OSITIOlj OF
OitAI .NA iL TAXES .'.1 LA.TRi LI...VI.. UON SAID LAN S IN SAID PR.t,-i4A.L DIS-
TR _CT ; }.'' IT.., A SAVING ,,LiU.'; }-. [,VTI THE L; ACTIVE I'A'fi, ''F 7TaS
ACTj AND ".TI AL liG ALL :A',,S IN 2. ]ICT T-. ITi-H.

BE IT LA '' ,D BY .1iL I uIS OF TI- ST-. T, F FLORI 'A

SCTICih 1: The Board of Comnmissioners of the ;ivernlades Draii.a.,e District

be and the same is hereby dissolved and :,boli..hed, and the term of office of

each miembe- thereoi is hereby terminated, and the employment of each ;and every

officer, agent or employee of s-dd district is !.ereby terminated to take effect

at 12:00 o'clock noon on the first ,v of July, A. D, 19h7. All of the ri.Jhts,

powers, duties, 1. abilities, privile Tes and governmental functions 1ieretofore

vested in and granted to the Board of Commissioners of the E:eri lades Drainage

District, a political subdivision establi--hed, or,:anized and existing. undLer and

by virtue of the laws of the State of Florida, be and the same are hereby severally

transferred, set over, .ranted unto and vested in the respective boards of county

commissioners of the respective counties located and lying wholl' or partially

within the said LFerglades Drainace Uistrict as heretofore created by law, such










transfer shall become effective at 12:00 o'clock noon on the said first a;

of July, A. D. 19%.7 the aforesaid lowers, dAties and functions shall be exer-

eised and performed by each such respective board of county commissioners with

respect to the lands, works and facilities of the said Everlades Draina e

District which are situate within such respective county, whenever the nature

of such power, duty or function is consistent with the independent operation

by such board of county commissioners of the said drainage works and facilities

as to the lands of said District lyir; within such county.

SECTION 2S Each county lyin,- wholly or partially within said Ever lades

Drainage District is hereby authorized, empowered and directed to levy and impose

upon the lands of such District lying within the said county a debt service tax

which shall be the maximum a--ount provided for with respectt to the zones inci-

cated in Sections 1530 (6A) and 1530 (8), -'.:hapter 298, Florida Statutes 1941,

beG;innin,; with the year 19)6 and continuiitn thereafter each year until certificate

;hall be issued by the Treasurer of the State of Florida as hereinaTer in this

Section 2 provided to the effect that all rTincipal and interest on all obli-a-

tions of the Ever lades Draina-e District heretofore incurred and o:.atstaidinz on

July 1, 1347, have been fully paid and retired, or that suAfficient fur.ds or

securities have been allocated to the Ever',lades Debt Service Fund hercinafter

described, to accomplish full payment of said debts and olli,,ations as same shall

become payable. The p-roceeds of the debt service tax authorized herein shall be

allocated by the State treasurer to a special Everglades Debt Service Fund which

shall be maintained by the State Treasurer for the purpose of retiring, all said

debts and oleliaatious of the Everglades Draina,e District theretofore incurred

and outstanding, on July 1, 1947, as same shall become due or shall be payable.

The debt service fund of the Everglades Draiuiae District established under the

provisions of Chapter 14717, Laws of Florida, Acts of 1931, and all -on-:,-s therein

are hereby transferred and set over unto the State Treasurer effective July 1,

1947, and shall become a part of the special Everslades Debt Service Fund provided

for herein to be maintinned by the State treasurer for the purposes, .herein pre-

scribed. Upon the payment and retirement of all debts and obligations thore Lofore

incurred and outstanding on July 1, 19l7, a ,..inst the Everglades Draina e District,



2.











or upon receipt into the special Everalade-- Debt Service Fund or e:'i,-lcnrij

mosUys and securities to retire all debts and obligations aforesaid as same shall

become payable, the State Treasurer shall issue certificate thereof and file a

copy of the sase with eash such board of county commissioner. The debt service

tax provided for herein shall not thereafter be levied or ir.-posed except upon

further certificate of the State Treasurer that such levy or iT.position is neces-

sary in order to pay the aforesaid debts and obligations of the district i.eretofore

incurred and outstanding on July 1, 19s47, All proceeds roeaininu: in cs.id special

Everglades [Iebt Service Fux.id after the re-tirer.ent of all the aforesaid _.debted-

neas shall be divided among and paid to the respective boards of -.ruLy commissioners

in the proportion that the land acreage of the district situate within each such

county bears to the total acreage of the said Everglades Drainage District as it now

exists. Such proceeds shall thereupon become a part of the general revenue fund

of the respective counties*

SECTION 5; All proceeds of the administration fLnd, de'bt service '-hnd, and

maintenance fL;ud established by Section 1550 (kL4), Chapter 29., Florida Statutes ll,

together with all unit district preliminary construction and maintenance funds and

all other funds of the 'verglades Drainage Oistrict which are under the supervision,

control and jurisdiction of the said Board of .:omrriisrioners of river lades Drainage

District, are hereby transferred to the State l'reIsuror, effective July 1, I9i7.

The State Treasurer shall transfer all such funds to the special c -verjlades Debt

Service Fund provided for in this Act to bo ised for the purposes herein directed

with respect thereto. The State Treasurer shall have the authority to invest the

proceeds of such flnds or portions thereof for such period of tire as h-e will

not be needed for the payment of obligations, (the payment of which, according to

their terms cannot be accelerated) in United States Government bonds which bonds

shall become securities in the said special Zver.lades Debt Service ui-nd.

SECTION 4 ihe maintenance, operation, preservatioh and renderin., efficient of

all works heretofore oonstruo ed by Everglades Draina;o District shall be the

duty and function of the boards of county commissioner in each county lyin wholly

or partially within the district as to the lands, works and facilities of said








District lyin, within each such county. The board of county commissioners in

each such county at the time of preparing; its annual budget shall prepare also

a special budget ooverine contemplated cost of administration and maintenance of

drainage works of such District within the county and is hereby empowered, autho-

rized and directed to levy and impose upon such lands in the District lyinL within

the county a general drainage tax for the maintenance of existing works and faci-

lities of the District within the county from whioh the county board shall de-

termine that benefits accrue equally to district lands throughout such county,

In addition to the general drainage tax herein provided for, each such board of

county commissioners is further authorized and empowered to levy and impose a

special maintenance tax, not to exceed fifty cents per acre per year upon lands

within say unit district or other subdrainage district formerly under the control

and Jurisdiction of the Board of ConmiAssioners of the Everglades Drainage District

lying within such county or upon any area of land within the district and county

which the Board of County Commissioners shall determine to be uniformly specially

benefited by improvements, works or facilities lying therein which special main-

tenance tax shall be applied to the maintenance and operation thereof Each such

board of county commissioners is further authorized and empowered to levy a special

tax for the cost of oonstruotin; hereafter additional drainage improvements, works

and faoilites in areas designated by such board of county commissioners within

the district and within such county as being specially benefited by said additional

provided however that none of the general drainage taxes, special maintenance taxes,

or special construction taxes authorized by this Section shall be levied until

the same shall first be approved each year of levy thereof by the owners of at

least fifty per cent of the lands against which such tax is to be imposed. The

operation of the facilities and works as herein provided by each county lying wholly

or partially within the district, and the improvements and levying of taxes as pro-

vided for in this ot, are hereby declared to be valid county purposes for the

respective counties thereby affected.

SECTION 5t The taxes provided for in Sections 2 and 4 shall be assessed and

collected as other taxes within said county. The board of county commissioners

in each county shall certify to the tax assessor at the tina provided for certi-

fying .*enerel ad valorem taxes a list of lands lying within the district and county


- 4 -


_____~__~~~






upon which the taxes authorized by this Act are imposed for such year, Said list

shall in all matters consistent with the provisions hereof conform to the require-

ments of Section 1530 (h2-A), Florida Statutes 1941. Such taxes shall be included

in the assessor's roll with general ad valorem taxes. The provisions of general

law with respect to the collection of general ad valorem taxes of the coaty,

issuance of tax sale certificates, advertising tax deeds and redemption, sto.,

shall apply to the taxes levied pursuant to this Act. Proceeds of such taxes

wtah are herein provided to be paid to the State Treasurer shall be transmitted

thereto by the tax collector and certification of the amount so transmitted

shall be made to the board of county c ongisuioners. All other taxes provided for

herein shall be transmitted to the board of county commissioners by the tax col-

lector, All collections shall be transmitted on or before the l5th day of the

9. month following their collection.

SECTION 6s There are hereby transferred to the board of county caissioners

ot each county lying wholly or partially within the Everglades Drainage District

all facilities, works, constructionsl improvements, tangible personal property and

real estate (except lands, title to which prior to July 1, 1947, shall have been

vested in the Board of Coiassioners of Everglades Drainage District under the

proviians of Seetion 1530 (614, Chapter 298, Florida Statutes 1941) of the dis-

trict situate in such county effective July 1, 1917. Where a canal heretofore

constructed by said District has drained surface water from two or more counties

for the ten years preceding the passage of this Act the respective boards of

county camaadioners of the counties affected shall cause the capacity of such

canal to be measured, and shall by resolution allot the drainage capacity thereof

to such aforesaid affected counties in the same proportion as debt service taxes

of said District for benefits received from said canal hare been paid by smoh coun-

ties for such period.

SBCTION 7T, T collectors and tax assessors of the respective counties lying
wholly or partially within the Everglades Drainage District shall be compensated

for their services provided for herein, in the ma r prescribed by general law

for the asessaent and collection to ad valorem taxes of the county.

SBCTION 8 All moneys iy the hands of the clerks of the circuit courts of







of the circuit court as agent aforesaid to cause a notice of intention to

sell to be published in a newspaper published in the county in which said land

is situated, which notice shall be published once each week for two sudcessive

weeks, two publications beini, sufficiEnt, iWhich shall notify all concerned that

such land will be offered at such sale to the highest bidder for cash at the

court house door in the county where the land is situated, on the day to be

specified therein, which day shall be not less than fifteen days nor more than

thirty days from the date of the first publication of the notice. It shall be

the further duty of the clerk of the circuit court as agent aforesaid, to send

by registered mail at least fifteen days before the date of sale, a copy of such

proposed notice to the last known address of the person, firm, or corporation to

whom the lands described in said notice were last assessed, if known. However,

the failure of the person, firm or corporation to whom said land was last assessed to

receive such notice shall not invalidate the sale or affect the rights of the

purchaser thereunder, nor shall the failure of the clerk as agent aforesaid to

give such notice by mail invalidate the sale or affect the rights of the pur-

chaser thereunder, it being the intention that this provision for mailing of

said notice shall be directory only. Said sale may be held on any day of the

week except Sunday, and at any time specified in the notice between the hours of
i.
1100 o'clock A.M., and 2:00 o'clock P.M. of said day of sale. The amount de-

posited with the said circuit clerk as agent aforesaid by the person :desirin: to

purchase the land, shall be taken and considered as the first bid, and if no

other bids are made, the land shall be sold to such person by the/ '1rk as agent

aforesaid, for the amount of such bid, but if other bids are made, the land

shall be sold to the highest bidder for cash, and if the person iho made the

deposit is the highest bidder, the land shall be sold to him, and the amount

deposited by him shall be applied on his bid. The notice of sale aforesaid

may contain descriptions of more than one parcel of land and may cover lands

included in more than one application upon which deposits have been made by

different bidders as aforesaid; provided, however, that each such description

of lands as separately applied for shall be sold separately.

SECTION 10: Any lands stnck off to the Board of Commissioners of Everpl-es

I"





7.


i








the counties lying: wholly or partially within the Everglades Drainage District

received on July 1, 1947, or received by such clerks after such date, by virtue

of the provisions of Sections 1530 (61) and 1530 (62), Chapter 290, Florida

Statutes 1941, less the fees of such clerks provided for therein shall be remitted

to the State Treasurer and shall become a part of the special Everglades Debt

Service Fund provided for in this Act.

SECTION 9: The title to all real estate which shall have vested in the
Board of Commissioners of Everglades Drainage District prior to July 1, 1947,

pursuant to the provisions of Section 1530 (64), Chapter 290, Florida Statutes

1941, which have not been sold prior to July 1, 1947, shall be automatically on

July 1, 1947, vested in the Treasurer of the State of Florida. The State

Treasurer shall have the power to sell such lands for cash, and shall have power

and authority to adopt and promulgate reasonable rules and regulations relating

to the said sale of said lands, the minimum price at which the respective lands

shall be sold, and the method and terms of such sales. The said State Treasurer

shall constitute and appoint the several respective clerks of the circuit court

of the counties whose lands lie wholly or partially within the said Everglades

Drainage District as his agents for the purpose of sale and conveyance of said

lands and the said clerks are hereby authorized and empowered to execute con-

veyances in the name of and under the direction of the State Treasurer to the

grantees who purchase said lands pursuant to this Act and the rules and regulations

of the State Treasurer aforesaid. For services performed as such agent, the

respective clerks shall receive the fees provided by general law for similar ser-

vices performed as circuit clerk, and each such clerk as such agent aforesaid

shall promptly account to the State Treasurer for the sales of such lands accor-

ding to the rules and regulations promulgated as aforesaid.

Any person desiring to purchase any parcel of the aforesaid lands, shall

deposit with the clerk of the circuit court as agent aforesaid the amount of his

initial bid, which shall be not less than the price as determined and fixed by

the State Treasurer in his aforesaid rules and regulations, plus the estimated

costs of advertising the same for public sale, and all fees incident theretw~ro-

vided by law. Before selling any land, it shall be the duty of the clerk,


-6-




I


Drainage District by the tax collector at any sale prior to July 1, 1947, for

which the period of redemption of two years from the date of such sale shall

not have expired on July 1, 19147, and which shall not have been redeemed as

provided in Section 1530 (64), Chapter 298, Florida Statutes 1911, prior to said

date may thereafter be redeemed as provided for in said law within said two year

period of redemption; provided, that the title to any such lands not so redeemed

after July 1, 1947, and within the said two year period of redemption, shall at

the expiration of said time for redemptioit vest in the Treasurer of the State of

Florida without any further proceedings, and shall be subject to disposition and

sale in the manner provided by this Act,

SECTION 11 Upon the payment and retirement of all debts and obligations

heretofore incurred and outstanding on July 1, 1947, against the Everglades

Drainage District, as provided in Section 2 of this Act, all lands belonging

to said Brainage District hereby vested in the State Treasurer shall be certi-

fled by him to the respective counties in which such lands are situated and

located. Such certification shall have the force and effect for all purposes

of a fee simple conveyance, and shall vest title to such lands in the respective

county wherein the same are situated tnd located, and said lands hnnaA.r uww.uj

to sale and conveyance by the Board of County Commissioners of such county in

the manner provided by general law authorizing the sale and conveyance of county

owned real property.

SECTION 12i The provisions of this Act are severable, and if any of its

.provisions shall be held unconstitutional by any court of competent juris-

diction, the decision of such court shall not affect or impair any of the re-

maining provisions of this Act. It is hereby declared to be the legislative intent

that this Act would have been adopted and passed had such unconstitutional

provision not been included herein.

SECTIOQN ~1 All laws and parts of laws in conflict herewith are hereby

superseded and repealed to the extent of such conflict.

SECTION i. This Act shall take effect at 12s00 o'clock noon, July 1, 19L7.


*


- ;x.~ ...-,






24

NELL L. COWAN BOSTI'ICK LEGISLATIVE BUREAU
TALLAHASSEE,.FLORIDA


PEOPLES OF GLADES HOUSE BILL NO. 660
DRAINAGE & WATER CONSERV~fICOI READ 1ST TIME 5-7-47

A BILL TO BE EII!ITLED

AN ACT RELATIN; TO THE EVERGLADES DRSINAA3E DISTRICT; ABOLISHING THE
BOARD OF COIMMIS-IONERS OF SUCH DISTRICT, .~D VESTING THE RIGHTS., POWERS,
DUTIES, LIABILITIES, PRIVILEGES ,',!D :OV;1RJiLj'TAL FUNCTIONS OF SUCH BOARD
IN THE AESPFCTIvE BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF TIE COUNTIES LYING
WHOLLY OR PARTIALLY IN SAID DISTRICT; AUTHORIZING 'ND DIRECTING SUCH
BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS TO LEVY THE DEBT SERVICE TAX NOW PRO-
VIDED BY LAW ON THE L,NDS IN SUCH DRAINAGE DISTRICT; PROVIDING TILT ALL
MONEYS AND FUNDS OF EVERY NATURE OF SAID DRAINAGE DISTRICT NOW HELD BY
IT, ._ND INCLUDE) DEBT SERVICE TAX PROCEEDS H-EREAFTER COLLECTED SHALL
BE PAID AND DELIVERED TO, THE ST,'dE TREASURER OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA
WHO SHALL ESTABLISH AND MAINTAIN A SPECIAL EVERGLADES DEBT SERVICE FUND
AND ADMINISTER AND PAY rIHEREFROM THE DEBTS OF SAID DRAINAGE DISTRICT
INCURRED AND OUTST.TNDINT ON JULY 1, 1947; PrOVIDIhG3 THE AUTHORITY AND
METHOD FOR THE SALE : .ID CONVEYANCE OF LANDS OWNED BY SAID DRAINAGE DIS-
TRICT AND DISPOSITION OF PROCEEDS OF SAID SALE; PROVIDING FvR INVEST-
MENT BY THE STATE TREASURER OF DRAII i- DISTRICT FUNDS; PROVIDING FOR
THE DISPOSITION BY THE STATS TREASURSi OF ALL MONEYS AND LANDS
BELONGING TO SAID DRAINAGE DISTRICT TO THi RESPECTIVE COUNTIES OF SAID
DRAINAGE DISTRICT AFTER ALL SUCH DISTRICT DEBTS ARE PAID; PROVIDING
FOR THE VESTING OF TITLE TO ALL FACILITI-S, WORKS AND ITPROVE1IENTS OF
SAID DR.,ITAJE DISTRICT IN THE COUNTY nHEA THE SAlE ARE CONSTRUCTED;
AUTHORIZING THE SEVERAL COUNTIES IN SAID DR IlIGE, DISTRICT TO LEVY AND
IIPOSE UPON LANDS IN SAID COUNTY IN SAID DRAINAGE DISTRICT A MAINTEN-
ANDE TAX, AND SPECIAL DRAINGE CONSTRUCTION TAX AND PRESCRIBING
THE TERMS, CONDITIONS AND METHODS OF LEVYING SUCH TAXES; DECLARING
THE OPER.,TION OF SUCH DRAINAGE FACILITIES AND WORKS TO BE VALID COUNTY
PURPOSES; PROVIDING THE METHOD OF COLLECTION AND DISPOSITION OF
DRAINAGE TAXES HEREAFTER L!VIID UPON SAID LANDS IN SAID DRAINAGE DIS-
TRICT; PROVIDING A SAVING CLAUSE; PROVIDING THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS
ACT; AND REPEALING ALL LAWS IN CONFLICT KI-~SWITH.

BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA:

Section l The Board of Commissioners of the Everglades District be and the
same is hereby dissolved and -abolished, and the term of office of each member there-
of is hereby terminated, and the employment of each and every officer, agent or
employee of said district is hereby terminated to take effect at 12:00 o'clock noon
on the first day of July, A.D. 1947. All of the rights, powers, duties, liabilities,
privileges and governmental functions heretofore vested in and granted to the Board
of Commissioners of the Rverglades Drainage District, a political subdivision es-
tablished, organized and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the State of
Florida,.be and the same are hereby severally transferred, set over, granted unto
and vested in the respective boards of county commissioners of the respective
counties located and lying wholly or partially within the said Everglades Drainage
District as heretofore created by lew, such transfer shell become effective at
12:00 o'clock noon on the said first day of July, A.D. 1947; the aforesaid powers,
duties end functions shall be exercised and performed by each such respective borad
of county commissioners with respect to the lands, works and facilities of the said
Everglades Drainage District which are situate within such respective county, when-
ever the nature of such power,.duty of function is consistent with the independent
operation by such board of county commissioners of the said drpin ge works and
facilities as to the lnnds of said District lying within such county,

Section 2a Each county lying wholly or prti-lly within said Everglades
Drainge District is hereby authorized, empowered and directed to levy and impose'
upon the lands of such District lying within the said county a debt service tax
which shall be the maximum amount provided for with respect to the zones indicated
in Sections 1530 (6A) end 1530 (8), Chapter 298, Florida Statutes 1941, beginning
with the year 1948 and continuing thereafter each year until certificate shall be
issued by the Treasurer of the State of Florida as hereinafter in this Section 2
provided to the effect that all principal and interest on all obligations of the
Everglades Drainage District theretofore incurred and outstanding on July 1, 1947,
have been fully paid and retired,, or that sufficient funds or securities have been
allocated to the Everglades Debt Service Fund hereinafter described, to accomplish
full payment of said debts and obligations as same shall become payable. The pro-
ceeds of the debt service tax authorized. herein shall be allocated by the State
Treasurer to a special Everglpdos Debt Service Fund which shall be maintained by


" 1 -





-2-


by the State Treasurer for the purpose of retiring all said debts and obligations
of the Everglades Drainage District theretofore incurred and outstanding on
July 1, 1947, as same shall become due or shall be payable. The debt service fund
of the Everglades Drainage District established under the provisions of Chapter
14717, Laws of Florida, Acts of 1931, and all moneys therein are hereby trans-
ferred and set over unto the State Treasurer effective July 1, 1947, and shall
become a part of the special Everglades Debt Service P'und provided for herein
to be maintained by the State Treasurer for the purposes herein prescribed. Upon
the payment and retirement of all debts and obligations theretofore incurred and
outstanding on July 1, 1947, against the Everglades Drainage District, or upon
receipt into the special -4viergledes Debt Service Fund of sufficient moneys end se-
curities to retire all debts and obligations aforesaid as same shall become payable,
the State Treasurer shall issue certificate thoroof end file a copy of the same
with each such bocrd of county commissioners. The debt service aix provided for
herein sh-ll not thereafter be levied or imposed except upon further certificate of
the Strte treasurer that such levy or imposition is necessary in order to pay the
aforesaid debts -nd obligations of the district theretofore incurred end outstanding
on July 1, 1947. All proceeds remaining in said speci-l Everglades Debt Service
Fund after the retirement of nll the aforesaid indebtedness shpal be divided among
pnd paid to the respective bo-rds of county commissioners in the proportion that
the lend acreage of the district situnto within each such county bears to the total
rcrenge of the srid Everglades Drrinpge Distriot as it now exists. Such proceeds
shell thercupon become a part of the general rovcnue fund of the respective counties.

Section 3: All proceeds of the administration fund, debt service fund, and
mpintennince fund established by Section 1530 (44), Chrptor 298, Floridn Statutes
1941, together with 1ll unit district preliminary construction and mninten-nce
funds "nd all other funds of the Everglades Drainage District which ore under the
supervision, control and jurisdiction of the said Boprd of Commissioners of Ever-
glades Drninage District, ere hereby transferred to the Strte Treasurer, effective
July 1, 1947. The State Treasurer shall transfer all such funds to the special
Evergledes Debt Service Fund provided for in this Act to be used for the purposes
herein directed with respect thereto. The State Treasurer sholl have the authority
to invest the proceeds of such funds or portions thereof for such period of time
a.s they will not be needed for the payment of obligations, (the payment of which,
according to their terms, cannot be "cceler"tod) in United States Government Bonds
which bonds shrll become securities in the said special Evurglades Debt Service
Fund.

Section 4a The maintenance, operation, preservation and rendering efficient
of all works heretofore constructed by Everglades Drrinoge District shnll be the
duty and function of the boards of county commissioners in each county lying whol-
ly or partially within the district as to the lands, works and facilities of said
District lying within each such county. The boprd of county commissioners in each
such county at the time of preparing its annual budget shrll prepare lso a special
budget covering contemplated cost of ndministr-tion rnd maintenance of drainage
works of such district within the county -nd is hereby empowered, authorized and
directed to levy rnd impose upon such l"nds in the District lying within the county
a general drainage trx for the maintenronc of existing works and facilities of the
District within the county from which the county board shll determine that benefits
crcrue equally to district lrnds throughout such county. In addition to the gen-
eral drninPge trx herein provided for, ecch such board of county commissioners is
further authorized -nd empowered to levy and impose a special maintenance t-x, not
to exceed fifty cents per acre per year upon 1-nds within any unit district or other
subdrninage district formerly under the control and jurisdiction of the Board of
Commissioners of the Everglades Drainage District lying within such county or upon
any area of land within the district and county which the Board of County Commis-
sioners shall determine to be uniformly specially benefited by improvements, works
or facilities lying therein which special maintenance tax shall be Epplied to the
maintenance and operation thereof, Sach such board of county commissioners it
further authorized and empowered to levy a special tax for the cost of constructing
hereafter additional drainage improvements, works and facilities in areas designa-
ted by such board of county commissioners within the district and within such county
as being specially benefited by said additions; provided however that none of the
general drainage taxes, special maintenance taxes, or special construction taxes
authorized by this Section shell be levied until the seme shall first be approved
each year of levy thereof by the owners of at least fifty per cent of the lands
against which such tax is to be imposed. The operation of the facilities and works
as herein provided by each county lying wholly or partially within the district, and
the improvements end levying of texes as provided for in this Act, rre- hereby de-
olrrcd to be valid county purposes for the respective counties thereby affected.

Section 5: The taxes provided for in Sections 2 and 4 shrll be assessed r-nd
collected --s other taxes within snid county. The borrd- of county commissioners
in erch county shrll certify to the tax assessor "t tho- time provided for certify.
ing general ad valorem taxes n list of lands lying within the district nnd county




upon which the tnxes authorized by this oct fre imposed for such year. Said
list shall in all matters consistent with the provisions hereof conform to the
requirements of section 1530 (42-A), Florid-. Statutes 1941. Such taxes shall be
included in the assessor's roll with goneral ad valorem taxes. The provisions
of general law with respect to the collection of general ad valorem taxes of the
county, issuance of tax sole certificates, advertising tax deeds and redemption,
etc., shall apply to the taxes levied pursuant to this Act. Proceeds of such
taxes which are herein provided to be paid to the State Treasurer shall be trans-
mitted thereto by the tax collector and certification of the amount so transmitted
shall be made to the board of county commissioners. All other taxes provided for
herein shell be transmitted to the board of county commissioners by the tax col-
lector. All collections shall be transmitted on or before the 15th day of the
month following their collection.

Section 6: There are hereby transferred to the board of county commissioners
of e-ch county lying wholly or partially within the Everglades Drainage District
all faciliti-s, works, constructions, improvements, t-ngible personal property end
real estate (except i1nds, title to which prior to July 1, 1947, shall have been
vested in the Board of Cor.missioners of Everglades Drainage District under the
provisions of Section 1530 64,1, Chapter 298, Florida Statutes 1941) of the dis-
trict situate in such county effective July 1, 1947, ;~here n canal heretofore
constructed by said District has drained surface water from two or more counties
for the ton y;rrs preceding the passage of this Oct the respective boards of
county commissioners of the counties affected shall couse the capacity of such
canal to be measured, and shall by resolution allot the drainage capacity thereof
to such aforesaid affected counties in the same proportion as debt service taxes
of said District for benefits received from said canal have been paid by such
counties for such period.

Section 7: Tax collectors and tax assessors of the respective counties
lying wholly or partially within the Everlaedes Drainage District shall be compen-
sated for their services provided for herein, in the manner prescribed*by general
law for the assessment and collection of ad valorem taxes of the county.

Section 8: All moneys in the hands of the clerks of the circuit courts of
the counties lying wholly or partially-within the Everglades Drainese District
reoeivwd on July 1, 1947, or received by such clerks after such date, by virtue
of the provisions of Sections 1530 (61) and 1530 (62), Chapter 298, Florida
Statutes 1941, less the fees of such clerks provided for therein shall be remitted
to the State Treasurer and shall become a part of the special Everglades Debt
Service Fund provided for in this Act.

Section 9: The title to all real estate which shell have vested in the
Borrd of Commissioners of Everglades Drainage District prior to July 1, 1947,
pursuant to the provisions of Secticn 1530 (64), Chapter 298, Florida Statutes
1941, which have not been sold prior to July 1, 1947, shall be 'utbmatic-lly on
July 1, 1947, vested in the Treasurer of the State of Florida. The State Treas-
urer sh-ll have the p:w-.r to sell such lrnds for cnsh, nd shall have power end
authority to adopt and promulgate reasonable rulos rnd regulations relating to the
said sale of said lands, the minimum price at which the respective lands shall be
sold, and the method end terms of such sales. .The said State Treasurer shrll con-
stitute -nd appoint the several respective- clerks of the circuit court of the
counties whose lands lie wholly c.r pFrti-lly within the said Iverglades Drainage
District as his -gents for the purpose of sale and conveyance of said lands,
and the said clerks are hereby -uthcrizod ?nd empowered to execute conveyances in
the name of and under the direction of the State Troasurer to the grantees who
purchase said lands pursuant tc this Act and the rules nd regul-tions of the State
Treasurer aforesaid. For services performed as such -gent, the respective clerks
shall rocciv.- the foes provided by general law for similar services performed as
circuit clrk, rnd eoch such clerk ps such agent aforespid shall promptly account
to the State Treasurer for the sales of such lands according to the rules and regu-
lations promulgated as eforesaid.
.ny person desiring to purchase any parcel of the aforesoid lands, shall
deposit with the clerk of the circuit .-urt as gent afcresaid the amount of his
initial bid, which shall be not less than the price sr determined and fixed by
the State Treasurer in his aforesaid rules nnd roguletions, plus the estimated costs
of advertising the same for public sale, and all fees incident thereto provided by
law. Before selling any land, it shall be the duty of the clerk of the circuit
court as agent aforeseid to cause a notice of intention to sell to be published in
a newspaper published in the county in which said lend is situated, which notice
shall be published once each week for two successive weeks, two publications
being sufficient, which shell notify all concerned thpt such land will be offered
at such sale to the highest bidder for cash at the court house door in the county
where the land is situetcd, on the day to be specified thurein, which day shall be
not less then fifteen days nor more then thirty days from the date of the first


- 3 -







P ag e Four

publication of the notice. It shAll be thju further duty of the clerk of the
circuit court as agent aforespid,. to send by registered mail at least fifteen
days before the dEte of sple, a copy of such proposed notice to the last known
address of the person, firm, or corporation to whom the lands described in said
notice were last assessed,. if known. However, the failure of the person, firm
or corporation to whom said lend was last assessed to receive such notice shall
not invalidate the sale or affect the rights of the purchaser thereunder, nor
shnll the failure of the clerk as agent aforesaid to give such notice by mail
invalidate th3 sale or pffoct the, rights of the purchaser thereunder, it being
the intention that this provision for mailing of said notice shpll be directory
only.. Said sale may be held on any da'y of the week except Sunday, and at nny
time specified in the notice between the hours of 11:00 o'clock A.M.,. and 2:00
o'clock P.M. of srid day of srle. The "mount deposited with the srid circuit
clerk Ps agent rforespid by the person desiring to purchase the lend, shall be
taken and considered as th.o first bid, and if no other bids are mPde, the land
Sj- : shall bqeold to such person by the said clerk es agent aforesaid, for the amount
of such bid, but if other bids are made, the lend shall be sold to the highest
bidder for cash, and if the person who made the deposit is the highest bidder,
the land shall be sold to him, and the amount deposited by him shall be applied
on his bid. The notice of sale aforesaid may contain descriptions of more than
one parcel of land and may cover lands included in more than one application upon
which deposits have been made by different bidders es aforesaid; provided, how-
ever, that each such description of lands as separately applied for shall be sold
separately.

