Miscellaneous Pamphlets and Brochures (Everglades, Okeelanta, etc.)

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Miscellaneous Pamphlets and Brochures (Everglades, Okeelanta, etc.)
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Writings, Speeches, News Clippings, and Miscellaneous Papers
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Box: 23
Folder: Miscellaneous Pamphlets and Brochures (Everglades, Okeelanta, etc.)

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Subjects / Keywords:
Everglades (Fla.)
Okeechobee, Lake (Fla.)
Okeelanta (Fla.)

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University of Florida
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Full Text


S~- t r 0 ( "


Extrad from Chiapter 23

HISTORY OF THE EVERGLADES OF FLORIDA

BY F. W. KETTLE


Sugar Cane Culture, as compared with the Sugar Cane Lands of the Hawaiian Islands.

The Everglades Soil Has Many Advantages


The following article on Sugar Cane culture is taken from the Florida Homeseeker of May 191o.
For years it has been demonstrated that the South portion of the East Coast of Florida is nature's own home
for sugar cane and that it will eventually become the great sugar belt of the United States.
The difficulty that has 'been a successful bar to this enterprise has been the yearly overflow of the Everglades,
but now the drainage of this vast territory is an assured fact, there is no question in regard to the future of the Sugar
industry here.
When the statement is made that the southeast coast of Florida will become the great sugar belt of the United
States, it is founded largely upon the type of people who make up the rank and file of citizenship of this great country,
men who have idle capital and are always looking for safe and sane investments, and so soon as it is practically demon-
strated that this vast body of rich, alluvial land will be drained beyond the question of overflow, so soon will capital
come pouring in to develop the sugar industry.
There are certain conditions that are absolutely necessary for the successful growing of sugar cane and all
these are found in this Southern Section. Without all these conditions failure to a greater or lesser extent is sure to
follow.
One of the first is climate. There are millions of acres of land within the bounds of the United States that are
suited to the growing of sugar cane; the soil is of the right consistency, rich and alluvial; but the climatic conditions
forbid the planter from growing cane, as in those sections there is a lack of sunshine, which is the greater saccherine
developer in the cane.
.The climatic conditions on the southeast coast of Florida is ideal for growing this crop. Here cane grows
throughout the entire year, blossoms and matures, thus assuring the greatest possible amount of sugar. Here cane may
be left in the field until grinding time without danger from frosts sufficient to destroy or damage. Further, it has been
demonstrated by actual analysis, that sugar cane grown in this southern portion of the east coast of Florida carries a
higher sugar content than that grown in Cuba, Hawaii or other cane growing portions of the world.
Another advantage the Everglades section will have over all other cane growing sections is, when the drainage
system is completed, locks placed in position and lateral canals dug, that the whole immense tract will be practically
sub-irrigated, which will insure a full crop each season. InLouisiana this season it has been so dry that it is said that
at least fifty per cent. of this year's planting is a failure and what cane is left has made a very poor growth. The stubble
cane has withstood the drought much better. The sugar output will be materially lessened by the continued drought and
frost.
From experience it has been shown that on drained muck lands the water level should be kept from 18 to 24
inches under the surface. Throughout the drained Everglades district this can be accomplished by "locks," which will
hold the water to certain levels, and in case of heavy rains the overflow can be drawn off rapidly by opening the locks
giving the water a free opening to the ocean.
It is evident that the cost of producing a ton of cane in the Everglades.of Florida will be less than in any portion
of the cane growing sections of the world. Hawaii has many of the finest sugar plantations in the world, for instance the
"Ewa" plantation, with a total acreage approximating 1o,ooo acres, with two thirds suitable for growing cane. The plan-
tation is wholly dependent upon irrigation. It has 60 twelve inch artesian wells and a dozen pumping stations. In a
day of 24 hours 80,500,000 gallons of water can be lifted. The pumping plants represent 2,700 horse power. The en-
tire cost of the pumping system is about $goo,ooo.oo. On the plantation there are employed about 3,500 people.
The output of their mills is from 250 to 300 tons of sugar per day. When it is remembered that the success of this great
plantation depends entirely on irrigation, and that all the water must be pumped by costly machinery, which necessitates
en expensive mechanical engineer, and contrast this with the Everglades lands, irrigated by the canal system, without a
dollar's expense for pumping machinery or expensive engineer's, it is evident that the Everglade proposition is by far
the cheapest and the most feasible.
The Oahu Plantation Company has 8,000 acres planted in cane and employes 2,000 laborers. It has eight large
and six small pumps furnishing 80,ooo,ooo gallons of water per day. Besides these they have ditches cut from the
plantation to rivers which furnish 5,ooo,ooo gallons of water per day. This plantation is almost dependent upon the
irrigation, as the annual rainfall amounts to only 20 inches.
The Walalua Agricultural Company controls about 35,ooo acres of land, with Io,ooo in cane. During the
rainy season there is a month at a time when irrigation is not necessary. When their irrigating plant is in operation it
takes about 1400 men to operate it and do the watering. One hundred millions gallons of water is obtained from all
sources every twenty-four hours. Forty million gallons comes from artesian wells. Five pumping plants are situated
to water all the lands below the 450 foot level. The pumps are in operation day and night, throwing water into sixteen
reservoirs, one reservoir having a capacity of 140,000,000 gallons. There is employed on the plantation 2,200 laborers.
The larger part of water used for irrigation on the Waianae Sugar Company's plantation comes from a central
pumping station having a capacity of II,ooo,ooo gallons in twenty-four hours. The Company also has a ditch line several
miles long which furnishes 2,000oo,ooo gallons of water daily.
Irrigation on the Waimanalo Sugar Company's plantation is carried on only during the summer months. Their
pumping plant supplies 4,000,000 gallons of water per day.
Water for irrigation on the Kahuka Plantation comes from six pumping stations and from flowing artesian wells.
Kahuka uses 47,000,000 gallons of water each day when irrigating.
The object in presenting these statistics is to draw a comparison between the methods of irrigation on these im-
mense sugar plantations and the method which will be used in the Florida Everglades. It costs the plantation owners
in Hawaii millions of dollars to install their pumping plants, employ mechanical engineers, firemen and others about
pumping stations, and general repairs for their machinery. Ditches, flumes and water ways have to be maintained at
considerable expense.
The irrigation of the Everglades will be of comparatively small cost when the State completes the 237 miles of
main canals and the locks which will hold the water at different levels as needed to be distributed in the lateral ditches.
The nature of the Everglades soil is such that sub-irrigation will fill the lower strata with water which will find its way
to the surface, making the most complete irrigating plant in the world. The annual expense of maintaining the canals
and ditches will be comparatively light, no expensive pumping machinery is to be supplied, but the absolute and never
failing irrigation will be done by nature's own process.
It is evident that with conditions that will prevail when the canals and lateral ditches are completed, that sugar
can be produced in the Everglades of Florida at a less cost than in any other section in the world. This means a great
deal for this southern section; it means sugar mills, thousands upon thousands of employees, with a mammoth weekly
payroll; it means the bringing in of thousands of wealthy men who are interested in the production of cane, it means
everything that goes to the building up of a prosperous people.







S*"

; Nube 7


The Palm Beach Farms


BRYANT & GREEN\\OOD, 1407 Republic


FLORIDA
Is the Greatest State in the
A Description from the
COSMOPOLITAN MAGAZINE.


Company C


SBldg., CHICAGO I




Union.



I have been all :,ver the great State
of Flo:rida. I ha\e been up onie co:,st
arid do.wn the other. I have seen all
the famo,:u- how place; .:.f tie .t:ate,
I have dipFcid int : the amethyst
xvater- o:,f risca; ne Ba.,. an,: I iha.ve
slept all night at a turpentine -till
h : cloe be-idc the st'jckade Oif: a c:-n'ict
S camp. I have -een the mighty results
) i of Florida's wonderful and incom-
S parable soil. La-t \ear I saw the











Si9.
A ii~nr,


trend of Iluan travel that \ a
pouring over the border- of Flor
S ida like a great armv o, f ii'.'a-s! .n
I have seen land valuess rise se\era
hundred per cent in onlY a fewt monthly
because of this tremendous, deman,-
for Florida land. I know the beaut?
of her exqui-ite climate, her gro:wini
verdure, her draped trees festooner-
with 'the dreamy mnoss. her pines
palms, palmettoe., her twonderfu
streams, unlike those of any other re-
gion of the world, and I have felt the
gripping charm or her "out of door'
that seems to hold one entranced as
S .-though in a spell.
All the 'wonders of Florida it' ha-
* *


1-been nm;, peculiar plea. ure to have \is-
ited and viewed during the rpat tvwo
year- I am \ wholl and completely
subdued an i infected v ith the index
in:cr ,n the right hand of the wv.rld.
Here arc -oon to, come Cthe tirelcs
greyhounldsA of the sea. carrying full
ar.oe:. to all part- .f the unrier-c on_
their '.,a\ t. and from the Atl'intic
and Pa.:ihc oceans through the Pan-
ama canal. The entire State i: one


Florida ha_ been known heretofore
a' the "rich man's playground," but
it ha- norw become the "poor man's
paradise." -
\\'e people of the North and East
and the \\e-t dc, not really know \ha-
life i- un til we haxe pent some timl
in Florida.
The beauty of the sly and land-
;cape, the beauty of climate and
health, the voluptuousnes- of foliage


//


* j


S gigantic field of activity. Develop-
- ment is in the air ever,'.lwhere. The
Sntdlne-s of n:oney and oppo.rtunitv
I ha- grap[,ed FloriJda. the peaceful. inI
s it- unrelenting halnd The government
I has applroipriated many millions for
the improvement of Florida water-
l va s. Thii. points t,: the nearby fu-
I ture, \hien Fl.orida -hall stand forth
, to the \,wrld rw ith the mos-t important
I port- of call for the th:ou;ands of
,-cean ve-sels which ,xill ha ec directed
Their cour-se toward the Panama ca-
nal and Florida There are more stu-
Spendous undertaking- in this. great-
SState than 'in -any otlier seeionrt of our
nation

THE ".' A" ":Cil FAI:"'S CC
.*. r. Glt I, N. ,iV
Phonr- Mam 42'.O V/.:hington,


andi farm. are nothing to be com-
pared with the great and limitkes eor-
po:irtunities for the. man of ordinary
meahs to establish himself .ipon just
a te., acres and make those acres give
him all there is in life to own. -
I have seen ten acres of Florida
land produce at the rate of more than
$800 per acre. The man who'-ovned
this garden patch of ground came to
Florida to die, after he had sickened
hi; body bending over a dirty desk for
fifteen year- in a' Northern city.; and,
mark you, this man knew' not ingof
farming when he came. .TodayJhe-is
rich beyond his wildest dreams .of
youth. He can go out any day of the

D. .

D. O.


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Pairtl.- tl P.rim Bli'. F.I]an- I.'l.iltarl l D.:m.:.r,;.tr :i..:I I'arm.


Number 7.






















































Now, when the whole North is set-
tling down to six months of ice, idle-
ness, large coal and plumber bills, and
the Northern farmer is doing nothing
but chop wood and mend fences, the
Florida farmer is tilling his fields,
planting his third crops which he will
send to market in mid-winter and sell
for prices that would set a Northern
farmer by the ears with envy. This is
the beauty of Florida. You buy the
land and pay your money for it ac-
cording to the number of acres you
contract for, the climate, the sunshine,
the ability to walk around every day
in your shirtsleeves-these things be-
long to the land and come to you free
from nature. Professor Knapp of the
Department of Agriculture once said,
in speaking at a banquet in Jackson-
ville, Fla., from an agricultural stand-
point, it may be reckoned in this wise
with.respect to the values of her
lands. "Ten per cent soil, 80 per cent
climate and 10 per cent man; and the


be back Saturday and will tell the
boys more about it then.
Yours,
WALTER I. SIEBER.

$15.00 PER CRATE PAID FOR
BEANS IN NEW YORK.
Eugene Hunt, of Stuart, has re-
ceived word that John Nix & Co.,
of New York, who stand away up
top when it comes to the successful
marketing of Florida fruit and veg-
etables, were selling green beans on
the fifteenth at $15 a crate.
Here is certainly a chance to get
rich quick, and could there be any
more fascinating pastime than the
computation of the amount of money
that would accrue from, say, a thou-
sand crates of crisp green beans, as
easily raised on the truck land of
Dade and Palm Beach counties?
It was the John Nix people who


V.


year and pick growing things for his
table. His wife and babies are simply
bubbling over with generous health,
and this man is every bit as much a
prince as though ages of royal blood
flowed through his veins. I have vis-
ited the many successful colonies
which have sprung up over Florida,
and I have seen there more peace,
pleasure and profit to the square inch
than has ever been my good fortune
to behold before.
Tind you, these Northern men and
women who are filling up Florida are
not a few hundreds in numbers, but
they can be seen by thousands and
scores of thousands. You may talk
with them from the windows of your
Pullnian as you travel along, and the
universal answer to your question is:
"I would not go back home for any-
thing in this world."


more you put into the question the
greater will be the result." E. Roy
Melcent, in Cosmopolitan.