Section 10: Any lands struck off to the Board of Commissioners of Everglades
Drainage District by the tax collector at any sn.le prior to July 1, 1947, for
which the period of redemption of two years from the date of such sale shall not
have expired on July 1, 1947, pnd which sh-:ll not hove been redeemed as provided
in Section 1530 (64),, Chopter 298, Florida Statutes 1941,. prior to said date may
thereafter be redeemed As provided for in said law within said two year period
of redemption; provided, thpt the title to any such lends not so redeemed after
July 1,. 1947,.- nd within the srid two year period of redemption, shall at the ex-
piration of said time for redemption vest in the Treasurer of the StPte of Florida
without any further proceedings, and shnll be subject to disposition and sale-.
in the manner provided by this Act.

Section 11: Upon the payment and retirement of ell debts and obligptibns
heretofore incurred pnd outstanding on July 1, 1947,, Pgainst the Everglades
Drainpie District, as provided in Section 2 of this Act, all lands belonging to
said Droinpge District hereby vested in the State Treasurer shall be certified
by him to the respective counties in which such lands are situated and located.
Such certification shall h've th; force -nd effect for pll purposes of a fee
simple conveyance, and shrll vest title to such Innds in the respective county
wherein the senme are situated pnd loctsed, and said lands shall be subject to
sale and conveyance by the Board of County Commissioners of such county in the
manner provided by general lPw authorizing the srle end conveyance of county owned
real property.

Section 12: The provisions of this Act are severable,, and if any of its
provisions shall be held unconstitutional by any court of competent jurisdiction,.
the decision of such court shall not affect or impair any of the remaining pro-
visions of this Act. It is hereby declared to be the legislative intent that
this Act would hrve been adopted and passed had such unconstitutional provision
not been included herein,

Section 13: All lpws and parts of laws in conflict herewith are hereby
superseded and repealed to the extent of such conflict.

Section 14: This tct sh-ll take effect at 12100 o'clock noon, July 1, 1947.


-4 -


I









L. f / //;' ; .
/1 )I *./ f


/ /



/ii ~1.



{ri


-y I

/( J ;


/


ii, '1

," .. ~




,% .16-


I.. -. I;


r/


A


A c ~ .~ I
I 21/


A w~-'/'- I


1i


:I>:
,~c


















Amount of
an Flood


Nosey spent, l Dade County
ergenCy Mike work .$119,867.73


t of Monr spent by the Federal
pnment on Flood teorgency dike work. .


. 39,82U1.30


$~19692.03


Mfint of Money spent by tade County
on flood Boergmomy oamal cleaning. .


Amount of Unwey ujpnt Wy the Federtl
Government f n lood uarlgenay canal
cleaning work a a .


This aakes a total of. .


. 19,L61.44


. a a 72.818.68


a 'a a a a a a a a a a a a a


92,280.12

2~1.,972.15


.3l


-'I


9,


C .f.


r


r :











TEITATIVE 1947 LEGISLATIVE PROGRAM,
EVERGLADES DrLiAQMAE DISTRICT, AS
PROPOSED AT I'MRLI IINARY LEGISLATORS'
CONFEREIICE, FEBRUARY 12TH

1. Amend statement of purposes of District to include water control and
conservation.

2. Amend sub-section t. of the section conferring powers on the Board for
the purpose of including after the words "other properties" the words "and
for the control of the installation and operation of public or private water
control facilities."

3. Specific authority to make oil reservations in District deeds, covering
point in controversy in ',est Florida I. I. Board litigation now in
Supreme Court.

4. Specific authority for consummation of proposed plans with U. S. Wildlife
Service and Park Service.

5. Provide statutory authority to dedicate conservation areas, ratifying
prior dedications. This would include soil conservation dedication powers
and provisions for cancellation of unsold tax certificates on conservation
areas, authority to redeem sold certificates on conservation areas, and
provision for no further certificates on such areas.

6, Provide for por.er to make "swaps" and exchanges where advantageous in
working out conservation areas and otherwise.

7. While not a part of Everglades Dr-Anage District legislation, it is
important to see that the I. I. Board secures legislation authorizing it
to dedicate conservation areas, to make exchanges and to deal with the
United States V.ildlife Service along the lines proposed with respect to
the Palm Beach County conservation area. This authorrt", -vhile intended
to cover these points, should be broad enough to authorize similar matters
which may be proposed in the future.

3. Provision allowing Board discretion in fixing attorneys' fees.

9* Provision based upon Sec. 298.57 in General Drainage Law for rights of
way of individ-.ls through lands of others for canal access, but making
the obtaining of such rights of way by individuals dependent upon approval
and permission from Everglades Board.

10. Provision for acquisition of easements reserved in I. I. Board deeds.

11. Provide a statutory remedy against squatters on the rights of way and other
properties of the District, with provision that the statutes of limitations
(Squatters' riiits) shall not run against the District.

12. Exemption of District from adverse effect of county tax foreclosures,
eliminating effort of Dade County decision.

13.?rotection of District against issuance of tax deeds, eliminating the
effect of the Rosen decision. This protection should include protection
against the possible loss of reserved rights of way through the issuance
of tax deeds.

14. Provision for specific statutory authority for use of :185,000 fund, for
use of 50,000 fund now in Federal Court registry, and any other funds
not earmarked at time of refunding for debt service, to be used for
construction and maintenance purposes.


I I












15. Provide that all proceeds from sales of land the title to which became
vested in the Board for non-payment of administration (ad valorem) taxes
only, hereinafter shall be paid into the Administration Fund of the
District, and that the Board may transfer into such Administration Fund all
proceeds of such sales heretofore made.

16. Clarify right to use Administration Fund for construction and maintenance.

17. Provision for giving Board power to use portions of Debt Service Fund not
earmarked for debt service by bond contract, for administration purposes,
including construction and maintenance.

18. Provide power to use Debt Service Fund for repairs, in the event of storm
or other natural emergency or "Act of God."

19. Increase ad valorem tax from one-half mill to one mill.

20. Revise provisions for setting up of maintenance areas and levying maintenance
taxes, so as to create practicable system.

21. Provision for taxing lands beyond the meander line of Lake Okeechobee, or
in the alternative, a provision disclaiming any responsibility for service
of such lands by the District.


'










Zarch 25, 1947


Everglades Drainage Distriot,
oameau Building,
l'est Palm Beach, lorida



Attentions: r. K.M. Throop
Treasurer



Gentlemen:


Peoeipt is acknowledged with thanks of your letter of the 21st instant

enclosing copies of proposed bills to be introduced at the coming ses-

sion of the Legislature as regards Everglades Drainage Diatriot matters,

as follows,


1 To establish areas for conservation water and soil in the District*


2. For maintenance areas and tax therefore in the District.


3. rFelating to County tax title suits ooveriniE, lands in the D stricta


4. Authority to convey to the unitedd States lands in the District or


any interest therein.


5. Relative to the administrative tax of the .istriot and increasLig

present tax for this purpose to 1 mill.


6. 1'ransfer to the ads..inistration fund o- the District any excess pro-

ceeds lro-. the debt service tax of the iistriot to the administra-

tion fund.


7 Tielative to water control and conservation of lands in the district*


V'e have not had opportunity, as yet, to study these proposed aots aun,

therefore, the followingg comments requested by you should be considered

as preliminary and tentative only.


1. ;;iile this proposed act apparently would have little or no efoeot

on tiose areas belonp.inp: to us in the district, it w-,uld appear to

have far reaohinE effect and, if such has not already been done, it

would be our suggestion that open hearings on the subject should be

held and the thoughts of those directly a-'ected be ascertained.

It occurs to us that this may become a very controversial matter.


_ -- --- -------- ,,_.....,_ ------- .--.-;.~.~~. ~-"-.~ ;;. ...~ 1


I















fIt as now appears to be the case, the tax for paying off the Dis-

triot's indebtedness results in the aoumulation of more funds than

are necessary for that specific purpose, then it occurs to us that

any such excess should be used to reduce the indebtedness and, in

this way, pay ot'f' the indebtedness ir even quicker time than was

originally estimated to be possible.


It is just such action as that proposed which brings into disrepute

the handling of the affairs o.' the Distriet. ie earnestly suggest

that this aot not be passed but, instead, that any excess funds in

this debt service fund over and above what is necessary to din-

sharge current indebtedness requirements, be utilized not for ad-

ministration purposes or any other purpose than more quickly dia-

charging the Distri.ote indebtedness.


T7 Our comment on this proposed act is the same as that stated in par-

agraphsa and 2, on the preceding pages.


We will appreciate any ecammnts froa you concerning our oo=mets above

expressed.


With thanks for your courtesy in the matter,



Very truly yours,


TAr.ISJSI LNWD DEVELOuMLk.ST 2uPANY


D, Graham Gopeland


-.Am


.. .-i....-











2. Our comment on this proposed not is the same aa that immediately

stated above.


. WeV see no objection to this proposed aote


4. Again, we see no objection to this aot, provided its purport is

t;1orou ghly understood and agreed upon by the owners o" land arreo-




5. "We most strongly oppose any increased village for administration

purposes


In the revamping of t e entire structure of the istriot dur.r.g the

Lolland Administration, a .ta oi 1/2 silU was imposed for administra-

tion purposes. Such tax is believe to be ample for the purpose and,

as stated we oppose any increase therein. For those portions of

the Distriot where absolutely no benefit has ever been received

from the Distriot's works and, indeed serious damage has resulted,

any tax for administration purposes is considered improper. ow-

ever, in order to "play ball", we did not oppose the 1/2 mill tax

for administration purposes. We will oppose any increase in that

tax if the increase be applied to our properties which, instead of

being benefited in the lightest degree by present works of the Tilse

triot and of those proposed, have actually been seriously damaged.


6e It is our opinion that this aot, providing for the transfer from

debt service tax fund to administration tax fund of any excess

S monies collected for debt service, is a very ba one and should not

be enacted into law.


It was our understanding of the original act governing debt ser-

vice that the main consideration was to pay off all debt at the

earliest moment practicable and, thereby, release all lands from

any originally incurred indebtedness.


For this purpose, certain debt service tax was established and, as

established, it was deemed just sufficient to pay olf the Distriot's

indebtedness in the shortest time possible*










GEORGE CONRAD WESTERVELT


8 CIRCLE
SEBRING, FLORIDA

PALM AND P1NE LAND CO. April 14
LAKE FARMS COMPANY
1947



Senator Ernest Graham,
Pensuco, via Hialeah,
Florida.

Dear Ernest:

I have no doubt that you have seen and are familiar with the various
special Acts of the Legislature introduced by Mr. W. D. Hilsabeck, Chairman of
the Everglades Drainage District.

Two of these Acts in particular, namely #9175 and #9177, have attracted
nm attention due to the sweeping nature of the proposed legislation and to a
very active doubt in my mind as to the reasons for the attempt to secure certain
powers, and the possible personalities behind these attempts. Take, for ex-
ample, Proposal #9177. This would empower the Board of Commissioners of the
District to establish areas for conservation of water and soil within the boundaries
of the District, etc. etc. I have not, of course, seen the proposed bill itself,
but an Act of this kind could, of course, be extremely startling in its extension
of the right of eminent domain and, in the case of our own immediate situation
in this area, could make it possible for certain individuals to benefit very
greatly at the expense of other individuals.

I tried to get you by telephone to discuss this matter with you but
due to the strike was unable to get through. Would you be kind enough to give
me your thoughts on these matters as I am sure you are reasonably familiar with
the behind-the-scenes moves and will, as always, be very enlightening and
definite in your opinions as to the merits of the proposals.

I am trying to get over to Tampa later in the week to discuss these
matters with Mr. John Lykes as, I am sure, he will take a very active interest
in them.

I wonder if you are familiar with another piece of proposed local
legislation. This is a proposed local legislation affecting Hendry County which
reads as follows:

NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY FOR LOCAL LEGISLATION
AN ACT providing that, in Hendry County, no person, persons or
interests shall fence out: or bar: or keep fenced out the
public from fishing or hunting wildlife on any lands contain-
ing, or occupied by, such wildlife when such fishing or


Wt 336













Senator Graham


hunting is done in accordance with the rules and regulations
of the State Game and Fish Commission and providing that nothing
in such Act shall apply to homesteads; or of farm lands under
cultivation; or of Game Farms established and licensed in
accordance with existing laws and of the rules and regulations
of the State Game and Fish Commission.

A. A. Harrington
No. 191-March 13, 1947

Similar moves to this have been tried in many parts of the U. S. and
have, I believe, whenever they have come to court trial, been ruled unconstitu-
tional. This, of course, is an expensive and difficult procedure to carry out,
and it looks like the thing to do is to "scotch" legislation of this kind
a-borning, if possible. As you know it is extremely difficult to deal with
local legislation, as one legislator does not like to oppose the proposals of
another. Will you be kind enough to consider this matter in your reply to me,
letting me know what you know about the particular situation referred to and
what you think should be done about it. I feel certain that you, as well as
any other fairly large land owner, would be opposed to a legislative opening
of his area to anybody who might care to go in it with a gun or a fishing pole.
If the matter is successfully accomplished in one county it will, of course,
spread at the next term of the legislature into many counties.

With best regards,


Very sincerely yours,

/^ __


G. C. Westervelt


M M M M


April 14, 1947













BROWARD COUNTY


What the passage of House Bill 660 would mean to property owners

of land in Everglades Drainage District in Broward County:



It will save them approximately $1,957,000

Which is $1,873,000 ad valorem tax
84,000
$1.,957,000


Total cost per person per year -- Population 50,044 -- $1.95












GOLJIER COUNTY


What the passage aof ouse Lill 660 wouLk Man to

property owners of land in ivtrglades drainage Itriat in

Col"ier Countyi



It will save thom

eremage tax 20 year 484,40
ad valoreo tax 25 year 4.32
Total saving, n 1970 $94,392


Total per yr3 per person


- 0.96
mnE.u-a











HIC~-hL&1M1S COIJHTY


lWhat the passage of House Bill 660 would mean to the

property owners of land in Everglades Drainage District in

Highlands County:


It would save

Debt Service tax
Ad valorem tax
Total


$71,440
2,151
$73,591


Total cost per year per person Highlands County


-- $0.23














MONROE COUNTY


What the passage of House Bill 660 would mean to

property owners of land in Everglades Drainage District in

Monroe County:



It would save

Debt Service tax $68,600
Ad valorem tax 3,519
$72,119


---~i-- r...- ......,... .












Martin County


What the passage of House Bill 660 would mean to property

owners of land in Everglades Drainage District in Martin Countyr



It would save

Debt Service tax $253,660
Ad valorem tax 16,192
$269,852


Total cost per person per year Martin County -- $2.28












GIADES COUNTY




What the passage of House Bill 660 would mean to property

owners of land in Everglades Drainage Distriot in Gl deas County:



It would save


Debt Service Tax
Ad valorem Tax


$478,620
15,318
$494,958


Total payment per year per person in Glades County -- $11.40


m I .....











OsER COUNTY


lat the psetage of houus Bill 60O would mean to the

property owners of land at Sverglades Drainagoe i striot $a

Okeehbobae Couanty



It would *aWve

Debt servloe tax 569,600
Ad valorom tlx 14 =3
S74,030


Coat per person per year population 2,919 1.26












ST LUCIE COUNTY




What the passage of House Bill 660 would mean to the

property owners of land ih Everglades Drainage District in

St. Lucie County:



It would save

Debt Service tax $41,180
Ad valorem tax 2,392
Total $43,572









CHEROKEE HOTEL





J.A.STILES, PRESS. & MANAGER
TALLAJIS SEE,FLORIDA


FACING PARK AVENUE


MJ '/


. '~i :


// /

-
/+


7 / 1 "


77 3H ./I *- I


z-l// 00
.... 0o0


/ 65 '


SAIR CONDITIONED ROOMS AND COFFEE SHOP
RADIO IN EVERY ROOM
HMHwor. OT AmFOREHT HOTL *LAB A HOT tOGN HOTEL IXE SHE HOT WLO H


, .1


L~~. ''r"


>L


.i


*'(/ /


HOTE L *HOTEL









CHEROKEE HOTEL




J. A. STILES, PRES.& MANAGER
TALAHASEE, FLORIDA


FACING PARK AVENUE


4;K


/;2~~1~~ <


/ .


( / 4


/'


S ,


AIR CONDITIONED ROOMS AND COFFEE SHOP
RADIO IN EVERY ROOM
FrIRFRESTNQr' Aln SEOTLLs. HTOTE Go A OT OELAlTON HOTEL AM HOTEL


C


/ 7 / ?-


/ ***


BALU1WIN HOTEL


$
/l.2tdi;










CHEROKEE HOTEL





J. A. STILES, PRESS. & MANAGER
TAIAHASEE, LOKIDA


FACING PARK AVENUE


/
I


f/f


/ (-


<- ,d
'di Ct2


.7


AIR CONDITIONED ROOMS AND COFFEE SHOP
RADIO IN EVERY ROOM
L HOTEL A ORe HOTEL A MA OTEL GEORGIAN HOTEL E SHERMAN TEL WALTON OTEL BAAM OTEL


r)
.w..


ik


c./


,. ^










CHEROKEE HOTEL





J. A. STILES, PRESS. & MANAGER
TAlAHAS SEE, FLORIDA


FACING PARK AVENUE


i
f..j


-~ r j


---;.~ ^-, /
iw7. /I


AIR CONDITIONED ROOMS AND COFFEE SHOP
RADIO IN EVERY ROOM
., ,N o L AAL, .... A TE I,,& .. .. .-I HO' UA o o ,o .oTE


i??-;Z








CHEROKEE HOTEL




J.A.STILES, PRESS & MANAGER
ALLAjAHAS SEE, FLORIDA


FACING PARK AVENUE


~r~4


- NI


KK iL..1$( k


-f?
0 f ,i


,Ej


$70


/ -.- -~ /2


.k: It


Ij
b I7 H


AIR CONDITIONED ROOMS AND COFFEE SHOP
RADIO IN EVERY ROOM
LDWIN HOTEL T HOTEL ALABAMA HOTEL E IAN HOTEL DIXIE SHEMAN HOTEL WALTON HOTEL BALSAM MOTEL


' ft


/" 1k-


M--


~'1 is


,yd









CHEROKEE HOTEL




J. A. STILES, PRESS & MANAGER
TALLAHAS SEE, FLORIDA


FACING PARK AVENUE




-7)
I" r ..
i .


ii


/T"..


/ /
7 -


(L ~


7)V >


/'


C


AIR CONDITIONED ROOMS AND COFFEE SHOP
RADIO IN EVERY ROOM
BALWIN HUOEL FAIRFORET HOTEL ABAMA HOTEL OGIAN HOTEL DXiE SHERMAN HOTEL WALN HOL B M HOTEL


i























FACING PARK AV


(


CHEROKEE HOTEL






J. A. STILES, PRES.& MANAGER
TAA EIISSE, FLORIDA


ENUE











/1


;:1 /


II


p.. f '.


AIR CONDITIONED ROOMS AND COFFEE SHOP
RADIO IN EVERY ROOM


BALDWIN HTL F'AIR TC HN. ALUMA ATEL ONROIAAN HOTEL DIXIE SHERMAN HOTEL
N1YO~Y ABOTA ALL.r AIAABL AWBN lINDA ANNrs.


., -


I I _


i)"


VILTON HOILL ~LI~Y *OTLL
- NIIIl ~04L MID1 Uyll. ~ C





















FACING PARK AVENUE


/4
k


,.% 1/
d-.


CHEROKEE HOTEL





J. A. STILES, PRES. & MANAGER
TALLAHAS SEE, FLORIDA





" V














//


7 I1


- 1'/9


94


V AIR CONDITIONED ROOMS AND COFFEE SHOP
RADIO IN EVERY ROOM
BACWIN HOTEL FAIRFOREST HOTEL ALAMA. HOTEL Co IAN HOL DIXiE SHERM. HOTL WALTO I


_ ___


HtOTE U AM *OTEL














April 15, 1947





Jr. G. C, .]uetervelt
8 Circle
Sebring, Florida

Dear Mr. Westervelts

Your letter to Mr. Graham .was received today and we are .
forwarding same to hime

Mr. Graham is familiar with the proposed SEarglades
legislation and has been working with Mr. John Lykes
in Tallahasse on these matters. He is spending a part
of each week at Tallahassee during legislature and can
be reached at the Cherekee Hotel Tallahassee, Floridae

Very truly yours,

GRAiAL'S DAIRY, I!iC.








jL;>

_






TELEPHONE 3-4611


"TOPS IN SERVICE"




P. 0. BOX 125, BUENA VISTA STATION
3448 N. MIAMI AVENUE
MIAMI 37, FLORIDA



April 19, 1947


Mr. Ernest R. Grahas
Cherokee Hotel
Tallahassee, Fla.

Dear Ernest:

There has been considerable publicity relative to the
legislation proposed by the Everglades Drainage Com-
mission, and it appears that there may have been a mis-
understanding in some quarters as to how this legislation
was viewed by the Dade County Commissioners.

The legislation in question was discussed at length by the
Board of Dade County Commissioners on two different occasions
but was not considered favorably.

At the second conference the matter was referred to
Mr. Park Campbell and County Engineer, Earl Rader, for
further study and report back to the Board, but to the
best of my recollection no report on the outcome of this
study has yet been submitted to the County Commission.

With kindest personal regards

Sincerely,



I. D. MacTicar
County Commissioner, 3rd
idm;jl District, Dade County


1. D. MACVICAR


PRANK WELLS








Miami Springs, Florida


April 23, 1947


Hon. E. R. Graham
Cherokee Hotel
Tallahassee, Florida


Dear Senator:


We, the undersigned, being property owners on or
near the banks of the Miami Canal, from the City limits of
Hialeah to five miles north of Graham Dairy, are very much
interested in the Everglades Drainage Bill, now before the
Legislature, and would appreciate your assistance and in-
fluence in protecting our rights.
As you know, our homes are of necessity located
on the lands immediately adjacent to the Canal, these being
the only suitable homesites. Also, the school busses run
along Route 25 to pick up our children for school in Hialeah.
Thanking you in advance for your consideration and co-
operation, we are


Respectfully yours,


47i^1) .P 6iJb^(
Ad /2
(^^^ S- c0yy

la~g-^r4 N:.


76 ?. M^^'
^ ^lVLA^^L ^




.. &?C CM-L^
1^^ o/M/LC
/a ^-^ -^^Z

y^.du JjL^' v-
c. 41J~3-Ce^A.f


^ite^ /^>^^ti<
;u^4^^^ W\,~a~


k ~u f

Ik;k-i


~2~


(^ C^.e-


7f-17




















Judge Tom Connelly
Okesohobee ra tla


*HEARING ON DREAJIGE BILL WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON IHEE O'CLOCK

WOULD HELP A GREAT DEAL IF YOU COULD BE THERE WILL TRY .TO


TELEPHONE YOU TONIGHT FROM TALLAHASSEE


ERG


a
1
.r
rp 1




3
r
d


1


-T~~-:ra




4j
T%
'- r4

1


,: '


.;;i

~;














April 12, 1C47


.r, D. CrS'.c. CZi.ci.-a "
.v .. C 'l, Z' *

-or -t.- C.



c o
S -., *u> ... no c...c l .r

,O 'c ': r t. 1:1. -."1:. lie ::;, ir e- ..cod In *...co cnr '.i-1sbe-t
l no t.c cr. c ,' to :' .rv .: ,c iC .cra.sinr L.-oC ad vcloroci tax
ancd CuLO "c Li. i1 rcnrJ to vl.mt :r.3 tases an:l' lmaintoCnauc dlistriots.
Tir t.roccioL givc .~ i t.c .a:-or rea:,o. her e a Lhact thc. Lore just
'."ran"- tciorsraily, Lut thA ic Lot Lt .c tol me-. tiftcr talking
r-':th -'r. 1:k..y a:i o-,ic 1r, I dCubt if t:.,-J on :.c any ao the bills Ea
pr.uc:.ily -re.. 1r. .1y told Ie Thu y f', unT'd o support for these


:*i..j a he Ic :iscu.ed L.L.Le ciD-VLabllity of '.i:.ttin. in a bill
t c .. ro :x LL-c.-u t.. ivc.'lades -'raina-.e -.o oach co-j-ty ;ould have
0 cjLT-E.tJLL e. .-ht lJ nar- cl.ven cou.t-iiconerz. r hi1e that
roulc'. Lo ao. UTr-lSIdly boear,_ it i.ould practicallyy insure araln-t thel
-Mni-ulc, I.t.i .'-t 'L., zo on. 'r r t.C iact f .r rcars, tV:rcr? ::en r.avo
Jrc-tc c .11 -i, -l eL. -,- :c a.Jairc 1, ,'-. .is 'ic-.
& .s i...17.
.' : .. ... o no 1. .: r c c,... plan aic-' rL he doesn't
I: A, : A' : ;: "t .n,.,orL ti 'him Et th-" .-cxrt lez slaturo. As for
i::tcC, .... .-::.- cu't:-, cr 31-ads, or a..y ot'cr as iar &as ti'nt goos,
Lt. c .- a bill "t'. r ::. : a y "'i: a a c.,-. s:; ait.irai.c bill
ju. pin' -yor t-.cr :. ,.l::; r', you :..cr' o-cr-t cas-cle cor auy
stable cro,, .,j -.uld -c; uiale to stay in 'usine-!sz.

S.ci::.--c ti.t ocJL l '- X ar a .111 li:c t:.is, t irL;!t be
,occf.blo i-1: :;.- r. r 'rc to ct ac aiC. l': : ;our U n ours and all
the.-: cccti';2l ;'.ji;' :.... o.c u- u:.' l-aLc o 'j i'K.c: .lie.rct. In faot
i thiil: CRC o..u; C:l. .::-i vL Cr- a.~mzu. i C... L.'trc. of t'.e i:debtness
!i0ch v would bc very smal. z t' .r.t tirs it.. -1-. c.dorrl Goavernuwnt in
contrAl of" La Lu "l:-o'obnie, cn: sec :o roeazr- -'ro= an engn,' ering
standpoint :. t1 -y : c u1C -;ct to -.cic. '. cn c c. a;. o-t :z:ir advantages
fro. an or.1craziii ctan.,'ointb.

1 a. .atrc alg. to ..cllcIo..sccc :-on.wa -rn min- ard n ill be at the
Chcrok:cc r u... I,..:.-il .hur'say or :'riay. r .-.::1 .2taciato it if you
i:ould drooj .c. .'. liic tollinGc A .hat you think of this idca,

2incerely yours,



Ernest R. Graham ,
. ERGGb ..









TAMPA MORNING TRIBUNE:
FIRST OI N -THE W EST CO T r

TAM FA 1, F LO RI DA
April 12, 1947


Mr. Ernest R. graham
Former State Senator
Miami, Fla.

Dear Mr. raham,

The Tribune is interested in the water control problem in
South Florida and particularly in the Everglades Drainage District,
where the problem appears to be of more serious proportions than
anywhere else in the state.

In the course of an investigation of this problem, I spent
part of last week in the Palm Beach-Belle Glade area interviewing
various persons interested in the water control program.

Several with whom I talked mentioned you as a leading opponent
of a plan to establish three water conservation areas in the Ever-
glades Drainage District.

Inasmuch as we want to present all phases of the water control
issue, I would appreciate comment from you on the following questions:

1. What is your objection to the water conservation plan?

2. Approximately how much land do you own in the Everglades
Drainage District and how would it be affected, if at all, by the
proposed conservation plan?

3. What is your own idea of the proper way to solve the re-
current drouth-flood problem in the Everglades?

4. Do you approve or disapprove proposed legislation which
would enable the drainage district to increase its tax levy in order
to raise more money for maintaining drainage canals?

5. Do you have any specific criticism of the way the Everglades
Drainage District has been operated in recent years or is now being
operated

6. Do you think the entire water control problem, including
encorachment of salt in the fresh water supplies of the East Coast,
is one to be handled on a federal, state or local basis?

These are spedfic questions which occur to me as bearing on
the issue. Any related comment you care to make on the general
water control problem will be welcome.


I










TAMPA MORNING TRIBUNE
F= I = S -T C:) I "-r- VV E: S"r C=O C)A -r

TAM PA 1, F L0 RI A





I would appreciate an early reply, as I now have in hand most
of the material for a series of news stories on the subject and plan
publication within a short time,




Sincerely yours,


James A. Clendinen
State News Editor


I









WAR DEPARTMENT
CCOr'-' OF EI'I'J IT RS
Office of the District Engineer
.acl'so- ,iille, Fla.

SAKGB 800.Q2 (CR^.ODA'P P.E. 21 May 1947


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
on improvement of
NORTH NEVW RIVER AND IALIi CANALS, FLA.
FOR FLOOD CONTROL
TO BE HELD AT CITY HALL, BELLE GLADE, FLA., AT 10:00 A.M. (E.S.T.) 18 JUNE 1947



Pursuant to a resolution of the Committee on Flood Control, House of

Representatives, United States, adopted 28 Fay 1946; an item in Public Law

525, 79th Congress, 2d Session, Chapter 595, section 7, approved 24 July

1946; and an item in Public Law 526, section 11, approved 24 July 1946;

the District Engineer has been directed to make a review of previous reports

on Caloosahatchee River and Lake Okeechobee Drainage Areas, Fla., and pre-

liminary examinations and surveys as indicated in the authorizations quoted

as follows:

a. "Resolved by the Committee on Flood Control, House of Repro-
sentaTives, That the Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors created
under Section 3 of the River and Harbor Act approved June 13, 1902, be
and is hereby requested to review the report on the Caloosahatchie
(Caloosahatchee) River and Lake Okeechobee Drainage Area, Florida,
published as House Document Number 215, 70th Congress, 1st Session, and
subsequent reports, with a view to determining the advisability of
drainage improvement and flood control along North New River Canal in
Broward County, Florida."

b. "Sec. 7. The Secretary of War is hereby authorized and di-
ricteT to cause preliminary examinations and surveys to be made at the
following localities, West Palm Beach Canal, Hillsboro Canal, New
River (iorth New River) Canal, and Miami Canal, for the purpose of
raising the water table in the area of Lake l0-eechobee, Florida.* *."

c. "Sec. 11. The Secretary of War is hereby authorized and
directed to cause preliminary examinations and surveys for flood control
and allied purposes (to be made at the following localities) Caloo-
sahatchie (Caloosahatchee) River and Lake Ckeechobee Drainage Area,
Florida, for drainage improvement and flood control along North New River
Canal in Broward County, Florida. "

The District Engineer has been authorized to combine the above authorized

reports with previously authorized reports on Test Palm Beach and Hillsboro

Canals into a single report.

In order that the required report may fully cover the matter, a Public

Hearing will be held i-i the City Hall at Belle Glade, Florida, at 1000 A.M.,










EASTERN; STAND.-.?TD TIIE, on 13 June 1lL7.


Since the public hearing held at Belle Glade, Florida, on 30 April

1cL6 covered a rather full discussion of West Palm Besch and Hillsboro Canals,

it is desired that the public hearing herein announced be concerned princi-

pally with North New River and !iami Canals. It is the intention of this

office, however, to present a comprehensive plan for flood control in the T.ver-

glades which will include features developed and coor.Jinted by the Corps of

Engineers end features a.-joc&ted by the Everglades Dreinage District, the U. S.

Department of Agriculture Soil Conservation Service, and several individuals

and agencies. In ordDr that local reaction may be obtained at the hearing,

Everglades interests are advised to.consult local newspapers for details of

the plan. A brief description of the plan is given as follows:

a. Since th.re are about 700 square miles of Everglades land
lying-south and east of Lake 01kech.obe.- along the main canals for vary-
ing di-tances up to 20 miles from the lake which are suitable for long-
term agriculture, consideration is 4iven to surrounding this area with
a perimeter levee and an interior rim canal,

b. Since the present canal system is inadequate for present and
prospective agricultural needs within the protected area, consideration
is siven to inirov--em-nt of existing canals, and construction of canals
running generally ..rallel to -nd between the Iiami and North New River
Canals and between North NIkw River and Hillsboro Canals.

c. Since drainage and ground-~at.:r requirements mu-;t often be ful-
filleT without delay, it is belicv..' that gravity flo': would be too slow
to prevent frcquc-nt damages. Therefor., consideration will be given to
large rrv-rsible pumping stations at the lake entrances of the perimeter
canals .nd each of the existing main c.:arjals for flood control or ground-
water reauireme.nts. L rge paLu'-1ing stations will also be considered for
the existing cantLls at the southern and eastern limits of the area suit-
able for agriculture, to deliver flood waters to cons rvgtion areas
outside the perimeter levee.

d. As much water as possible would be impounded in conservation
areas between the agricultural area and the coastal area for increase
in municipal wstr supply, soil and water conservation, wildlife benefits,
and amelioration of winter temperatur..-s. Improvement of spillway
structures at the coastal enis of e-isting canals would be necessary,
and certain control works and outlet channels would be required for
emergency drainage of conservation areas during periods of severe
rainfall.

All interested parties, including Federal, State and local government

officials, flood control and navigation interests, and the officials of any

drainage district or other local organization, representatives of civic and

commercial organizations, and private individuals whose interests may be

affected by the improvements under consideration are invited to be present


I I










SAKKGB 800.92 (CR&ODA) P.E.



or to be represented at the hearing. They are invited to give information

concerning the character of improvements desired and to give specific data

on the suggested means of accomplishing such improvements. Especially are

they invited to present data on the economic benefits to be derived from the

improvements which may justify Federal participation in their construction.

These data should include the most complete and detailed accounts pos-

sible of the dates, frequency, duration, extent and severity of floods,

together with their damage both direct and indirect to agriculture, business,

transportation and public health. Information is also desired covering the

aspects of wildlife, pollution abatement, malaria control, recreational

improvement, and other related ratters.

In adopting improvements of the nature under consideration, local

interests may be required to f() provide without cost to the United States

all lands, easements, and rights-of-w ay necessary for the improvement;

(b) hold and save the United States free from damaogs due to the construction

work; (c) maintain and operate all works after completion in accordance with

regulations prescribed by the Secretary of War; (d) make necessary alterations

to any existing improvements; and (e) participate in the cost of the project

as determined from the study of the benefits. Local interests should be

able to give an indication of the degree of local cooperation which they will

be willing to offer.

Oral statements will be heard, but for accuracy of record all important

facts and arguments should be submitted in writing, as the records of the

hearing will be forwarded for consideration by the ar Department. Written

statements may be handed to the undersigned at the hearing or mailed to him

beforehand. It is requested that written statements be submitted in sextup-

licate.

Please bring the foregoing to the attention of persons known to you to
be interested in the matter.



Colonel, Corps of Engineers
District Engineer
















22 May 1947

Hon. D. Coleman,
Senate Chambers,
Tallahassee, Florida
Dear Senator:
I understand that House Bill ,660 is before the Legislature and I would
appreciate it if you will vote for this Bill. I own property west of
27th Avenue in Miami and to the beat of my knowledge the abolishing of
tohe drainage district will not harm any one and on the other hand it will
effect a saving for the tax payers of Dade County.
It seems that most Bills in the Legislature create expense. This Bill
will reflaot to your credit since it will be one that reduces taxes for
ts. I kmnow you will look at the matter in the same light.
Sincerely, yours,


Pres. LEOtARD BROS. TRANFER & STORAGE 00., INC.
Copy to: Mr. Ernest R. Graham
o/o Graham Dairies,
Hialeah, Florida
















22 May 1947

Hon. VW. C. Lantaff,
House of Representatives,
Tallahassee, Florida
Dear Mr. Lantaff:
I understand that House Bill #660 is before the Legislature and I would
appreciate it if you will vote for this Bill. I own property west of
27th Avenue in Miami and to the best of my knowledge the abolishing of
the drainage district will not harm any one and on the other hand it will
effect a saving for the tax payers of Dade County.
It seems that most Bills in the Legislature create expense. This Bill
will reflect to your credit since it will be one that reduces taxes for
us. I know you will look at the matter in the same light.
.iiit kind regards, I am

Sincerely yours,


Pres. LEONARD BROS. TRAfSFER & STORAGE CO., INC,

Copy to: Mr. Ernest R. Graham,
Graham Dairies,
Hialeah, Florida

















22 May 1947


Hon. R. B. Gautier,
House of Representatives,
Tallahassee, Florida
Dear Mr. Gautier:
I understand that House Bill #660 is before the Legislature and I would
appreciate it if you will vote for this Bill. I own property west of
27th Avenue in Miami and to the best of my knowledge the abolishing tf
the drainage district will not harm any one ad on the other hand it will
effect a saving for the tax papers of Dade County.
It seems that most Bills in the Legislature create expense. This Bill
will reflect to your credit since it will be one that reduo" taxes tor
us. I know you will look at the matter in the same light,
With kind regards, I am
Sincerely yours,


Pres. LEONARD i~RS. TRANSFER & STORAGE CO,, INC.
Copy to Mr. Ernest R. Graham,
Graham Dairies,
Hialeah, Florida


I

















May 22, 1947


Hon. Riehard Oelkers
House of Representatives,
Tallahassee, Florida
Dear Mf. Oalkers:
I understand that House Bill #660 is before the Legislature and I would
appreciate it if you will vote for this Bill, I own property west of
27th Avenue in Miami and to the best of ay knowledge the abolishing of
the drainage district will not harm any one and on the other hand it will
effect a saving for the tax payers of Da4e County,
It seems that most Bills in the Legislature create expense. This Bill
will reflect to your credit since it will be one that reduces taxes for
us. I know you will look at the matter in the same light.
With kind regards, I am
Sincerely yours,


Pres. ONAD BROS. RANSFER & STORAGE C0., INC.

Copy to:
Mr. Ernest R. Graham,
c/o Graham Dairies,
Hialeah, Florida


M 0












May 21, 1947.


Senator E. R. Graham,
Pensuco
Hialeah, Florida. Re: House Bill #660.

Dear Senator Graham,

I saw your splendid advertisement in
the newspaper recently, and immediately
wrote to our Senator and Representatives
asking them to vote for House Bill #660.

I agree with you that this Drainage
District could very well be abolished without
doing anyone any harm.

Kindest regards,


Respectfully yours,



A. P. Walter


APW:er







/



May 22, 1947.





Eon. Wm. G. Lantaff,
State Capitol,
Tallahassee, Florida.

Re: House Bill #660
Dear Mr. Lantaff#
The writer is a resident West of 27th
Avenue in Dade County. I understand there is,
before the Legislature,the above numbered House
Bill for your consideration.
After considering the merits and
demerits affecting this Legislation, as a
property owner in Dade County in the area affect-
ed, it is my humble opinion that your vote in
favor of the passage of this Bill will result
in savings to our County.
At.any rate, from experience, I know
of nothing for the expenditure of any money that
has been made in recent years by the so-called
"Everglades Drainage District"# that has proven
of benefit to our County, and I am in favor of
abolishing it.
I shall appreciate it very much if you
will support the above Bill.
Respectfully yours,

A. P. Walter


APFWer











May 22, 1947.





Hon. Richard Oelkers, Jr.,
State Capitol
Tallahassee, Florida.

Ret House Bill #660
Dear Br. Oelkers,

The writer is a resident West of 27th
Avenue in Dade County. I understand there is
before the Legislature the above numbered
House Bill for your consideration.

After considering the merits and de-
merits affecting this Legislation, as a
property owner in Dade County in the area
affected, it is my humble opinion that your
vote in favor of the passage of this Bill will
result in savings to our County.

At any rate, from experience, I know
of nothing for the expenditure of any money that
has been made in recent years by the so-called
"Everglades Drainage District", that has proven
of benefit to our County, and I am in favor of
abolishing it.

I shall appreciate it very much if
you will support the above Bill.

Respectfully yours,


SA* P. Walter


APWter


r











May 22, 1947.


Hon. R. B. Gautier, Jr.w
State Capitol,
Tallahassee, Florida i
Re: House Bill #660
Dear Mr. Gautier,
The writer is a resident West of 27th
Avenue in Dade County. 'I understand there is
before the Legislature the above numbered House
Bill for your consideration.

After considering the merits and
demerits affecting this Legislation, as a proper-
ty owner in Dade County in the area affected, it
is y humble opinion that your vote in favor of
the passage of this Bill will result in savings
to our County.

At any rate, from experience, I know
of nothing for the expenditure of any money that
has been made in recent years by the so-called
"Everglades Drainage District", that has proven
of benefit to our County, and I am in favor of
abolishing it.
I shall appreciate it very much if you
will support the above Bill.
Respectfully yours,


A* P* Walter


APWter











May 22, 1947*


Hon. D. C. Coleman,
State Capitol,
Tallahassee, Florida.

Dear Senator Coleman, Re: House Bill #660

The writer is a resident West of
27th Avenue in Dade County. I understand there is
before the Legislature the above numbered House
Bill for your consideration.

After considering the merits and
demerits affecting this Legislation, as a property
owner in Dade County in the area affected, it is
my humble opinion that your vote in favor of the
passage of this Bill will result in savings to
our County.

At any rate, from experience, I know
of nothing for the expenditure of any noney that
has been made in recent years by the so-called
"Everglades Drainage District", that has proven
of benefit to our County, and I am in favor of
abolishing it.

I shall appreciate it very much if
you will support the above Bill.

.Respectfully yours,

A. P. Walter


APWter







May 24, 1947
-1-



NOTES ON EVERGLADES DRAINAGE


Due to the intermingling of funds and other conditions, the Everglades

Drainage District had practically bogged down in 1929. In 1931 a new act

was passed setting three taxes--administration, debt service, maintainance--

and also providing how construction work could be financed. The district

was re-financed in 1941 and again in 1944. When oil leases were given in the

Everglades, tax payments began to reach close to 100% and debt service money

began to accumulate until on October 31, 1946 the audit shows cash on hand

and U. S. Bonds in the amount of $1,252,000. The amortization schedule shows

that the bonds outstanding April 2, 1947 to be $3,594,000. Evidently this

would leave a net debt of approximately $2,300,000, but there is no accounting

made of lands and certificates owned by the District. From statements made

and information gained, we believe these assets are worth well over $1,000,000.

In other words, the real debt of the district is probably less than $1,300,000,

or equivalent to two years' taxes. If this is so, why should the landowners

west of 27th Avenue continue to pay debt service taxes for 23 years and an

ad valorem tax indefinitely

House Bill 660 would correct this condition. It would eliminate

the ad valorem tax on July 1, 1947. Incidentally this year the property

west of 27th Avenue paid in over $62,000, or approximately 80% of all the

ad valorem tax in the district. Does it make sense to you that 80% of

all the ad valorem value in the Everglades Drainage District is in that

area west of 27th Avenue? Or that this area should carry 80% of the

administration and 80Q of the maintainance that is no* being done*.---(

The passage of House Bill 660 would end the ad valorem tax July 1

this year and the Bebt service tax in at the very most four years, more

likely in two years. It would make a saving to the tax payers of Dade County

west of 27th Avenue of approximately $3,000,000.

This ad valorem tax was started over 30 years ago. Since then the

development west of 27th Avenue has been such that the tax is now just a

nuisance tax as far as small acreages, land and lots are concerned. But,










remember it encumbers your land. Remember that this area takes in the

municipalities of Homestead, South Miami, part of Cocanut Grove, Coral

Gables, Miami Springs, Hialeah. it Opa Lockma %NWS i { 2

House Bill 660 puts the debt service money in the hands of the State

Treasurer. The tax will continue until a sufficient amount is on hand to

pay off the bonds and this cannot take over four years and will probably

be within two years After that, no debt service tax will be paid.

House Bill 660 places management of the district in each county in

the hands of the County Commissioners. This will eliminate all administration

costs. One of the objections to the bill is that there was no co-ordinating

body in case of disputes between counties.. This objection w~.albaweliminated

by making the State Conservation Board (which consists of the whole cabinet:

who are all elected by the people),the co-ordinating body.

In principal, the opponents approve the bill as I have been told the

are willing to let out of the district all counties except Hendry, Palm Beach,

Broward, and Dade. Why keep Dade in except as a source of enue? The

Everglades Drainage District has spent no money in Dade County in the last

20 years. Dade county now has a county wide water conservation district and

can assess a two mill levy which will raise $250,000 per year# Why should
.r.e. .... .
we carry we carry some one else's burden to the tune of approximately $150,000

per year? Furthermore, if Dade does not get out of the Everglades Drainage

District when the small counties do, she, will never get out.

House Bill 660 should be passed now. The old tax set up should be

completely eliminated. Do not think Made County is the only county getting

a Bad deal. All the small counties around the north end of the Lake get

practically no benefit since the Federal Government now controls Lake Okeechobee

and the St. Lu6ie and Caloosahatchee canals. For instance, Glades County 1946

levy was over $24,000. This meant $11.40 for every man, woman, and child per

year. Do you wonder that they want out?

The solution is this: pass House Bill 660 and eliminate the present

tax set up. This bill provides for levying taxes for maintenance and construction

but makes it so those who benefit shall pay the cost. (What is unfair about

that?) Th'aeretv"and ofP-two-years t is unworkable as some opponents

olaim, ..Dale, Broward, Palm Beach, and Hendry could join together under a local

bill without opposition.

> jIf you favor House Bill 660, wire, write, or call Senator Coleman and

your House Delegation of Messrs. Oelkers, Gautier, and Lantaff.


------













In rftes noe to aouse Bl 860, the purpose of which bill Is

to abolish the Board of Ccmmis ioner of the 'verOgdes Drsinage

District and put the colleotion of all debt serves taxes and the

paysmt of all bond in the hands ef the Stato Treasurer, and to

put the control of the wriwe in the bands of the County GauDicaoners

of at County.

'iah information has been given st about this bill whieh L

not true. the ftets are these Ai property in Lade County west

of Sth Avenue It in the Everglades Draima District. The growth

t this arse ban been so gzeat tnht n~ this area aloe payg 78O of

the administasti~ o tax of the Derglade Dalamsng Dietiote. As

fbr instans. Osarl Ombles aloes papys 17,500, or approximately 1/t

of the entire administration tax of t:e district. Thsea figures can

be wvrified by calling Mr. Newt Lumnus, Tax Assessor of Ltde County*

Iad Cownty ays approximately $84,000 per year in debt servsie tass

and no work Ies been done in Dade County in the last twnty years

Iwo years 6,* the Dvrglades Draina Jistria~ Cramnisioner

brought in bills that would have doubled the ad 'vloreF tax and

would tanstrr part of the debt esrvioe money to construction purposes

Thow bills wre beaten in ooittees. This year the same bills un

brougWt bek in In ftt, they advertsed seven or eight bills but

o itWh eprnosition wv rated that only four billsa re introduced.

After the first bill as rejected b the Senate omBittee# the rest

of the bills w- re hld p in the Senate and withbdsrn bg the coasittee

in the House and indefinitely postponed.

Kuh has been said about thi water conservation this area

but the Chief h~ngineer of the Sverglades :,rainae a i triot wrn

questioned by the represent tive frarn Dade County stated that the

plane of the District and the resolutions p proposed would hav little

material efteut an the Yia mi water supply*

Those in control of the trerglades Bor. tay openly state they

believe ll at ilorida should contribute t t he dew palonmt of tbi

flerglades. 'he sponsors of the ;ious Bill 6O0 believe that ay arm

to be developed in the Evrglades asould bear its am casts. ?he


----











oil amlsee i the Svrglade a re ponble for the people payng

pretiamlly 100l a the debt serve tax. As a result of that te
oolleootior are apvroxLrately GOO.G00,0 a year If this noney is used

for te purpose it saoald be used for, all the bonls woul be rettid

in less than four years' tize. That euans the property iners west

of 27th Aennu would save saoe ,84,000 a year in debt senior tax

If House Bill 8i0 paseu the ad valorem woule. be abolished July I

and th tapers of this area woulc save approximately another '.52.000

a year*. Owing tio growth and rapid devlonent west of *th Aven

thief taae in doectead, mu of Coconut GroveB all of Coral Gsblese

l:iLas Springs, ia2e.hf, and Cpa Lo a. This land has beer divided

ibto oity lots and mall acreage and the Rvergladea debt erwioe tax

has boms more or less of a n uaL3fe tax~ At the sars timr, it is

a lian oa the pro-ejd in this aEre '=any of you will really one

piece of property that was lost or nearly lost for l.42 drainage

tx certitinftot

No greater benefit could ow to this area t os to abotll those

taw taxes. It this it done, it will be one of the iw taxes abolished

at the present session of the Legislature.

Mr.e Graham Gopeland of Everglades, Florida, who is a cdradm

of AInapolia and one a: the beat engineers In the "tate of Florida

aid to has lived in the _verclades for the past 2W years, says

that 'roa an raelcerin, atandl.,oint thore Is no reaspa hy the County

JaBaisisonera of each o should not taage the affairs of their

respective oountieso

If you wish to Let out .r.x under this tax burden, ';I' YOuri

SKATOR ZD0 YIO 7R 2EPrES;&ATIV1i acing theR to 11M? P.. O:USE BILL L 69


..._





I :









May 84, 1947
VIA AIR MAIL
SPECIAL DELIVERY
Honorable 1. PI Kelly,
Floridan Hotel,
Tallahassee, Florida.

Dear Mr. elly

I received your telegram yesterday afternoon reading as fol-
lows
"PLEASE SEND ME BY LETTER ANY INFORMATION PERTAINING
TO OUR COUNTY AND DRAINAGE DISTRICT IN EVENT I AM
ASKED OW THP FLOOR HOW IT AFFECTS US REGARDS"

To which I replied this morning by wire as follows:
"RETEL DRAINAGE AMMU-.NITION AIR MAILED YOU SPECIAL
DELIVERY FLORIDAN HOTEL TODAY REGARDS"

I take pleasure in enclosing herewith my knowledge of the
Drainage Distriot bill (louse Bill 660) as it is viewed by
your constituents in Collier County.

It will require 10 minutes to read the entire manuscript
enclosed herewith.

I infer from your telegram that the bill abolishing the
Drainage Distriot Board will come up early next week in the
House, and that various supporters of the Bill, including
yourself, will be called upon to explain the provisions of
the Bill.

If such inference be correct, it would appear logical that
the leading proponents of the Bill might well confer among
themselves so as to prevent any conflict of statements.

With this in mind, I am enclosing herewith two additional
copies of my suggestions and, if it meet with your entire
approval, I would suggest that you hand one copy to Senator
Graham and one copy to Mr. Lykes so that they may suggest










May 24, 1947


COLLIER COUNTY AND EVEROLADES DRAINAGE DISTRICT,

When Collier County was created in 1923, 18 Townships in the
extreme Eastern portion were found to be in the Everglades
Drainage District. Many years previously, some draftsman in
attempting to make a nice map put them there.- That is the
sole reason they are there today, as no portion of Collier
County lies in the Everglades.

NO WORK OP ANY CHARACTER WHATSOEVER HA" EVR EEW DONE BY THE
DISTRICT IN COLLIER COUNTY.
The nearest Distriot work to Collier County is the Miami Canal.
This canal, fortunately for Collier County has silted up and in
its Northern reaches opposite Collier County is little more
than a ditch. It approaches nearest to Collier County 10 miles
from the Northeast corner of the County and from the Southeast
corner of the County is more than 30 miles away -- the average
distance from Collier County being more than 20 miles.
Instead of benefitting Collier County, the Miami Canal has
actually caused grave damage to farm and timber lands in Collier
County by reason of the vast volume of water formerly brought
down from Lake Okeechobee and the Northern Everglades, whioh
water overflowed the banks of the oanal into the Tamiami Trail
canal which drains water from a point only 10 miles West of
Miami and dumps it into Collier County.
Collier County, since its formation in 1985 to 1930 when the
Drainage District became bankrupt, paid its drainage taxes 100%
and actually contributed to the District in those 7 years in
excess of $202,00. And, since the refinancing during the
Holland Administration to date, Collier County has paid in
addition all of its Drainage taxes Just 100% in the amount of
$37,000. -- a grand total of about ONE QUARTER MILLION DOLLARS -*
FOR ABSOLUTELY NOTHING
When the refunding plan was beirg considered, Collier County
was not permitted to withdraw from the District on account of
bonds in the hands of third parties, but the Administration and
the R.F.C. agreed that, as Collier County should never have been
in the District, it would be placed in a low zone with Monroe
County.
Collier County has fulfilled its obligation exactly 100% every
year and seeks only to pay off its portion of the debt and be
forever freed from further burden.











-2-


A smokesoreen has been thrown about the entire matter by those
who, for selfish motives, would defeat the present bill which
seeks merely to eliminate the Everglades Drainage Distriot
Board. The uninformed would be led to understand that this
bill will destroy the Drainage District and ruin its prosperous
farmers.

What are the facts?

This bill will not destroy the Drainage District: It will
positively help every farmer in the District by eliminating
the District debt.

The District Board consists of 5 members each appointed by
the Governor and, of the 11 Counties in the District, at least
8 have no representation whatever. This bill definitely con-
tinues the Drainage District EXACTLY AS PRE7CRIBTD BY PRESENT
LAW, except only in one important particular -- namely the
abolishing of the present Board and placing the direction of
the District in the Commissioners of each of the Counties in
the District, all of which County Boards are elected by the
people in the District.

Why do we desire to abolish the Board?

The answer is simple. It has betrayed its trust and abused
its power

In what manner has this Board betrayed its trust and abused its
powers?

The present law states that only S forms of taxes may be levied.

First, an acreage tax to pay off the Distriot debt, which tax
varies in amount according to the location of the lands taxed
and according to the benefits received by those lands from the
works of the District constructed by the District many years
ago; and

Second, 1/2 mill ad valorem tax for administration purposes; and

Third, a maintenance tax which may be assessed ONLY against
those lands which will be benefitted by the maintenance work.

This law is admirable and is extremely clear and simple in
application. It seeks merely

First, to pay off the District debt now down to about $3,500,000;










03-


Second, to provide for ample administration of the District; and

Third, and finally -- AND SIGNIFICANTLY IMPORTANT -- provides
a simple means for constructing new work and repairing old ones,
whereby ONLY THOSE WHO BENEFIT PAY.

It is significant that, since the refunding was completed during
the Holland administration, NOT ONE PET1Y has been levied for
maintenance.

Why?

simply because the few who derive benefit DO NOT DETIRE TO PAY,
but, instead, WANT TO PORCE THE ENTIRE DII.TRICT TO PAY FOR WHAT
BENT-FITz 'iTIEM ALONE.

This statement may appear so absolutely incredible as to be
unworthy of belief by business men such as compose this honorable
body; but it is absolutely true.

During some 6 tax years, large excess funds have been aoouulated.
How may this accumulated surplus be legally seized from its
rightful owners and spent for the benefit of a few?

Answers The present Everglades Drainage District Board actually
advertised and sought to have this Legislature enact into law
several bills which would completely kill the intent of the
present law.

The first of these proposed bills sought to increase the tax
for administration purposes from 1/2 mill to 1 mill, and to
provide that any surplus in the administration fund could be
used fcr maintenance and construction purposes.

It required only one or two radio talks for the people of Coral
Gables, Miami and Hialeah to realize that 78% of this tax would
come from their pockets. The reaction was so loud and so im-
mediate that that proposed bill was withdrawn RIGHT NOWl

The second of these proposed bills would turn any excess in the
debt service fund not currently required into the administration
fund, which, in turn, might be used for maintenance and new
construction work throughout the District.

So perfectly ruthless and contrary to all business principles
was this second bill and such "hubbub" was raised concerning
it that it too was quietly withdrawn. Each of you has sought
loans at banks and some of you may have borrowed from the R.F.C.
Everybody knows that no bank or the R.F.C. will loan large sums
unless the loan is properly secured and unless provision is made










-4-


for retiring the debt as prescribed.

In the case of the Everglades drainage District, the R.P.C.
prescribed the exact acreage tax to be levied in each zone.
But, contrary to what had been expected, the refunding plan
proved so excellent that land owners actually paid their drain-
age taxes better than the R.F.C. expected. On top of this,
suddenly oil was discovered in Collier County close to the
Western boundary of the District, and a stampede to pay taxes
on hundreds of thousands of acres leased for oil purposes with
consequent tremendous increase in the value of lands in the
Drainage District.

All this resulted in the accumulation in the debt service
funds far in excess of requirements for current payments.
This excess, according to the Drainage District's own audit,
NOWY AMOUNTS TO MORE THAN ON'E MILLION DOLLARS. You may now
begin to see why this Board has attempted to betray its trust
and has actually sought the passage of a bill to legalize
what is little less than theft of debt service money paid by
hard working taxpayers in order that it may construct and main-
tain works which will benefit only a favored fewl Is hot this
alone sufficient reason to abolish this Board?

This is the reason outraged taxpayers demand that an end be
put to such flagrant violations of the law, and that the Board
be abolished and its duties placed in the hands of competent
Boards of County Commissioners, the members of which are always
under the eyes and nose of the taxpayers who elect them.

(Noter In the event the actual ftpures are desired, the follow-
ing is taken from the audit of the Drainage Board as presented
to Senator Pranklin, recently.

"Cushion Fund $500,000.00
Debt Service Cash in Banks 883,995.30 $1,583,995.30
Less!
Bonds called Apr. 1, 1947 $340,000.00
Premium of 5 17,000.00
Premium normal maturities 75,000.00
Coupon No. 5 69,121.25 501 121.25

Plus Estimated Collection in Mar. 100,000.00


Total Cash Position Debt servicee Fund 4/2/47


$982,874.05")








/

*-5-


Other bills proposed by the Drainage Board provided for the
establishment of conservation of water and soil areas, can-
celled all taxes on lands in such areas belonging to the
Board, permitted the Board to do ANYTHING it considered proper
in connection with such areas, empowered the Board to convey
lands in the District to the United states created water con-
trol areas and provided for the conveyance gratis of vast areas
to one or more of the XTY agencies of the Federal Government.

In innoeent disguise, these proposed acts would alienate and
remove from the tax rolls more than 400,000 sores of land for
water conservation and Federal purposes AT NO COST TO ANYONE
B T THE TAXPAYERS OF THP DISTRICT. One of these beneficiaries
would be a MILLION DOLLAR AFTERR COMPANY IN MIAMI.

This is a DRAINAGE District. Is there any rhyme or reason to
the thought that this tax-ridden District should give that
water company or ANYBODY TWO MILLION DOLLAR" NORTH H OF PROPERTY
FOR ABSOLUTELY NOTHING?

Or the Federal Goverrment?

Has not the "tate Just given the United States 800,000 acres
of State lands and TWO AND ONE-HALP MILLION DOLLARS for a
National Park?

Look again at one of those acts proposed by the District Board.
Inconspicuously, it is provided that any land owned by indi-
viduals in one of the proposed water conservation areas --
these amount to about 70,000 acres in the proposed Broward-
Dade conservation area may be exchanged for other lands of
the District outside this area.

Imagine, if you will, what misuse of power and abuse of trust
there would be if such a bill became a lawl

The Board admits it now has ONE MILLION DOLLARS in the Debt
Service Fund in exoess of current requirements. Let the Board
sell some 400,000 acres at only $5.00 an aore -- some lands
in Collier County touching the proposed Broward-Dade conserva-
tion area are assessed at #10.00 per acre, and the Department
of education has refused to consider an offer of :10.00 an
acre in similar lands -- and the entire indebtedness of the
District, amounting to $3,500,000, can be paid off in about
two years.

Collier County has fought the battle of the District's tax-
payers ever since the County was established nearly 25 years ago:






//


-6-


Collier County has paid its taxes as levied -- totaling since
1923 ONE QUARTER OF A MILLION DOLLARS, Collier County has never
ceased to protests But Collier County has finally arrived at
the conclusion that there is one and ONLY ONE way to put an end
to such abuse of power and trust -- and that is TO ABOLISH THE
BOARD OF COBISSIONERS OF EVERGLADES DRAINAGE DISTRICT.
House Bill 660 will do just that and ONLY THAT.

I hope you will vote for the passage of House Bill 660.


*"


b mmmI











RANCHERS 9 PACKERS OF BEEF & PORK PRODUCTS
Cable Address "Lykes"-P. O. Box 2879
J. W. LYKES
Vice-President 'AMF .PA, Fr.0OIIJ'A

July
19th
1947










Mr. Ernest R. Graham,
Graham's Dairy,
Hialeah, Florida

Dear Ernest:

Glad to know that you have returned and to
receive the clipping concerning the supposedly extra-
ordinarily good financial condition of the Everglades
Drainage Board. I do not see how this can be accom-
plished, and think the quicker we hold our next meeting
the better. I talked with my attorneys yesterday and
told them to endeavor to arrange a meeting the first
part of August as I should like to leave here for a
short vacation on the 6th or 7th. Will keep you posted,
and in the meantime I should like to hear from you.

Let me know of any political developments.
I understand Gautier is going to run for the Senate and
certainly want to help all I can so keep me advised re-
garding this as well as in Broward and Palm Beach counties.

Hope to see you soon.




ncer. Lykes

J. W. Lykes









K-* *-~


*nl Y U000
vbflt 'so-*vs


*tO $ 1 BtAA'


uw orr0cEs
HUDSON & CASON
a308o3 SEYSOLD BUILDING
MIAMI 32. FLORIDA


CABLE ADDRESS
PUDCA
P 0 BOX 870
ZONE 5


July 21, 1947


Honorable Preston B. Bird
County Commissioner
Tenth Floor, Court House
Miami 32, Florida

Dear Pr. Birdie


Re-: .Sea l =" ...
'.. .- .: L-, -i..;


for EVergiad-e4ge
collaborate It_ it
about the tite Citi

The bill
in otber bills lntroada
of trerl adee Bralaga ltl
It has asoe feature wheIt Il
lieve, are probably objeatloaab
sioners of Dtde County. owere


until June 3, 1917 and 8 A
did adjourn about noon. SUD 6, 1t t
tlae to take up this bill with the Boeda.

The bill contains, in 1 pit "t j i tion-
able feature, one feature which is, autt urs at all times
has been, highly desired by the Board of onty Coomasaloners;
:h.t is, it provides for the setting up of a water conservation
iren nd permits co-operation among the Truatees of the Internal
:=.rsvement 7Ful, Dade County, and the tvergladl Drainage Die-
:".r::: -r Fuch purpoee. As far as I know, It was the only bill
w.-. .. w-i,-. rovi!e for such co-operation and the setting up of
W.: r :-.--.rerv&tl.r. areas by Everglades Drainage District that
.'L..:. of pssBEC~;e. Consequently, In order to accom-
-.rl" .;.ore, it was passed. I understand that an
'*." :'- for the description 7f the conservation
,, rci,5 ?'r -(f- -r-"nr1 :lunty.

.. :, d of course, that Section 14 of the bill
.-.-. F t: e .held in sDde Tounty to determine whether


-a


"''




















Honorable Preston B. 3Brd Paje 2



or not the same shall become effective. Thies cleetl'. '- :
quired to be held within six months after the A111 ec-.-

Twy truly yours,



'** ** -' A. ..,-,-"


.f^ 1!4s


v'fY.
-'' '~p ~ ~ lie


' ';.; "'' ," :.r'; "

-" ,'a .:~l ,.


.,....
,..1 :"_ i ',
,."


... ,
2 4t~V$.a~i











SUMMARY REPORT

EVERGLADES DRAINAGE DISTRICT

July, 1947




GENERAL SUGjI ARY



Water levels in general were higher than at any time in the past
decade. All of the lands not in use and much of the farmlands with-
in the peat and muck area were inundated. Overland flow south
across the open 'Glades continued in considerable volume. The ar-
terial canals discharged water at full capacity in an effort to re-
duce flood levels. These canals operated to a greater degree of
efficiency than during recent years due to the hyacinth removal
program.