West Palm Beach, Fla.,
December 11, 1910.
Mr. Chas. M. Happ,
Chicago, Ill.
Dear Sir:
I was out to see the land yesterday
and found it a great deal better than
I expected. There has been about 60
people out on the land in the past
three days and every one of them was
satisfied. The land is level as a floor,
with pine trees about 100 feet apart.
No underbrush. They plow between
the trees, and plant vegetables, leav-
ing the trees standing. They are
building roads out there now. They
are out to the land now but the rock
has not been put on yet. I expect to


.-tSlp~


telegraphed congratulations to the
East Coast Fruit and Vegetable
Growers' Association at their recent
meeting in Miami and gave author-
ity for calling upon them for fifty
dollars, to help along a little.-Mi-
ami Metropolis.


AN OHIOAN'S OPINION.
18 West Miller Ave.,
Akron, Ohio, Dec. 26, 1910.
Palm Beach Sales Co.,
416 Citizens Bldg.,
Cleveland, Ohio.
I have just returned from inspect-
ing your lands at West Palm Beach,
Florida. There were about 50 of us
in the party and nearly half were
from Ohio.
I fully believe that you have a bet-
ter proposition than your printed mat-
ter indicates. I was so well pleased
that I shall take several more farms
and I am going to get them before the
price advances.
We rode over the land in automo-
biles; it is practically level and just
like one grand big meadow mile after
mile, very few trees, and clearing the
land really amounts to nothing at all.
The soil is rich and deep. At the
demonstration farm, I was especially
pleased with what Mr. De Cottrau
showed and told us. He is a thorough
all around farmer' who has made a
success there and I believe I can do
as well.
During the last year I have traveled
through the Northwest States-
through the great apple regions--over
Washington and Oregon, down
through California and Arizona,
across Texas and all this to see if I
could not find a location that pleased
me, but I did not and came back here
to the rubber shops and went to work
again. But you have put me next
and I want to thank you for it.
Your talk at first seemed too good
to be true but I tell you now, after
having been there and looked it all
over and really seen for myself what
is being done there, I think it is one
of the very choicest regions in the
whole United States and appeals to
me more than any other region that I
have seen. I fully believe that that
land will be worth, every acre of it,
five times what we are now paying
for it.
I liked the town site on Lake Worth
very much. It is a beautiful place and
will make a charming town. The
Company seem to be carrying out
every promise made. Surely I have
no kick coming, in fact none of the
party had.
Respectfully yours,
JOHN L. ROBERTS.


Al


On the Level Prairies in Palm Beach County.










PLEASED WITH FLORIDA.
John Thomas returned last Satur-
day from a two weeks' trip to Florida,
where he had been inspecting the land
now being offered for sale by the
Palm Beach F.arms Co. At Chicago
he joined men fi _,m various other sec-
tions of the country, the party from
there numbering about 150.
They spent about a week going over
the Palm Beach Farms Co.'s lands
and acquainting themselves with the
conditions of the country and Mr.
Thomas says that he found the land
to be just as represented in the com-
pany's literature. The principal crops
in that section now are oranges, grape
fruit and truck gardening, the yield
of all these-being large. The grape
fruit grown there is of an excellent
quality, and commands higher prices
than the California product. Egg
plants are also a profitable crop. Mr.
Thomas talked with one man who
realized $2,800 this year from one
acre of egg plants.
One thing which impressed Mr.
Thomas favorably was the excellent
public roads throughout that section
of the State. They are constructed
of rock and are as smooth as the
S paved streets of a city. The Palm
Beach Farms Co. is having the same
kind of roads built through their
lands.
Mr. Thomas visited St. Augustine
_.:;' and other points of interest in Florida
and had a most enjoyable trip.-
Montpelier, Idaho.


NOT ONE DISSATISFIED.
Wellington, Ohio, Dec. 27, 1910.
Mr. W. J. Sanborn,
Cleveland, Ohio.
Dear Sir:
Pardon me for not writing sooner
but I am very busy. I made the trip
to Florida to see the Palm Beach
Farms Co.'s land and I must say that
I found everything fully as g.,od as
represented and in some respects it
looks better than I expected.
I met about a 100 contract holders
and did not find one A. hi:, wa: di: atis-
fled. As the whole I am greatly im-
pressed with the pro[p-oition you have
there.
Yours truly.
B. E. CRO\' L.

Mr. Crowl is superintendent at
. Wellington of the Hoffman M1fg. Co.,
"B' manufacturers of crates, hoops, etc.
S -Ie is a man of standing in his town
i % d a man of large experience and he
knows lands.


EAST COAST TO HAVE NEW
LINE OF STEAMERS.


Trips Will Be Made From St. Au-
gustine to Palm Beach After
January 15.



Beginning January 15, the Gulf
Coast Navigation Company will put
on a freight and passenger carrying
steamer, which will make regular trips
between St. Augustine and Palm
Beach.


For the present but one boat will be
operated and this boat will do local
passenger and freight hauling be-
tween St. Augustine and Palm Beach.
Later more boats will be added and
the line of boats will be sufficient to
handle all the IIuI -ilne fulri. _h,-l--J L-.%
the i-.ecO[ie of the eiast coa-t
T l h,, :t. h i ., ill .-t rl tli:- ir :r
run frot-m S:. A.'UL. VI e. i,1i be tihe
rSl.jan, a fl.j t-LI.tt.-. *trn-, hee:l
-tearnl r '. i i L: 1.i .:it' f 4.S [ -*i e- n-
geis and 2 0 t. .-iri of fiei t in li.
thl-an fur fe..:t :i 1A .ater Tlie lC at
...ill e handled 1.y Capt. H. H,:o...-
ard, h li' i f tli,-: '. ini:,n tlu : ..li ne
*tearmi er \. 1l LIe ot -utticient :a[a.:ity
tr. handle the bu-iine-_: of the ne.,' line
at the -tart -Jlack:on\ ille NMetror.o-


NO PLACE LIKE PALM
BEACH COUNTY.
West Palm Beach, Florida,
December 27, 1910.
Mr. O. M. Crum,
Virginia, 11.
Dear Sir:
You will find at the express office
a box of fruit of different varieties,
a part of the kind grown here, quite
a number that are not on the market
now. You will find a note telling the
names of the fruit, from the packer.
This is without exception the finest
fruit and vegetable section in tlie
State or any other State. There are
men here from all over the world.
I was talking to a gentleman just
from California who says he has been
all over the United States. He says


there is not another place on the globe
that will compare with Palm Beach,
taking climate, soil and everything
else in consideration. I find every
other man says the same.
The thermometer ranges from 65
degrees to 80 degrees since we have
been here.
1 on:i, n ll every knocker .s\a' here
1.. -te f,,r hlini elf. that ..,ould Ienock
:ll tle V ilnd ot o-f him. I h..e f ound
.,' .-r -tatv'iient m adk- 1., th, .-, m -
I -.n ali... lutely c.-,*rrict and tlie half
I -: n i,.-.t I_,L t-.1.1 \i \'e are- all three
no.:re tl- ln ,plea-ed nli lle 1,~-tn ;
11n-v. ttre e\:xa tl]\' ,'n rel le-~ n el>-,J
Ti ll all the ',contract lh.-.,lr. t,, hold
th-ir c iintra.t:t, ain. b all tile, can;
thev l can't t l i:,-e I.,v -o .:n .
.-'it', l t. one m ile fr ,iii i l'.liii ,:ach
are s,-ling for $501.i ca'ih an.. viIl be
Il. 'ni thie -imlle in i.ir t,,. n-ite in le s
thiIn thi e,? ear-' time.
They\ have the Fun -t ,tri-et; and
r.,aids I ever saw here, in fact, Palm
De'ach is the nicest city I ever saw.
Repo,,,rtfull.y yours,
JOHN IM. PATILLO.


Homeseekers at Demonstration Farm of the Palm Beach Farms Co.











SURVEY FOR NEW CANAL
FROM HILLSBORO RIVER
TO LAKE CLARK.
Paul F. Jenkins, a civil engineer
and drainage expert, widely known
throughout the state of Florida, and
who had charge of the state drainage
work up to the time the contract was
let to the Furst-Clark Construction
Company, is engaged in making a
survey of the coast lands of Palm
Beach County, involved in the rec-
lamation of the Everglades.
He is running lines and levels and
taking soundings east and west at
different points on the lands of the


Palm Beach Farms Company and
the Florida East Coast Railway. He
will also run lines north and south,
taking the levels of the land in all
the region involved. It will prob-
ably require six \reeks' tim' to c,.,lm-
plete the \ork.
Mr. Jenkins has a large crew of,
men at work and tlheI haie made
their first canip south .f \Vest Palm
Beach. The survey v\.ill open to set-
tlement 60,000 acre- of the best land
in Palm Beach County.


ROAD WORK IN PALM
BEACH COUNTY
Boynton, Dec. 20, 1910.-Mr. H.
B. Murray has completed nineteen
bridges on the road extending ten
miles west from Delray and this week
he begins the bridges, to the number
of twenty-two, necessary for a road
running the same distance west from
Boynton. These bridges form a por-
tion of the roadway and vary from
twelve to thirty-five feet in length,
being substantially built on piling to
withstand the weight of loaded truck
teams. A third road running north
and south will connect the westerly


ends of the roads from Boynton and
Delray, thus enclosing a huge paral-
lelogram of which Freshwater Lake
forms the fourth and easterly side.
Yet this tract is only a portion of a
larger land development extending
fr,-,m \\c-t Palm Beach to Deerfield
and including a district seventeen by
ten mile. no.w being opened for culti-
vatio:n Lb the Palm Beach Farms Co.
MIr. Murray ha- their bridge contracts
and uplerinteind a crew of six to
eight men.


UNSOLICITED LETTERS
FROM INVESTIGATORS
West Palm Beach, Fla.,
Dec. 27, 1910.
Bryant & Greenwood,
1407 Republic Building,
Chicago, Ill.
Gentlemen:
It is with great pleasure that I am
writing this description of the Palm
Beach Farms Company's lands in
Palm Beach County.
I made a careful inspection of the
lands, and found that they are much
better than was represented to me,
and above anything I pictured pre-
vious to my visit. I have met and
talked with men from all sections of
the northern country, and all are just
as enthusiastic as I am.
I can make as much on one acre of
this land in sixty days as I could make
on five acres in the north in a year's
time. I have looked over other lands
in the southern part of Florida and I
find nothing that compares with the
Palm Beach County lands. The op-
portunities presented here would
astonish those who have spent their
lives in the north. I can not do jus-
tice to this country in a short letter,
but will have a lot to talk about when
I reach Chicago. With regrets that I
must leave this place so soon but hop-
ing that I will return here at an early
date, I am,
Very truly yours,
G. H. ZAHRT.


Chicago, Ill., Dec. 22, 1910.
The Palm Beach Farms Company.
Gentlemen:
We have visited the lands owned
by your company and find them just
as represented in your printed litera-
ture.
We believe that when you have the
rock roads that you are now building
completed, that you- will have one of
the most attractive propositions in the
State.
Chas. N. Hammond, Elmira, N. Y.
Floyd W. Drake, Erin, N. Y.
J. M. March, Elmira, N. Y.
L. E. Gifford, St. Joseph, Mo.
J. M. McCall, Richmond, Kan.
Eugene E. Walker, Charleston, Ill.
H. A. Durre, Greenville. Ill.
Otto A. Patswald, El Reno, Okla.
G. H. Zaiirt, Chicago, Ill.
J. H. McCauley. Glenwoo d. Minn.
L. M. Landing. Glenwood, Minn.
L. H. Peck, Chicago, III.
M. G. Schreiber. Olmitz. Kan. i
Ino. M. Pattillo. R. D. No. 3. Ash/
land, Ill.
Jas. M. Pattillo. R. D. No. 3. Ash, ,
land. II1.


Land Buyers in Banana Plantation on Palm Beach County Farm. Hay in Foreground.


Ji





0 *'-^N R 1 D A





ERGLADES





W .

Iif [ 1 i:LERT A ELi








-I.% F -l-.; 1, 1 'K i 1. :!F R V F F. Li

SFLORIDA EVERGLADES

RECLAIMED LAND CO.
?John E. Holland W M. Butterworth Chas. S. Holland

SFirst National Bank Building :: Chicago
at a c
SS. JENNI
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LOII) E 'RG *DES
31 -











































The hottest ever shown'
by U. S. Government Ob-
servations.
The Everglades having
the Ocean on the east and
west are rarely without a
sea-breeze both pleasant
and healthful.
The Everglades have al-
most the lowest extreme
heat in the United States.
Compare.


Jupiter, Palm Beach, Dade County

Latitude, 26 57'. Longitude, 80 07'.