As this was -not the season for truck cropping, such losses as
occurred were corifined principally to livestock and perennial crop
interests. However, continued rains resulting in prolonged flooding
may seriously delay fall planting of vegetable crops. This is es-
pecially true where dikes have, broken and farm lands flooded.

The unusually heavy runoff in the tidal sections of canals
emptying into the ocean has forced salt water far downstream and the
threat of contamination of the fresh water supplies for the time
being is negligible.
DETAILED SU-'TAF ':Y

RAINFALL AND EVAPORATION

Rainfall was well above average at most points in the Ever-
glades during July. No unusual rainfall occurred during the month,
the rainfall being in the form of local showers. Most of the rain
fell between July 7 and July 27. At several points the rainfall
for the first seven months of the year approached the annual aver-
age total. Rainfall totals for-the month of July at various sta-
tions were:


-1- /


W __ -M-~- --..,_~


;-ii---i~;r~i,,,~;,,,,,,..;~: ........:~~ .,










UPPER GLADES


Moore Haven, HGS, #1
Everglades ExpSta,
Shawano Plantation
Chosen, HGS. #4
Canal Point, HGS. #5
NoN.R,Canal south
of Okeelanta


'.6,09 inches
14,22 inches
14,99 inches
12,.55 i.:ch'ba
10,23 in hes
(No report)


USSugar Corp:
Eastern Division 15.10 in.
Western Division 10.77 in.
Port J.Taaca 8,02 in.


MIDDLE AND LOWER GLADES


NoNoR. Canal at County Line
Miami Canal at Broken 'Dam
Tamiami Canal at Dade -Broward
Levee
Tamiami Canal at 40-Mile Bend


7,.35 inches
7,93 inches


10,42
12,56


inches
inches-


COASTAL AREA


Loxahatchee
Hypoluxo
Water Plant Hialeah
Miami U.S. Weather Bureau
Homestead


14.71
11,25
9,04
7. 80
12.32


inches
inches
inches

incn es


Monthly averages for July and accumulated excesses or deficien-
cies in rainfall during the current year at representative points are
as follows:


JULY
STATION IUF;iHL


ACCUMUITLATED EXCESS (4.)
OR DEFICIENCY (-)
SINCE JANUARY 1, 1947


Everglades Exp.Sta.
Hypoluxo
Miami
Moore Haven


6,90 inches
5,13 inches
5,60 inches
6,67 inches


?21,96 inches
+26,66 inches
J 1.12 inches
7 7o91 inches


Open pan evaporation at the four stations reporting was:


Everglades Experiment Station
Loxahatchee
Hialeah (Water Plant)
Tamiami Canal a't 40-Mile Bend


5.11 inches
4,98 inches
5,90 inches
4,98 inches


Open pan evaporation at the four stations averaged 92% of that
in June.


-2-


- --~


--












STAGES AND DISCHARGES


Note: All elevations and canal stages refer to
TMEN SEA LEVEL, U.S.C. & GS. datum plane. (Add
1.44 feet to obtain elevation with reference to
Lake Okeechobee datum). All discharge figures
indicate cubic feet per second (cfs.). 1 cfs.
flowing for 1 day amounts to over 646,000 gallons,
the equivalent of about 24 acre-inches, or 2 acre-
feet.

Upper Kissimmee River Basin Lakes Stages in key upper lakes showed
gains up to 1o5 feet.

Kissimmee River At the gaging station west of Okeechobee the dis-
charge was 5;520 cfs. to the 5th; decreased to
4,490 the 14th, increased to 6,800 the 28th, was 6,500 at the end,
and amounted to about 330,000 acre-feet, which was 198 percent of
the June discharge and 428 percent of the 22-year normal for the
month of July.

Lake Okeechobee The mean daily weighted stage was about 15.2 feet
to the 14th, rose to 15.7 at the end and averaged
15.44 (16.88 L.O.D.) which was 1.22 higher than in July, 1946.
Hydrological Summary:
Average daily losses -
Evaporation 2,400
Outflow 80230 10,030

Average daily gains -
Precipitation 5,210
Inflow .1.1,90 16 400
Net gaily gain in cfs. 5,770

Caloosahatchee Canal At the southeast side of the Moore Haven
control and lock the stage was about 12.5
feet to the 17th, rose to 13.5 the 22nd, jumped to 15.1 the 23rd,
declined to 13.9 the 24th and was 13.2 thereafter.
Discharge increased unevenly from about 2,640 cfs. the 1st to
about 3,930 at the end and amounted to about 200,000 acre-feet.

St. Lucie Canal At the west side of the control and lock west of
Stuart the stage was 8.6 feet to the 4th, varied
between 8.5 and 10.9 to the 11th, was 806 to the 17th, declined to 4.5
the 23rd and was about 4.6 to the end.
Discharge increased unevenly from about 5,720 cfs. the 1st to
5,380 at the end and amounted to about 300,000 acre-feet.


-3-


III




7-------






West Palm Beach Canal At the southeast side of the Canal Point con-
trol and lock the stage rose from 15.2 feet
to 15.8 the 31st.
Discharge, which'was all into'the Lake, increased unevenly from
560 cfs. the 1st to 1,290 the 21st, varied between 1,080 and 1,230
to the end and amounted to about 59,000 acre-feet.

At Big Mound Canal the stage rose from 15.7 the 2nd to 17.2 the
27th.

At 20-Mile Bend the stage rose from 14.5 feet the 2nd to 16.5
the 20th and declined to 15.8 at the end.

Ati the south side of the Cross Canal control.the stage rose from
14.7 the 2nd to 16.3 the 19th and declined unevenly to 16.0 at the
end.

At the West Palm Beach control and lock the stage rose unevenly
from about 6.2 feet the lst to 7.9 the 18th, and declined unevenly to
5.9 at the end.
Discharge varied between 2,300 and 2;570 cfs. to the 7th, in-
creased to 3,580 the 20th, decreased to 2,830 at the end and amounted
to about 180,000 acre-feet.

Hillsboro Canal At the Belle Glade gaging station the stage rose un-
evenly from 14.8 feet the 1st to 15.7 at the end.
Discharge varied between 159 cfs, southeast and 175 cfs. north-
west with no significant trend and amounted to about 470 acre-feet
northwest.

At Shawano the stage rose unevenly from 14.6 feet the 1st to
15.5 the 26th and declined to 15.3 at the end.

At the control-and lock near Deerfield Beach the stage was about
7.8 feet to the 4th, was 6.6 to the 15th, and varied between 5.2 and
6.4 to the end with no significant trend, he variations being
caused by moving hyacinth jams through the control.
Discharge was 1,740 cfs. the 1st, decreased to about 1,280 the'
6th, increased to about 1,760 the 20th, was 1,440 at the end, and
amounted to about 94,000 acre-feet.

North New River Canal At the south side of the South Bay control
and lock the stage rose from 14.0 feet the
1st to 15.3 at the end.
Discharge, which was all south, varied between 18 and 118 cfs.
with no significant trend and amounted to about 2,600 acre-feet.


-4-


__ ___









At the north side of the 26-Mile Dend control the stage ranged
between 10.0 and 10o6 feet for the entire month and was 10.5 at the
end.
Discharge through the main control was about 960 cfs. the 1st,
declined to 890 the 10th, rose to 1300 by the 14th, was 1450 by the
29th, declined to 1300 at the end and amounted to about 72,300 acre-
feet.
Discharge through the east spillway ranged between 5 and 12 cfs.-
leaka Te and amounted to about 446 acre-feet.
Discharge through the west spillway ranged between 45 and 58 cfs.
and amounted to about 3200 acre-feet,

At the Holloway control free flow existed through the main con-
trol during the entJre month, Head on the lateral control ranged be-
tween 1.4 and 3.1 feet and averaged about 1,O, with heavy flow south.

At the control and lock west of'Fort Lauderdale the stage rose
from 4.9 feet the 1st to 5o9 the 2nd,L declined to 5,3 by the 9th,
rose to 5.9 by the 18th and ranged between 6,2 and 5.9 to the end.
Discharge rose from about 1480 cfs. the 1st to 2100 by the 17th,
was 2440 the 28th. fell to around 2200 at the end and amounted to
about 124,000 acre-feet.

South New River Canal At the Highway 25 observation station the
stage rose steadily from 7.9 feet the'lst to
9.4 at the end, which was around 2,2 feet higher than July 31, 1946,
and 2.8 feet higher than July 31, 1945.
The north borrow pit stage rose steadily from 8.0 feet the 1st
to 9.5 at the end,
The south borrow pit stage rose steadily from 6.5 feet the 1st
to 8.1 at the end.

Miami Canal At the south side of the Lake Harbor control the stage
rose from 15.1 feet the 1st to 15oG at the end.

At County Line Dam the upstream stage rose steadily from around
7.7 feet to 805 at the end. Head on the dam averaged about 1.7 feet.
The five main control gates were closed the entire month with varying
small outflow through the culvert south.

At Broken Dam the stage rose from 5.5 feet the 1st to 6.1 by the
17th, was 6.4 by the 21st and rose to 6,6 at the end.

At Pennsuco the stage rose steadily from 4.1 feet the 1st to 4,9
by the 17th, and rose to 5.5 at the end.

At N.W. 36th Street, T? ri, the temporary steel piling dam was
breached for the entire month. with a large section completely re-
moved.
Discharge was 1380 the 14th, 1430 the 18th, and 1574 the 25th.
-5-


I









HENDERSON, FRANKLIN, STARNES & HOLT
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS AT LAW
COLLIER BUILDING
FORT MYERS. FLORIDA

ROBERT A. HENDERSON, JR.
JAMES A. FRANKLIN
FINIS ,E. STARNES
PARKER HOLT
August 19, 1947



Mr. Sam Collier
Eve-rglades, Florida

Ie: Everglades Dra:ina ge District

Dear ?r. Collier:

On August 15th, we filed Bill of Complaint in the
Circuit Court of Palm Beach County, against the Ever-
glades Drainage District. A copy of our Bill is en-
closed to you herewith.

This suit attacks only the 1947 Act, which attempts
to authorize the Board of Commissioners of the District
to convoy lands in Palm Peach County to the United States
for conservation purposes. Other acts were passed in
1947 to set up conservation districts in Dade and Broward
Counties, but these acts are subject to approval by vote
of the people, and elections have not yet been held.

`.e expect to push this suit as fast as possible,
and will keep you advised of developments.

Yours very truly,

HE'DEISu FRANKLIN. ST.l E" SS & HOLT




By

/ James A, Franklin

JAF:bb .
enc.
oc: Mr. Ernest R. Grahaiz
Okeochobee Road
Hialoah, Florida


. --~i --.;---~--- f ibL







I
HENDERSON, PFAKLIN, STARNES & HOLT
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT LAW
ROBERT A. HENDERSON,JR. PORT YERBS, FPLORIDA
JAMES A.FRANKLIN
FINIS E.STARNES
PARKER HOLT October 3, 1947



Mr. Ernest W. Graham
Okeechobee Avenue
Hialeh, Florida

Re: Lykes Brothers, et als. vs. Board of Commissioners
Everglades Drainage District
Dear Mr. Graham:

On August 19 Mr. Franklin sent you a copy of the Bill of
Complaint filed in Palm Beach County against the Everglades Drainage
District seeking to restrain conveyance by the District of lands
owned by the District to the Federal Government.

We asked the Commissioners of the District if they would
agree to withhold any conveyances, or attempted conveyances, until
this litigation could be settled on its merits.

After some delay, the attorney for the District advised
us on September 5 that the Board of Commissioners declined to agree
to withhold conveyance of said lands, and had instructed him to
proceed to convey the lands to the Federal Government. Thereupon
we made application to Circuit Judge Chillingworth of West Palm
Beach for a Temporary Injunction, and the writer in company with
Mr. John Allison of the firm of MacFarlane, Ferguson, Allison and
Kelly of Tampa, attorneys for Lykes Brothers, journeyed to West
Palm Beach on Monday, September 29, for the hearing on our
application for a Temporary Injunction. After the hearing had
gotten under way, Mr. Manly Caldwell, one of the attorneys for the
District agreed, after some discussion, that no conveyance would be
made until this matter could be settled upon its merits, or
before any conveyances were made that the Plaintiffs in this
litigation would be given ample and reasonable nbtice to enable us
to then apply again to the Court for a Temporary Injudction. This
agreement on the part of the attorney for the District was put into
the form of a Court Order by Judge Chillingworth, and recorded in
the file. This eliminated the necessity of our applying for a
Temporary Restraining Order and it was quite agreeable with us
because if a Temporary Restraining Order or Injunction had been
entered, the 'laintiffs would have had to post bond.


1
LL. --,









/ Mr. Ernest W. Graham Page 2 October 3,1947
Re: Lykes Brothers, et als. vs. Board
of Commissioners Everglades Drainage District

The District has to file further Motions or defensive
pleadings on next Rule Day, which is October 6, and we anticipate
that in due course thereafter this matter will again come up before
Judge Chillingworth to determine the constitutionality of the
Special 1947 Act involved.

In making a study of the applicable law in this case,
our position would be greatly strengthened if the plaintiffs, or
some of them, owned a bond or bonds in the District, because we
could make the additional argument that transfer of these lands to
the Federal Government without compensation would be illegally
transferring assets of the District earmarked for the retirement
of the bonds. It is advisable, therefore, that the Plaintiffs, or
some of them, acquire a bond or bonds of the District, and we would
appreciate your endeavoring to do so, or authorize us to do so.
A single bond would enable us to make this additional attack on the
unconstitutionality of this Act in this case.

Also, we need to know the amount of taxes paid by oun
on your lands in the Everglades Drainage District during each of
the last two or three years.

We also need to ascertain approximate estimates of value
of the lands located in Palm Beach County owned by the District
which the Special Act would authorize. .conveyed to the Federal
Government. These lands are located, according to our information,
in the Southeasterly part of Palm Beach County, and it is our surmise
that for the most part they are swamp lands of small value, although
I do not have personal knowledge as to these lands. If you have any
information as to said value of said lands, please advise us.

We willkeep you advised.

Very-tral ours, -/

PH:onf

P.S. We understand that in addition to the 4,430 acres, approximately,
of lands in that District owned by you individually, that you also
own lands in the name or names of one or more of your corporations.
If so, please give us the names of these corporations, acreage owned,
taxes paid during recent years, etc.

PH /












October 11, 1947






Mr. Parker Holt
Henderson, Franklin, Starnes & Holt
Collier Building
Fort Myers, Florida

Dear Mr. Holts

Pardon me for not answering your letter of Ootober 3 sooner, but we
have been in such a mess here since the storm of September 17 we have
hardly had time to do anything except repair damage and prepare for the
Nature.

In reference to Everglades bonds, we have no bonds at the present
time* We turned them in for taxes and I cashed in the balance last year.
As soon as I have the opportunity I shall try to pick up one or more
bonds around here it it is possible.

Please let me know just how soon you have to have the information
regarding our taxes and the estimate en the value of the lands in Palm
Beach County. As s-on as possible I shall go to Palm Beach and try to
get an estimate an them. I will also send you a list of additional
acreage owned by corporations and others and controlled by myself.
I shall be unable to get this information for you, however, until this
present storm passes and we get cleared up here. If the water raises
another six inches, we will have to move out entirely.

Sincerely yours,



Ernest R. Graham


ERGib ,


4,
?kpK. -~. i.r


U,. V, -a;akA~a


i












I!


*, I.





-1


L..

-Ip


October 11 1947


Mr. John Lykes
Lykes Brothers Ino.
P. 0. Box 2879
Tampa, Florida

Dear Johni


Your letter to October 9 at hand. I will try to get
about the Palm Beach land the latter part of next week.
depends upon the results of the stom today.


the information
Everything


We have only a seven-inoh leeway. If the water raises another seven
inches the houses will be flooded and w will have to move out* We have
made all arrangements for this oontingenoy and are in pretty good shape*
Naturally I have got to stick around to see what happens. Our battle
are all in good shape down at the other farm and I think we will ride
it out o.k.

Sincerely yours,




Ernest R. Graham


ERGi b







!




J. W. LYKES
Vice-President


The enclosed copy of

torneys, dated September 30th,

Please give me any information

connection in order that I may


letter from our At-

is self-explanatory.

possible in this

present it to them.


Sincerely,



J. W. LYKES


LYKim E- lEHII=OTHERMS [NJORIPORATEDI
RANCHERS PACKERS OF BEEF & PORK PRODUCTS
Cable Address "Lykes"-P. O. Box 2879
TAlMIPA, FL.OORIDA

Oct. 9, 1947















Senator Ernest R. Graham,
Graham's Dairy,
Hialeah, Florida



Dear Ernest:







J i L!I i i l



FACFAF'LAJE, FERGUSON, ALLISO': & KELLY

First National Bank Building

P. 0. Box 1531

Tampa 1, Florida


September 30, 19h7



Lykes Bros., Inc.
209 Franklin
Tampa, Florida

Attention: Mr. Holloway
In Re: Everglades Drainage District

Dear Mr. Holloway:

Yesterday Mr. Parhcr Holt of Senator Franklin's firm in Fcrt Vyers and I
presented our application to Circuit Judge Chillingworth in 'st "alm
Beach for temporary injunction to restrain the Fistrict from co~;-rin
certain lands gratuitously to the United States.

'arly in the hearing counsel for the District a-iouimced that red tape
complicated the conveyance and it would be months before it could be made.
Therefore, by agreement a-id with the approval of the Court, the injunction
was held in abeyance on the assurance of the District counsel that he would
notify us at least fifteen days before any deed was executed so we might
have an opportunity to renew our application for injunction.

Meanwhile, the Judge expressed interest in certain aspects of the litigation
and Mr. Holt and I feel that we should amend our Bill of Complaint to set
these matters up. I would, therefore, like for you to advise me the amount
of Everglades Drainage District taxes paid by Lykes Bros. on its lands last
year and this year, if available. This need not be broken down into
descriptions but simply the total sum for such taxes. However, it should
be segregated from any county or other special District taxes.

Further, if you or anyone in the company has any information concerning
the present asking prices for lands in Palm Beach County within the District
similar to the land in the southeast part of that county which the District
\ proposes to convey to the United States, we would like that information,
and feel we should set it up in our Bill. The Judge is naturally interested
in determining whether the amount involved can create any substantial hard-
ship either way. In this connection, you might be able to inquire of
Senator Ernest Graham and get such information.















Page Two
Lykes Bros.



As soon as you have these facts, I will be grateful if you will give them
to me so I may get in touch with Mr. Holt and prepare the desired amend-
ments.

Cordially yours,


/S/
John M. Allison

JMA/lwo







/

HElNDERSON, FRANKLIN, STARNES & HOLT
ATrTORSNEYS AIW COTrSEIOSS AT IAW
ROBERT A. HENDERSON,JR. FORT MYPBT MLOEID
JAMES A.FRANKLIN
FINIS E.STARNES
PARKER HOLT
December 23, 1947




Mr. Ernest R. Graham
Graham's Dairy, Inc.
Hialeah, Florida

Re: Everglades Drainage District Litigation

Dear M-rx--.a-hain:

Mr. Lykes advised you that we would hold a
conference in Tampa on Mrnday to consider further steps in
litigation against the Everglades Drainage District. Mr.
Lykes and Mr. Collier, along with John Allison and myself
were present at the conference.

It was agreed that the defense against the
suit of the District to obtain release for maintenance pur-
poses of the "185,000.00 fund would be continued. That
case is set for trial on January 14, and we will present
our defenses, and in the event of an adverse decree, expect
to take appeal to the Supreme Court of Florida.

Our suit against the District to prevent trans-
fer of lands to the Government is now being held in abeyance
pursuant to an Order of the Court requiring the District to give
us thirty days notice prior to any transfers. We believe the
District will take no action pending efforts to get the
Federal Government to take over.

The local bills in Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
Counties permitting establishment of conservation districts
have been passed by votes of the people. It is our belief
that the District does not want any litigation or adverse
publicity at this time, and it was decided that Mr. Allison
and myself will appear before the next meeting of the Board
of Supervisors of the District and inform them that litigation
is proposed, and will be filed unless the District will adopt
a resolution or write us advising th t thirty days notice
will be piven before any action is taken towards the establish-
ment of conservation districts under these bills.

At the trial of the suit of the District on
January 14, we will need evidence of the ownership of lands by


; -- -----------~----- -- ------- ---- ----- ------ -- -




Full Text
I -.1. I W nrt-,'R', I ...., _' ',7_1 -,',.-.,%j,-;j,'. I -,?'ZF.: I I I 1
.. -, ... t, I ., I .,. ..;, I I
,-. X. V, .k .. .q .,--fC I I
1411. 6 ., t sn ": .,"I -.., .4.1- !- .; 4) 1.;114iq -,iil 4 ..... 11 .: I !:.
.. '1.1,!", "'; -...'Itrli.- I- . N..,i;0--..1, .1 -, 0 I... ` iii ..
t. .., k ,. ". i., I ,n;.:-,k I-4... "*, .." ... -4" '. '. t. 11".z.,`,.-S'i.,,-, -- --
V.I. I .- ".. ... --,... .1, I,- I .. -- ... -. -, "A.- .. '. ,, '.. ,
L. ... 11,11%,,.,,,; 4 -,-g ., '
.. 4. ,- "C34 ... ... I ,I- ........ r -.1 -1 1 .- Ct4 ; .- -... ,
,4, V p t .11/14K .-;; S. ,,, M ,1j$:-. -, --.,rp-4?, i MIMO, ... ; k..-'..-. [ ': '. I ;A" ., I~ "I.- R I .* ,.t ., I 'I- --I-%.. q I 5 -1. A- '. "I -. ., v% 14. 6, .. o ,
.
.; -.. --.., L', 0 A -1 14 1 ,t,'; Il-'. i ---- ,T.I..V i ..."'P, '.. ,, ., .. -
... .il .1 a A ,I ... f ,.-
,.. 1. .., 1, m I ...
X ,A ,,. !Ilii,,; ,.,..,:, I A lk "o ,. Al .... .. .
17 2h ,
1. -V,-,;.` v, ; ;,... -,
'.. I 14 !".... t, ,i -, y &.. .
;IIICW !.,;. ,,)- ZR ;1.2,-'- ,Vii; ,:;,
'';.-,,' P "k .' 7 -, .. ':
I ,? ;-'i]?-111: ,,A i 'r,-In'a, 4VM- S a.l. ,- V.l .
.,-. ..,- 'i -'- i 1, -'A %.,. I; '; ,,,
11 ... ,7,,,,,,.,,.',,O-,,_,.,r !rx,",;; ,i ,;. ,
'. z -.
,-.. : A '. .,
-7".A,. ;" I -.." X. ,- -7 t IA*t,,, -'.-.'4 1" I .... ,
". ", .. .C.-'...."I" ,-,;
'.. I 5 1..14.11,,.W i.-,.'t.-F..4,ili,- ffiw-oY $ 0 4 ,.,,g ..;Jj., lz.1 .. "W ""VX64?% ";V -1- 11-v r., T
... .. ;.. .,, I tl.1:4N ...,4z,-
.. -r .
I',- y1-
A ,t wt'.;w
;.".". -,. ....; xi, 'a ?"'A., A 46F. -M ;W ,,A, I
.1 ; jm kl3.%, .,
n I c ,-,4i,.,, -6- I --- YO ..*14' 11'..-'4M-rl..M-- ,Y.N v m '.
1 4 "'79 01 -".,;, -'L 'w'- i
im A .. ..I, -, -711 1
-....!Qv ., 1 j-,,:,. --,
1-.1-N.W7.11 .11.
,.,..q 11,,N?,- I
.. -,. -, vuw -.4 ,.,. I li.'-,., .. ., 11. ..,i., ., !". t",, i ,i
1P....J.2m w I X.
,I Z'M -11 q '. a,N,01; t f
A f '. ., --. '. "' ""
;., .
-, -- ;111111 .2 ` .'.t ...... .... v, .,I ". 1. -. ", .. i,
,e, ..w -- i. TTI
.. P ?q
W -" ild Rb -11 d T, ., - - m e ; .. -11
4 ,4 -,, t -, t
'. : ... .
I f,
'U %'.,, ., --, ."", 'i
;IYM M., .m Id, '-,, I", 4.41'11.1;;, xw-'* 41,,.9` ,; 7."A w.-Pt ,4m, --'. i2 1 -;4
0.1
,
-. 04 A .* R iii."..., k-'j '11.
.c 7- A 1 ; 4 ;, ,?. 'gh't-41%,' I.
I % -, ,.-11-- -, .. r I I V A I, ik,' ,
I .. I ly .-"", ,I
.. 1- IL : f A. m ,,I -I17 a R .. S'
Z. -, '.., ,
&I f lliiz.Z Yj. .1w. 9-, .'e )-, -, ijk
Flf.. ,*, ,),, ,,,I
-- I ., 11 f'..V,,; I.-I......'... m ., .. ., W.
V., u -m ii ,;'.."... Vi, 3 ; M X I -
,.,q W ; vl.i.,-.711 '.WA 1 .., !.
40, ; t Ir e n., .v
.. .", ..Ilk. 1.1 .. 4 .
t I I .1 at k ]I-1, ;, r; I ; ,:oy "t .. -....
4A Am -, .; "A!T J v i 1lt .
.- .....
1. 411-.1 e ., D..,.- .,_
11 '.. .y '' I ,- .. ... --
W ":)k'ai:11.114 y .ik .. i -tz i .. ,..-.
., ,9 'J "i, "'. 1. -. IM .
,;, -,7 ` .. 1% .. 1. -,r ..
T ., .., A zl: ve4 -I." k2i-- 14-.1'--wx "" ,, ARORAlf R xiro..-. q., ,lx +`q, !mw p -r ,; ,. ".. ,%; ,
, ... % -, w -, ,,, -".- .1.7
-14- C -11 #. I I ,4 -A '.. ,!l ., f,. ,4 4v-vnv .1, q ).W-v--- v . ., I ",
Ll.., .: 1 't,
1-4ill"-M- .-,': 15 X"', -, W-5 i- N -
-1.1 ., ...
5 1 `g
.. A -1 ,
... n I ., "ali,
iZ i.C#-5 S.-T -'c,71h, -I M, ... 0I, ,.v.l e I -.- .J." 2--.,!;,g
.. ..,.I,- I-M I!Ml 1114- I I tn 11'wrw. -.j ,_...,, i- ,,
, Y'. 4 I" J-yrj,,iv 4t,, '11. .,... p i .; .. t. -n, Im
-FiX ., 7 ., '- -,.,!
q!3fvj % i, .t :,;. .,
Z .. w ,'. -
A -- ;4- Pj1qzT-r.' u 71
'141. W.'4K-:.,.- .Q'i, --1f,-A % Te -.2i% -,-
R i -, ; t --', ... O ILI 'k?-6 w.;-F -- ,- 1
14 ,1 1. rl '14 w ,414,- ,/# I .
'. 1 .., .4., .,.- .4 ... -,X--',l
.., .T ..
1. -4 W. 5 W N .
I io, Vv-. -x aj.'A'VNe.:,;L ,%,. P .-I,;.,- i,,4
i.P. 4,.:, 4 I, .. .v .,1,,, + ,'- 11A:vj,-;-O-JI-+IT,-A-jg "
N ., 11
t? 1;. : 951N,54
VA : ; .".4 ,
-. u &.., 1. I ti f, ; j -M -i:`0
I I, w -.. -, 'RN ItW #1110, ,,*V, -'!e,- ,9
n -. .. ..22". '.. .. '.
1 g .% 7g, r,:, .;; ;,
,- -5,--i;,L- ." I-P r. ... !! -
t. _
.45,.MA, _t tQ1 4 ,".. ,:`
.
.
;-, 1)r! .4
12 il yl SM
.- M .. ., 1v ..' iF ". ; V-;,-4 11
4.v .) ?,.-...',, 0 14 .1 .P .
W M -9, .. ,J .. V,
.4., 1.11'A', ,t&. ,.f--A.;I'jj :, I Pwff -,, 'd
r; ; '... .", i .. -.. ""'.3
M .;, P., *, ., a ,,-,:Jo, O ;, :,.. %.. a.o.,.,
.- ,- ,I- P, ." 1,
It-ill' ., O IL & .% f ,- ,- - 'l T-- ;-A$,7 I ,: -`: E) -I.. .. 1-
4- ,
,., ,
1#5 -C'!",.6o "!",.6o .1111 -1-1 !. p' K 7!... "
.w Z I 1 .
.74 ... -
--,, ., CF.-%!-t-' o R .
"q I 1. ,,-
_t ;., -_;..." l'o ,""'Al ;-,- . 7, -."m -.
.. -N,"' '% I, '141- r ZA --- .; Iila--` .". ., V V ,?V.
t "A -, At --,,
,,% i-, .11 .-I 4
.11. 1 V -4-11 -1 li, k"14A--. .., .7., s .v ,,, --- .. -1-1k.'i" k4
i ,N ft
r I '! .. .. ": L.. ,7,-Aezv!! .i -.'. gy.c ,1',,'.."
'. ; m w N q i: ,P e'l- 14. -"' ,.
1. -- .,. V, ; N 'N.M
., ..., A f!"I",
.. OA, I I ; ,,4 1 r, i-- ; .. ..., A ig;q"ii I --t i
., ".., "T. 'I ,,-1114., I s .'...M .-'A
.11, ee W., --111-II& ",- h2. "..
.t...Dfsil-,, a...-Y -r I ? it ., 17 :Ig"L. i.. 'J, ,1 '.,-,, I .!- I"
w ,e x Q(N, "W -Vi*,"; q % !A Rji : :, '. LA
,
:01P fltl, 1':',- ", .;
-t.". IT. 1*1-,, -1' I i ; t z,, .7 -, .. -4 A
ft i.M -.':',',`ii ,, 5N,
ct;. ..,
A I M ", .. .. ..., r! I P '11-l"V.,W7. e-j- -. Y IZ, -r .A.'a7M ,;4_1 1- 7, -...
I i
1 .v IV' .- -. I
U-11 I xv .4 ., .
,q 4 .. ,-.
"' -
6.11 1-4. O k.
W -I...?", lp -'-,1;6' A'i.,-,,. I !. I I .." V; .-.
-., -- ".,.
-i A O.- oqa I -11
Ll --.I 1 _- I k. '2 -e, < 17 1 -1 .a -, . ... .. -W R r RM 1 I
M4 v-, 'L ... -
iI-,,:`q 9 li.- 4M I ..
gp--- I .. 1.4. A S4 1_'j ,'4.T t -Sg.,,- 1 f: I ZPA WvP,
Mi Jg- I .. j %;V ... 'O ."I %(' tz- 11 Y C ., i: -, I i 1 I.;
: ; I ,
... ". -'-k ?Ar
k -1 qA,?k; : i- I k, K r.,T, ii I I 141, .,-., 4!
;- F 1-
.... I k. ,` ..
"; I ?42 ; .,
1-T;, 2; .6',
-- I R-- -.,-I-fl
o-- .. .'.
... ,% Le I g -, T ,?4,. k w ,N I.,-P f.
W, WO _t a ..... -..
W14V --ow..
-nQ ;-..IL.- .:-.' 6p,;'
"' .; ,,, ". .. I I -Rwn
-1114 "`jrtVj ""7' :.-6 .-* .,. .,. ,p I I I fa,.:..,., ;b6g 01- -, IT ? ., t
., I, I 'r
.1 q._ ..g i P. ,@ -..; `, .,.,, T -p, I .. .j:,Lf.'e,,..."..,.,;.,..L,,.',...'.:6 k I P eo
ww-- ... o)L -11. 'A 1, ur i 'I A,-& ". i, I ffl ', -',1--),t,51`1 ..
T.jl,,-m I AAK`k*1 "J", ,i-,'.:"'e-a-&,_
0 4 -- I ,A,,C. ",-exx ... >- -.ie. I !, ".'] .,."6,, _, _. ...) v .
.. '.. ., 4 E, Molls nM
"j) I v .
'. .,: -,.,. i -.,.-. e., .1 .
.6. -; -. r !. 1' M11, .
i .
I 4 _.L
,:, _
-6. .11 &-'- r .. '.-. # ,,',,,',, .
.. 1. 'Pek 1,
,
IT 1, x i Lii'Ni O;R VA',7,, .,
I S" 'o -:V, J..'.k.."!
W11 4,) ', I-11 .. ; -- ... -- -4N ;C. . "r ., -,, .' 1 .6'6 I' ;', "I .
-- t ,: ,,, i ,`.,;.,j 'J, ,14 Y'1'11,;,-,, ; v ,I -.
k t
I ,I -.k-,
.k w -- 6
I .,e* u
... -, .; r .-,.,. I ,1.1 .. ','..'2.1.'.. 6 ,, W .
,
N
_;_ 0 'A 1j, I r -4 -
Vv. -.. .. r '. 1;111 Nl`., "
'o'. "I ,','t ..., v i"!,A;'";,4:-,- % lt. ?
1, - I. i" .. -- ,4'.f-,. JA-.", ,: -.- ""A I,-'% ,,z f ;`Iy t A ,;. 'J-r-"
;` -, .11., -, e '... .. ? ,!" .; i Rl"Ui". a4 -;!,. k vNA"' I'm I
I 'i -" 'I.- j',',,6.i jV .,-. 4 L. ". -L.1'4. ". "' -
. i & 14.-;1 1 40
'. 7n 4.;-&. v 1.1.4 *8 ,-,W" I ", ... q -.,.,,,.,. -. ..: -,;w.
.. 4411 .,% 'I'lild. ., .s .-i .71" .
.. .. .. IN 01.1.1,41, ", , ,,;,, -.Ue .* .. kl--i Wi ,,-,.T -,-.-;H
.. % ";. V I 4- '. .!i I I I -i-Tf
r"!,,, ,;,. ... v --. ,;',- ., -S- -- ',' 'o'. L Y-1. .1
e,,. ,,, I ..- ... -. ; .. .... Z-,-.,.,-,j
-9 'I. ..
e, -h '. 1" -,,-wi.,,., ,,, '(, -j 'F, -t-- -11 I R ,', i,4t -
.., ...
.A -;O,*rx: Hc I il-,4t Ir 1-4 1 1, i, A.. .. r, ,
j.. 14 -Oq.--.; 1 ,11 4-2 -
,f.IiX I -- '. -, -1.
.. .1 -4. ,,& -,-rl- .. ,- "'-4 -S:aw'. ..'e,-n'-', .,,.,, 441M, bi L; -N
W I, q I -.- I~ If, ., ",?v-.e ivAj% mi ;44 4k kl--,',cI,! L I.-C4
ij- ,: .-r j-,-6 ,; h ... .. 4- ', ` '?,
.k L > .. If ... ..
O.,.z _1' X, V '. 2 li, Ve. f., 'I4,4f, ... 7 '- J. I ..v, .R_.- I'll ,l 11 W e 1.4 1
.., ... 'i. ',
a, 1. ,.; K... M ,. .. !, iX-r$'.
"I' ,-.'A It; N I ;m f. llp.-,7.-,; -',,,-, .- "'- ;- .r, r%..,4-,rl...-..':.Wll,!,,,;.,-"L,"$,,:% I
-04 4f'lUi' Ak .,-, ,,,, .,. -, ', ,q 5:-A
,M .- .6i N a -, j ,"
M ON r -, -,... q. ...
'. O ., I -,--- t -IN,. P 1.' 1U
.-M. &j; P', I ill I f i ..... ,,, ;.-, .,.j
'4 "'
-IMI.4 ?. .. I', A*;,-holir v ,Al -- A''. ko".-!", 11 ..
..;IN I 'A 1A 4 _-'.. '. ,,,--.. ` '.ik' t 1 .. 0. N i P ?
P `Ilx- "71..' & "R ,,, .,.? A., L P...2",
". "
.1- I '. rl .4 .: '- .-I. L F I
N '. N, ; .. .. 'o *., JI W2111 R. w '-
r X ,.-. ,,N --- ,,A.-
J ,e, 4 'L 4,'& ,f 5 m I
10 7, 2AL vh`--- ., 5, '. v ...-.
,w %. T .- t, u V. -.7, , 6 ir ,j .- r .. -, ,N T ';i I T .-,. P. -5 L6zVl-l,,
.- .. 1....- 11 ..-.I I NO.. Im
,l .!';'., 1. # &?,`, .- 11-i
"..,.,. ... .iW Z, A
"'p*. 1;0 11ri. .!
LLL -, -11 -1 I ...;.- 4.,h .. ..... k'.- Ap. p e i.- ... Kio"`
I.X i-.. 'Y .. ."..