Annual Monthly and Total Precipitation, Inches and Tenths
Jan. Feb. March April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Annual
4.1 3.0 1.7 2.6 8.0 5 6.1 6.3 8.8 5.2 3.4 1. 50


W Am


KEY WEST
Ktv wst







P


OOKING at a map of the State of Florida, toward the
southeast lies Lake Okeechobee, and to the south and east
of it the great and fertile Everglades. Neglected for ages,
this rich and fertile kingdom has been passed by man in
his search for wealth and home, and a kingdom it is.
Covering over three million acres, lies this level, fertile, rich muck
land, from two to twenty feet in depth with a base of coral rock,
and full twenty-one feet above the sea level. This land, without a
question of doubt the richest in the United States today, is being
reclaimed by the State of Florida.
In various parts of our country there are small areas of land
which nature has endowed most richly in climate and productivity.
These might be termed "the little paradises" of the world. A few
years ago a strip of barren land along the Columbia River in Wash-
ington was sold for two dollars per acre. A man with brains had
discovered that by taking water and saturating the dry soil with it
he could raise some of the finest fruits in the world. He acted
upon his thoroughly tested convictions. This land is now selling
for four thousand dollars per acre. Every similar spot in the great
West was taken up and developed in the same way, bringing the
value of these acres into millions of dollars where they had been
fruitless and barren before. There, a man or woman can take care
of a few acres, have an independent living and a good income.
The result of this primitive development has been that every
tract which is favored by sunshine and the proper altitude, and on
which water may economically be carried, has been transformed
from desert and formerly worthless land into valuable orchards, pro-
ducing fruit valued from $500 to $1,500 annually per acre.
This is very expensive land, and as the Government charges
for the water alone on its projects from $40 to $65 per acre, the cost
of perfecting a western orchard is about $600 per acre.
The soil and sunshine and lack of frosts in that part of Florida
where the Everglades are located places this section in a class by
itself. The soil is far richer than any soil on the Western slope;
there is no possibility of frost affecting the tenderest fruits; there is
no lack of water, and instead of the necessity of irrigating at a cost
,*of from '$40 to $65 per acre, this land may be drained at a cost to
the State of Florida of about a dollar an acre.


S. i
( --`--, ve













TIHE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


WEST CANAL.


DRAINAGE.
The idea of draining the Everglades
is by no means a new one. Mr. Buck-
ingham Smith in a report to the United
States Senate dated June 1, 1848, wrote
as follows:
"Of the practicability of draining the
Everglades I have no question. That
such work would reclaim a million
acres of highly valuable lands I have
no doubt. My plan for the work would
be to dig a large and deep canal from
Lake Okeechobee into the Caloosa-
hatchee river on the west side and
smaller canals from the Glades in the
heads of the Ratones, Little River,
Arch creek, Miami, Shark river, and
other outlets on both sides of the Pen-
insula. I am satisfied that these ca-
nals and drains once opened the Glades
M. 'iulT become dry. It could in that
latitude be made valuable for raising
tropical fruits and it is the only region
of the presenttnited States in which
they tan le' al.i.. 1I do not know
of a prji'''l flhat I regard as more cal-
cuialcedJ 1.ii., 'it the country than



tlik.i


Although this report was made over
sixty-two years ago and its author has
not lived to see the fulfillment of his
prophecy and the great work under
way, yet every statement of his report
has been proven correct.


THE WEST CANAL.

The great dredge Caloosahatchee
has completed the west canal, drain-
ing from Lake Okeechobee into the
Caloosahatchee river, thus opening a
great waterway through the Ever-
glades direct to the Gulf which is val-
uable for drainage as well as affording
a great internal artery for commerce.
Three canals sixty feet wide and ten
feet deep draining into the Atlantic
Ocean are already under way, and the
fourth is under contract for construc-
tion. Five ge'c: di lc .,:- ;ai, .,iliii,
their .w ay 1i i1..t.lle e -..fi i1 i I.
lands nnd il ll e il l,
completion .f t realt a
conmplshed i l united States ll -


1Y~









THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


1


S FORT MYS.



FORT MYERS.


MAJOR WRIGHT'S OPINION.
Sixty-two years after Mr. Smith's
report to the United States Senate,
Major J. O. Wright, Chief Engineer
for the State of Florida, in an address
before the State Bankers' Association,
said:
"It is an insult to the skill and intel-


GOV. W., S. IENNINC..


jh& .^ij^^flebji


ligence of the American Engineer to
say that they (the Everglades) cannot
be drained, or that it will not pay to
drain them."
What conclusions can we draw after
such opinions expressed by "Men who
know"? It is best expressed by Prof.
W. H. Wiley, Chief of the Bureau of
Chemistry, United States Department
,:,f .-\.r]iulture. \\h, ai' -I "
"'There i pjrati:ally n,:. other body
of land inl the \world \.hich presents
.su.'Ih remarkalhle p,,:,- il..ilities .4 devel-
,opmenit a_ the mntick lands s,-tlh of
Lake 'keecl-l.ce \\ ith a sturface al-
Im.l-t c]-.aoluteil lev.el. they afford
pr:mis-e .f level'[ment which reaches
be ..-n:l thle liiit ...t.f [ir:.pl-ie.:y I U ni-
ted States Depalrtment o:f .\i\ric:ulture.
Rep...n I.r1S'-1.
The State ha- already provided am-
ple fL id, t': hlriic' thle pr'.ic.:tr, J m
the -al: .-.f part .-.i th'-c 1., 1-l- .Lnd an
a inin;ual t.:I\ .f : .:nt i: r a', .re on all
lin.l .iitlin tle:. d,-raina!e di- trji.'.t
T" e in- tral Ic.-[, i n =. ii '- ,ii E ,.er-
la'Idc.- t, til e. ., 'l,.. ril i by G ov-
ei'll W \\ ,. 1,. rii .*li, ,rrl 'i'er his


-. A
7' j: d


=44


---- -~LIr----L- i. --- 1


a I I S ALL


i










THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


GOV. N. B. BROWARD.


inauguration in 1901. Previous to that
time various legislatures had disre-
garded the trust by which the title to
all overflow lands was vested in a
Board of Trustees and had already
given title to much of this land to
various railroads as a subsidy.
He refused to execute any more
deeds to the land, claiming the legis-
lature had no power to make such
grants, which position was later ap-
proved by the courts.

RE-CLAIMING THE EVER-
GLADES-GOV. BROWARD.
The man to whom the credit is due
for beginning the work of re-:l:imiii-
the Everglades was Napoleon Bona-
.parte Broward. Opposed by prac-
tically every newspaper and rich cor-
poration in the State, he persevered.
To carry the scheme to completion he
found it necessary to have power. That
power was held by the Governor.
I-Frili Tlie extreme south to the north-
ern limits of the State he electioneered
alone,' talking the re-, 1 liiiiii, ...f the
Everglades, preaching it-t. e','e-r man

sl :


who would listen, and he was elected
governor by an overwhelming ma-
jority.
MR. BOLLES.
With the characteristic energy and
decision of the Western man and his
capacity to pick the grain from the
chaff, the good from the bad, and make
a decision based on experience of past
years with all the knowledge achieved
in many successful enterprises, Rich-
ard J. Bolles of Colorado readily saw
and realized the value of the task
Florida had undertaken.
It was an undertaking requiring
money and that in large quantities.
With the Westerner's love for high
stakes he purchased from the State of
Florida millions of dollars' work of
Everglades muck land, with no restric-
tions other than that the money should
be used by the State for draining the
Everglades, as already provided by
law.
His was the hand that provided the
means to begin the great task and to
him belongs the credit for backing up
the foresight of his clear brain.


Ii B'jLI r.









THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


BOUND FOR THE GLADES


From the very beginning the work
was successful. Those who laughed
and derided turned to assist. The best
engineering talent was secured. Major
J. O. Wright, Supervising Drainage
Engineer of the United States Govern-
ment, was secured and appointed Chief
Engineer for the State of Florida.
"The work of drainage, while a large
undertaking, was a simple one. Lake
Okeechobee is twenty-two feet above
sea level, and the only engineering
necessary was to cut a sufficient num-
ber of canals through the Everglades
to Lake Okeechobee and gravity does
the rest." Water always runs down
hill.
SOIL.
No matter how favorably located
any farming land may be situated as
regards its accessibility to transporta-
tion and market, if the quality of the
soil is such that it is unproductive or
its products can only be had by an ab-
'n:.rmail expenditure of money, time
.and labor, its other good points count
for nothing. The fertility of the soil
is the first and inm :.t imp it :'l. ,nt ft ,,-e.
L_ nc before the ,-e-t -,


ON CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER.

ON CALOOSAHATCHtEE RIVER.


drainage was planned and the work
begun, a complete analysis of the soil
had been made and its productive qual-
ities were well known.

NITROGEN.
The most expensive element enter-
ing into all fertilizers, and the one
most lacking in farm lands, is nitro-
gen. Chemical analysis shows that the
muck land of the Everglades contains
between 2.17 and 2.21 per cent nitro-
gen. The high percentage of this most
valuable element is not confined to any
one section of land, but is general
throughout the Everglades region.
This soil contains every element neces-
sary in perfect "growing" land, and
contains these elements in the proper
proportion. The soil is different even
in appearance from that of any other
section of the United States. It is
granular and light in weight. A bushel
of muck soil weighs 392'lbs. \i.hd't.ry.. "-"
as against 75Y2 lbs. per tbu.;l w lI
weight of dry sandy soil in .:tler part-.
of Florida, and 87 lbs., the weight :of
a. .'ai-n:~'~, s l in the northern states.
' it'i _"'- i.hrei per rent nf lime, and


X- 4
.rAi,^^ & _










THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


GLADES MANGOES.


an ample proportion of other minerals,
no other muck deposit in the world
compares with it.
This Everglades muck land is so
nearly perfect in its chemical compo-
sition that it is worth $6 per ton as
fertilizer.
In no other part of the world are
conditions so favorable for success as
here. Nowhere in the world is there
land of greater richness and promise-
not even the famous valley of the River
Nile can surpass it.
Three million acres of the richest
land are now waiting but the magic
touch of the hand of man to transform
it into the paradise for which it was
intended.
CROPS.
Dade County, the north half of
'c'l-ihch was recently organized as Palm
*,. .-.eacI:h County, of which the Ever-
glides is the. greater portion, has
gained for Florida a large share of her
reputation and fame for being the lead-
ing state in producing the lir.'-I and
most vai ti:,l1.,i1 crop- tn tbe'.e. W\;'
the e -ti-'- e pical .:lini:ite eni.-.e.l ,


this section of the state it is possible to
raise with the greatest success those
fruits confined to a great extent to the
tropical climates of land to the far
south. The orange and grape fruit
are prolific in growth, and a killing
frost has never been known in the
Everglades.
We show photographs here of grape
fruit trees on the muck bearing when
but two years old.

GRAPE FRUIT.
The true value of the grape fruit is
just beginning to be understood and
Florida has a monopoly in the raising
of this delicious fruit. California can-
not raise the grape fruit on a commer-
cial scale, and with the exception of a
little inferior fruit raised in other
Southern States, Florida in this partic-
ular is without a competitor. The
Florida orange also has long been a
favorite over the California product
on account of its superior flavor.
These two fruits can be raised with-
out any loss of money or time for them
to come into bearing. The Florida
muck farmer sets out his vegetables
and other green truck between the
rows of bearing trees, reaping a good
profit every year until his trees are
bearing enough fruit to warrant his
giving up the truck gardening. He is
thus enabled to grow his orange and


I


..'hti':.1 .d'j)NG [.ANAN


Oe


1


; I-












THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


THREE-YEAR-OLD GRAPE FRUIT ON GLADES.


grape fruit trees at little or no expense.
Once the trees are bearing the owner
is assured of independence for life.
Both trees are long lived and the quan-
tity of fruit increases each year with
reasonable care and the quality re-
mains just as good when the tree is
twenty-five years old as when the first
fruit was picked from it. Unlike the
fruits of the northern states, the orange
and grape fruit do not ripen at one
time, but the ripening process is con-
tinuous for a period of from four to
six months, thus enabling the grower
to handle the ripening crop with a
material saving of labor as well as
serving to maintain a steady and high-
priced market.

BANANAS.
Thie ,lerglade iss the only region in
the United States where bananas can
be grown on a commercial scale. Mr.
SWalter \\aldin, in the Daily Metrop-
olis of Miami, und-' -' nf Sepo--
", 1909, says:


"I have now grown many kinds of
tropical fruits and trees. I have ba-
nana plants fourteen months old load-
ed with fruit and have every winter
successfully made large acreages of
profitable crops; this in addition to
growing a fine grape fruit and orange
grove on the same land now laden
with luscious fruit."
Mr. Waldin's experience covers a
period of about ten years, on muck
land, during which time he has suc-
cessfully grown practically every fruit
and vegetable adaptable to the soil of
the Florida Everglades. In speaking
of his residence he says:
"It has not alone given me wealth
but health and happiness. I lia\e a.tk
times received returns per acre i.t .
would astound the best gro:\\ers in
other prosperous agricultural sections,
and this under conditions in which the .
v.ai.:r i.as n,:t under control as it will
:'i.irtlv be. under the system of drain-
age,"


.\.n '


~
L',~










THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


MIXED CITRUS GLADES GROVE.