tli, 11 .... .. -
.%, xl, 'e%'--` "' R ..-- .- 01--
I:--- 4, A I Kly .1 141b, ... .. t4* ., ..;... r .,,., ,:."%`,,.-. ,,b 7 -, eii I
-.11--6. F 1 .T'?O, I .. .. .. V7- ,rr 0 ,. A i,T,Vi,,il- ,, ?I"".,4 W ,
i- I .-, -4`,ftroii .., .1
... .. .. I ,V- ,JTR .,, .; M .
-1 -X I ir-4f'. -.j. 2-,' ." "'..;I7q.. y jl-;,
_4 L ... . R. ; ., 1 ,''. -- .. .." -.'fLt1. '. r_ ,.,....,. I 8 .. ,
f', ,; ... T -w-,X:., P & -, -,Q C 4!* '6. -.1 r, -.4,; ..',.7..,,-_ -,.'- .": 'jj: ,.. ;
,_, 0 1- -- .4 ., ,;,.b. -- -, A, I.. i 1,%'W-M -Z -..voi, IN
.;:: ... I -i ,,171-14 --, 4, ,...m -',-- '-- .. ;! '. 'f1
r- ; 4, .4-7 .. 2, i. F, .- .1 1;1 AA-1-1_-,.q_ w ,%'. -.-I
.. I;- F., Z% 4 ,-,,- A Ir ,-k ,'vW-.-,tT-.,n.,-,t -j I~ ,- .. A. '. -e 1"A It 5e41,
1P. b M .- -1. r 8. 411',4..-.,.11 'F ",`- .1
... ...%,f.- I -.- ..' '. %T ..- ; ..
I 1-11 -I m let" i;q, 11 I "-..,. "..
. i g i X ",
. .11 o 'I- ,., I "^, "i I -0.'- 1 6ej -,-,h ,`24 ;;l; ., .%. IA7 ),: I ,
A-, .. I ,-..I 3 1.11 -',-- p M, ..-! 0",(-., 'r i!
:1: ".. I ;..- -- I e.-r,-'!q-.,:
..: TQ).! L. .' 1*1, 11 IV 'gj' .
11 .. 3--111 ., F i .. . 7 : 1 v ,
.. ..... A,_t,. O". "I"-p.; I,'. .. i-il, '. .-A j --,-,' C,. no m 'i ",'I I 1 ill -!
i 4 A W-;, ;M. ,
11 T .... -!,-,, .i. ,.- l'.a .- '.. : .1. -: ,-jt ir. --f. -;;f.
'" y 'f L -'-' i X ..;, T, 16
1 V1, ": j .- W
- -, ,---, t i:';'P
.. U 11
,- ; I t.,-. ". ., L, .1 -,-VnCVIN A ff-,.A7, ".1,V"".j A m-igl. .,. .. ..... .. :
I .-.' cji_ q !.,; P;,Wj$z;'",o M, .. .1 3k.1z",'All'. -1-1-,V'11Q --Ni J? ,vx .* ".. .1 Y4,,q -10 ,:R";, A-
-. '.... iv .: V #-"h Y, ., .. r. -XI -.- a I
-, N -.-K. --- 4,0, .. 1; r4- I.... '.. i-41,"'
.1 .
4 ;,A Q-111 ., I .- 1. .. .L..;ko. "I 1. -. I A. w .. -
w ,4 r
', 1 K i i e
lp I 1 t. I ... ', --
K..- 1. 1. ." .i 11`1 ,,-, !, ". .' ., % i "S; "'i"'t
,.ili.l f -. ".1 I'."" .. P--it. Iwi
I ,;,
6 '. w a ...
K, I- 7 I 14' _..;,.,,, -,-, .",.- ....., .. ".,k
-br -IW,,..,'-'- ?-t 1 4h-,V ", .' I .... .. ., '. .., ,v -!
,N4,,; 1.,: .. j 'L- -, x .-
..1 .I. vl&'4,w .:Vl jp)i -",.!N, ,.;Z W "..
I W
"; 7. .Y. ..
; :?, ".4-4-M.." & -,- j ;...JNL P, "A"""' :i .. .,.
tj .. M, .. .. i 1. ,,,,;'.';,W -,,-, ',,# .j
.- .4, 1 .. -4 .,,..r k I -
4'.,*, .
;. .. --. I. .- ;, m ,.: i
.. .. r'. %
IL It ", .. e ..
.... ; ,, '0; ...
0- ,,, 4,.: "li. : : ,
" -'Ilp, I ..w ...
"' "' X ,- ;:--,..,-i,.-:; .,& I
Z. 1. -4. 1 I g 1. I A -` Z` i,- I 7 .
x` ... ; I L p; # ,j I '. .. 11. .,e'. 011,i -W ., .-
x t l "' ,"'.41, 4 1--.,,,Tl -- N wl Or
_,. ;4 t'4,
Air I r ','.'-I '.-,'
T. .5 .Ti. 'vok, -7 -.). P ", -
.. .. ..; .. r -,- vkr v .."'..
.. - I ,."-'L41'_--';j$; -.!,. 1 ), .)Z, .'T
-- ?,,WP MN V,%r 0 ,h..,.
1 ,''. ... .r. I t.--,- '. I'.. I.
&I pv I -,
-. P,:. V ... 4 .., O'. Z I.V A..
;.. I f'. .. -, 1"..
., *r a -.4 4
a7 ,, ;.f. J; P.- ..
,. 0 .., ,-,-, ;.f., %
:.. 0 t 'L, di,
roji .- N ., t ml
, -.' Myl m ,-;
," -'.- R L,.,j r-7 -,A :, ..... 'K
....I.A. 9- v .- .., . 0.t -"*,I!,f i r 1 I ,4. A. 4-. 1. 1;W I Zn-,'- Z ,,,-,`.4 .1 i f-
.
11,11; kNv g I -.-Y" N
I -1 --' -, ,,',?-,I j-,u, I ,.. w. .t "-V I *-,.
.. ...1 ', .....- .. '. i ...- 1: .:
4 -).. Ili, -1k., ,',, i k.
M
W, 11
.. t., .:. ,V .1 ,, P--, .hi I
..t I V. .- r:'.- .;,,r--,, i ;6 -
-,?.:'4-. 1`l,'..,._ r .;q j- T- f '. ) -..- ... 3 %.1.. ... I T 11- L I .1
mm '. 1, .,,4..+,.., -.- I 't',,;,.j,,;,.),;.,..-ilp..:,-..,.,... I- "' I .. ., _.. ,
f % h w--- c :.,-' -N -i"-t!,I'r 11 .'-V ii 1 ,'....."-- ..46;-T. .. r'. .. ... I f.;' L iw 11 .1
,.t,, "ek, w3m .I,;. L. es:76- -1.
V! & -, ,A:; t!, -'; il ft- n ..A l
.w. I a i,;Clria.,- v f ',.!. ', V ,;:. :
,- M , L.. .,
- --t, ....I.W .,..".- ,01-11 i, P., ,& .,s,., .. .1 '4 I- ".. I













,--. # L







kILLIAM KENT
RST DISTRICT.CALIFORNIA



laouse of irpre.rntatiu s 1M..


1astiingtuoni l. i.

"ei. t- -e,, 1,, 11 3.'






_. t l. ^ ..- 111,

." '- -* : 1 -
L I .'-, -- -.




I r".'.r -L tila t I onrill 7. u. i ,!.' t" co- t y* -o inovi-

'---. *- .- II ,- .,_* j- j -. . Y .. ..
j- -
ti. L.

Y ::!I'"A 'r.,: 3
.


_






LONC BuILDID., DLI X41 4 "s 4D i :
KANSAS CITY, MO PHILIP S DELANY
/ENRY 0 RALSTON.
HEL M
R.M. PRICE,
C8c'Y. crT.IIAsUEN..
p W' WILLIS P. MUNOER,.


-LANDSALES'COMPAVYG
.( INCORPORATED)
PAADII OLPH 1773
NIMAJESTIC B13UTILDINGr
i -H CHICAG O

I C HOWE. WASHINmTON, D. C. OFFICE.
Gr.M 4L. Ac.eir Co -HE OURAY BUILDING
CCo"" -s L ogs 809 Q STREET. N. W
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following: .

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The.Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
.B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
',place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
d~ducing point of-view*. They will be glad to answer your inquiries;
and we can refer you to numbers of others.
r
My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did. YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government


I_


''- ';~ ;3~uW

~


I











M F4


PHILIP S DELANY,
HENRY O RALSTON.
I VVICE ssieDE-l
'.' W HELM.
a-* MaC PREBIDKHn
R M PRICE.
ILLIS. P MUNOER


(INCORPORATED)
TELEPHONE
RAINDOLPH 1773
IA, JESTIC: Tl3TLDINGI
C HI CAG 0


AuS.a.r.GorN, D C O;.2c;a
OURAY BUILDING
BOB 0 STREET N. W
TEL aOnr.e MAIN 4260


'3


A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
oreasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
banded me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the'I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of dares have been sold in Washingtoh, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils'-- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those whd have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,

I_:Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
,.plaoe for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
rduoing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries;
!and we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government


e-_




Li
i'
IW




--7 r



I ':
r;rL
; A
I
/ -
. :_L^


I'"
\* \,


t,






DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SUFFRAGE LEAGUE


7 MARLOW BUILDING
811 E STREET. NORTHWEST
WASHINGTON, D. C.





Mr. Clinton Rogers Woodruff,
#705 North American Building,
Philadelphia, Pa.


121 S. Broad St.

GOVERNMENTS DERIVE THEIR JUST POWERS FROM THE CONSENT OF THE GOVERNED.






GENKHPAl, O FIE.IS: SOUTHERN OFFICERS
IAON(. Ii'il.I)IN( 227, 1aTIi STREET
KANSAS CITY, M

Energlaihe iJanb oarls company

14E C. HOVOWE, w~nAMHIN;TON, 1). C., IIIADQUATRERil:
(O NIE rAL AU( NT FOR TIlE 800 G. STREET, N. V.
COMPANY' M I.ANDM OURRAY BIIuI.MI)IN;
I'HON MAIN L.O4200
Dear Eadam:-

You will be interested-to know that the work of reclaimingthe
Florida Ev'erglades is advancing by leaps and bounds.

Tri Furst-Clark Construction Company, a leader in its line, is
h',.J]l'ig the work with extraordinary skill and vigor. Six great dredges are
working night and day, and several more are expected soon to begin.

Visitors, constantly coming to us t'f-r the 'Glades, are enthusias-
tic over the work and the outlook for the investor and homeseeker. One sub-
stantial business man declared at one of our meetings that the buyer is
"sure to win," and that "the only question is as to how much he will make."
T,, President of the State University of Florida visited us recently, and
testified to his faith in Everglade lands. T.:,o men who have actually
crossed the 'Glades one, over twenty years ago, and the other, later -
have recently called, and strongly confirmed our statements regarding the
character of the lands and climate. Still others tell us that we understate
the facts, and that "the half has not been told."

'rt, long since, one caller bought of us ten acres, then twenty,
then another ten, and started for Miami. After seeing the lands, he wrote
us for twenty acres more.

..*:erJ I -i lands are going fast. Within a year, one tract of
64,000 acres, and another of 180,000 acres were sold; another of 46,000
acres is now almost gone, and thousands of acres from other tracts have also
been sold.

The prices have risen from ":24 and $30 to _.40 and $50 per acre.
Our fifty-dollar land is now almost gone, and buyers can afford to waste no
time unless willing to purchase at '60 and .S'j per acre, at which figures,
also, we have lands to sell.

Our office is now at 809 G Street, N. W., in the Ouray Building,
one of the best office buildings in the city. We are on the ground floor,
and have a fine window with southern exposure, in which are displayed choice
products from the 'Glades. Crowds stop, day and night, to ins:eict it. Our
lantern lectures, reinforced by new slides, are given Tue-day, Thu'-.rsday, and
Saturday nights, and are finely attended.

We shall be glad to welcome all our friends, old and new, to our
new headquarters. To those who have not yet bought we can present THE op-
portunity of a life-time; to those who have, we can outline one plan which
will simplify their task of paying for their lands, and another, for obtain-
ing revenue therefrom.
ST. ': O;l, CE OF,
Very truly youre. :::_ : SALTS CO.,

'....'""'Y "-"-;...,-_Q -GQ STi N. W,








DOCUMENTS ON DISTRICT HISTORY AND GOVERITENT.-


Following are some documents on the history and govern-
ment of the DistrAct of Columbia.

VARIOUS FORMS OF LOCAL GOVEiHNMEIT IN THE DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA. McMillan. April 14, 1898. Senate Document No. 2384
55th Congress, 2d Session. ; .

THE REMOVAL OF THE SEAT OF GOVERNMENT TO THE DISTRICT
OF COLUMBIA. Wilhelmus B. Bryan and Samuel C. Busey. Dec. 20,
1899. Senate Document No. 62. 56th Congress, 1st Session.,:

THE ESTABLISHMENT AND 'GOVERRAENT OF THE DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA. Wm. Tindall. 1901, Senate Document No. 207. 56th
Congress, 2d Session.

LEGAL RELATIONS OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA AND THE
UNITED STATESt Poland. June 1, 1874.. House of Representatives/
Report No. 627. 43d/ Congress- let Session.
7
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. Jeremiah H.
Wilson. June 16, 1874, ,House of Representatives Report No.
647. 43d Congress 1st Sessi6on.

FORM OF GOVERNMENT FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. *r.
Hunton. Dec. 27, 1876. House of Representatives Report No.
64. 44th Congress 2d Session.

MINORITY REPORT OF JOINT SELECT COMMITTEE TO FRAME :A
GOVERNMENT FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. George E. Spencer.
Jan. 11, 1877. Senate Report No. 572. 44th Congress, 2d Session.

REPRESENTATION OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA IN CONGRESS
AND THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE. H W. Blair. Sept. 17, 1890. Speech
in U.S. Senate. ,

DOCUMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH HIS SPEECH OF SAME DATE
IN SUPPORT.OF SENATE JOINT RESOLUTIONS 11 AND 18, PROPOSING
AN AMENDMENT OF THE CONSTITUTION TO CONFER REPRESENTATION TO
THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA IN THE TWO HOUSES OF CONGRESS AND IN THE
ELECTORAL COLLEGE. Henry W. Blair. Sept. 17, 1890. Senate
Miscellaneous Documents No. 237. 51st Congress2 1st Session.

CHANGE OF GOVERNLMENT IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUI'B!A.
Memorial on Behalf of Fourteen Citizens' Associations, Propos-
ing a Plan for a Change 6f Government in the District of Columbia.
S6,. Gallinger. Jan. 2P, 1909. Senate Document No. 684. 60th Congress,
2d Session. _

AN ACT PROVIDING A 94 MIAN3 FORM OF GOVERNMENT FOR THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. Feb. 41, 1871. Statutes At Large 1869-
Y ^. 71. Volume XVI. 41st Congress. Page 419.

l \ AN ACT FOR THE GOVERWI4ENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ?
', 1D FOR UTHER vURPOSES. June 20, 1874. U.S. Statutes at Large,
1 ~33-5. Vol. XVIII. Part 5. 43d Congress.


II II_ ~






* E. WILL, EXECUTIVE COMM4T
EXECUTIVE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SUFFRAGE LEAGUE TEXEC E CWILT
SECRETARY i 807 WOODWARD BUILDING ROSCOE JENKIUS
*A~ rMRS r-. JENINE L. IWANRWSJgif,
TELEPHONES, WASHINGTON, D. C. M. 0 NI' .N MR
MAIN 1480 LOUIS IKON
INCOLN 3568 FEDERAL CONTROL OF FEDERAL AFFAIRS MISS RACE
DISTRICT CONTROL OF DISTRICT AFFAIRS W D. MACI~KZIE ZAE
LET THE PEOPLE RULE MAJOR w, O. OWEN

Dear Sir:-

That our local government will soon be profoundly modified seems
certain. Bills to this end are now before Congress, and others are
promised. The question for us is whether we shall sit idle and mute
while issues, vital to our well-being, are decided by others, or whether
we, ourselves, shall manifest a living, intelligent interest in our own


Se D. C. Suffrage League holds that government of the people, a i
le and for the people is our birthright as truly as that of any
immunity on earth. Hence, we are giving careful study to our
rm of government. Yet we realize that to attempt to impose our
rnmental ideal upon our neighbors would violate the democratic
p p e as completely as did the arbitrary acts whereby, in 1871, 1874
an 878, self-government here was superseded by a local despotism.

Justice and political wisdom alike demand that the coming local
government shall be instituted not by indirection, back-stairs influence
or a coup d' etat, or handed down by rulers to passive subjects. Instead, ,
it should represent an informed public opinion, the ripe fruit of full
and free discussion. "What concerns all should be considered by all."

To this end, the D. C. Suffrage League urges every interested
organization, civic, commercial, political, religious, labor, reform or
other, to take up, without delay, the discussion of the question, "WHAT "
FORM OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT SHOULD EXIST IN ThE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA?"

Some, in the past, may have hesitated to assert their rights as
American citizens, lest they offend those in power. Today. a new
spirit is at work among us. In consequence we are now more liable to
offend by manifesting timidity and apathy than by acquitting ourselves
Like men. Lovers of liberty admire its manifestations in others

Connected with this League are public speakers, students of the
problems of the District, including its government, who will be glad,
upon invitation, to address such bodies, without charge, or participate
with them in the discussion of this question.

District government is already receiving earnest consideration at
the Capitol. If we would make our own views felt, we have no time to.
lose. Prompt action by your organization is therefore advised and .in
early reply regarding speakers and dates will be appreciated.
Very truly ours,



Executive Secretary

Present Office Address, 7 Marlow Building, 811 E St., N. W.i
Present Office Telephone, M. 1555.






- 6-


Connecticut where 76high schools are supplied with tcxt-ooks,
a "Catechism" graciously prepared, published and furnished free by
the State Utility Information Bureau.

How much money has been spent for "resawch" and for college
subsidies of one kind and another will be known perhaps when the
report of the Federal Trade Commission is made public.

DEAN RUGGLES CCOE3 KIGH.

Harvyxd has an annual appropriation from the utilities of
$30,000. Dean 0 C. Ruggles of Ohio State University is now
tourTEg the country, arranging conferences between university
teachers and utility representatives (at no expense to the professor.
in various sections. His salary is $15.000 and expenses.

The larger universities apparently have heavy investments
in utilities. The following figures showing the percentage of
endowment funds so invested appeared in the record a few days ago:

Harvard...... Endowment, $82,039,574 Invest. in utilities, 33%
Columbia..... 62,601,349 a 33%
Mass. Inst. Techn. 29,293,000 30%
Univ. of Rochester 24,500,000 24
Williams College 5,427,493 36

PROF. STEWART EDUCATES THE FARMERS

"Experiments in rural electrification" is a favored plan as
in Texas and Minnesota. In the latter state a grant of $7,500 was
made to assist in the experiment at Red Wing conducted by Professor
Stewart. The committee in that section is generous to the Univer-
sity. It paid the expenses of Prof. Stewart and a monthly salary
of $500.00 to attend the vorld power conference at Geneva, Switzer-
land.

Also paid were Prof. Stewart's expenses on an "investigation"
trip into Ontario which resulted in a pamphlet very adverse to
rural electrification as managed by the Ontario Hydro-Electric Power
Commission, in which misleading statements and omission of fact make
his pamphlet a very serious breach of faith both to the Ontario
Commission end to the American public.

MR. YTER TRICKS THE T.ITHI ONIAN

And $3,000 and expenses to one Samuel S. Wyer for an earlier
trip to Ontario and the writing of a pamphlet which in some way,
utterly beyond understanding, he induced the Smithsonian Institution
to publish as a government document a pamphlet which aroused the
fierce indignation of the Ontario people and is now thoroughly
discredited.

Cope The states more especially concerned with Muscle Shoals get
was particular attention. Take Georgia. Mr. Willard Cope, the
wise utility corr.ittee director, spends $30,000 a year on his
work but it cannot be shown what it is spent for. Mr. Cope
blandly testified that he did not have "a penmark or record of any
sort prior to January first of this year.






LONG BUILOIDNG
KANSAS CITY, MO


^r annsaB 'lrannma"


A,9
.Jky


E C. HOWE,
GENE.r L AGEo r FOP rT
Co -MPAT LAN .


- e


rr
~) AJ


Id
II'~









i iJ


.',
"I
[J
a





... .
Cm-*"*

. I s
'~l- r-A?"r
." c' !.
.'>^ "1,,


L.4


...ca rrs.noln
PHILIP 9 DEL~Nfc N
HENRY 0 RALar&B.
M/ HELM ,
R M PRICE,
WILLIS P MuNOEP


(INCORPORATED)
TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH 1773
%AlJTlESTIC; B13 LDY INCr

CHICAGO


WAS.. oTro., D C OFFICk
OURAY BUILDING
809 n STREET, N W
T ErLEDOr .E MN u4260


A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 aorse of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employee in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. 0. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
Sbuyerg .. qjunr.ed. .aras MaabaIn sold-in. Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrdwd, -iartdhead6d Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted'farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than folle their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be na&''
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muniaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington. D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C..

,-r:Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
_V place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
4 during point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries;
iand we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that. if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government








Mr. Thos. E. Will #2.



voice in their onm affairs and relieving Congress of the burden of

details in that regard which it is l'ryly unfitted to deal with.

With kind regards,

Very truly yours,





S- f


-r








National Popuilr Government Leagiue
637 Munsey Building, Wa2hingtoin, D. C.


Bulletin No. 121. By Bertha King
June 22, 1928 Secretary.


WHERE SOME CF OiUR IDEAS CONE FROM

A Partial Review of the Fo'r:er- Ir-.'stigation


The evidence and the testinlony brought out by the investi-
gators of the Federal Trade Com~iissiion in the probe of the pr-opa-
ganda methods of the power tru.t have established all and more than
all that was ever char-ed against the utility ine-.eests as a corrupt-
ing force in Americcn life. For three months the evidence has been
piling up until it is mountain high.

But the "high-powered executives" of the utilities are quite
unashamed. Despite an increasing public condemnation they are un-
abashed. At the the convention of the National Electric Lirit
Association at Atlantic City early this month attended by t-.husands
of utility men from all America, they gave their answer. What wea
it? They declared their .methods were entirely ethical and rec"cmmei-ric'-
ed more money for proc-a.anda!

What, then, becomes of the theory that a majority of the
leaders in the electrical industry are honest and engage in fair
practices, end that all thi high-handled stock juggling and lying
propaganda is thE work of an unprincipled minority? Why did not the
decent majority speak out and taks- control of their industrial ship?

Surely no more a azing, bewildering exposition of the technic
of Big Business in behfuiling the people has ever been made than is
being steadily, relen'lcUcr3ly unrolled at these hearings.

This raises an interesting question. The reaction of the
people to the acquittals of Sinclair, Doheny and Stewart in the oil
scandals was prof: undly cynical. "You cannot convict a million
dollars" was the cry that ranr through the nation. Despite the fact
that the highest court in the land after reviewing the evidence
declared the leasing of naval oil reserves was conceived in "fraud
and corruption," Sinclair and the others are free and will remain
free.

Now it is the business of this investigation to discover
whether the utility intr.sts ha-.ve violated the anti-trust laws.
Suppose the completely fE.ir pnd rimpartial work of the investigators
of the Federal Tr-de Coirii ssion should eventually disclose that not
only the n ti-tru.-t l-a.w- ouL other laws have been flouted and lay
the results of their fi;di~gs before the Congress and the Department
of Justice. What will happr.en?

If you cannot convict a million dollars of Oil what can you,
do with ELEVEN BILLIOIT iCLLARS OF PUBLIC UTILITIES?










.. y, ov,







..... W, A .'
J L4 e 7 A4^-7 Z-(-.

AA A6ta /A6 a Q cu' t^, a-<>Z





Ate4


p -<-aR


L tL l,-< -










AN ACT PROVIDING A.PER MAANENT FOJM OF-GOVERNMENT 'OR
THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. U.S. Statutes at Large (a.ee)(btJ d
^' Vol. ._ Congress. Session. ;

ASSESSMENT OF TAXES IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.
Johnson, May 24, 1892. House of Representatives Report-r No.
1469. 52d Congress e1st Session. '

REPORT ON ASSESSMENT AND TAXATION OF REAL ESTATE IN
THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. Henry George, Jr. August 20, 1912.
House of Representatives Report No. 1215 62d Congress 2d
Session.


~






- 5 -


executive of the Denver Gas and Electric Company; nor, when the
student was instructed to secure a copy of "Economics in Public
Utilities," was he advised that the author, L. R. Nash, was an
official of Stone and Webster.

Prof.Duvall Professor W. S. Duvall of Colorado College at
fills Colorado Springs was paid $250.00 per month..
an order and expenses for preparing a report claiming to
prove municipal ownership to be a failure
in the Rocky Mountain States.

In addition to the monthly dinners tendered representatives
of the college faculties by Mr. Lewis, he maintains a "Speakers
College" where forty students are constantly under training
"to fill all engagements for speakers in the junior and high
schools, civic associations and luncheon clubs as may be called
for by the Public Utility Information Committee and other sources.

From a report of September 19, 1927, Mr. Lewis
Where the apparently expected his "Speakers College" to
boys and girls reach practically every high school student in
got "facts." Denver during the ensuing school year. The debates
on Boulder Dam in 60 high schools of Colorado found
Mr. Lewis in position to supply the material used by the students
through their paid agent, Professor Wolfe.

Mr. Lewis's work is by no means confined to the schools but
there is no space to describe his activities in full. He has been
in the Rocky Mountain States a long time and has been a very busy
man. He maintains his own blacklist and helps to exclude such
wild radicals from the Chautauqua platform as former Governor
Charles Bryan of Nebraska. He is a good fellow to the newspaper
men and each year gives a theater party to the convention of the
Colorado Editorial Association. He is notably successful in
getting his two men elected to the United States Chamber of
Commerce Philip H. Gadsden for one with the object of getting
reinforcements for the fight against Boulder Dam.

PROF. WOLFE COMFS LOW

In other states the story is much the same and differs
slightly except as to particulars. More money is spent in other
states than has yet appeared in the Colorado record. Prof. Wolfe
was had at bargain prices they paid him $1,200 a year.

A $S,400 a year professor "helping" Eleven Billion Dollars.

In Washington and Louisiana the committee director has the
co-operation of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction.
Everywhere the committees have mailing lists of students, profess-
ors, editors, high schools and colleges and thousands and thous-
ands of pamphlets are distributed by the utilities to these
addresses.

"Surveys" are made followed by the revision or entire remov- /
al of offending text-books. In many cases the books substituted
are prepared by utility executives. A notorious case is that of










Members and Friends -2-


Bulletins and articles his findings of the most recent developments of pu'blc
enteXprises similar to thjt *o-,*-?-ed by Seuntor NorriATo-r the Southern people
within a radius of 300 miles from i2asole Shoals.

This is a nationalj-..4gbt. If you aro with us send us the names of
live.men and womerjaSywhero in the nation -- espfcillly those in the couth --
to vnaom wJe may sairj ; gy of "THE VALUE OF .i.LE .SHOALS TO THIE SOT=r'

Vory truly yours,


POWER COMMITTEE, NATIONAL POPULAR GO' -RIVEiiT LEAGUE,

Harry A. Slattery, Chairman Mrs. Edward P. Costigan
Edward Ke4atjg Dr. John A. Ryan
Louis F. Post Judson King

............. ........ .......... (Tear off and mail) ........................... .*

IJotional Popular Government League,
637 MVlunsey Building, Washington, D. C.