To give an idea of the imme
profit in raising vegetables on
muck lands we give here some facts
to the prices Mr. Waldin has obtain
for his crops.


RETURNS FROM GLADES
CROPS.
Wax beans with Irish potatoes
tween the rows, and followed by u
beans again, the trio netted as high
$1,000 per acre, in one year.
Tomatoes as high as $1,300 per ac
Egg-plant and peppers in exci
tional cases as high as $2,000 per ac
although the average is about one-h
this figure.
Irish potat:--es. which are eas
Grown in -tlil, -cction of the count
k'v\ill yield J'r.i 200 to 400 hampers I
acre, and sell at $1.90 to $2 -c hnam
F. O. B.
-While these figures may'i&-f' Ili
to the man i cu l.-nmel t,: the c.,


nse paratively small yields in the northern
the states, it must be remembered that this
as is virgin land, and the crops are mar-
led keted from December to April, when
new vegetables bring the highest
prices of the year. This is one of the
great advantages of an Everglade
farm. The season is ahead of any
other portion of the country and nat-
urally the crops are marketed before
the products of any other section,
a therefore receiving the highest prices
as
paid for the early fruit and vegetables.
The northern man would scarcely
give credence to the extraordinary
ep- yields cLtained each and every year
re, from this class of produce, especially
alf in view of the fact that no fertilizer is
used or needed, were it not for the fact
ily that the figures have been proven over
ry, and over time and time aiain-r by men
)er successfully raising fruits and vegeta-
icr bles on the muck lands, as \\ell as'by
the testimony of reliable eye-witnesses, .
-h rpo -s of the T : --artment of Agricul-
i11- iaet-; and the tes-

:. A ^ *-


Ten '
". ." .


:I .










THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


- *-


d ___ ~ -


-----_


CANAL NEAR EAST RIM.


timony of men whose word is unim-
peachable.
SUGAR.
The raising of sugar cane will be one
of the Everglades' greatest industries.
It has been demonstrated and proven
that the muck lands will produce an-
nually a minimum of thirty-five tons
of sugar cane per acre, or a yield of 40
per cent greater than that of Louisiana,
and averages about 50 per cent greater
in saccharine matter, and requires
planting only every six years.

SHIPPING CANALS UP THE CA-
LOOSAHATCHEE RIVER
Congress made an appropriation for
an investigation to determine the feasi-
bility of building a ship canal from the
Gulf up the Caloosahatchee river and
across the Glades to the Atlantic, thus
n saving, many days', travel and about a
thLu0-aIri'miles journey around the
dangerous re-eft and il-Ian,.d- ..tt the
south c.a-lt. The en1ineiers -Cv ;t ,.ill
be built. \\hen bLi ilt itr .alue t,, ,,Iur
district i. apparent..


NO CLEARING NECESSARY.
Mr. A. J. Bendle, President Miami
Metropolis, says that the Everglades
require no work in clearing but after
setting fire to flags and saw grass is
ready for a crop; immediately after the
grass is burned off, it can be planted in
vegetables of all kinds, a few of which
are mentioned below and which yield
a most abundant crop within four to
twelve weeks: Potatoes, tomatoes,
peppers, beans, okra, onions, egg plant,
celery, melons of all kinds, and many
more; also tobacco can be raised easily,
but takes longer time and more culti-
vation. While such crops are being
harvested, the fruit trees can be plant-
ed, including every tropical variety;
oranges, grape fruit, mangoes, lemons,
avacadoes, bananas, almonds and nuts
of all kinds, small fruits of. elerv de-
-. ril:,ti':m t l a -11 .".'. ,-'I ie Call be
l1;a .C'(-I l: -t' ',ra illmt a ,-.' in fact,
the r th xin-.. ,.T -il '. 'I. i l.'i the re-
tit 11 110 L -


S .1,


*-'!y










THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


MIXED CITRUS GLADES GROVE.


To give an idea of the immei
profit in raising vegetables on t
muck lands we give here some facts
to the prices Mr. Waldin has obtain
for his crops.


RETURNS FROM GLADES
CROPS.
Wax beans with Irish potatoes I
tween the rows, and followed by w
beans again, the trio netted as high
$1,000 per acre, in one year.
Tomatoes as high as $1,300 per ac:
Egg-plant and peppers in exce
tional cases as high as $2,000 per ac:
although the average is about one-h;
this figure.
Irish potatoes. which are easi
grown in *tliis -ction of the county
W"" ill yieldJrom 200 to 400 hamptrs p
acre, and sell at $1.90 to $2 pr-'haillmp
F. O. B.
'While these figures ma, i.etfn hil
to the man i:.:uii-:.rned t.:i tle ,i:'i


l. .i- .


S..j .


ise paratively small yields in the northern
:he states, it must be remembered that this
as is virgin land, and the crops are mar-
led keted from December to April, when
new vegetables bring the highest
prices of the year. This is one of the
great advantages of an Everglade
farm. The season is ahead of any
other portion of the country and nat-
urally the crops are marketed before
,e-
the products of any other section,
ax
therefore receiving the highest prices
paid for the early fruit and vegetables.
The northern man would scarcely
re.
give credence to the extraordinary
'P- yields cGtained each and every year
re, from this class of produce, especially
alf in view of the fact that no fertilizer is
used or needed, were it not for the fact
ly that the figures have been pro,. en over
*y, and over time and time again. by inen
er successfully raising fruits and vegeta.-
cr bles on the muck lands, as \\ell as"' b
the testimony of reliable eye-witnesses,;
r.h re "--s of the F'eAartment ,of Agricul-
ii- _--.'ia, sed, and the tes-

.'.










THE FLORIDA


ci~-


CANAL NEAR EAST RIM.
CANAL- -- AS RIM
_ -. ._.- -- --


timony of men whose word is unim-
peachable.
SUGAR.
The raising of sugar cane will be one
of the Everglades' greatest industries.
It has been demonstrated and proven
that the muck lands will produce an-
nually a minimum of thirty-five tons
of sugar cane per acre, or a yield of 40
per cent greater than that of Louisiana,
and averages about 50 per cent greater
in saccharine matter, and requires
planting only every six years.

SHIPPING CANALS UP THE CA-
LOOSAHATCHEE RIVER
Congress made an appropriation for
an investigation to determine the feasi-
bility of building a ship canal from the
Gulf up the Caloosahatchee river and
across the Glades to the Atlantic, thus
, savifig. many days' travel and about a
thouisatd miles journey around the
danger, lu reefs and islands off the
south Cq: ast. The engineers say it will
be built. When biilt its .value to our
di-trict i. apparent.


NO CLEARING NECESSARY.
Mr. A. J. Bendle, President Miami
Metropolis, says that the Everglades
require no work in clearing but after
setting fire to flags and saw grass is
ready for a crop; immediately after the
grass is burned off, it can be planted in
vegetables of all kinds, a few of which
are mentioned below and which yield
a most abundant crop within four to
twelve weeks: Potatoes, tomatoes,
peppers, beans, okra, onions, egg plant,
celery, melons of all kinds, and many
more; also tobacco can be raised easily,
but takes longer time and more culti-
vation. While such crops are being
harvested, the fruit trees can be plant-
ed, including every tropical variety;
oranges, grape fruit, mangoes, 1cirn.un,
avacadoes, bananas, almonds and nuts
of all kinds, small fruits of every de-
scription such as strawberries can be
harvested several times a year; in fact,
the :r, .t:in,.ncver stops, hence tie re-
tf:.r thel i ll I.'I,. .1 1 'ii i nnl tl g.

-. -*-*""


EVERGLADES


L^


A A-











THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


GLADES CABBAGE.


SHIPPING FACILITIES AND
HEALTH.
"Freight facilities for, such products
are good by rail or by water. Health
conditions are almost perfect, neither
malaria nor fevers prevail and insects
are not more annoying than in the less
troubled parts of the United States.
The Everglades have no mosquitoes.
The distance from New York to the
Glades is about forty hours; from Chi-
cago, forty-eight hours by rail. The
land can be cultivated at all times and
early vegetables can be grown and
shipped at a time when they bring the
hiighe-. t price: fro:nl tVl t... four cr,:,:s
Inmay be r. vLi'n cvec-\ \rear 1.11 thie -1me
land before tie nlrtliucin ciro c- ome
into the market. F.uii hundred ald
fifty dollars- per acre is the l' es-t :.[
this land ir.. erl cultl.ated."
W'. \\. Pr...ut, PIrc- leIlt 4.. tih
Miami BLoard :of Trade, -aV thatliL he
has farmed in that -ecticii f.ir illln e-n
Sears .Ii- I.1. '2i 1.. ii lltiin .. thi

that ex,.,:-i'tin4 pni a|al,!le.-. e^ ,r', lliii
ha' Lbcrn ,' -.1i ii -.i11 -111ii iLir t,: tliit


i .
-.I


now being reclaimed, known as "Ever-
glades land." "It is my candid opinion
from my own personal experience that
Everglades land will grow not only
the finest truck, but also all kinds of
fruit, bananas, sugar cane, oranges,
grape fruit and all our native fruit
productions. The average results
from his own planting on reclaimed
soil were as follows: Tomatoes, gross
yield from 300 to 500 crates per acre,
and received an average of $1.50 per
crate.
Beans: 200 to 600 carriers per acre1
average price, $2.00.
Peppers: 400 to 800 crates per acre;
average price, $2.00.
Bananas: First yield about 600
bunches per acre.
Banana slips, about 400 to 600 per
acre.
Bananas, F. O. B.: 25c per bunch;
banana slips, $200 per thousand.
He stated further-the life of the
banana plant once planted is perpetual.
After the first yield, the production is
increased from four to six times, mak-
ing the gross yield about 2,500 bunch-
es. The cost of maintenance, care, etc.,
is less than any other product grown,
and the possibilities of profit are larger
from bananas than from any other
product grown in that vicinity."


1.

. 1 :


til. ,'...' h-',.i ;.. \DES BAN.\N,AS.

Whe.t ,


!r







-:-. ,,. :,-,

" Ti-, 7 : IlL .' ii'E IF' E
,~r-i L F'
H ur


SOME NEIGHBORHOOD TESTI-
..MONIALS.
C. D. -Leffler -ay.: "1 Ia e had
charge of a grove ,if ra rl rapi.e
fruit planted o,:n i :a- land ;. the
M iami River end .-.f the i'ai:ial. thi.- -:iam
,'la-s rf -,.1 f. li-l irthI r In tie
4-,l-ide-s, .1 -, Tlc tr1- -,I. h e -,n it."
E. .H.: Kirkman, a Dade Lounty
:ariner. sa s: "In my fourteen years'
experience here I have had only one
cr-,lmparati, e failure, and I have ranged
from $80.00- an acre to as high as
$1.300.00 an acre net, and I only
cropped for the winter and spring mar-
kets. The average the county over on
:-.rmat:oes \\ill run about 200 crates to
the acre i marketable), and the average
,price will be from $1.50 to $2.00,
:hI.,ugh orn muck land 600 crates per
acre is not unusual. The muck is ex-
triemely rich, and I believe it will grow
almost anything adapted to the cli-
mate."
Mr. Simon Bobodean, of Dade
County, says: "The possibilities of
the Everglades, agriculturally, are
boundless. The muck soil is admitted
to be among the richest soils in the
world, and will grow almost anything
.in great quantities; truck of all sorts,
sugar cane, rice and fruit (including
many varieties practically unknown in
the north.) On the Glade land, with
a little intelligence and application, a
man may get larger returns on less
capital than in any business that I
know of anywhere. A truck farm on
a grove handled competently will net
a man a splendid income, and in this
section, as far as possibilities go, the
surface has not yet been scratched."
J. D. Lee, a Glade farmer, says: "I
have trucked on muck land with good
success for six years. A man could
average on ten acres 300 to 400 crates
to the acre in tomatoes, and I have
raised as high as 600 per acre. I much
prefer the Glades muck soil to the pine
land for truck. When the Glades have
been drained I believe the fruit trees
will do extremely well, and grow much
faster on muck than on sand. Ten
acre- i I..nd with careful farm-
i f .h! a handsome income
f, r .r li' ve farmed in several
pla..:,- I" l on several different
klir', lu "' .- convinced the


muck land .-4 the adeI is t[le b.e-t :.f
all i.f tlihe in r.l'hI.ii i ai I pi ."JuctL -
It\,
Tli p-,art .-f Flrida i- thl.- i.nly part
,:, the iUn; ted -. tat,- with the climatic
.. n,,litr. .11 required fr the 1 I .hc .:e-Sfull
gr...ii th .f the mani ,: and a.a .:al.


there is such a demand for them
throughout the country that a single
mango tree has been known to produce
a crop of over $1,000. While such re-
sults are unusual and perhaps unrea-
sonable, it is only an example of many
rare and profitable tropical fruits that
can be counted on both for profit and
pleasure by the Glades farmer when
the canals have been completed.
Dr. Wiley, United States Chief
Chemist, is also enthusiastic on this
subject, and in speaking of the soil
and climate of the Everglades says:
"The climatic conditions of tempera-
ture approach those of the Island of
Cuba. This being true of the central
portion of the Peninsula, it is true in
a much greater degree of the lower
portion. The cocoanut and date palm
flourish and tropical plants of almost
every description predominate over the
sub-tropical."
LAND IS CLEAR AND READY
FOR PLOW.
It is far too often the case when the
homeseeker takes up new land there
is confronting him the immense prob-
lem of clearing the land -before any-
thifig can be done toward raising a
crop. He has before him the hardest
work connected with farm life. Not so
with Everglades muck land. Here is
land absolutely clear of every obstacle.
All the work the homesteader must do
to put his land in shape for cultivation
is to burn the saw grass which he will
find growing upon it. There is little
land today even in Florida or any other
State which does not require clearing
and grubbing before cultivation may
be started. Often a year or more of
time is consumed in this work to say
nothing of the cost of labor and the
loss of the year's crop

7Tirteen


J








THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES

THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


4-L


GLADES FIELD READY FOR CULTIVATION.