I am with you in tlio fijht to back up Senator Ilorris iext December. Send
at once "The Value of Muscle Shoals to the South" to the fo-l'ji.:

N;JIE ADDRESS OCCUPATION


.......... ........... ..... .............. .. .... ......


.............. .......... ..... ....... ....... ......

..... .. .............. .......... .. ......

.......... ... ..... ..... .... .......

........ ... .... .. .


B-r thie r'a;j I think I can help at least a little toward
Here's rTy ch.3ck for I wish it were more.


expenses.


ALjdiLo


Address


July 28, 1926





4
V


X, 7.q 't.
A,:
V,
Rne!", bfR
MWTJ7 44 v t 4V
'.0 Kv
Al
-1 1-1 "N
.... ......
A 9 v"', ,
.4 5v. N Aw, .4 4
''Rpm q'N i, 44 f. M i4.1
W. 1.3, o, v F
Cl. k. rp a ,o ".-T- q, _5L, Ail, A
viiRT
g
j4 -g-


4, it Jxl
lk
1 Sm
e jlq! rl,
z Al io Pf.
V, Pe ',4- 1 I '. -w
_4 7j r': v N

'U
.2. ri Z
N ej ,r
4% 1 .7.
ur
ge.
; Vl
e, IN
AC
As A
. . . .
R






lv

'A
'e. "t, Y, 'llik" z 'ATl"-jh
.nq k.4 j- C ON
0 . . P
je .,r
I! aw
RN
j, efj w4m
-fm . . . .
."4N.
AW1.,
Tk
I ki _Ax 0
m;
A 9
'96111 111,57 f

V7
Am "'KA,
AIN
k'A
R
N
'44 g
.R Ifl -9. _A7
R
IM
iR A.-I

firkg. k
"A pgr e
lv;W v. `A-i A? r
A, IYL'
w.,
1,41
NO
Vk
Re
'Ile '4
TV, 54
W..
4 'MA


Mill
1% iJ Tl
n
NX WT 717

Eli.
A, VS lf RIM 004 11YRIN 0."
Rv 11%
RN
&W.
MR, 5i
NE
R, p
'Ilk Al







The census divides the District into t areas,
nAmely Washington (original, limits, Georgetown original limit
and the remainder of the District. The figures show an extra-
ordinary increase in ,the population of the third district during
".(the last decade at the expense of the other two districts. In i cjg<-
,i^^ o c1890, the third district increased at the rate of 11.9j-;in i 1900/
:' it increased _16.~$hiie in the last decade it increased 25.5 per
.t' ce-nt wilt corresponding decreases in the proportion of the popu-
./ 'latinn of Washington and Georgetown.

The third district ha. increased g@ore than fourteen
times as rapidly as Washington, and more than eight times as
rapidly as Georgetovwn. No district within the old limits of
Washington or Georgetown increased in population as rapidly as
the District as a whole. Of the decennial increase in the popu-
lation of the District, namely, 52,351, nearly three-fourths
(73.4 per cent) was in that part of the District outside of the
former limits of Washilgton and Georgetown, somewhat less than
one-fourth (23.8 per cent) within the former limits of Washington,
and less than 3 per cent (2.9) within the former limits of George-
tow .... .






S- 2 -

The failure of the Kansas City convention of the Republican
party to denounce the inescapable evidence of nation-wide corruption
together with the silence of its platform denies substance to hope
of corrective action from that source. Those politicians are not
going to fool with Eleven Billion Dollars which are su. jrely behind
their candidate and their campaign chest. The power trust has
nothing to fear from Herbert Hoover, Charles Curtis, Andrew Mellon
or Candidate Vare.

What the Houston convention of the Democratic party will
do remains to be seen and the independent voters of this nation are
waiting to see if the evasions of Kansas City are to be duplicated
at Houston in the hope that the ElevenBillion Dollars will splt
its contributions and political influence.

But no matter what may happen in political conventions, or
what action may or may not be taken by the Congress or the courts,
a great, constructive and potent result is being achieved. Let
Judge Healy and Attorneys Chantland and Wooden and Commissioner
McCulloch be of good cheer. The real jury, the actual convention
to which this question is being presented, is the American Public.
And it marks a beginning the formation of a mighty public_opinion
which one day ere long will speak. There is the real hope.



The utility propaganda machine is made up principally of
the National Electric Light Association and 28 "Utility Information
Bureaus" now operating in 38 states. The Joint Committee of National
Utility Associations of which Hon. George B. Cortelyou is chairman
was revived last Summer specifically to fight legislation in
Congress and collected $400,000 for that purpose. The state and
regional bureaus and committees are composed of utility executives
and work is financed entirely by dues and subscriptions from
utility companies.

The Federal Trade Commission requisitioned the files of the
various bureaus and summoned the directors to identify and explain
reports and correspondence. At this period of the inquiry it is
impossible to make anything like a digest of the evidence. The
facts pile up too fast. As each director finishes his testimony,
under oath, he is followed by another who outlines much the same
sordid program. It is a program, a deliberate policy, of tamper-
ing with the schools of the country and of reaching a venal press
by increased paid advertising. It is a program that has turned
unnumbered teachers, the custodians of the future, into represent-
atives, consciously or not, of big business and has secured
uncounted newspaper columns for the publication of private utility
propaganda as fake news and canned editorials; of articles written
in the propaganda factory but published under the pseudo-authorship
of our very best people.

The difficulty of making a comprehensive summary of the
evidence was greatly increased by the apparent independence of the
agencies employed. The work within the boundaries of each state
seemed only sympathetically related to the work elsewhere.


"" i"




















--------- FILL OUr i HIS LAI. X AND FTURlI WITH ETLCLOSURE ---


National Popular Government League,
Bertha King, Secretary,
637 Munsey Building,
Washington, D. C.


We are not getting the story of the power trust
investigation from the newspapers in sufficient detail to
make us understand how clearly it is a matter of concern to
every citizen of this country.

The Bulletins of the League are helpful in this and
should be continued. We know the niinber of bulletins sent
out depends entirely on the funds at headquarters. So you
will find my check for

$ to help with the next one.

If the bulletin fund is sufficient to permit some
free distribution, I wish you would send them to my
friends as listed below.


Name


Address


State


1.

2.

3.

4.

5.


(Signed)


(Address)


Date


~


__


I~


_ __ _


__


~II
_ I _








/ 1 Act of June 20, 1874, Chapter 337, Act for
Government of the District of Columbia and for other
jurpo ses. :

U.S. Statutes at Large, 43d Congress, 1873-5.
4 Volume XVIII, part 3.


A joint 'select committee was created 'to'prepare
a frame 'of' government (page 118). Two Senators and
^ two Representatives. It was to report,with appro-
priate statutes, to Congress on the first day of
the next session. It was also to suggest the proper
proportion of the expenses of the District which the
U.S. Government should bear.

3.65 debt (page 120). Bonds of 3.65 exempt
from taxation. Slavery was abolished from the Dis-
trict of Columbia, April 16, 1862 (page 376).
against
D.C". a.sessing taxes as/Government property 'in
D.C.? 'Loof~tY'bhdex of Statutes at Large from
1859-1875 but found nothing other than paragraph
abpve from act of 1874.







GIFFORD PINCHOT
1617 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE
WASHINGTON D C
December 26, 1912




Dr. Thos. E. Will,
District of Columbia Suffrage League,
Ouray Building,
Washington, D. C.

Dear Doctor Will:

On imy return to 'lashington I find yours

of December 19. I don't see how I can be one of the

signers of the petition you enclose for the simple

reason that I am a voter elsewhere, and could not vote

in the District even if the people here were to get

the vote. I.am sorry to have'to write in this way.

Sincerely yours,


Q^j^~c~d











:Nov. 19, 19*.








Mr. D.A. Brown, President,

League of Anerican municipalities,

Kansas City, Kansas.

Dear Sir:-

I am enclosing herewith copy of a form letter vhich, I hope,

may receive your rost earnest consideration.


Very truly yours,






SExecutive Secretnry.








STATE OF IOWA: BOARD OF CONTROL OF STATE INSTITUTIONS.








T E. W. #2.


city in this state would be willing to have the capital on the

same terms.

4th. The present financial relations between the

state and its capital are entirely harmonious.

Very truly yours,

BOARD OF CONTROL OF STATE INSTITUTIONS,

By

Chairman.

GSR.MG.











Suffrage Bulletin of the District of Columbia


r o
m
z m
0


rZ Wm

U0
S~ m
S> m


oO
o 0


a a I
.cr ;d > C'







m
to 0




M )
Z

0 >I



m
o




r
i-4
co







r f r
i--+







,o o
r O

m p o o
0 S

N


:y are prompt to speak their word
political emancipation. It would
easy to enlist enough prominent men
women in this District to conduct a
tinuous revival meeting in the inter-
of District home-rule and represen-
bn.
Ihe opportune time for emancipa-
has come. Public sentiment is with
The people outside the District are
unded when they hear of our po-
:al condition. Both Houses of Con-
s and the White House will soon
resent a single political party. The
n is hot and daily growing hotter.
w, of all times, is the time to strike."

jE GODS HELP THOSE
WHO HELP THEMSELVES

aid Representative Robert E. Lee,
Pennsylvania, on December 11, at
SEast Washington Democratic Club:
'If the people of the District of Co-
nbia will get out, and, by working
rd to secure the right of suffrage,
)w that they are really desirous of
during the vote, they undoubtedly will
it. If they will really try to secure
Right, I will do all in my power
aid them in their fight; and when
matter comes up in Congress-if it
es up-I will cast my vote in favor
the residents of Washington."
unless we demand a vote we don't
4crve it. If we go after it we can
I it
Now is the accepted time. Let's strike
lie the irrn is hot!

GREAT ON THE FLESH POTS!

MVhen the Israelites had escaped from
brick kilns and bitter bondage of
rypt, and were headed toward "land
'd liberty," what was the one, inces-
htly-urged, everlasting inducement
esented them to toll them back to
laraoli's slave pen? The flesh-pots
I Egypt, the leeks, the garlic and the
ions. If, on one of those occasions.
ien they were clamoring for another
porrunity to "eat flesh to the full,"
me one had dropped in on them
Ith a copy of that citizens' federation
solution holding money to be worth
ore than liberty, couldn't he have
killed a rousing vote?

S OBSTRUCTIONISTS

Some of the District slaves might
.nsent to vote if all the facilities were
finished them gratis and, at the same
ne, special care were taken to exclude
retainn huge sections of their adult fel-
*w-beings; those, notably, who are "off-
ilor," "off-sex," or possessed of inade-
iate bank accounts.


Such obstructionists are grist for the
slave-drivers' mill. They deliberately
rivet the fetters upon their own wrists,
and bequeath to posterity a heritage
of bondage. If their children rise up
and call them accursed whom shall they
blame? Freedom is the birthright or
all; and, to be possessed by one, must
be possessed by all. It is one of the
good things that must go around or not
go at all.

DIVIDE AND CONQUER

When Caesar entered Gaul with his
legions, he launched the good old plan
of "divide and conquer." In conse-
quence, he had the whole province in his
vest pocket in short order; and, with.
the gold and added legions thus ob-
tained, was enabled to cross the Rubi-
con and conquer the world.
It's exactly the same game that's beet i
played here all these thirty-eight years.
A lot of addle-pated white men, fight-
ing negroes who never harmed them,
never desired to harm them, and who
couldn't possibly have harmed them if
they had so desired, have virtually said
to the "Plunderers of Washington,"
"Help yourselves." And the plunderers
have waited for no second invitation.

"CITIZENS" VERSUS "SUBJECTS"

In America the appropriate form of
salutation for a speaker about to ad-
dress an audience on a public question
is ''Fellow Citizens." In the Federal
District, however, better styled "Little
Russia." whose people, as stated by Sen-
ator Morton, of Indiana, "are governed
as despotically as are the serfs of Rus-
sia," and who live under "a pure des-
potism," the proper address is "Fellow
Subjects."

Here's a little sum in arithmetic: Sup-
pose Congress. for any reason, should
decide to stop contributing to District
expenses, but should, at the same time,
compel the local millionaire tax-dodg-
ers to pay up their back taxes and keep
up their end in the future, and stop the
public service corporations from rob-
bing us, how much would the average
man in the District lose?

MONUMENTAL SELF-SACRIFICE

notes s for women-ourselves ex-
cepted!" seems to be the slogan of some
of the sutfragists in the Federal Dis-
trict.
"Give the ballot to the women of Ohio,
Kansas, California. Michigan, England,
China, and the isles of the sea, but please
excuse us!"
This. it seems, is their "immediate de-
mand." Funny, isn't it?


SUFFRAGE BULLETIN
Of the Ditrict of Columbia.
Published on the First and Fifteenth of each
month by
THE DISTRICT OF. COLUMBIA
SUFFRAGE LEAGUE,
Ouray Building, 809 G St., N. W.,
Washington, D. C.
Subscription price....25 cents per year.
Single Copies,.............one cent each.
THOMAS ELMER WILL,
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY OF LEAGUE, AND
EDITOR OF BULLETIN.
Entered as second-class matter October
3, 1912, at the post office at Wash-
ington, D. C., under the Act of
March 3, 1879.
ANOTHER STEALTHY
BLOW AT LIBERTY

The writer can understand the posi-
tion of those who think that, for some
mysterious reason, the Federal District
must be governed by Congress. For
years, this was practically his own view.
As those who know will testify, he
has made a lifelong study of history,
and of the science and art of govern-
ment. Since 1905, furthermore, he has
been a subject of the despotism of the
District.
Furthermore, he has been a subject
of the despotism of the District.
But not until, at great cost of time
and labor, he took up the special study
of the history of the District from the
sources did he discover the skeleton in
its closet.
Like many others who know-if they
know anything about it-that the Dis-
trict is governed, nominally, by Con-
gress, though, actually, by a local
clique, he supposed that some profound
reason of state, however erroneous,
lurking in Article I, section 8. clause 17,
of the Constitution, gave a quati-justi-
fication to the "peculiar system" pre-
vailing there.
But investigation tore off the mask
and revealed the amazing fact. It is
this:
We have here in the National Capital
of the world's greatest republic another
of the outrageous attacks upon human
liberty and human rights, historic exam-
ples of which may be found in the par-
tition of Poland (1772, 1793 and 1795)
-the purchase and uprooting of the
Irish parliament and the crushing out of
Irish liberties in 1800, and the high-
handed destruction of the Boer repub-
lics by Great Britain, and the rape of
Finland by Russia, both in 1900 and
thereabout.
Is this what the American people want
at their Capital? Will they stand for
it when they know the facts?


DO YOU KNOW IT?

Do you know -
1. That, for almost seventy-two years,
the people of the National Capital en-
joyed local self-government?
2. That. by the acts of 1874 and 1878,
they were robbed of this right by force
and fraud ?
3. That, since the performance of this
foul deed, a group of powerful, local,
exploiting interests have sat on the lid,
and frowned or bludgeoned into silence
every attempt, by the enslaved popula-
tion, to reassert their rights as American
citizens?
As an American, loving your coun-
try and proud of your Capital, will you
stand for this state of affairs?

THE "BALANCE OF POWER"

Those who dread the possibilities of
"negro rule" point to the number of ne-
groes in the District as a conclusive rea-
son why self-government should never
be restored.
When they are asked how twenty-
eight and five-tenths per cent of the pop-
ulation can control seventy-one and five-
tenths per cent, they answer, "Oh, but
the twenty-eight and a half per cent will
hold the balance of power."
That's just where they are \wrong. Do
they know what would be necessary to
enable the negroes of the District to
hold the balance of power?
It would be necessary that they
should be highly intelligent. But are
they?
They are certainly far more intelli-
gent than when the suffrage was over-
thrown in this District But do peo-
ple realize how high a degree of intelli-
gence is necessary that a group of peo-
ple may exercise the balance of power?
What group of people in America do
stand together, year in and year out,
amidst all the vicissitudes of party poli-
tics, and exercise the balance of pow-
er? Do the farmers? By no means!
They are sufficiently numerous in many
States, not simply to wield the balance
of power, but to constitute themselves
a single party that could absolutely con-
trol public affairs. In not one State in
the Union do the farmers thus stand
together
Do the working class stand as a solid
phalanx and wield the balance of pow-
er?
Practically never. In every city in
America the working class, if its mem-
bers stood together, could not simply
dictate which party should win, but
could monopolize every political office.
Do they do it? No, never!
As a matter of fact, about the only
class in America that does stand to-
gether, year in and year out, and throw


December 15, 191Z


December 15, 1912


Suffrage Bulletin of the District of Columbia








, ORGANIZED 1913



Phone, Franklin 8124


To Build the Needed New and Guard the Valid Old


NON-PAI


NATIONAL POPULAR GOVERNMENT LEAGUE
637 MUNSEY BUILDING
WASHINGTON, D. C.

July 28, 1926


_ __ ____I_ _


PRESIDENT
ROBERT L. OWEN,
Former U. S. Senator, Oklahoma.
GENERAL COMMITTEE
WILLIAM KENT, Kentfield, Cal.,
Business. Ex-Congressman.
DR. JOHN R. HAYNES, Los Angeles,
Physician.
GEORGE W. NORRIS,
U. S. Senator, Nebraska.
j. H. McGILL, Valparaiso, Ind.
Manufacturer.
PROF. E. A. Ross, Madison,
Sociology, University of Wisconsin.
HARRY A. SLATTERY, Washington,
Former Sec. National Conservation
Association.
JACKSON H. RALSTON, P110 Alto, Cal..
Attorney and Author.
DIRECTOR
JUDSON KING, Washington.
SECRETARY
BERTHA KING, Washington.
CONSULTING COMMITTEE
ALICE STONE BLACKWELL, Boston,
Former Editor The Woman's Journal.
WARREN S. BLAUVELT, Terre Haute,
Coal and Coke Operator.
LAWRENCE G. BROOKS, Boston,
Attorney.
GEO. H. DUNCAN, E. Jaffrey, N. H.,
Member State Legislature.
HERMAN L. EKERN, Madison,
Attorney-General, Wisconsin.
PROF. A. R. HATTON, Cleveland,
Political Science, Western Reserve
University.
PROF. A. N. HOLCOMBE, Cambridge,
Government, Harvard University.
WM. H. JOHNSTON, Washington,
Pres. International Machinists.
EDWARD KEATING, Washington,
Managing Editor, "Labor."
EDWIN MARKHAM, Staten Island,
Poet.
FRANK MORRISON, Washington,
Sec. American Federation of Labor.
ALICE TEACHER POST, Washington,
Former Managing Editor "The Public."
Louis F. POST, Washington,
Former Asst. Sec. of Labor.
DR. JOHN A. RYAN, Washington,
Industrial Ethics, Catholic Univ.
WM. S. U'REN, Portland,
Attorney; Creator "Oregon System."
CARL S. VROOMAN, Bloomington, Ill.
Farmer; Ex-Sec. of Agriculture.
DaLOS F. WILcox, Grand Rapids, Mich.
Consulting Franchise Expert.
MRS. LAURA WILLIAMS, Washington,
Director, Progressive Education
Association.
H. H. WILLOCK, Pittsburgh,
Manufacturer.
PnOF. J. A. WOODBURN, Bloomington,
History, University of Indiana.
2


To our T Iemhl?'rs d F ientds:


V.'h-teler .11',C.13 Shoals is to
or practically vve 7 1 .'y will in &li
by Congress next~L DoJ.carT.


be kept for the people
pronobility be decided


For three successive sessions SenLtor George W.iIoxris
has led the fi,ht which has prevented the Coolida.- miniristra-
tion, aided by rsuctionarswDemocrats, from.handing the Shoals
to the ) ovju r trust or some rn~nufacturinm; interest.

Norris vants the Shoals to re'.ain a public _-ia:t to
conn~l t ". ithl the Do-.-ari itrests sud this j'/. the Southern
people the benefit of lov0 utes and deu:oa--brute to ti!3 -:rtiro
nation the ;:zmuzinl.y low cost at wici electric current can
be generated and distributed as far as 300 ij.les from a pov.er
L a nt.

The power plan t u'.ilson D-Trm bus been in opqzLtion
since September 925. Army e.i- .- ir ::yrge are doixg an
efficierijob. The strstagii., ')' "oe to the trust of, -
capturiin Muscle Shoals now is ~unJflot.

If the American people Xcnew the truEt about elaotri-
o&l c sts no member of Congress would dare vote Muscle 3nools
out of their t:-,:session any more then he v.ould dare advocate
givir the ?ansm._,nal to Meort n.

This LeuuSie.hos backed Ssentor NgX is and his orogr3s-
sive colleagues for thrT. years to the extent of its u1bility
and resources. Norris will fi;ht on; 3:e nr2nose t r'

We believe, ,nd Senator Norris concurs, 'tat the
most nrectical thing now in ;-orenvration for the coming great.
battle is to help '0ot_ to 13aders of public p-.inio-i the .acts
as to the low.j;tes given by public plants to the neoole of
many American cities and to the whole, province of Ontirio.

We have now ready for distribution a Pamnhl3t
entitled "THE VALUE O MUSCLE SHOALS TO IE SOUTH" vi.;ch gives
in readable form significanjfacts of esoeciaLntoroc.t to
small manufacturers, marcShats, city officials, and ho.,-ima.k3rs.
A co.py 0oes to you v:ith this letter. .

In addition, our Director, Judson Kinc, will soon
leave on an automobile investigtiion tri to i-tario and savarE
American cities and Reclamation projects, anic will report in
e~a


/

ITISAN


1


t






\\


41 .


---


-i

1









4 Suffrage Bulletin of the District of Columbia December 15. 1912


elections at will to one party or an-
other is the little group of millionaires
we call "Wall Street." They do it be-
cause tlhe, have the necessary sagacity.
Farmers and workingmen do not be-
cause they lack this sagacity.
What is true of farmers and work-
ingmen is true in less degree of various
organizations, societies, orders and
bodies. Many of these, did their mem-
bership but stand together as a unit,
could control close elections. How
many of them do it? Practically none.
Instead, they split up among all the
parties in the field and thus dissipate a
force which, concentrated, might prove
in\ incible
Does anybody imagine that the ne-
groes of WVashington are more intelli-
gent than the white workingmen of
other American cities, the white farm-
ers scattered all over the Unifed States,
or the other whliite men mentioned? If
so, he pays a high tribute to the intel-
ligence of this race who are frequently
referred to as "too ignorant to vote."
Rest assured that people who are
"too ignorant to vote" are too ignorant
to stand together at the polls and vote
together.
THE SAME OLD SERPENT

Being destitute of patriotism, those
who would sell our liberties for six mil-
lion dollars per annum and then seize
both the price and the reins of local
government. imagine, evidently, that we
are equally lacking in honor, and also
in common horse sense This is a case
in which they "never say turkey" once
to us Buzzard is good enough for the
rank and file. The members of the oli-
garch-i n ked the turkey for their own
continuous Thanksgiving dinner.
"V\.-te for our candidate or this mill
will shin down and your job will go
glimmering !"
"Vote for our candidate or we will
call in our loans!"
"\ote for our candidate, or this coun-
try s\ill be swept by a devastating
panic !"
Did you ever hear that kind of talk?
Now listen to this.
"Let up on suffrage or we'll lose our
government grant!"
"Abandon the fight for local self-
government, or Congress will quit pay-
ing half the District expenses!"
"Stop demanding your Constitutional
right, or it will cost you six million dol-
lar% a year!"
It's the same old club. and its use is
instigated by the same old serpent.
DELIVER USI

The constant prayer which the lib-
erty-loving subjects of the Federal


District should offer up to their Mak-
er and to their brethren in the States
is this:
"From the grafting ruling class in
this District, who plunder us, and from
the blind, unreasoning, negro-hating
slave white class who rivet upon us
our chains, deliver us I"
Because some white people were born
with a slave's collar about their necks,
and point to it with pride, shall the sons
of freemen and of the heroes of Bunker
Hill, of Naseby, of Marston Moor and
Runnymede calmly submit to such dis-
grace?
The absolute basis, the foundation of
civil liberty, is the right of self-govern-
ment. The National Capital is the one
city of the United States to whose peo-
ple this fundamental right is denied.

A CITY WITH A SOUL

Of Tom L. Johnson's work in Cleve-
land it was eloquently said, "He left a
city with a civic heart a city
with a soul."
If, within the entire confines of the
United States, there is one city which
fails absolutely to answer to this de-
scription, it is the Capital City
How is it possible that a city can have
a "civic heart" or a "soul" so long as its
inhabitants have absolutely nothing to do
with the control of its affairs, and are
robbed of all responsibility save that of
paying taxes?

GOOD FOR THE CLERK

Do you say, Mr. Government Clerk,
that you fear suffrage here will inter-
fere with your tenure? Stop a moment.
In what possible sway can the transfor-
mation of Little Russia into an Amer-
ican commonwealth interfere with your
keeping your own individual political
residence right where it now is if you so
elect? At the same time, the change will
have hastened immeasurably the process
whereby the hands of the local plunder-
ers will have been taken out of your
pockets. This is your light Help it
along. The writer has been a Govern-
ment clerk himself.

LIBERTY OR SLAVERY

"It is time to know whether it be the
tree of liberty or of political slavery
which was planted here when popular
government was subverted in 1871, and
the foul work consummated by legisla-
tive rape of the rights of man in this
alleged temple of liberty in 1878."-Sen-
ator H W Blair, September 17, 1890.


THE SUFFRAGE BULLETIN

OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Vol. I. Washington, D. C., December 15, 1912. No. 6.

STRAWS FROM CONGRESS "With others of our organization, I
interviewed Senator Clapp. He said:
Oin December 11, the secretary of the 'Why, I have always understood your
District of Columbia Sufrage League people were satisfied with their present
gae out the following interview: form of government.'
gave out the following interview:. "I told him that was true of the pow-
'Whoever looks upon the restorationI old hm that prey upon te District, and of
of political rights to the Federal Dis- rs that prey upon the District, and of
trict as a forlorn hope, should form those who reflect their opinions; but
trict as a forlorn hope should inform that it was emphatically not true of the
himself. Note sonic facts.
"Congressman Robert L. Henry, Chair- ast multitude of District people, as
"Congressman Robert L.iHenry, Chair- shownuby their exre tns whenev
shown by their expressions whenever
man of the House Committee on Rules, opportunity is given them to express
declares himself emphatically and un- themselves. I told him the most nota-
equivocally for this principle and states ble recent instance was our straw vote
that some member of the House should election day when altouh tou-
gjve himself wholly to the work of pus- on election day when, although thou-
give himse ho to the or o sands of people had not heard of the
.,the proposition vote, nearly twelve thousand cast their
"'Honorable Ben Johnson, Chairman ballots, ninety-two per cent of these
of the House Committee on the Dis- demanding the right to vote, and local
trict of Columbia. on January 22, 1912, control of local affairs.
expressed himself as follows: "'Well,' he exclaimed, 'if that's so, I
"'I would not object to see the Dis- am with you.'
trict have her own law-making body, "'Will you speak for us at our mass
elected by the people of the District, meeting?' I asked.
and I would be glad to see the District "'Certainly I will,' he replied.
have the privilege to expend her own "I saw Senator La Follette. He as-
money just as the people of the Dis- sured me that he was with us first, last
trict wish to spend it. I. above all oth- and all the time. in fact, he had al-
ers whom I have heard express them- ready signed a statement from our of-
selves upon the subject, am in favor of fce declaring himself in favor of re-
a democratic local self-government in storing to the people of the District their
the District.' right to democratic local self-govern-
'I have recently had a conference meant.
with Mr. Johnson. It was very satis- "'Though little inquiry has been made
factor to me. He stands absolutely on the Senate side, other members of
upon his statement as above quoted, and that body are known to be favorable,
shows by his conversation that he has while many more of the House have,
made a profound stud) of the District, upon inquiry, shown themselves to be
its history and problems. tery favorably disposed or outspokenly
"I hate interviewed more than hlf for the proposition. Mr. Sulzer, one of
the members of the House District Com- the biggest men in the House, though
mittee. As yet, I have not found one rushing his preparations to go to the
in sympathy with our present despotic Capitol at Albany, stopped long enough
form of District government. Almost to say, 'l hope your meeting will be a
half the members of the Committee are great success'
clearly for self-government. Five are "That brings us to the mass meeting
out of the city, three I have not yet of next Friday night at the National
found and two have not fully made up Rifles Hall Anybhody who thinks the
grtheir minds, though one of these is people of the District are satisfied with
favorably disposed. being political eunuchs should note the
"To what extent the District is to list of speakers already enrolled for that
,blame for the condition of political meeting' Senator Moses E. Clapp. Mr.
vassalage under which its people live IrJustice Wendell Philip Staffl Mr
may be inferred from the following. Frederick SiddgC I fr. Louis P.
"I talked with the Speaker, Hon. Sbna e f r.,has. A. Dou las, Mrr.
Champ Clark. I told him we wanted .Chs. F. bL iJMr. Fra nl- a n,
self-government here. He looked at me PMr. Ter ce V.Posderl44 eYJT
sternly and inquired: 'WVh did not vourd ,-ri fr. P. T. Zran Re'. Chas.
people help me when I was working __ .ev. IJohr V. N y, AMisss
for that very thing? For three Con- Harrie. HiftodtMrs. Bel Case La
gresses I tried to give your people the FltefIr. John B. Colp ,ys and Col.
vote and they showed no interest what- J.7 Clarke.3
ever. I am tired of working for things "We don't have to beg for speakers,
I can't get.' however distinguished they may be.


A o- a I / 7/uf


The Hanford Pres, *S 11' 621 FStint, N. W.


/ /7-5?-7 ^^^*^













. qI'/, / .


4' 2-/0 5S "1W'




I3 .
/ ,^W^































At V;










. y'

I f -., ts












I t.







... V V I AAA*



.14 44




o. .
V V *-






N I V SECOND CONGRESS.
BEN JOHNSON KY C.AIRMAN.
VAYTA.iKEN S C C.O.LOBECKNEBR,
.JOHN H ROTNERMLL PA. WILLIAM C.REOFIELD,N.Y.
JAMESI A HAMI.L N J GEORGE KONIGMD.
JOIN A 1 ADAIR IN JULIUS KAHNCAL.
CARL C ANDERSON OHIO. WILLIAM J.CARY,WIS.
MARTIN DIES TEr C Ru A SuLLOA~0 N n
ILLIAM & OLDFIELD ARK LCONIDAS C OVER MO
GEORGE -' SHAUNF.SSV R I HENRYS.DEFOREST,N.'"
HENir GECOOG Ja N Y. SOLOMON F PROulY,IOWA.
EDUND STACK ILL. VICTOP L BERGER WIS
J. ROGERS GORECLERK.


COMMITTEE ON THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA,
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES U. S.,


Washington. D. 0.,


December 13, 1912.


Dear Mr. Will:

In response to your question, I am glad to say that I

believe in suffrage for the people of the District of Columbia, as I

believe in b suffrage for the people everywhere else in the United

States. I also favor giving the vote to women as well as to men. In

brief, I believe in home rule.

Yours sincerely,


I~


~~


/-V C
















py'.i
i1- If



fIi~ c 'L
Ln--








* 4 4..' .'






























AI




-4i









rEr
ti l!Ip~









01-
+ 4,'. ~ ~ FE';.















4 ~. 0
1''













UFA













I tft;W'I~~~itil~~i~ft~~
4..% ).~* *. ~ ~ 4'



:~:Al r

a s4 .