Neither is there any need
expensive fertilizers each y
upper and well oxidized gla
cost of from $25 to $100 per
ture has taken care of all
rank growth of tropical
which has been decaying fo
has endowed the soil of the l
with the most wonderful
any land in the world. The
important points to be
when purchasing a farm.
you will in all probability liv
balance of your life and tl
should receive your very c;
sideration.
Your future income will b
soil, and in just the same
as the soil is rich in that
portion will be your income
The richest land is cheap
price, and there is no rich
the world than the Eve
Florida.
CLIMATE.
For years Florida has beer
her salubri u.L climate, ind
i,\ in qiialitie_. i_ htr air.

.' I Oh LC ':


to provide
ear on the
de soil at a
acre. Na-
that. The
vegetation
r centuries
Everglades


The death rate in Florida today is
the lowest of any state in the Union.
The average death rate is six per thou-
sand.
No wonder, indeed, that the discov-
erer of "this land of many colors" ex-
pected to find the fabled fountain of
youth.


fertility of In no part of the world is better
se are very health enjoyed than in the Everglades
considered region. Many people have been under
Remember the mistaken impression that the
re on it the Glades are malarial, and that mosqui-
his feature tos abound. Such is not the case. The
areful con- Everglades is not a swamp. A swamp
is land covered with stagnant water.
e from the The water covering the Everglades is
proportion not stagnant, but is fresh and sweet
same pro- with a constant flow toward the sea,
ie. seeking its own level.
ip at any Malaria is unknown here. Men em-
er land in played on the huge dredges working
rglades of in the middle of the Everglades enjoy
the best of health. Mosquitoes are
few, as they breed in 'a0' t water.
n noted for The constant ;itead i'oav ui the water
the health- iandi tlie f:tct that it !;ll and sweet,
ti",.ctcler w ith 0 ".- -'- ..- and
.:- _r .,. .DE% N... A N S.


., t lr .,.' _. I I


1










THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


THOSE. A. EDISON GROVE-FORT MYERS.


almost constant sea breeze make the
locality a most undesirable one for the
mosquito.
Dr. John N. MacGonigle, in an ad-
dress before the Eighth Geographical
Congress, said:
"The climate and productiveness of
the Everglades are not surpassed in
the world, presenting conditions both
winter and summer where the maxi-
mum results of labor are produced by
the minimum of effort.
"The water in the Glades is always
pure and clear and drinkable. No-
where is it stagnant; nowhere does it
seem to be wholly at rest. It seems
to move in one mass from northwest
to southeast.
"The climate of the Glades is most
mild and equable. The vegetation
shows by the habits of growth that
frost is unknown. Only moderately
high temperatures prevail in summer,
and these are modified by prevailing
breezes."
SThe climate is ideal. The highest
S- temperature recorded by the United
Sterat-u. .- ibe ':reau at Mliami fI.r
t i p'i eri,..i-d -, tn rt,. ear-. it ':'I en .ret.
... Sun:ti-,:,ke: and, _,iLt r,,-trat arc-
.I n -l1. b. t da
".. ,


the heat is tempered by the cool winds
from the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf
of Mexico, which blow at the rate of
8 to 8y2 miles per hour across the en-
tire peninsula.
The entire distance from the Atlan-
tic Ocean to the Gulf, just south of
Lake Okeechobee, is only 105 miles, so
that no point of this portion of the
state is more than 53 miles from sea
water and always within the radius of
their prevailing breezes.
Here the sun and soil combine to
work for you. Nowhere in the world
can such prolific and valuable crops be
raised with less effort.

OUT DOOR SPORTS.
The owner of a small farm is the
most independent man on earth. A
small farm does not require every hour
of his time. Here he has time for lei-
sure and enjoyment.
For the man or woman who loves to
fish. the southern pnrtinn of Florida is
not -iUrl[a-icl bI_ anr, S. tate ill the
inii, ii. ihe -c treanis :i4 the Gladc-s
al,-uiind in J1 kiind ,'f fre-ih water
-h. \while Lake (,kee,:l,,ot:ee furi1 lhe':


; ~ .~Y











THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


LAKE OKEECHOBEE CATCH.


every year hundreds of tons of fish for
the northern market. The sea-coast
furnishes the finest salt-water fishing
on the continent. King Tarpon, the
games of all salt-water fish, is at home
on both the east and west coasts of
Florida, and his captor may well boast
of his prowess once he conquers this
grizzly of the deep. Every year thou-
sands travel hundreds of miles to en-
joy the fishing which is in your front
yard.
Hunting is to the farmer what the
theater and other amusements are to
the city man or woman, yet
hunting offers a much more
healthful recreation.
The Everglades district,
with Lake Okeechobee and
the great canals, furnish
unusual opportunity for the
hunting of small game, such
as wild ducks, geese, .
brandt, snipe, woodcock -
and quail. During the .
winter when thece birds
come south, aid tlhe ric:h "
feeding gro-,rnd- .tA h.e Ev-


erglades attract untold numbers of these
fowl. It is an easy matter for any sports-
man to shoot the full limit of the law
almost any day during the hunting
season.
Quail are abundant also throughout
this part of the State, and supplies the
table of the farmers during the open
season. Wild turkeys are also a prime
sport in this section, and those who
prefer the quest for this game fowl
will find the district nearby unrivalled
as a wild-turkey hunting section.


...
liT T[iRKOL i.H j ._ \ I.,F .
4 -*l ,, 2'.,


Sixteen


-eIrv


4.









THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


FORT MYERS HOME.


MARKETS AND TRANSPORTA-
TION.
The great northern markets are
within easy access both by rail and
water.
THE ATLANTIC TO GULF
CANAL.
Congress has already appropriated
ten thousand dollars to investigate and
survey the proposed great ship canal
from the Atlantic Ocean to the Gulf.
Engineers state that the plan is feas-
ible and simple. Of the several routes
proposed, the one most in favor cuts
directly through the Everglades land,
it will thus lend an increased value to
our lands as well as opening up an in-
valuable artery of commerce.

TOWNS OF THE EVERGLADES.
The small farms will bring a much
larger population to the Everglades
than in farming communities where
farm-s :,f r'e a'crea.e are held. Thisi
". .. ill cau-c nui eri :uI ri!ll t-i:\ ns and
cities t: prii .- 'p. .-lready a larje
Sto h i.s pr. p.:ed and l.he site -elected
1on thiL .1,uthl shor .:,f Lake Okkeech,:.-
S''bee. T he -,te i.. i:..- 1 I.-.th froi a c:,m -
S m er ,.i ; l -i t nd .: iiit. L.-.-
i/


cated on the large canals which lead
directly to Miami and Fort Lauderdale
and near the west canal running into
the Caloosahatchee river and the Gulf
of Mexico, it presents wonderful pos-
sibilities to the merchant as well as an
excellent market for the farmer.

SOCIAL LIFE.
Once the small farms are settled up,
you will find plenty of pleasant neigh-
bors and there is probably not a sec-
tion in the country where people get
more out of life and have more enjoy-
ment than on the small farms already
taken up in southern Florida. In the
winter months thousands of tourists
flock to this part of the country, so that
no one is out of touch of city life.
Churches of practically every de-
nomination are found, and the school
systems of southern Florida rank high.
The problem confronting every indi-
idiual '.ho ,o: rkis f:r v a-e is indeed
a -eri,-,us .line Thiii -:isn.-s ,:,f tho,-e
employed in the citic-. Lboith meni and
i.-.mein, concluded Ihond. a,., that nI
matter ho\w nman\- years tlihe cirontinue
to employ their timic in their present
car.acit\, the result ill l.e the same,

&t f:i tct r


!II 11111111iinn n~ n ii iiiiiiiiiiiii i _1 1 _1 _: ....... ._ .. ......................... "i


....-










THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


A FORT MYERS SHADE TREE.


which virtually means that the great
working body of men and women are
laboring for a living alone, and indeed
in many cases that living is indeed a
frugal one, although the best of their
lives and their utmost effort is spent
at such employment.

BUT ONE TIME.
There is but one time in our lives to
provide for the future, and that is when
we can put a few dollars away each
month. The usefulness of men and
women in the city office, factory and
shop, passes away at the age of fifty.
Good health cannot hold out against
the fatally gripping life of the city em-
ployed.
ARTIFICIAL LIFE OF THE CITY.
We are bound to acknowledge that
this city life is an artificial one. Rising
in the morning and dressing with the
aid of a dim gas light, working all day
under the artificial light of the electric
bulb and returning home in the dark-
ness again, too tired for anything but
1..el D idl y:.u %ver t..p- t:' a; k ...ur-
s I Nf. "Is it v. .-.1rtl 1 the v. 1ile I

IN DEBT TO YOUR FAMILY.
>ach M alll I'-i'. '- t,:, him -I Ilf. hiZ f'ini-
ilv an' hii frien.l pr,,vi ii', fr futture


years. Think seriously and look for-
ward. Realize that you are growing
old and take time by the forelock and
prepare for what is to come. Decide
immediately whether or not life is to
continue for you as you have lived in
the past or whether you will devote a
few dollars each month to possess a
small estate which offers you inde-
pendence any time you wish to take
advantage of the healthful life out-of-
doors. The time is near at hand when
all the choice lands will be absorbed
by the far-seeing thinker and if you do
not act quickly your position will be
like those in the West. They sat idly
by and watched the land values around
them jump from hundreds to thou-
sands and were then unable to provide
a home for themselves.
The Everglades offer absolutely the
keenest, surest, and safest solving of
the human problem for the present and
for the future of any land in America.
Do not lack confidence in your own
judgment Tlhuruu-zMly investigate and ;..
accept the oppguftiinity which we offer
', u inll this p)a t ..f Fl.,rida. -
I v!,:u w ill take i.. :: dcr:iti. '
every .land ip 'rtun;i' .n the Uni- -'
._tate- an] Cl'ji1Ui-' l, -, ,1, deeply
, trI- fullv. ,'V.,tIr ,tiI:i-i I' lea L
t.:. the ilr'lda E .. .


r* .. i. '.


"- rJ^









THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


FRUIT BARN ON CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER.


OUT-OF-DOOR LIFE.
The development of the out-of-door
life, during the past few years, has
been nothing short of marvelous. A
few short years ago the farmer fought
out his humdrum existence with walk-
ing plow and slow-moving oxen, the
hand scythe, threshed his grain with a
hand flail and made his home in a hut.
Today he rides his plow and harvests
his crop by aid of modern machinery,
his home is a modern mansion. The
orchardist, instead of planting large
tracts of fruit trees which he cannot
personally superintend, and which de-
velop into breeding grounds for pests
of different species, has specialized and
now gives his time to a few well cared
for acres.
In every branch of agriculture the
same progress has been made, and the
man or woman who now cares to pur-
sue the natural vocation for which we
were all intended may now profit by
the experience of the ;,piuoeer and live
i luxurA itl. a minin'lB of effort.
PLACE T. AISE A CHILD.
U PLACE T .RAISE A CHILD.


,o\ irln tI .-
c':,are tha-: .',
are rii-, ... ]: lI?,] .,\


can t nihe itatin:I ly

..ail F_ r ; ,lie-.


farm have never been equalled. It is
the ideal spot in which to raise the
child and make him feel the independ-
ence and self-reliance which will some
day make him a comfort to parents and
of use to society.

TO THE MAN OVER FIFTY.
Are you over fifty years of age?
What provision have you made for the
declining years of your life? If you
were to lose your position tomorrow,
how long would the few dollars you
have in the savings bank keep you
from actual want? What plans have
you made for your wife and children?
Is it not a fact that you would have to
depend on the charity of your children
for your future support? Do you not
know that every corporation is simply
looking for an excuse to get rid of its
men who are over fifty years of age?
May it not be your time tomorrow?
Thousands of men today are walking
the streets of the large cities, strong in
body and strong in mind, whose only
*:rimce 1has been that tlhe are -''.er hft',
carI- -'f a-e It is true thes-e ime'.n a:! n
earn a prccariniu. li. mi en, iilhl t.
keep l,.:.i.j and -,:'ul t.,.cther but the
earnin _y ,-,f :i-a >: their '. :,u n\ier .ear.
I,' I,:,nC l ,-v 111a .. \,>a-'r- ,:,t acti' itv


I










THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


UPPER EVERGLADES.


are there before you? Now is the time
to make safe your future. Put aside
a few dollars a month in a small farm
and when old age comes upon you, you
will be independent, happy and self-
supporting. Cast your lot with a prop-
osition backed by the State and ap-
proved by the U. S. experts, and thus
take no chances.

TO THE OFFICE MAN.
Is your health giving out under the
strain of office work? What are your
chances for. advancement in your pres-
ent position? Is it not a fact that your
work is irksome, the hours long, the
pay just enough to live on?


i^cl A !E

PL~i~iL n~


BAN.\N.\AS .,Ti *lTI OF [. \KE


Why not get a small farm?
You can earn more than you do now.
Your health will be excellent; your fu-
ture will be assured. A small farm in
Florida is the best place in the world
for the growing child. The Everglades
is the ideal home for you. A small in-
vestment with small monthly pay-
ments will purchase for you a few
acres of the richest land in the world.
That is sufficient to earn you a good
living. Even though you never live
on it, the operations of the State are
multiplying its value without expense
to you, the investment is better than
city property. During the next five
years this land will multiply and you
can sell at a big profit! It is the chance
of a life time for you. You do not have
to be an experienced farmer to make,
a success, some of the most successful
farmers in the country are men who
applied to the farm the energy and
training of the city office and have
"made good." *'
The training you have had in the of-
D IGe -i s ,, ,,u1 i. a:' nt..e. D .-'t
Ja il I.o u -e it. ",

DRAINAGE vs. ,
N d thcr irr:.-atih:,, !, ".. '
riev.. pr,:,1leri.' h.-thi ire ;.',.ti'ced ii
the earlie-t tin.-: rec.r.ided ii ,:tory
N'. 5%- i-.


U.. ,.,


i--------~-
i










THE FLORIDA


-r -.
;4i~ e


A STATE DREDGE.


but we do not have to go out of our
own country and generation to get
figures on both.
The national government and vari-
ous private companies have huge pro-
jects on hand for irrigating western
lands. The amount of money spent is
enormous. Past experience teaches
that the initial cost of irrigating land
is from $25 to $65 per acre. To reclaim
the Florida Everglades the cost is
about $1.00 per acre.
This is the whole story. Irrigation
is the last step taken in reclaiming land
a.:: iunt of the prohibitive cost. Re-
l to i,cli the initial cost is the smallest
in--, every year there is a water
it ,I from $1.50 to $3.00 per acre.
The yearly tax for water alone is great-
er per acre than the cost of keeping
drained an acre of Everglades land for-
eier. Which is the better investment?

FIO LABOR PROBLEM IN THE
- i ADES.
l i


'. fl.t_ nll .l t h ,,l l ,]i\ l.li,, l ,i,'t i l


ripen at one time, but you have a con-
tinuous crop throughout the year.
Grape fruit ripens for six months dur-
ing the year so that a family can easily
cart for and pack the fruit as it is ready
for market. Sugar cane is harvested
any time during the fall and winter
months, and other products in from
two or four crops instead of one.
This is one of the most important
points to be considered. The .labor
problem is a serious one and should be
considered seriously in purchasing a
small farm.
In the Everglades there is no labor
problem.


.5I1 11h. I -.


I I I I I I ..,..,. II r


EVERGLADES


,-











THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES


ACROSS TIlE SEA.


WATER TRANSPORTATION.
It is a well known fact that transpor-
tation by water costs but a fraction of
the cost of shipping by rail.
While the saving in freight is a very
large item one of the greatest advan-
tages lies in the fact that fruit can be
shipped by water when ripe. You can-
not ship ripe fruit a great distance by
rail; the citrus fruits of California must
be shipped when green, otherwise the
jolting and jarring to which they are
subjected would make them absolutely
worthless for the market.
Shipping by water overcomes this
trouble. The steady regular motion
of the ship prevents vibration and
makes it possible for fruit to be mar-
keted when ripe.
THE TIME, IS SHORT.
The opportunity to own a small farm
in the Florida Everglades will not last
much longer.
Over six thousand farms were sold
between March 1 and October 23, 1909,
and this number has more than dou-
bled since that time.
Such an opportunity comes but once
in a lifetime.
Three weeks after the Government
opened the Standing Rock Reservation
in Dakota there were eight applicants
for every farm, and this land was very
inferior to the Everglades, as it is situ-
ated inii a harsh. ,:11 > .:.tnti'. ,vher
rainfall i li. iht and11 i cr-iI'- ti hir-'t:tlnI
aud neaI a\ ni i u., h l;,i.-I 1 i-' I ...-edl
.f there a-. thcre. .-. intl it ,l'. rl-. I-iV-n'
i- I n rtniii :i I I t ... I i -
Il ,i l -n l t' llllI. 'i i '; \ .. I.2 t l i. i > :[ I, ,J|


7nt.'.ntl "t',tu


r,-1


failure is unknown, frost has never
been felt and transportation is unsur-
passed.
Here you may enjoy the income of
a one-hundred-acre farm on ten acres
of Everglades muck land, with none
of the discomforts of the north. Here
work is light and the hours short and
with a climate unsurpassed in the
whole world.
THE BUCK EYE DITCHER.
The famous Buckeye Ditcher has
been installed by some of the farmers
hack of the lower canals where they
are unwilling to let their land rest idle
until the great dredges from the sea
and lake meet and draw off the water.
It has been cutting a ditch, approxi-
mately four feet wide by four feet deep,
from one-half to a mile long in a day
at an expense of less than twenty-five
dollars. At this rate, when the com-
pletion of the canals has made the
overflow from the lake impossible, and
has lowered the water level in the soil,
the little ditching that may be required
to speedily take care of rainfall will be
a very simple and inexpensive matter
on the Upper Glades, where the soil
is so deep and spongy and so ready to
absorb precipitation.
CANALS UNDER PRIVATE
CONTRACT.
In April 1910, decree was agreed
upon in the United States Supreme
Court which removes all doubt of the
speedy completion of the canal system;
in fact, practically
makes it impossi-
ble to string along
with this drainage


things it is pro- ake
vided that the
drainage trustees
should employ ',
Major Wright of '
the United States,
Government ser- P
vice to take charge
of the work as 4 Y

1lt L 1.1 I Ir d '

ii
I' I, I t ., I '"''.






4i


I I.'':


a t::l i ,- .I h L i' lJ :I
the Glades canals under the require-
ments of this decree). Second: Con-
tracts should be promptly let for the
finishing of these canals by private
contractors and give a heavy bond that
the last canal would be finished within
three years (under the requirements
of this decree this was done on June
15th last, and the Furst-Clarke Con-
struction Company, one of the largest
concerns in the country, took the con-
tract for finishing the remaining 184
miles of canals and filed said bond).
Third: The contractors should bid for
the several dredges and dredging out-
fits (this was accordingly done and
purchased by said company, thus tak-
ing this work entirely out of politics).
The Furst-Clarke Company took
over the dredging plants and com-
.menced work on their contract on July
1, 1910, and increased the capacity and
rapidity of the work as rapidly as it
could be done. They have added
',. ..i greater capacity than those
.I 1I i.l, State and are building oth-
I,-.. have increased the working
S-..i these dredges from eight
,i'a. s the case under the State's
I..in, to twenty-four hours per
S.ii recent communication from
I .r \'. lght, the supervising engi-
-Ii., s that the combined prog-
-* rtli.. present dredges is over 15
f yu dn I- onth-which should com-
our agent. i '--timated 115 miles of canals
o.u I. i,-h in ample time for set-
t 1y the fall of 1911: "We
the present time six
..at work and advancing
follows: From the Atlan-
.......... ilc canals: the Miami branch
or ,r ,, i South New River-300
S_ ii, New River-500 feet.
The Florida F th from Lake Okeecho-
Suite 103 1Mr ulti.: dredge No. 8-800 feet;
Kar ... nal-500 feet. On the
"aj-300 feet per day; and a
I11,1 ..n hydraulic and dipper
Sunder construction to work
111 East Coast, and another
probably be installed early
thir. <-' k west from the Hills-
^ official source,
Rate of fifteen
considering
"ke many .-


ii. iitli: t.., ,.:,,ir i [t, ihe 114 1ni cb k:Li-
mated to be yet unfinished.
TERMS OF SALE.
Our lands are sold in definite lots at
Fifty Dollars per acre, payable in in-
stallments of Two Dollars cash and
Two Dollars per acre each month,
without taxes or interest until fully
paid. We are General Agents for the
Okeechobee Fruit Lands Company,
who hold title to these lands free and
clear of all incumbrance of any kind,
and they will convey perfect title by
warranty deed when contracts are fully
paid, or make any other reasonable ar-
rangement to deliver title before full
payment has been made.
THE TRIP.
Round trip excursion tickets may be
purchased to Fort Myers and return
on the first and third Tuesdays of each
month. Our people reach Jacksonville
on Thursday morning, rest and visit
the city during the day and leave for
Fort Myers in the evening, arriving
there Friday forenoon. Our headquar-
ters in Jacksonville are in the Dyal-
Upchurch Building, and if our custom-
ers meet there at 10:30 Thursday fore-
noon and present their card for identi-
fication, we will assist them to spend a
pleasant day and see the city.
A CARD OF INTRODUCTION.
A trip from Fort Myers up the Ca-
loosahatchee River into Lake Okeecho-
bee through the Everglades and down
the canals is one of the rarest treats
that can be offered anyone visiting
Florida. While we have not the facili-
ties to provide accommodations for the
general traveling public, we are anxi-
ous that as many of our customers as
possible may visit our lands, and we
will exert ourselves to help them make
the most extensive investigation with
as much comfort, pleasure and econ-
omy as possible.
We have our own boats, a commo-
dious hotel on the Glades, and every
convenience for the comfort of our vis-
itors, whether men or women. In or-
der to insure accommodations for those
who visit our lands it is desirable that
our patrons notify us or our represen-
tatives before going, and a card of in-
structions and identification will be
provided.


Twenty-three
















































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Remember, that while they last, $240, pay-
able $10 per month, buys one of the farms
shown in the following subdivision, and a lot,
with other rights:

SUB DIVISION:


2
8
20
100
250
3,620
8,000


Farms of 640
Farms of 320
Farms of 160
Farms of 80
Farms of 40
Farms of 20
Farms of 10


acres
acres
acres
acres
acres
acres
acres


each
each
each
each
each
each
each


ONE TOWN LOT WITH EACH FARM,
FREE.


If you desire
.our agent.


3 llin 9 d1
kallRi d


further information, inquire of


or write to
The Florida Fruit Lands Company,
Suite 103. Massachusetts Building,
Kansas City, Mo.


Ill I_ ITO A- i%'a


S fonfth m aIFllu ai


think of their investment.


I -


rr -~s~ql r I ---- --




















The Reclaimed Everglades

of Florida.

Unquestionably one of the richest bodies of
land on the North American Continent not
under cultivation today, embracing 180,000
acres in Southern Florida,, is now *being
reclaimed and opened for settlement for the
American people.
This is practically your only opportunity to
get choice, cheap lands with ideal climatic con-
ditions in the United States.
Two hundred and forty dollars, payable
$10.00 per month, buys from us a contract for
one of these undivided farms, and other rights;
the farms ranging in size from ten acres to six
hundred and forty acres of magnificent fruit,
vegetable and sugar cane land. Along with
each farm goes a town lot in a central town-
site to be established on the most. available
spot on said lands.

The Florida Fruit Lands Co.,
Suite 103 Massachusetts Building,
KANSAS CITY, MO.

A. D. HART .... .President.
JOHN MATTHEW, Secretary-Treasurer.
R. J. MARTIN
J. H. BORDERS Managing Directors.

REFERENCES.
Gate City Bank ............. Kansas City, Mo
Pioneer Trust Co... .......... Kansas City, Mo.
First National Bank ....... .Colorado Springs, Colo.
Florida National Bank ........ Jacksonville, Fla.
N. B. Broward, Ex-Governor ...... .Jacksonville, Fla

$1,000 is offered, and all expenses of inspection, if it is
not as good as represented in the printed literature of this
Compilny,


The Reclaimed Everglades

of Florida.