,+*. A*IitA a e.4;f
4".
.4 'a~4~4 4.a4 ~ .-~ f
'I t s"i~ *tM
; r ~ ''4 t 4 1



a a 1



a.' .. '. 4af4









THE DISFRANCHISING ACT OF 1874/


The act which disfranchised the people of the District:
of Columbia was passed un June 20, 1874. It was entitled,
"An Act for the Government of the District of Columbia, and
for Other Purposes". This act provided for a joint)select corn t -
mittee, consisting of two Senators and two Representatives, who
were to who -e- .te sit.during the recess, prepare a.frame of
government for the .District, suggest the proper. proportion of the
expenses of the District which the United States Government should
bear, and report, with appropriate statutes, to Congress on the
first day of the next session.

----U.S. Statutes at Large, 43d.Congress, 1873-5, Volume XVIII,
part 3, Page l18.












CENSUS FIGURES ON THE DISTRICT,-

"\ The U.S. Census has recently published two bulletins
1 on the population of the District of Columbia. The first deals
with the number of inhabitants. The population in 1910 was
331,069- ,,n 1900, oEpulain wa8278,718, the pn~e ,.n. /,.
haimig tcreaseg during the decade 4Q.18.8 per csnt. .

The most rapid growth in the population of the ....-
District occurred during the decade between 1860 and 1870,
this increase amounting to 75.4 per cent. Since 1870, the
growth has been slower with each succeeding decade, the per-
centages of XREERLxKxgxixRExxxxgK increase ranging from 34.9
6, '. for 1870-1880 to 18.8 for the decade 1900-1910. The absolute
increase during this hgy a xfrxft Pnaxxrmm A.year period was,
nevertheless, 199,369, or nearly seven times the absolute in-
crease of the first period of f years, romr 1800 to 1840.

The xtxantixay inrcrea_ in the rate of population
for the District between 1860 and 1870 was extraord ilary,
being more than three times the rate of increase of tne country
as a whole. The population of the District in 1910 was more than
twenty-three times as large as in 1800, while the population
of continental United States in 1910 was seventeer. times that in
1800.

The total lana area of the District is 4 square
miles. The average number of persons to tne square rile in
1910 was 5,517.8; in 1900 and 1890 it was 4,645.3 and 3,839.9,
respectively.


L








SUBJECT TO CONTROL.
MT PLEASANT STATE HOSPITAL.
INDEPENDENCE RATE HOSPITAL.
ELARINDA STATE HOSPITAL,
CHEROKEE STATE HOSPITAL
STATE SANATORIUM FOR THE
TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS.
STATE HOSPITAL FOR INEBRIATES
SOLDIERS' RPHANS' HOME.
SOLDIERS' HOME.
SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF
INSTITUTIONN FOR FEEBLE MINDED CHILDREN.
INDUSTRIAL. SCHOOL FOR BOYS.
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
PENITENTIARY
REFORMATORY


v--- --IilF



$ STATE OF .WA.

G.S.ROBINSON, CHAIRMAN.
JOHN F.WADE,
DR MURDOCH BANNISTER.
F. S.TR EAT, SECRETARY.


/"eKVj


SUBJECT TO INSPECTION
AND REGULATION.



ALL COLINTY AND PRIVATE IN5STfTUT/INS
IN WHICH INSANE PERSONS ARE KEPT



HOMES FAR FRIENDLESS CHILDREN,


ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO
BOARD OF CONTROL OF STATE INSTITUTIONS




November 26, 1912.


Mr. Thomas E. Will, Executive Secy.,

District of Columbia Suffrage League,

Washington, D. C.

Dear Sir:-

In answer to your circular inquiry of the 16th inst.

we respond as follows:

1st. Inhabitants of Des Moines, which is the state

capital, are not under any political disqualification whatever.

People who come here to render service to the state retain, as

a rule, their legal settlement in the place from which they

came.

2d. The state does not pay any part of the municipal

expenses of the city.

3d. The property of the state has the benefit of the

fire protection of the city. It pays for the use of the water,

and maintains its own police force Undoubtedly the police

of the city would render any needed assistance if requested to

do so. It is probable that the city is entirely willing to

offer such police protection as it gives without charge. Any

i0


1~_ IXBXI~.-.i~-7- -- --


--






W. i. GIBBER. Mayor G. F. COOPER, City Clerk & Treasurer

CITY OF COLUMBIA
Commission Government
OFFICE OF CITY COUNCIL

W. B. GIBBES, Mayor R. J. BLALOCK F. S. EARLE R.C. KEENAN W. F. STIEGLITZ
Public Affairs, Police, Licenses, Sanitation and Health, Engineeringl Waterworks and Sewerage.
Pardons, Charities, Insurance and Building Permits, Trees and Parks, Street D,-partmmt, Public Buildings, Schools,
Law, Taxation, Fire Department, Bookkeeping, Auditing and Collecting, Mnrklet and Liglilng. Plumbing lnspecilon,
Civil Service, Contracts, Loans and Discounts. Paving Assessments and Petitions. Garbage Department. IJsp.:ction o Fire Fydrants.
Printing, Budget.
Write to Heads of Departments

COLUMBIA, S. C. 25th November 1912.




Thos. E. Will, Esq.
Executive Secretary,
809 G Street, Northwest.
Washington, D.C.

Dear Sir,

Replying to your circular letter of NIovember 16th, I beg to
advise:-

1. The inhabitants or our State capital do not suffer any politi-
cal discrimination by virtue of their present residence, except that
those residing here without establishing a local residence must go
home to vote.
2. The jState pays no part of the municipal expenses of our City,
but on the contrary has been a heavy beneficiary by a discriminatory
water rate in favour of the State.
3. Answered above.
4. The State property is protected by our Police and Fire Depart-
ments without any charge for such service.
5. We are attempting to make an arrangement with the State by
which they shall pay for water on the basis of actual consumption at
a rate twenty per cent. lower than the lowest rate given to private
or corporate consumers. Even this rate would bring more revenue to
the City than the rate the State now pays.

Pardon me for offering a voluntary suggestion *ach is this
Can you not get Congress to pass a law permitting every citizen of
the United States who may have with him full proofs of his citizen-
/ship and compliance with the requirements of his State as to voting,
to vote for the presidential nominee wherever he may be on the
election day. This would prevent the necessity of having the citizens
of the District of Columbia go. to their own states to vote.


Very truly yours,




I, Mayor.


WHV i *M







9-

wives. Their most important work therefore is to convert women to
the gospel of private ownership and no meddling in business by the
Government. Specific instances of this kind of service appear in
letters and records. The utility-trained women join clubs and
even religious organizations as a routine part of their work. In
elections they heve worked actively to influence the vote on bond
issues and similar measures. Social affairs have been arranged
attended by large numbers of women voters as invited guests. The
"Utility Women" carefully present the private utility point of
view.

More serious than their social lobby, however, is the
settled policy of having these women employes join educational
and religious organizations. This latter is a permanent influence.

THE ANSWER OF THE TRUST IS MORE PROPAGANDA!

At the Atlantic City convention of the National Electric Light
Association early this month, the .Public Policy Committee reported
that the utility interests claimed the right to develop "unhampered"
and was preparing to defend the industry against "unwarranted and
unjust interference."

In the speech of the president, it was indicated that the
"educational" program was bringing highly desirable results, that
such activity was quite ethical and would be continued and extended.

BUT YOU PAY FOR IT

Now here is something to consider you pay for all this. All
those subsidies to schools and salaries to professors and payments
to teachers and writers for "research" work; all these expenses for
conferences and conventions; all the funds expended to supply news-
papers with releases and bulletins and boiler plate miles and
miles of it measured in columns of published material every cent
of this enormous expenditure with an added margin for complete
safety and a modest profit, goes right into that electric light
bill so blithely sent you each month. And if you don't want to
buy that kind of service just try refusing to pay for it.

At Atlantic City utility men took the position that they had
done nothing that was not completely within their rights. But if
it is the right of the Power Trust to invade the educational institu-
tions of the country, why not the Railroads, the Steel Trust, the
Insurance companies, the Banks, the Fertilizer Trust, the Farm
Machinery combine, the Ammunition makers and so on and on?

There is an abundance of evidence disclosed and it repeats
endlessly. The Press- the School educational integrity all in
the market place; bargain and sale across the counter in every
corner of the nation. Through it all there is a terrible sense of
pressure pressure upon legislators, upon public officials, upon
the moulders of public opinion. Pressure the relentless pressure
of Eleven Billion Dollars.
0- -






MILES POINDEXTER, CHAIRMAN.
HARRY A. RICHARDSON. JAMES P. CLARKE.
MOSES E.tLAPP. ROBERT L. OWEN.
KNUTE NELSON. DUNCAN U. FLETCHER,
FRANK B. BRANDEGEE. CLARENCE W. WATSON,
ALBERT B. FALL. JOAN W. KERN.
WILIlAM A. MASSEY. .

COMMITTEE ON
PACI FIC ISLAND DS AN D PORTO RICO






December 12, 1912.






Mr. Thomas E. Will, Secretary,

District Suffrage Association,

Washington, D. C.

Dear Mr. Will:

I received, through my secretary, your very kind invita-

tion to attend and addras the mass meeting to be held to-morrow evening

in behalf of equal suffrage forthe District o lumbia. I thank you

very much for the honor of this invitation and regret to say that pre-

vious -ngr.germents will prevent my attendance.

I take this means,, however, of expressing my entire

Sympathy with your movement in both respects mentioned above. In

fact, at a public meeting in the District of Columbia last winter I

agreed to introduce a bill which had been prepared providing for m

suffrage and some measure of local self-government. I desire to go

through this measure and perfect it somewhat and after doing so I will

introduce it in the Senate and urge its passage. I have thought for

some years that the political condition of the District was an anomaly.

There is here a typical American population and it ought to have the

characteristic American political rights. You should have a delegate

in Congress and a larger measure of control of locsl affairs. This

vould serve t~s double purpose of giving the people of the District m







-7-

At a time when there were public ownership bills pending in
the Georgia legislature, Mr. Cope issued a 32,000 edition of a
pamphlet of which 29,000 were distributed. Mr. Cope said the 3,000
remaining were thrown away after the Municipal League, the sponsor
of the bills, had disbanded. Today he issues a periodical he cells
"The Week" which is sent to and used by the high schools of Atlenta
and Augusta in social science and other classes.

152 SPEECHES IN 90 DAYS

Mr. Cope's brother is chairman of their speakers bureau and
receives expenses and a salary of .48,000 a year. He probably earns
it. In a report of last September it is shown that in one period of
ninety days, Channing Cope made 152 speeches on Muscle Shoals before
commercial bodies, Rotary clubs, etc. In another period of four
months he visited fifty country towns.

As relating to Muscle Shoals, Prof. Grayson of the University
of Pennsylvania visited the South as a paid lecturer for the Utility
associations.

The progandists now and then discover a man who can neither
be fooled nor bought. This is evident in repeated admonitions from
utility executives that caution must be used since some university
men were extremely "cagey" on the question of text-book interference.

When Samuel Elmore Boney, director of the Utility Information
Bureau of North and South Carolina, sent inquiries to professors
in his territory preliminary to the usual "survey" his letter was
returned by Prof. H. C..Brearsley of Clemson College who said:

"I may say frankly that I consider the censorship of
text-books as one of the most objectionable and reprehensible
of the practices of so-called big business."

On March 11, Senator Brookhart on the floor of the Senate
paid his respects to a report prepared by Prof. Arthur H. Ford of .
Iowa State University which purported to show that the public gained
materially in reduced rates for electricity when municipalities
disposedpf their public_plants and were thereafter served by
private companies. Despite his best efforts, the tabulation of
Prof. Ford could show only slight--reductions but it was generously
distributed by the power lobby last Winter.

INCREASED ADVERTISING GETS MORE FREE SPACE

In the testimony of Joe Carmichael, director of the Iowa
Utility Information Committee, it was disclosed that Carmichael had
hired Prof. Ford to make the survey. In that state also great
progress was made in eliminating text-books offensive to the utility
companies. Mr. Carmichael is strong for the press subscribes
for all the state papers and as a matter of policy has increased
his paid advertising an estimated one-thousand percent.

The news and editorial columns are not marked for sale.
But there is wonderful persuasion in a thousand percent increase
of paid advertising. As a result of Mr. Carmichael's policy






-3 -


AGENCIES UNITED

But in the evidence presented on June 18 the inter-cnnrect-
ion was established. In October, 1925, at the convention of the
American Gas Association held at Atlantic City, nineteen utility
men in charge of propaganda throughout the country held a confe'-
ence. The president of the Electric Bond and Share was the princi-
pal speaker. Mr. J. B. Sheridan, whose testimony for the past
two aa.ys has amazed even the newspaper men, reported upon a nation-
wide survey of textbooks which he had been appointed the year before
to make. A copy of that report is now one of the exhibits in the
investigation by the Federal Trade Commission.

The report reveals that the much prized "contact" with
educators and schools had already been established in 30 states
and that in the preceding four years much had been accomplished in
the avowed purpose of reaching the twenty million school children
of the country. It further declared that the work in these 30
states had "done much to change and direct the economic thought
and economic practice of the American people."


TO CONTROL PRESS SCHOOL AND FORUM

Future plans are clearly indicated in the report a id reveal
a fixed purpose to control the great opinion-forming agencies of
modern life, the Press, the School and the Public Forum.

The press and the platform for the misleading of today's
voters. The school for the oncoming ranks of voters, of teachers,
legislators, interpreters and administrators of the law, public
officials and members of regulatory commissions.

The program is elaborated in the evidence previously sub-
mitted during the two months past of the hearings and includes more
or less direct enlistment of the Chamber of Commerce, Manufacturers
Association, Rotary Clubs, Women's Clubs even the Boy Scouts and
the Girl Scouts civic bodies and groups of various kinds as
reinforcements for a Back Home Lobby to fight such popular legis-
lation as the Boulder Dam bill and the Norris bill for Muscle Shoals,
or any other measure that is not acceptable to the power trust.

The power lobby rates the press as of first importance, but
it is probable that the invasion of the educational system of the
country will be of more immediate concern to the general public.
In a report of the Federal Trade Commission last January less
than two months before the investigation began, occurs the follow-
ing:
"The general public may well question whether
the integrity of established institutions of higher
learning is not being undermined."

The facts revealed overwhelmingly sustain this warning.
Although mnoh of the f4iSr is yet to be covered, it is evident that


I




- / I


S1C6 'L







1|gj orable the Mayor,

Boston, Mass.


Dear Sir:-


I shall greatly appreciate such information

as you can ihve in reply to the enclosed form matter .


Very respectfully yours,





executivee Secretary.

Sent to: Mayor of Boston, Mass; Board of Commissioners

I Des Moines, Iowa; Mayor, Madison, Wis.; Mayor, Sac-

ramento, Calif; Bd. of Com. Houston, Texas; Mayor,

Harrisburg, Pa.; Bd. of Comms.- ropeka, Kans.; Mayor of

Springfield, Ill.; Columbia, S.C.; Albany, N.Y.;

Lincoln, Ndb.


__







MOSE 5 E CLAP CHAIRMAN
Bi.' M .ULLOM SENJAMN T.LLMAN
0A *UF Al LRAl"E MURF' y J ;OTErF
S;ORGE S. tlXON. FRANCIS G. NEWLANDS.
ALBERT B IJMMiS JAMES P.CLARKE.
FRANK B BRANDEC-EE THOMASP.GORE.
GEORGE T. OLIVER. CLARI NCE W. WATSON.
HENRY F. LIPPITT. ATLEE POMERENE. fniteh Shde Senate,
CHARLES E.TOWNSEND.
LEE F.WARNER,CLERK. COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE COMMERCE.





Was.iington, D2eember 18th, 191i.



Dr. Thomas E. Will,
809 G. Street N. W.,
Washington, D. C.



Dear Dr. Will:

Yours of the 16th inst. is at hand.

Of course when it coies to fra:.ing a bill,

there will be a great mary views and some

difficulty in reconciling them, but I think

your plan is good. It forms a nucleus and

will make a sort of recognized head to the

movement and add materially to the discussion

and interest. For that reason I think the

plan a desirable one.

With regards, I am,

Very truly yours,


'3W ^ / /








(Clifu, iT kir3bar

EXECUTIVEs DEPARTMENT.'


JOHN K. ROYAL
MAYOR.


6/y '. A. November 20 1912.




Mr. Thomas E. Will,

809 G. Street, N. W.,

Washington, D. C.

Dear Sir:-

In answer to your questions, contained in your

communication of recent date, I would say the answer to #1 No.

#2, No, except that the State makes a donation of $200.00 per year

to each fire company in the city. There are fourteen companies.

#4, The State property is protected by the Fire Department, but

they have their own police protection. #5, I cannot answer.

Yours respectfully,



Mayor.


__













1820 Belmont Road, II.W.,
Washington, D. C.,
November 15, 1912.



Prof. Thomas E. Will,
809 G Street, N.W.,
Washington, D. C.

'.y dear Mr. Will:

I recall you as one of our western friends back in the

great fight in '96, and am glad to hear from you. I shall

be glad to call if I can find time while here; but I am very

much afraid that it is going to be difficult to give you the

time that your work would deserve. If I do not come now, I

shall be glad to avail myself of the information you can .fur-

nish if I am ever in a position where I shall have influence

in the settlement .of the question.

Appreciating your friendly interest, I am,

Very truly yours,




















-h


_?; i (










*ov. 22, 1912.









iHon. ',.HI. GibLs, "'a.'or,

Colunbi.a, S.C. .

De .rT Sir:-

1nclosed find conp of forn letter omitted by

mistake from my letter of the 18th inst.


Very truly your,


: :. : r; .




















kr. Clinton i.ogern .c '.oed-uf,
70Ob iorth Amerioen Building,
.'hilade Jphiha,, I-enna.


JI'; dearr fr. .oodruff:

Sa:a- of the,. 12th at. hwitnd. I ciolose copy
of &Auly bill for lo0.'.F1 selfiv-over.tirnt, and program oi
mwe-tin" .i.d. I.~ t p .i b.t in ;t'.;:..i.c Libr;a ,.- ,

his il] rcv.' .t, a ,i. t C.o t 4i t o0' wirk by
our orgrnization, a~id is uli 1G-d( to caiCry w-ira it tUne
si '.'le -t :M'uiiLe soluti:' IL -',otd6 all the greatt
dii'':icilties, anfiludring tnie plan oi govurnrwent, t.ae
q'. i'f'i.stion's f'r voting, T nd t.hi question of Federal
a;)Firo p Itio t to t isc 0L;b ebntL nc3LeC. eiCr ainy one of
:. e!?s .x .:2k w-: ?.d."r 11 -:i.--ht weok in Con.-rer-s

ni h.v .iv.'.:;* f-'w.~'Ri*le qsntrinent in 2"on-re-s.
inowever, the local illlion2ire ClasE otat&in li-iu a
.. in L'..: w:-. .. u'i 1 ,.:-1. libert- Tho reason nri-
rurily is that tney oeiieve sel1f-guverrlment means the
sacrificn of 0t '.? f b T' r i. f .C-< -'-bi h i.0 iures enor-
!aously to tie benefit jf our local real estate ring.
'ith there liliert 'i nothing; in comnnris on with m:,oney.

ihe intereuts -'ie nof gv :ceealy rejoicing,
tirou-h their four '!ashington newspapers over tAerr'e-
cent victory in Congress. They feel safe until another
Thonpress meets,

The so-called "Jomrittee of One Hundred" has
flooded the country with mi,..ersding, misinforrmtion re-
garding District matters. They have money lor their
propaganda; the friends of our local libert'Viave not,
Ours is an uphill fight. Organizations like yours might
well interest themselves in the situation here and make
of it an issue. There is much talk of Washington as a
"model aity." Friends of municipal reform should try
to make it such. It is anything but that now, and the
enemies of self-government here would love to have our
? local autooraoy copied by cities elsewhere.. In that
I1


" %
*.* .... .


i i


1ay 14, b914.





LONG BuLDING,
SKANSAS CITYMO. T*ro:
SPHIL P S DELANY
HENRY 0 RALSTON.
.I ".V. W, HELM,
SR.M. PRICE,





SRANDOLPH 1773
,NIAJESTIC 3ITTILDING
-ICHICAGO

S E C HOWE WAHINTON. O. C OFFICEi
GENEA ET C, MerW L OURAY BUILDING
C MPr.. s LrAN 809 9 STREET. N. W








wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
oient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of aores have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded iashington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. Mu. Master, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
SB. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. ., S. P. Compher,
n;.. 2142 P Street, N. t., Washington, D. 0.,

'. Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
f. place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
w atuoing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries;
mesand we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government


- .. -..



















faot is found the i..crace to munacipal liberty every-
there for which Yrlin.;t.r' A.tn ,.

V'.".y truly ,ouT'rs,


. --- :-- -: i ; ~. F


CA R. W- ....S!2,0








-8-

he secured space and editorial columns he estimated as worth
$80,000 but which he could not have purchased outright for
any amount of money.

A few days ago there came to light an arrangement between
the American Gas Association, the American Electric Street Rail-
was Association, the -National Electric Light Association and the
publishing firm of Ginn & Co., of Chicago, by which a represent-
a.cive of each of the Associations and two representatives of the
publishers should work together.

Ginn~ .Co., are said to publish 12,000o000 text-books
each year. To insure against "errors" the agreement provided
that all manusripts dealing with public utilities should be
reviewed by this committee before publication. The kind of
editing is illustrated by the fact that they deleted a reference
to Samuel InsuJl!s famous campaignriontributions from "Community
Life and Civic Problems" by Howard Copeland HL, a text-book
said to be used by more than a half-mllion students.

Few have not heard or have forgotten that Colonel Frank
Smi h of Illinois was shooed away from the United States Senate
because Samuel Insull, utility magnate, spent $125,900 in a
primary campaign in his behalf.

We will concede that the contribution was an "error."

Mr. William S. Vae of Philadelphia, also refused a seat
in the Senate, comes into the picture when the testimony shows
his chief Lieutenant received $14.D3 from the Pennsylvania
Utility Information Committee. This gentleman, John P. Connelly,
was especially interested in legislation at Harrisburg.

THE LADIES ARE NOT FORGOTIFU

In reaching the voters they have by no means forgotten
the importance of special efforts to ingratiate themselves with
that great political problem, the women voters. Here are two
significant items. The General Federation of Women's Clubs
conducted a survey on Home Equipment. In the report of the
president submitted to their convention in San Antonio, Texas,
a few weeks ago the receipts in contributions for the survey
are given. Out of a total fund of $106,300.10, the National
Electric Light Association gave $80,000.10 and the American Gas
Association, $3,000.

Women employes are trained for platform work and placed
in grade schools to train the young mind to shoot in the direction
of private operation and ownership of utilities.

"They call them Women's Information Committees and describe
them as not just stenogrephers and clerks but Ambassadors to ,
the people." This means that the women and girls employed by
the utility companies are selected primarily because of their
qualifications for reaching other women and especially the house-


I -1


-






IN RJPLY ADDRESS
THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY,
AND REFER TO NO.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,
WASHINGTON.



November 4, 1912.




Sir:

Replying to your letter of October 31, 1912, you are in-
formed that the Department has no objection to an opportunity
being afforded its employes to express themselves on election
day on certain questions of general and local interest, provi-
ded it does not interfere in any way with their work during of-
fice hours.

With respect to the distribution and collection of ballots
by persons stationed outside of the building, you should commu-
nicate with the Superintendent of the State, War and Navy De-
partment Building.

Very respectfully,


Acting Secretary of the Havy.r'


Mr. Thomas E. Will, Secretary,
District of Columbia Suffrage League,
Ouray Building,
809 G St., N. W.,
Washington, D.0C.


S4.
'


I "It'


S-,- '


L ~~ ~I


-, I


I *









2-Of the total population of the District of Columbia,
236,128 or 71,3 per cent, are whites, and 94,446 or 28.5 per cent,
are negroes. The corresponding percentages in 1900 were 68.7
and 31.1, respectively. In (jMw of the ay subdivisions into rg"j
which the District has been divided, fifA,,n L ,U ,FjQf -n % 2-
per cent of the population is negro, and in the r -re-remaining /
divisions the percentages are 85.9, 36.3, and -~ acat-
ively. Thus the percentage of negro population is falling off.

Native whites of native parentage constitute 50.4 per
cent of the total population and 70.6 per cent of the white
population. Native whites of foreign or mixed parentage consti-
tute only 13.6 per cent of the total population and foreign-born
whites 7.4 per cent.

Of the population born in the United Statesp45.5 per
cent were born in the District of Columbia and 54.5 per cent
elsewhere in the country; of the native white population, 53.3
per cent were born outside the District, and of the native negro,
57.1 per cent.

The total number of males 21 years of agt/and over is
103,761, representing 31,3 per cent of the population. Of such
males, 73 per cent are white and 26.6 per cent negro. Native
whites represent 61.7 per cent of the total numberpand foreign-
born whites j11.3 per cent.

For children from 6 to 14 years, inclusive, the percent-
age attending school was 86.7 per cent; for foreign-born whites,
the percentage was 86.4; and for negroes, 83.7.

There are 13,812 illiterates in the District of Colum-
bia, representing 4.9 per cent of the total population 10 years
of age and over, as compared with 8.6 per cent in 1900. The
percentage of illiteracy is 13.5 among negwoes, 8.2 among
foreign-born whites, and 0.5 among native whites.

From these figures, some interesting lessons may be
learned concerning the so-called "negro question" in the District.










December 15, 1912 December 15, 1912


They are prompt to speak their word
for political emancipation. It would
be easy to enlist enough prominent men
and women in this District to conduct a
continuous revival meeting in the inter-
est of District home-rule and represen-
tation.
"The opportune time for emancipa-
tion has come. Public sentiment is with
us. The people outside the District are
astounded when they hear of our po-
litical condition. Both Houses of Con-
gress and the White House will soon
represent a single political parry. The
iron is hot and daily growing hotter.
Now, of all times, is the time to strike."

THE GODS HELP THOSE
WHO HELP THEMSELVES

Said Representative Robert E. Lee,
of Pennsylvania, on December 11, at
the East Washington Democratic Club:
"If the people of the District of Co-
lumbia will get out, and, by working
hard to secure the right of suffrage,
show that they are really desirous of
securing the vote, they undoubtedly will
get it. If they will really try to secure
this right. I will do all in my power
to aid them in their right; and when
the matter comes up in Congress-if it
comes up-I will cast my vote in favor
of the residents of Washington."
Unless we demand a vote we don't
deserve it If \we go after it we can
get it.
Now is the accepted time. Let's strike
while the iron is hot!

GREAT ON THE FLESH POTS!

When the Israelites had escaped from
the brick kilns and bitter bondage of
Egypt, and were headed toward "land
and liberty," what was the one, inces-
santly-urged. everlasting inducement
presented them to toll them back to
Pharaoh's slave pen? The flesh-pots
of Egypt, the leeks, the garlic and the
onions. If, on one of those occasions.
when they were clamoring for another
opportunity to "eat flesh to the full,"
some o:ne had dropped in on them
with a copy of that citizens' federation
resolution holding money to be worth
more than liberty, couldn't he have
polled a rousing vote?

OBSTRUCTIONISTS

Some of the District slaves might
consent to vote if all the facilities were
furnished them gratis and, at the same
time, special care were taken to exclude
certain huge sections of their adult fel-
low-beings; those, notably, who are "off-
color," "off-sex," or possessed of inade-
quate bank accounts.


Such obstructionists are grist for the
slave-drivers' mill. They deliberately
rivet the fetters upon their own wrists,
and bequeath to posterity a heritage
of bondage. If their children rise up
and call them accursed whom shall they
blame? Freedom is the birthright or
all: and. to be possessed by one, must
be possessed by all. It is one of the
good things that must go around or not
go at all.

DIVIDE AND CONQUER

When Caesar entered Gaul with his.
legions, he launched the good old plan
of "divide and conquer." In conse-
quence, he had the whole province in his.
vest pocket in short order; and, with
the gold and added legions thus ob-
tained, was enabled to cross the Rubi-
con and conquer the world.
It's exactly the same game that's been,
played here all these thirty-eight years.
A lot of addle-pated white men, fight-
ing negroes who never harmed them,
never desired to harm them, and who-
couldn't possibly have harmed them if
they had so desired, have virtually said
to the "Plunderers of Washington,"
"Help yourselves." And the plunderers
have waited for no second invitation.

"CITIZENS" VERSUS "SUBJECTS"

In America the appropriate form of
salutation for a speaker about to ad-
dress an audience on a public question
is "Fellow Citizens." In the Federal
District, however, better styled "Little
Russia." whose people, as stated by Sen-
ator Morton. of Indiana, "are governed
as despotically as are the serfs of Rus-
sia," and who live under "a pure des-
potism," the proper address is "Fellow
Subjects."

Here's a little sum in arithmetic: Sup-
pose Congress, for any reason, should
decide to stop contributing to District
expenses, but should, at the same time,
compel the local millionaire tax-dodg-
ers to pay up their back taxes and keep
up their end in the future, and stop the
public service corporations from rob-
bing us, how much would the average
man in the District lose?

MONUMENTAL SELF-SACRIFICE

"Votes for women-ourselves ex-
cepted !" seems to be the slogan of some
of the suffragists in the Federal Dis-
trict
"Give the ballot to the women of Ohio,
Kansas, California, Michigan, England,
China, and the isles of the sea, but please
excuse us!"
This, it seems, is their "immediate de-
mand." Funny, isn't it?


SUFFRAGE BULLETIN
Of the District of Columbia.
Published on the First and Fifteenth of each
month by
THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
SUFFRAGE LEAGUE.
Ouray Building, 809 G St., N. W.,
Washington, D. C.
Subscription price ....25 cents per year.
Single Copies,.............one cent each.
THOMAS ELMER WILL,
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY OF LEAGUE, AND
EDITOR OF BULLETIN.
Entered as second-class matter October
3, 1912, at the post office at Wash-
ington, D. C., under the Act of
March 3, 1879.
ANOTHER STEALTHY
BLOW AT LIBERTY

The writer can understand the posi-
tion of those who think that, for some
mysterious reason, the Federal District
must be governed by Congress. For
years, this was practically his own view.
As those who know will testify, he
has made a lifelong study of history,
and of the science and art of govern-
ment. Since 1905, furthermore, he has
been a subject of the despotism of the
District.
Furthermore, he has been a subject
of the despotism of the District.
But not until, at great cost of time
and labor, he took up the special study
of the history of the District from the
sources did he discover the skeleton in
its closet.
Like many others who know-if they
know anything about it-that the Dis-
trict is governed, nominally, by Con-
gress, though, actually, by a local
clique, he supposed that some profound
reason of state, however erroneous,
lurking in Article I, section 8, clause 1T,
of the Constitution, gave a quasi-justi-
fication to the "peculiar system" pre-
vailing there.
But investigation tore off the mask
and revealed the amazing fact It is
this:
We have here in the National Capital
of the world's greatest republic another
of the outrageous attacks upon human
liberty and human rights, historic exam-
ples of which may be found in the par-
tition of Poland (1772, 1793 and 1795)
-the purchase and uprooting of the
Irish parliament and the crushing out of
Irish liberties in 1800, and the high-
handed destruction of the Boer repub-
lics by Great Britain, and the rape of
Finland by Russia, both in 1900 and
thereabout.
Is this what the American people want
at their Capital? Will they stand for
it when they know the facts?


DO YOU KNOW IT?

Do .ou know:
1. That, for almost seventy-two years,
the people of the National Capital en-
joyed local self-government?
2. That, by the acts of 1874 and 1878,
they were robbed of this right by force
and fraud?
3. That. since the performance of this
foul deed, a group of powerful, local,
exploiting interests have sat on the lid,
and frowned or bludgeoned into silence
every attempt, by the enslaved popula-
tion. to reassert their rights as American
citizens?
As an American, loving your coun-
try and proud of your Capital, will you
stand for this state of affairs?