One hundred and eighty thousand acres of
rich bottom land in Southern Florida, which
for the past four hundred years have been
impossible of development and cultivation, are
being reclaimed and opened for settlement.
The Florida Fruit Lands Company, the pur-
chasers, announce that the entire acreage is to
be developed and sold at prices and on terms
that are alike attractive to the speculator and
the homeseeker.
The land to be placed "on the market lies in
alterate sections in Dade County, near the
southeast coast of Florida, beginning on the
Miama River, about six miles from the city of
Miami and extending west and north, paral-
leling the Florida East Coast Railway, to a
point nine miles west of Palm Beach. This
land is now being entered by three canals:
one at the head of the Miami River and two
at the two forks of the New River, which
flows by Fort Lauderdale, and another will
soon be started from the Hillsboro River, a
short distance south and west of Palm Beach.
"Miami, Fla., Jan. 7, 1908.-Where the swift
Miami River, draining the Everglades, dis-
charges its limpid flood into the crystal waters
of Biscayne Bay, stands what its people delight
to call 'the magic city of Miami.' Miami has a
story like that of a mushroom town of the
great West. It was born a full-grown city.
In the old days of the Seminole War the Gov-
ernment built Fort Dallas at this site. A por-
tion of the old barracks remains to tell the
story. Fifteen years ago there was one store
at Fort Dallas, a trading post for the Semi-
noles of the Everglades. There were three
families of white people, and the only connec-
tion with the outside world was by schooner
and the long sail behind the keys to Key West.
"In April, 1896, the railroad came to Fort
Dallas, and the city of Miami was created. In
six months it had 2,000 people. Now it has
10,000 the year round, and, to dazzle the eyes
.of the wondering stranger within the gates, as
likely a lot of paved streets, water works,
electric lights and public buildings as an enthu-


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siastic board of trade secretary could wish. It
is more like an Oklahoma city than one expects
to find on. the Atlantic Ocean, and the surprise
is so great that one finds himself lending a
willing, if not credulous, ear to the glowing
predictions of the town 'booster.'
"Miami is not entirely given over to sight-
seeing and to play. Its thrifty home popula-
tion is intent upon building up a good city and
upon developing the surrounding country. So
much has been done in the past thirteen years
that it is easy to believe the rosy things pre-
dicted for the future. No other section has
such advantages in the culture of grapefruit,
the pineapple farms are unsurpassed, and there
is a constantly increasing tide of immigration
from sections of the North.
"Many people who came here only to estab-
lish their winter homes, have yielded to the
charm of the tropics and now live here the
entire year. In the protection of the free trade
winds they have settled down permanently,
knowing that they need fear neither extremes
of heat nor cold. The lure of the tropics is
not a misnomer. The drowsy, sun-lit days,
and the gorgeous nights are like succeeding
pages in the book of enchantment. No won-
der the spendthrift tourists come trooping to
Miami on Biscayne Bay."-Frederic J. Has-
kins in Kansas City Journal.
History and Description.
The popular impression of the Everglades of
Florida has been of a stagnant, malarial, fever-
stricken swamp, full of gnarled cypress trees,
impenetrable undergrowth and stagnant water,
absolutely useless for any purpose whatever
except as a hiding place for criminals and
Indians.
The United States Government and State
authorities, as well as many reputable individ-
uals who have made thorough investigations of
this supposedly "terra incognito" (unknown
land), are unanimous in testifying to an entirely
different condition of affairs.
According to the United States Government
and other reliable authorities, the Everglades
consist of an immense basin, covering some
hundreds of thousands of acres of land, sur-
rounded on the Gulf and Atlantic coast sides
by an elevated rim of rotten limestone. This
immense basin has a floor of limestone mixed


with pebbles and phosphates, the latter being
the finest fertilizer in the world, and is profit-
ably mined in many portions of the State. This
basin is filled with a rich alluvial soil running
in depth from eight inches to fourteen feet.
The soil deposited in this basin from the
rivers on the north emptying into Lake Okee-
chobee has .raised the center of this basin to
from 21 to 25 feet above the level of the sea.
During 'the rainy season the lake has over-
flowed annually, covering the Everglades with
fresh, constantly moving water.
The State of Florida is now dredging four
main canals from Lake Okeechobee to differ-
ent points on the Atlantic Coast (from 40 to
60 miles distant), cutting outlets through the
rim rock and of sufficient capacity to take up
all of the surplus water, making dry land of
what for centuries has been submerged land
during certain seasons of the year.
Two other features of this drainage proposi-
tion are as follows: First-These canals are
navigable, enabling the farmer or fruit grower
to float his produce to the seaport, the current
naturally being in the direction that- the load
goes. Second-These canals are to be equip-
ped with a series of locks or gates whereby
during the dry season and when necessary the
water can be held back for sub-irrigation pur-
poses.
The State has ample means at hand for the
construction of these canals, and is actively at
work on them at the present time. At present
writing three large specially constructed
dredges are working, and before the season is
over two more of these dredges will be placed
in commission and the work will be pushed
from each end of the canals.
One canal now completed, running from
Lake Okeechobee west into the Caloosahat-
clhee River, has already lowered the level of
the lake fourteen inches,
The reclamation of these lands will open up
for settlement the richest and most productive
lands- in the world. As evidence of this fact
it can be authoritatively stated that other
portions of the Everglades that have been
reclaimed, notably along the Kissemee River,
are now selling at from $100 to $1,000 per acre.


in 1 he l lorloWa r.Ive9- -

think of their investment.


A


---4--lB31IPLiilr~~ '~I --_,






















Climate.
The climate of the Everglades is most mild
and equable. The vegetation shows by the hab-
it of growth that frost is practically unknown.
In fact, this land is considerably south of the
27th parallel, which is called "the frost line."
Only moderately high temperature prevails in
the summer, and this is much modified by the
prevailing breezes from the Gulf of Mexico on
the west and the Atlantic Ocean on the east.
As to the climate in the winter, it is only
necessary to call attention to the fact that our
lands are in the same latitude as Palm Beach
and Miami, only a few miles distant, and
acknowledged to be the greatest winter resorts
in America, where hundreds of thousands of
people go annually, and which have admittedly
the finest winter climate on our Continent.
The mean temperature is 73 degrees. It is
seldom warmer than 83 degrees in the sum-
mer or colder than 50 degrees in winter, with
a minimum of 38.27 degrees, and a maximum
of 83.7.. The climate of this section of Florida
compares favorably with the world famed
Southern California. The figures given above
are from the Climatological Service of the
Weather Bureau of the United States Govern-
ment.
Products.
Among the almost innumerable products that
can be profitably raised on this land, particular
mention may be made of oranges, grapefruit,
lemons, limes, avocadoes, pawpaws, persim-
mons, mulberries, figs, guavas, beans, cabbages,
tomatoes, celery, eggplant, bananas, the plan-
tain, sugar cane, cotton, tobacco, rice, coffee,
hemp, flax, Indian corn, barley, hops, buck-
wheat, cassava, pineapples, strawberries, water-
melons, cantaloupes, peaches, pears, citrons,
squash, okra, beets, cucumbers, cauliflower,
lettuce, onions, sweet and white potatoes, and
peanuts. Two crops of vegetables per year
are raised.
The opportunities offered by the many ad-
vantages to be had by locating in Southern
Florida would take volumes to describe. All
of our statements, however, can be verified by
reference to the United States Government and
Florida State reports and the standard ency-
clopaedias. It is the object of this Company


to mention only a small number in the short-
est possible manner. Located as we are within
a few hours from the greatest of the world's
markets, with soil of unequaled richness, and
an unrivaled climate, he who secures property
under these favorable conditions is certainly
taking full advantage of his opportunities.
Where the water is pure, soft and plentiful.
Where one never feels the need of a vaca-
tion.
Where you have neither cyclones nor bliz-
zards.
Where the average fruit farm is from five to.
twenty acres.
Where a year from now this land will be out
of your reach.
Where the taxes .are so low the amount is
never' missed.
Where the laws protect both the investor
and the settler.
Where the air is pure, is filled with ozone
and invigorating.
Where the overworked business man can
rest and recuperate.
Where that hacking cough will cease and
sore throat never appear.
Where the country is advancing and prop-
erty values rapidly increasing.
Where the land yield is enormous and the
prices are always remunerative.
Where not only the greatest variety of fruit
and vegetables are grown, but the very best
quality of each.
Where pure air and pure water enables your
stomach to successfully perform its work and
indigestion is no more.
Where the growing season is twelve months
every year and two crops of vegetables can be
grown each year.


"9',


I,

- -


4
Pt A


~ac~r~c-~,,


~L~J






Little Journeys
to the

Everglades
of

Florida


What some


of the Contract


Holders


in The Florida Everglades
think of their investment.


Land


Co.







-' -. *

"'A'
R L





The following letter of Mr. I'ert L. Merry, of Minneapolis, should bear particular
weight, because he has backed his own opinions heavily. He investigated the Florida
Everglades Land Company enterprise for himself and his friends and associates, and
upon his return made the following report and bought thirty contracts:

Minneapolis, Minn., March 31, 1910.
To the Members of Florida Everglades Land
Club, of Minneapolis.

Gentlemen:
I submit the following report of my trip to the Everglades of Florida.
I left Minneapolis March 14th via the Great Western Railway, in company with several
other delegates from different places in the state. We had been supplied with round trip tickets,
maps, etc., by the B. W. Mulford Company, 25 South Fourth street. We arrived in Chicago Tues-
day morning. We visited the General Office and were cordially received by Mr. Schocke. We
there met a large number of delegates who had been selected by their clubs to make a report on
the Florida Everglades Lands.

We arrived at Fort Myers Friday. Saturday morning eighty of us delegates were taken on
seven boats up the Caloosahatchee River to see the "Land of Promise." What sights we saw on
our trip up the beautiful Caloosahatchee to gladden the eyes of us Northerners! Grape fruit and
beautiful orange groves upon either side of the river. We stopped Saturday night at Hotel
Goodno.

Next morning we started for Lake Okeechobee, which we reached about noon. We then
headed for Camp Sewell, where we arrived Saturday night, in time to do justice to a bountiful
supper of the most excellent vegetables, grown at Camp Sewell.

Next morning we visited the experimental farm, where we saw many varieties of vege-
tables, all of the highest quality and appearance. Bananas ten to twelve feet high, with fruit five
to six inches in length. Sugar cane at least seventeen feet high and about two inches in diam-
eter at the lower end. Nursery stock of many different kinds: Avocado Pears, Mango, Guavas,
Grape Fruit and Orange trees, and many other varieties. One of the things that in the future will
be grown here on he Everglades, successfully and profitably I believe, will be tobacco.

The fleet took us down the South Canal several miles, then we went ashore and walked
along the shore to the Observatory, erected by the Company. We climbed to the top, some
forty feet, and we saw to the right of us, in front of us and to the left of us as far as the eye
could see, a vast prairie of tall, waving saw grass. Not a tree to be cut down or a stone to be
removed by the husbandman, and the only thing to be done to clear the land for cultivation is to
cut the grass or burn it off when dry.

This is the greatest opportunity for a poor man to get a home in what will be the "Garden
Spot" of the United States in the very near future. This is the only place in Florida that was not
affected by the frosts of last winter. I found upon investigation that all kinds of vegetables could
be grown on this land in summer as well as in winter, which cannot be done on sandy land in
summer.

Mr. Sewell found a ready sale for all that he could raise and sold his watermelons in Fort
Myers for three cents per pound.

I found the land as good as represented; yes, better than I expected to find it, and my advice
to the members of the club is to complete their contracts and advise all their friends to buy all they
can, for I believe this land will sell within three years for $300 to $500 per acre. I am going to
sell my property here and invest it in the Florida Everglades Land-"The Land of Promise."
Yours truly,
27 West Fifteenth Street. BERT L. MERRY.
P. S. I will add that at a meeting of the eighty delegates held on the land at Camp Sewell
it was unanimously agreed that the townsite be named Garden City, Florida.
(2)





. .. ..... _--- -"









Mr. Huckins is the Chicago representative of the Hyde-Shaw Company of California,
packers of fancy table fruits. He has an office in the First National Bank Bldg., Room 102S.

Chicago, March 8, 1910.
Florida Everglades Reclaimed Land Company,
Chicago.

Gentlemen:

Leaving Chicago February 15, 1910, I went direct to your lands on the south shore of Lake
Okeechobee and personally made an exhaustive investigation from the standpoint of an investor
and intending settler. Briefly, I concluded that your proposition contained four fundamental ele-
ments which appeared to me as being of vital importance in analyzing your offering:

First. The climate is ideal, judging from personal observation while there, and the govern-
ment weather reports for many years. One, therefore, must conclude that the climate is a strong
commercial asset, owing to the absolute freedom from frost, and thereby giving twelve months
of uninterrupted growing season, which means much when winter crops are to catch the high
prices in the Northern markets.

Second-I found the soil to be all that is claimed for it, and surely the richest I have ever
seen and of great depth, said to be ten to twenty feet, and I cannot doubt it.