THE "BALANCE OF POWER"

Those who dread the possibilities of
"negro rule" point to the number of ne-
groes in the District as a conclusive rea-
son why self-government should never
be restored.
When they are asked how twenty-
eight and five-tenths per cent of the pop-
ulation can control seventy-one and five-
tenths per cent, they answer, "Oh, but
the twenty-eight and a half per cent will
hold the balance of power."
That's just where they are wrong. Do
they know what would be necessary to
enable the negroes of the District to
hold the balance of power?
It would be necessary that they
should be highly intelligent. But are
they'
They are certainly far more intelli-
gent than when the suffrage was over-
thrown in this District. But do peo-
ple realize how high a degree of intelli-
gence is necessary that a group of peo-
ple may exercise the balance of power?
What group of people in America do
stand together, year in and year out,
amidst all the vicissitudes of party poli-
tics, and exercise the balance of pow-
er? Do the farmers? By no means!
They are sufficiently numerous in many
States, not simply to wield the balance
of power, but to constitute themselves
a single party that could absolutely con-
trol public affairs. In not one State in
the Union do the farmers thus stand
together.
Do the working class stand as a solid
phalanx and wield the balance of pow-
er?
Practically never. In every city in
America the working class, if its mem-
bers stood together, could not simply
dictate which party should win, but
could monopolize every political office.
Do they do it? No, never!
As a matter of fact, about the only
class in America that does stand to-
gether, year in and year out, and throw


I


Suffrage Bulletin of the District of Columbia 3


2 Suffrage Bulletin of the District of Columbia






LEKNMHAI. OFFICKEM SOUTHERN OFFICKI8
L.ON(t IMUII.I)IN(. 2 12TII STREET
KANSAS CITY, MO. MIAMI, FLA.


Eewrglaie Eano Balts QImpany

E. C. HOWE, WAnVINGTON, U. C., IIEADQUATREIIR H
CGENIRAL AiGENT VFO THLE 800 G. STREET, N. WV.
COMPANY'S S LAND OURAY BUILDIING
PlIONE MAIN 4200
Dear Madam:-

You will be interested to know that the work of reclaiming the
Florida Everglades is advancing by leaps and bounds.

The Fur'.- Clark Construction Company, a iadEr in its line, is
hinilir n the work with extraordinary skill and vigor. Six sreat d-rS.d1s are
working night and day, and several more are expected soon to begin.

Visitors, constantly coming to us from the. Glades, are enthusias-
tic over the work and the outlook for the investor and homeseeker. One sub-
stantial business man declared at one of our meetings that the buyer is
"sure to win," and that "the only question is as to how much he will make."
The President of the State University of Florida visited us recently, and
testified to his faith in Eerzita:e lands. Two men who have actually
crossed the 'GlThds one, over twenty years ago,-and the other, later --
have recently called,, ri.d strongly confirmed our statements regarding the
character of the lands and climate. Still others tell us that we understate
the facts, and that "the half has not been told."

Unt long sinor., cnr caller bought of us t~n. ncr: -th-;e twenty,
tnnr aEotben ten, and startedd.for Miami. After seeing th,; lands, he wrote
us for twenty acres more.

:.'e-rlade lands are going fast. Within a year, one tract of
64,000 acres, and another of 180,000 acres were sold; another of 46,000
acres is now almost gone, and thousands of acres from other tracts have also
been sold.

The prices have risen from $24 and 30 to $40 and $50 per acre.
Our fifty-dollar land is now almost ocne, and buyers can afford to waste no
time unless williu; to purchase at J60 and $80 per acre, at which figures,
also, we have lands to sell.

Our office is now at 809 G Street, N. W., in the Ouray Building,
one of the best office buildings in the city. We are on the ground floor,
and have a fine window with southern exposure, in which are displayed choice
products from the 'Glades. Crowds stop, day and night, to inspect it. Our
lantern lectures, reinforced by new slides, are given Tiisday, Thursday, and
Saturday nights, and are finely attended.

We shall be glad to welcome all our friends, old and new, to our "*
new headquarters. To those who have not yet bought we can present THE op-
portunity of a life-time; to those who have, we can outline one plan which
will simplify their task of paying for their lands, and another, for obtain-
ing revenue therefrom.
N:;" OFrICE OF,
Very truly yours,.
S- -. .S CO.,










Questions
by
District of Columbia Suffrage League.
gATjIEZ
C 177 OF






1. Do the inhabitants of your state capital suffer any political
discrimination by virtue of their presentiresidence? No.

S. Does your state pay any part of the municipal expenses of the
capital city? - - -No.

3. If so (a) Trhat part?
b) on what ground?

4. More specifically, is the state's property protected by the muni-
cipal police and fire department, and is the entire cost of such
protection borne by the municipality? - Ye.

5. Axe the present financial relations between your state and its
capital (a) the same as formerly? - -- Yes.
(b satisfactory to all concerned? Apparently.






t ... -" .. ; '"< .... "
i i-
r f' k''


IMlilM


5-






NG BUILDING ]D1< l e I] a"JPDr Ie 1 :
IKANSAS CITY,MO. PHIU s DEL'.N-
SMHENPpv O A*N.5i N C .
V W HELM






INCORPORATED)
RANDOLGH 177T
iIAJES'TIC I3UILDIN(*
I CHIGAGO
SC HOWE, WASHINGTON, D, C. OFrICE
D A.. 0 F'ME OURAY BUILDING
C O.FA.N LAncO soB U STREET. N W
TKLcPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people,
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employee in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 aores on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C, in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of aores have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. 0., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, M. W., Washington, D. 0.,

,'Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment,- as a
u., lace for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
4duoing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries;
Hand we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose la bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that. if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have'aome
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government


,,......--.. ---r*i~;r; I;rxr-;;;~-~j~;l -,;;;r.i, r 5: ;. :. .1.. .. ".".'".I" .j ': : ) i .







SiXTY-SECOND CONGRESS.
WILL.4M A OLDFlELD.LPt .CHlARMAN
MARTNh A MOPRISON IND FRANK D.CURRIER,N.H.
EDWIN Y. WEBB N C E 5TEVENS HENRY.CONN.
FRRAN CLARK FLA ILLiAM W.WILSON,ILL.
JOSHu' A ALEXANDER MO IPINE L.LENROOT.WIS.
R j, BuLLEy. OHIO N0.LLIAM H.WILDER,MASS. Xm w6o e p to' VIA *.
MARTIN W. LITTLETON, N.Y.
OSGAR CALLAWAY,TEX.
SAMUEL A.WITHERSP06N,MISS.CLARENCE E.KY, CLERK.





December 11 1912.




Thomas E. Will, Secretary,
District of Columbia Suffrage League,
809 G Street, Northwest.

IMy dear Sir:

I am just in receipt of your kind invitation

to attend the suffrage mass meeting to be held next Friday

night and regret exceedingly that I will be unable to attend.

I take pleasure in assuring you, however, that I am in hearty

sympathy with the movement engaged in by your League and shall

be very glad indeed to see self-government accorded to the

District of Columbia.

Thanking you for your courtesy and wishing you much suc-

cess at the coming meeting, I am,


Yours very truly,
/ f


_






LONG BUILDING,
KANSAS CITY,MO. ini~inrowia:
PtILIP S DEL Nf
HENRY G. RALSTON,
i- .' I C L e- i V IC -f P


V.. HELHONE




"iS RANDOLPH 1773
1HAJXESTIC BiUILDIN*TO
R.M. PRICE,





SE C HOWE. WAsHIN D. C. OMUNER.




"Er4.ri' Ac-N" reRD THE OUCRAY BUILDING
(INCORPORATE6,D)







TELEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Cofmission, theu writer was looking forward'io the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my'own home, in:a balmy,'eqtable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as i.he years rolled by'. .'

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enol'sedawas
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 aores of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employee in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. .I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Evergladas may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Munraster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. 0., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
.,place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
-ducing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries;
r-and we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government


I _


I '




- -i-------I I -------------


HENRY F. HOLLISN.H.,CHAIRMAN.


JCnitet faf$tates enate,
COMMITTEE ON ENROLLED BILLS.


June 7, 1913


Thomas E. Will, Esq.,
1330 G Street, N.E.,
Washington, D. C.

Dear Sir:-

In accordance with your request, I enclose herewith a

copy of Mr. Owen's draft of a joint resolution regarding the

District of Columbia.

H/C Sincerely yours,
Eno.
-^ c i ck f ^QQ ,


Ir" .













S. F. PROUTY
7TH DISTRICT IOWA

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

WASHINCTON
J.ay 16, 1915.

.!r. Thomas Elmer Will,
Pashington, D. C.
Dear Sir:
ly secreta-.ry inform im that you wvre in my
office yesterday. "nd I regret that I was out when you
called. I should be most glt.a to see you -an talk with
you about District matters, 1.-J a long acquaintance here
has giveni you the kInowledge that would be a great benefit
to mle in my official relations to the District. I a.-: just
nov; leaving town but will return on ':oniay aan shall be
glad to see you at 2 o'clock that day. If pou cannot
call then I car. arrange for a meeting on some other day
next week.

Yours truly,



































. .. -*- ... 'r .. .. -





LONG BUILDING,
5-W KANSAS CITY MO. DI1 S I (4
aO HILIP 8 DrLANY,
HENRY G PALSTON.

R.M. PRICE,

I O S.. r Ac*uIM rt4Sle


(INCRPORRATEb) rPZE
ly, TELEPHONE
-P" RANDOLPH IT73
ItAJXESTIC 3BUTILDINGr
CHIF1CAGO

E C HOWE. WASHINGTON, D. C. OFFICE;
GEr. .- A~ AN R TE OURAY BUILDING
Co'Pa 5 LS OBl 809 G STREET, N. W
TEL.pMONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employee in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C, in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Wishington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. U. Munoaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington. D. 0., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

SAsk them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
.place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
_ducing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries;
1"and we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did, TOU also want to have some-
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government"








W a AFFORD PINCHOT
GFPE V T U A E A a
MILFORD PIKE CO P4 July 25, 1912





Dr. Thomas E. Will,
809 G Street, NW.,
Washington, D. C.

Dear Doctor Will:

On my return to Milford I have just

found your letter of July 22, and hasten to

thank you for what you were kind enough to say

about my letter to Congressman George.

As to the other matter, with what I have

on hand now it would be impossible for me to take

up the question of suffrage in the District at

present, but I shall be very glad indeed if you will

lay the whole question before me fully when I get

bacjk-to Washington next fall. Perhaps I can be of

some use then.

Since ely your%,
1), .


~~u~~-.~ ...: I


i










4 Suffrage Bulletin of the District of Columbia December 15, 1912


election. at %%ill to one party or an-
other is the little group of millionaires
we call "\all Street." They do it be-
ci-.ie their have the necessary sagacity.
Farmers and %workingmen do not be-
cauc thic lack this sagacity.
\'hat is true oitf farmers and work-
inImen is trute in ltss degree of variouss
ior3garniation,., societies, orders and
bodies Mlan; of these, did their mem-
bership but stand t..cgther as a unit,
could contr:,l close elections H-ow
many ot them do it' Practically none.
Instead, they split up among all the
parties in the field and thus dissipate a
force: which, concentrated, might prove
invincible
D.is an:,body imagine that the ne-
groes of \asllington are more intelli-
gent than the white workingmen of
other American cities, the white farm-
ers scattered all over the United States,
or the other white men mentioned? If
so, he pas~s a high tribute to the intel-
ligence of tlii race who are frequently
rcfcrred to as "to.) ignorant tu Vote."
s,:.t assured that people who are
"too ignorant to '.ote" are too ignorant
to -tand together at the polls and vote
togectli.: r

THE SAME OLD SERPENT

Being destitute of patriotism, those
wh.o would sell our liberties for six mil-
li.n dollars per annum and then seize
both the price and the reins of local
go;: eirnient, imagine, evidentl that we
are cquallk lacking in honor, and also
in comrrion hi rse sense. This is a case
in .. hi:l th, ': "n,.er say turke'" once
to us Buzz.rd i. goiod eno Igh fc-r the
rank and ile. The members .:,f the Ail-
parchli, n.ed the turkey fo r their o'\n
continuous Thanksgiving dinner
"V.'te ifor our canJidate or this mill
will 'hut down and sour job will go
glimmering !"
"\'Vte for our candidate or we will
call in our lrans !"
"\Vte for our candidate, or this coun-
try v. ill be swept by a devastating
panic !"
Did youL eer hear that kind o:f talk?
Nov. li;tcn to this
"Let up on suiffrage or we'll lose our
government grant "
"Abandon the fight for local self-
governnm.int, or Congress will quit pay-
ing half the District expenses!"
"Stop demanding 3your Constitutiional
riglit, cr it 'iill cost you six million dol-
lars a year!"
It's the same old club, and its use is
instigated by the same old serpent.

DELIVER US !

The constant prayer which the lib-
erty-loving subjects of the Federal


District should offer up to their Mak-
er and to their brethren in the States
is this:
"From the grafting ruling class in
this District, who plunder us, and from
the blind, unreasoning, negro-hating
slave \ hie class who rivet upon us
our chains. deliver us!"

Because some whlte people were born
with a slave's collar about their necks,
and point to it with pride, shall the sons
of freemen and of the heroes of Riinker
Hill, of Naseby. of Marston Moor and
Runnymede calmly submit to such dis-
grace.'

The absolute basis, the foundation of
civil liberty, is the right of self-govern-
ment. The National Capital is the one
city of the United States to whose peo-
ple this fundamental right is denied.

A CITY WITH A SOUL

Of Tom L Johnso:n's work in Cleve-
land it was eloquently said, "He left a
city with a civic heart a city
% ith a soul."
If. within the entire confines of the
United States, there is one city which
fails absolutely to answer to this de-
scription, it is the Capital City
Ho.w is it possible that a city can have
a "cliic heart" or a "soul" so long as its
inhabitants have absolutely nothing to do
with the control of its affairs, and are
robbed of all responsibility save that of
paying taxes?

GOOD FOR THE CLERK

Do you say. Mr. Government Clerk,
that Nou fear suffrage here will inter-
fere with Vyour tenure' Stop a moment.
In what possiblee way can the transfor-
mation of Little Russia into an Amer-
ican c.:mmonw\ealth interfere with your
keeping your own individual political
residence right where it now is if you so
elect? At the same time, the change will
have hastened immeasurably the process
whereby the hands of the local plunder-
ers will have been taken out of your
p,:,ckets Ts is your fight Help it
aloin The writer has been a Govern-
ment clerk himself

LIBERTY OR SLAVERY

"It is time to knIow whether it be the
tree of liberty or of political slavery
which w'as planted liere when popular
go-vernment was subverted in 1871. and
the foul work consummated by legisla-
tive rape of the rights of man in this
alleged temple of liberty in 1878 "-Sen-
ator H WV Blair. September 17, 1890.


THE SUFFRAGE BULLETIN

OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA


Vol. I.


Washington, D. C., December 15, 1912.


STRAWS FROM CONGRESS

On December 11, the secretary of the
District of Columbia Suffrage League
gave out the following interview:
"Whoever looks upon the restoration
of political rights to the Federal Dis-
trict as a forlorn hope, should inform
himself. Note some facts:
"Congressman Robert L. Henry, Chair-
man of the House Committee on Rules,
declares himself emphatically and un-
equivocally for this principle and states
that some member of the House should
give himself wholly to the work of push-
ing the proposition.
"Honorable Ben Johnson, Chairman
of the House Committee on the Dis-
trict of Columbia, on January 22, 1912,
expressed himself as follows:
"'I would not object to see the Dis-
trict have her own law-making body,
elected by the people of the District,
and I would be glad to see the District
have the privilege to expend her own
money just as the people of the Dis-
trict wish to spend it. I. above all oth-
ers whom I have heard express them-
selves upon the subject, am in favor of
a democratic local self-government in
the District.'
"I have recently had a conference
with Mr Johnson. It was very satis-
factory to me. He stands absolutely
upon his statement as above quoted, and
shows by his conversation that he has
made a profound study of the District,
its history and problems
"I have interviewed more than half
the members of the House District Com-
mittee As yet. I have not found one
in sympathy with our present despotic
form of District government. Almost
half the members of the Committee are
clearly for self-government. Five are
out of the city. three I have not yet
found and two have not fully made up
their minds, though one of these is
favorably disposed.
"To what extent the District is to
blame for the condition of political
vassalage under which its people live
may be inferred from the following:
"I talked with the Speaker, Hon
Champ Clark. I told him we wanted
self-government here He looked at me
sternly and inquired: 'Why did not your
people help me when I was working
for that very thing? For three Con-
gresses I tried to give your people the
vote and they showed no interest what-
ever. I am tired of working for things
I can't get.'


No. 6.


"\With others of our organization, I
interviewed Senator Clapp He said:
'VWhy, I have always understood your
people were satisfied with tleir present
form of government.'
"I told him that was true of the pow-
ers thdt prey upon the District, und of
those who reflect their opinions; but
that it was emphatically not true of the
vast multitude of District people, as
shown by their expressions whenever
opportunity is given them to express
themselves. I told him the most nota-
ble recent instance was our straw vote
on election day when, although thou-
sands of people had not heard of the
vote, nearly twelve thousand cast their
ballots, ninety-two per cent of these
demanding the right to vote, and local
control of local affairs.
"' ell,' he exclaimed, 'if that's so, I
am with you.'
'Will you speak for us at our mass
meeting?' I asked.
"'Certainly I will,' he replied.
"I saw Senator La Follette. He as-
sured me that he was with us first, last
and all the time. In fact, he had al-
ready signed a statement from our of-
fice declaring himself in favor of re-
storing to the people of the District their
right to democratic local self-govern-
ment.
"Tlough little inquiry has been made
on the Senate side, other members of
that body are known to be favorable,
while many more of the House have,
upon inquiry, shown themselves to be
very favorably disposed or outspokenly
for the proposition. Mr. Sulzer, one of
the biggest men in the House, though
rushing his preparations to go to the
Capitol at Albany, stopped long enough
to say, "I hope your meeting will be a
great success.'
"That brings us to the mass meeting
of next Friday night at the National
Rifles Hall. Anybody who thinks the
people of the District are satisfied with
being political eunuchs should note the
list of speakers already enrolled for that
needing: Senator Moses E Clapp, Mr.
justice Wendell Philipps Stafford, Mr.
Frederick L. Siddons. Mr. Louis P.|
Shoemaker, Mr. Chas. A. Douglas, Mr.$
Chas. F. Nesbit, Mr Frank J Hogan,
Mr Terence V. Powderly, Rev. J. W.1
Frizzell, Mr. P. T. Moran, Rev. Chas.
Wood, Rev. John W. Melody, Miss
Harriette J. Hifton, Mrs. Belle Case La
Follette, Mr. John B. Colpoys and Col.
J. B. Clarke.
"We don't have to beg for speakers,
however distinguished they may be.


The Hanlord Pre. *Ui& 'r 621 F Srert, N. W.






W. H. GIBBES, Mayor

k


G. F. COOPER, City Clerk & Treasurer


CITY OF COLUMBIA
Commission Government
OFFICE OF CITY COUNCIL


W. H. GIBBES, Mayor R. J. BLALOCK
Public Affairs, Police, Licenses,
Pardons, Charities, Insurance and Building Permits,
Law, Taxation, Fire Department,
Civil Service, Contracts, Loans and Discounts.
Printing, Budget.
Write to Heads of Departments


F. S. EARLE
Sanitation and Health,
Trees and Parks,
Bookkeeping, Auditing and Collecting,
Paving Assessments and Petitions.


R. C. KEENAN
Engineering,
Street Department,
Market and Lighting,
Garbage Department.


W. F. STIEGLITZ
Waterworks and Sewerage,
Public Buildings, Schools,
Plumbing Inspection,
Inspection of Fire Hydrants.


COLUMBIA, S. C. 20th November 1912.






Mr. Thomas E. Will, Secy.

809 G Street, Northwest,

Washington, D.C.


Dear Sir,

Your favour of 18th inst is duly received, but you

failed to enclose the letter which you wish me to answer.


Very truly yours,





Mayor.


WTH I-/M







NATIONAL MUNICIPAL LEAGUE
President, WILLIAM DUDLEY FOULKE, Richmond, Ind. Secretary, CLINTON ROGERS WOODRUFr, Philadelphia Treasurer, GIORe BURNHAM, JR., Philadelphia
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 705 NORTH AMERICAN BUILDING, 121 SOUTH BROAD STREET : PHILADELPHIA
CPW/H May 12,1914.




Mr. Thomas 'Will,
809 G St.,
Washington ,D. C.
My dear Mr. Will:-
Has there been any new development in the zove-
ment to secure self-government for Washington?
Yours faithfully,








^^i
)> -i (


44A3







S4 -


the underground work in colleges and universities "everything
above the grammar grades" has reached formidable proportions.
In the interchange of letters the objective of all these Machia-
vellian activities is clearly expressed.

TRAINING "TOMORROW'S LAWMAKERS AND JUDGES"

The students are tomorrow's "Lawmakers in city councils,
state legislatures and in Congress; members of public utility
commissions; judges; future counsel for the utility companies and
for the public or regulation authorities." And those students who
do not attain to such authoritative positions are still of the on-
coming voters and will soon be "a very important part of the public"
and "may help to bring about fair and equitable regulation of the
public service industries."

COLORADO AS AN EXAMPLE.

In the report of the conference at Atlantic City in 1925,
Colorado was singled out for especial commendation. It was assert-
ed that college professors and utility representatives met freely
in that state for discussion.

A few days ago there appeared a news item to the effect that
Prof. Hubert H. Wolfe had been discharged from the University of
Colorado because it had become public (one can hardly
Prof.Wolf's say it had been "discovered") that Prof. Wolfe
salary received half his salary from the Rocky Mountain
States Committee on Utility Information. Wolfe, a
graduate of Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill.,
may serve as an example of the product of higher education under
the beneficent influence of the power trust. Northwestern receives
an appropriation from the utilities of $25,000 and Prof. Ely of that
institution appears frequently in the investigation.

A little more than a year after the Atlantic City conference
Mr. George E. Lewis, executive manager of the Colorado section of
the Eleven Billion Dollars, reported to Mr. John C. Parker of
Brooklyn, chairman of the "Co-operation with Educational Institution
Committee," that "Professor Wolfe has the co-operation of the
University librarian" and "we now have 24 public
Executives utility executives as members of the University
on college faculty, and Mr. Wolfe is collaborating with each
faculties in the preparation of the nine major subjects
covered."

To offset the growing agitation in Colorado for
municipally owned industries, Prof. Wolfe prepared a set of over
100 lessons as a correspondence course in utilities, a course that
was put on by the university and also was sold throughout the
country for general use.

In this correspondence course, one lesson entitled "Benefits
of Customer Ownership of Public Utilities," bore the authorship of
L. V. Board, but it did not indicate that Mr. Board was an


I __


. ..........








CITY OF TOPEKA
J. B. BILLARD, MAYOR
POLICE AND PRIB DIPARTMERNT

COMMISSIONERS
ROH L. BoE. %V. O. TANDY,
rFMANCe AND REmVENUE *lmE ET Az D PUFPIC P PB OWII HrTSB
E. B. STorTTS H. P. MILLER,
PAREB AWD PUR IC G TMDrNO8 WATEI WORK AMID BTRUET LIGRTIEO


TOPEKA. KANSAS.

NIover-ber 1), 1912.





r. Thoma', 7. V'.ill, :.ec..;tive :.ect.,
District of Colurr.bin Suffrage Le.ague,
809 "0" Street, rortlivest,
Washi ri-ton, D. C.

Dear Sir:--

Your letter f the 16th inst., received en-
closinE certain questions to answer in rfagrd to tie state
property in this city, and in reply I be( to advise that I
have ansv.:ered the qcue:tions to the best of my ability. I
v:ish to sny in ,ddtion that the state does not pay to the city
or county any ta7. whatever. The city has even gone so far
as to any the e:- sense of paving tile vrriours streets -round
ti.e state cr-oitol froun-ds, and while ve as citizens of Topeka
feel that it is an injustice to the ta:.-pnyers to go to this
expense, at the srme time, we have never been able to convince
the legislators that tle stnte should reimburse the city for
this e:-pense, hnrever, vwe have n.t lost all hopes along this
line. P/ to the city police and fire de ,Lrtments :..rotec.ting.
the state property, this property has the sarne adIvantage as
all other -roperty within the city limits from both the police
and fire lde-ortments, however, as I stated before,th.e cit' re-
ceives no tn:x from thii. state on its oro-uerty. We Falo have
a federal builiinr, and the citizen- al-ro hPve defrayed the
ex:-enrc of ,.nri t ,l the trcr-t ,;nd nl eey !ipns'-ed tlhi1; -ro ierty,
ars '*e -ra riven to understand that the national government
pays no e:-:'enss3 of thin character.

Itrust this will give you the informa:-tion
desired.

Yours very truly,

.'-U -m


City 'Clerk.






A- Or-G C, ai .DIG ULOILO flrr Or M :
-KANSAS CITY..MO PHILIP 9 DiLANY
HENRV 0 PRLS7N.





Vkj..w SAES GOM4toPAiW
,,INCORPORArTED)
TELEPHONE
RANDOLPHn 773
NIA.JESrl lTf( flr'It)1N(.
= ^^ ^ jiB^ ..|F.i I C A'r [()- r lN .
CHIC LGO
C HOWE. Ar.srovc'. D C iO.Fce
GECNEIL ACLET 0C.' T* OURAY BUILDING
CDO-PM. S La.O 2 809 I STREET. N W
TELEaP.ON MAN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he-could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a-balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with'what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. 0. in December last to-sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have. actually seen the Everglades may be named
Sthe following:,

Dr. 0. M. Mun'aster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams., Forest Service, Washington, D. 0., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,

'.Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
fpjlace for a home, from a-olimatic standpoint, from an income pro-
ducing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries;
fand we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did. YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government


I






THOSE. E. WILL. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
*EXECUTIVE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SUFFRAGE LEAGUE THOSE. .WILL
SECRETARY 807 WOODWARD BUILDING ROSCOE JENKINS
MRS. JENNIE L MUNROE
TELEPHONES, < WASHINGTON, D. C. H. O. SKINNER
MAIN 1430 LOUIS KOPELIN
MAIN 10 E. J. DArIN
LINCOLN 3568 FEDERAL CONTROL OF FEDERAL AFFAIRS MISS GRACE HILLYER
DISTRICT CONTROL OF DISTRICT AFFAIRS W. D. MACKENZIE
LET THE PEOPLE RULE MAJOR W. O. OWEN

Dear',Sir:-

That our local government will soon be profoundly modified seems
certain. Bills to this end are now before Congress, and others are
promised. The question for us is whether we shall sit idle and mute
while issues, vital to our well-being, are decided by others, or whether
we, ourselves, shall manifest a living, intelligent interest in our own
affairs.

The D. C. suffrage League holds that government of the people, by
the people and for the people is our birthright as truly as that of any
other community on earth. Hence, we are giving careful study to our
coming form of government. Yet we realize that to attempt to impose our
own governmental ideal upon our neighbors would violate the democratic
principle as completely as did the arbitrary acts whereby, in 1871, 1874
and 1878, self-government here was superseded by a local despotism.

Justice and political wisdom alike demand that the coming local
government shall be instituted not by indirection, back-stairs influence
or a coup d' etat, or handed down by rulers to passive subjects. Instead,
it should represent an informed public opinion, the ripe fruit of full
and free discussion. "What concerns all should be considered by all."

To this end, the D. C. Suffrage League urges every interested
organization, civic, commercial, political, religious. labor, reform or
other, to take up, without delay, the discussion of the question, "W!AT
FORM OF LOCAL GOVERrJMENT SHOULD EXIST IN T ,E DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA?"

fome. in the past, may have hesitated to assert their rights as
American citizens, lest they offend those in power. Today. a new
spirit is at work among us. In consequence we are now more liable to
offend by manifesting timidity and apathy than by acquitting ourselves
like men. Lovers of liberty admire its manifestations in others.

Connected with this League are public speakers, students of the
problems of the District, including its government, who will be glad,
upon invitation, to address such bodies, without charge, or participate
with them in the discussion of this question.

District government is already receiving earnest consideration at
the Capitol. If we would make our own views felt, we have no time to
lose. Prompt action by your organization is therefore advised and an
early reply regarding speakers and dates will be appreciated.

Very truly rs,



Executive Secretary.

Present Office Address, 7 Marlow Building, 811 E St., N. W.
Present Office Telephone, M. 1555.






LONG BuILDIIJr
KANSAS CITY.MO


LAJTDSALL
3^' ;fiNCO ,c, ..


PHILI'P S OCLANV
iENRY G ALSrTOri.
/A HCLr.I
M PRICE
AILLIS P MUNO-R


PORArrED)


/ e TE LE
RANDOLPH 1773


[A.TE:STIC- T-fIr LLDIN(
CHICAGO


A *s-.r.oG i. D C. OFFICE
OURAV BUILDING
eBO Q STREET, N W
7EL!p'ON MA.r. 4260


Eera I


LJ



I


Pt4

I-.,
Stm;t


.Ifs










'V'


A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected 'the wonderful Everglades' regi-on
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people:
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example..

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington. D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C..
i : ,.


p Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an
place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from
ducing point of view. They will be glad to answer
and we can refer you to numbers of others.


investment, as a
an income pro-*
your inquiries;


My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did. YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government


I~ `;




'I
' V




December 18, 1912.







Mr. Chas. F. Nesbit,

Union Trust Bldg.,

Washington, D.C.


My dear Mr. Nesbit:-


I am sending/to most of the marked names

on the enclosed bulletin, and to other prominent citizens, 'the

enclosed appeal. We desire to publish and circulate this

communication, that we may obtain the means with which to

continue our campaign. Will you be one of the signers?

The Treasurer is yet to be selected.

You c;in also aid materially by sending a list of

names of persons to whom this appeal, when signed and printed,.

might profitably be 3ent.


Very truly yours,


Executive Secretary.






GEORGE F. BOWKRMAN
LIBRARIAN


THE PUBLIC LIBRARY
OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
WASHINGTON


8 March 1913

Dr. Thomas E. Will, Secretary,

District of Columbia Suffaage League,

809 G Street, N. W.,

Washington, D. C.

Dear Dr. Will:

I an returning herewith the essays on suffrage in the District.

I note that one of them is written on the subject of woman suffrage and so

is not to be considered.

Enclosed find a note from Mr. Edgerton giving his markings on the

papers and his recommendations on the subject of the award of prizes. My

markings are as follows:

Mendelsohn, 75; Kayser 65; Gershanick, 60; and Ott, 50.

The essays are all so poor that I suggest that the cause be not

injured by publishing any of them. I agree with Mr. Edgerton that there

ought to be no first prize.

Very truly yours,


Librarian,


B/F






L.ONG ruiLDinlaO, XD ]:l "i-i cM
K. rNSAS CITY,MO. PHILIP S.;DL,,,.
.d i j isHENRY C F.....Trir





SAN SALES COY!PANY
S(INCORPORATED)
i 'PANDOOu H 1773
TA.JESTITC B1rrTLDING
CH CAGO
SC HOWE. WASHINOTON D. C. OprFIC
GECI. eR An.e.. *Ci ,He : NOURAY BUILDING
CoMMAs L5 aon8 O g STREET. N. W
TELEPHONE MAIN 4A360




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, .in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. G. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
;place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
tucing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries;
and we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government


. 3


I









257WAR DEPARTMENT,
2576/1 a Appt.
WASHINGTON.




November 4, 1912.

Mr. Thomas E. Will,
Executive Secretary,
District of Columbia Suffrage League,
809 G Street, N. W., City.



Sir :!

Replying to your letter of 31st ultimo in regard to

the straw ballot which you propose to take, I have to advice

you that this Department has no objection to the same, provided

it is carried on entirely oAtsiie of the State, War and iavy De-

partment Building; and provided further that the services of any

of its employees are not utilized for the purpose during business

hours.

Very ;aep~itfully,


Acting secretary of War.