Third. Transportation. While transportation for commercial use does not exist today,
Palm Beach and the Florida East Coast Railway is only thirty-two miles distant, and an inviting
field for feeder roads to that first class system. The state canals will provide cheap and effective
transportation at an early date.

Fourth. Drainage. The fact that the State of Florida is bound by contract to complete the
projected canal system, and is constantly working to that end under the able management of Maj.
J. O. Wright, recently chief engineer of the United States Department of Agriculture, removes
all doubt about the successful outcome in the quickest possible time.

All other features are, in my opinion, of minor importance, and do not affect the merits of
the propositions.

There can be no doubt but what these lands will carry a valuation of $1,000 per acre within
a very few years.
I have invested to the extent of my ability and advise my friends to do likewise.
Yours with respect,
W. A. HUCKINS.

Kansas City, Mo., May 1, 1909.

Gentlemen: I already own ten acres of muck land three miles out of Dania, Florida. I rent
my land at $15 per acre per year to vegetable farmers. It is new land, having been ditched or
drained only six months. The renters raise eggplant, okra, peppers, lettuce and tomatoes in the
early fall, winter and early spring. They make from $200 to $300 off their lettuce, eggplant, okra
and peppers, and from $400 to $1,000 per acre off tomatoes; the latter being considered the best
crop. My renters tell me there is enormous profits in the raising of vegetables and that poor
negroes and crackers pile up small fortunes in raising vegetables for the Northern markets.
There is a great deal of poor farming done in this section of the country by such people, but
nature is so lavish in her gifts that they succeed regardless of slovenly farming methods.
Yours very truly,
4128 Troost Ave., Kansas City, Mo. ELIZABETH T. BAKER.


I __ ~~~~~


d










. .. .. .P Q ..
. . -" i








AMr. T. J. Champion, who for () years has heen constantly engaged in business
at the Chicago Stock Yards, became interested in our enterprise, and, after a visit to
Florida, writes as follows:
Chicago, February 21, 1910.
Gentlemen:
Having just returned from a three weeks' trip in Florida, a portion of which was most pleas-
antly devoted to an inspection of the land of the Florida Everglades lying immediately south of
Lake Okeechobee, in which your Company is interested, I wish to thank you for urging me to
get a personal view of these lands while in the South.
This I did, leaving Fort Myers on February 4th with a genial party of twelve in which Chi-
cago and Minneapolis were doubly represented. The States of Iowa, Wisconsin, Colorado and
Texas each had representatives, and one of Florida's most successful pineapple growers, Mr. H. G.
Strouder of White City, had come over from his home on the East Coast to join us.
In most delightful weather like days of June in Chicago we ascended the Caloosahatchee
River to Lake Okeechobee, remained two nights at your Camp Sewell on the South shore of that
lake and there found the tenderest garden vegetation, thriving amazingly on new land that had
been first turned from its virgin state last November.
Herbert Sewell's field of bananas, planted there seven months ago, was in a thrifty state,
tomatoes were ripe and sweet corn ready to tassel. From the truck gardens that are being culti-
vated there, cabbages, cauliflower, egg-plant, green peppers and tomatoes are being shipped and
all these products are of premium quality. It seems the most productive and most easily cultivated
virgin soil I have ever seen. These crops and many others are being grown on your tract before
the drainage system is more than just well started. But the State of Florida is now thoroughly
aroused over this reclamation work. Four dredges are now in active operation, and I am given to
understand the drainage commission is negotiating with one of the largest contractors of the Pan-
ama Canal a contract to complete the entire system of canal work within a specified number of
months.
There has been opposition, corporate, political and otherwise, to this drainage plan in years
past, but those who antagonized the project twelve months ago are now rallying to its support, as
all interests begin to realize what this great work means to Florida's future. Former foes of the
enterprise are now its stanch friends and many of the best citizens of the state are investing in
these rich and promising lands.
We saw the dredges in operation and the vast work they have already done. Their prog-
ress reveals to the observer the ease and dispatch with which this great drainage work will be
completed when the present working force has been tripled or quadrupled, which will undoubt-
edly be soon.
Possibly the best evidence of the unanimous enthusiasm of our entire party over these
lands is the fact that every man returned a buyer, or, if he had previously bought, increased his
former purchase.
Very truly yours,
T. J. CHAMPION.


"In the past three years I have made $30,680.00 from five acres Celery Land."-C. F.
Williams.

"I received $10,700.00 for the Celery and other vegetables grown on six acres of my land on
Celery Avenue, in 1908."-Mrs. B. E. Tackach.

"Last year I let out eight acres on shares for a Celery Crop. I furnished the land, my
tenant the labor and each shared equally the expenses of seed, fertilizer, etc. When the crop was
marketed and all expenses paid, we divided $8,400.00 between us."-J. E. Pace.

"I began growing Celery here nine years ago with $500.00. I paid $100.00 down on my land,
and used the remaining $400.00 for working expenses. I would not sell my place now for less
than $30,000.00, nor a single improved acre of it for less than $1,000.00. I grow mixed crops of
vegetables. Some of my neighbors have made larger crops than I, but I never did better than
$1,700.00 on an acre of Celery."-A. McDonald.

(4)




1 __ /' ^ -^ <- ----








Mr. W-ombacher, the.author, of this report, is one of the old residents of Proctor,
Minn. For the last 16 years he has been an engineer on the D. M. & N. Ry. He was
selected by his neighbors as the proper man to make this investigation on account of
his experience and judgment:

The Members of the Proctor Everglades Club.

Gentlemen: Proctor, Minn., March 26, 1910.

As your representative I make this report of my trip to the Everglades of Florida:
I left Proctor February 28th, and reached Ft. Myers March 4th and left same day for a
sail up the Caloosahatchee River; on which trip I made a few stops to examine the country, and
reached Camp Sewell on company's land at the south end of Lake Okeechobee, Sunday even-
ing, March 6th.

I found everything as was represented-even beyond my expectation. At the camp we were
served with fine fish caught from the lake, and all kinds of vegetables grown on the Experimental
Farm of the Florida Everglades Land Company, adjoining. We had Tomatoes, Cucumbers, Cab-
bage, Peas, Beans, Red Beets, Onions, Cauliflower, Celery, Egg Plant, Peppers and Potatoes.

Monday morning we made a thorough examination of growing crops and the soil. There
was a fine grove of Bananas seemingly ten feet high.

The entire party of sixty delegates, hailing from twelve different states then entered the
five launches and went to the east end of lake to see the Rubber and Paw Paw trees, and re-
turned to camp for dinner; after which we went down the south canal four or five miles through
our land and climbed to the top of an observatory erected by the Company to give a better view
of the saw grass than could be obtained from the ground. As far as we could see with the
naked eye it was one vast level prairie of saw grass. We again examined the soil and found it the
same as on the lake at Camp Sewell, where it ran from ten to fifteen feet of black muck-the
finest and best soil I ever looked at.

After a good night's rest we started for Ft.. Myers, arriving the same evening. Here we
spent a day taking in the sights.

On the morning of the 10th we departed for Miami, on the East Coast, where we took the
steamer "Lady Lou" and sailed up the Miami River and into the State Canal, being dug towards
Lake Okeechobee, and saw the Everglades from the south-looking northwest. It looked the
same as we saw it from the other side, near Lake Okeechobee-looking south. The Everglades
looked good from whichever end you saw it.

I gained all the information I could on the drainage question, and was pleased to find that
the railways, land companies and state had reached an agreement whereby the state was to let the
drainage by contract, which I hope will soon be done, and if so, the drainage will be completed
inside of two years.

I was so well pleased with all I saw of the Glades that I took one more contract, for it
surely is the best proposition I came across while looking over the different propositions offered
in the Everglades.

In closing I will say, as to health, climate and all other conditions, the Everglades look good
to me. Yours truly,

R. M. WOMBACHER.

(5)


A.





R-- --'J




T .. \





Mr. T. R. IDodson, of Nashwauk, Minnesota, also wrote the following clear and
comprehensive report of his observations and impressions of the trip, and his conclu-
sions as to the value of a contract in The Florida Everglades Land Company:


Nashwauk, Minn., March 18, 1910.


To the Members of Florida Everglades Club
of Nashwauk.

Gentlemen: I submit the following report:
I left Nashwauk February 28th for Minneapolis. On train I fell in conversation with a gen-
tleman who proved to be Mr. R. M. Wombaiher of Proctor, one of the veteran engineers of the
Missabe Railway, who was also a delegate. Ne were met at depot by Major Cooley. After sup-
per we proceeded to the office of Company, No. 25 South Fourth street, where we met Mr. B. F.
Mulford, and were supplied with round trip transportation, maps, folders, etc. We left Minneap-
olis at 9:55 P. M., via the Northwestern and reached Chicago at 11 A. M. After dinner we visited
the General Office of the Florida Everglades Land Company, and met Mr. H. J. Bryant, vice
president, who gave us a cordial welcome and assured us of good treatment, which we certainly
received throughout the trip. We met a number of delegates, among whom were Senator J. T.
McGowan, who has bought five contracts, also his friend, Mr. McCarthy, of Minneapolis. We left
Chicago at 9:55 P. M. of March 1st, and reached Ft. Myers about midnight of March 4th, ten
hours late.

It would be difficult to describe our sensations next morning, as we awoke in what seemed
to be a veritable fairyland; instead of bare trees and bleak and snow capped landscapes, we saw
beautiful orange and grape fruit trees, stately palms and many fruit and ornamental trees of which
we could not even guess the name. It was a wonderful sight to one who had spent twenty years in
northern Minnesota. I actually forgot my dinner in my eagerness to see all the sights of this
beautiful little city.

Finding a boat going up the Caloosahatchee River I preceded the party for a more leisurely
inspection of the country. It was a pretty sail. The shores were lined with groves of Orange,
Grape and other fruit trees. We stopped at a grove owned by a Texan named Flowrie. It cov-
ered 450 acres and I was presented with all the fruit I could carry. I landed at La Belle and pro-
ceeded by automobile to Goodno's Hotel at Ft. Thompson. In the morning a fleet of five launches,
conveying about sixty delegates, came along in charge of Mr. Edsall, whom I found to be a most
estimable gentleman, and I continued my journey. There was a swift current, and it was plain,
even to the landsman, that we were going up hill all the way. I will state here, that from the
force of the current for sixty miles, I was thoroughly convinced as to the fall from the lake, and
it was manifest that no engineering problem was involved in the reclamation of the Everglades.
The fleet entered the lake and headed for the south end, reaching Camp Sewell for a late supper,
which was much enjoyed by a horde of hungry men. Among the vegetables we had potatoes, cel-
ery, tomatoes, and beets, all raised on the premises.

After a good sleep and hearty breakfast we paid an early visit to the experiment farm
adjoining. Here we saw a great variety of vegetables. I was much impressed with the character
of the cabbage. It was firm and solid instead of loose, as I expected to find it, because of rapid
growth on this rich soil. All the vegetables were high grade in appearance and quality-the pota-
toes were smooth skin and solid with no evidence of scab or blemish, as might be expected. The
bananas were ten feet high and had fruit several inches long. We saw a large amount of nursery
stock in beds ready for setting out, and secured much valuable information from the man in charge.

(6)






S-... -. ., .. .




I ---~-----~I~


He stated that no fertilizer whatever was used. This is significant as it was practically the only
place in Florida where it was not. We visited the east side of lake; here we found more gardens,
and many wild Rubber, Paw Paw and other native trees. Returning, the fleet descended the old
Diston Canal (running south from the lake) for four or five miles. At this point, the majority
were satisfied with what they had seen, but I went ashore with about a dozen delegates and
walked along the bank of the Canal a mile or more to the Observatory erected by the Company.
We climbed to the top, a distance of forty feet, and were well paid for our trouble. As far as our
glasses could carry, we looked upon a vast, unbroken, level prairie covered with tall saw grass.

Returning to Camp Sewell, the delegates reviewed their experiences and compared notes.
We made another examination of the soil. A teh-foot pole failed to reach the strata of Caroline
limestone. The soil was moist from a heavy raih of previous day, yet it seemed to retain its
granular character. It would not pack from pressure when held in the hands as would clay soil.
and a handful rubbed between the hands presented much of the characteristics of sawdust; that
is, it would sift out and did not stick to the han s.

I need not refer to climate, temperature, health, productivity of the soil and general condi-
tions. I could only confirm what has been repeat dly told by those who have preceded me. I did
not meet Maj. J. O. Wright, but those who did learned there would be efficient, aggressive vush-
ing of the drainage work from now on. One large contractor offers to give a million dollar bond
that he will complete the entire system in thirty months, and in this he claims a margin of half
a year. There is evidence of rapid settlement of this whole district.

As to the value of our contracts I will say that from prices now being freely paid for land
in other sections of the Glades, the land adjacent and south of Okeechobee, ought to be well
worth Two Hundred dollars per acre; but dividing this estimate by four, will state that our con-
tracts are cheap at Five Hundred dollars.

Respec Ifullv.

T. R. DODSON.
Mr. Dodson is a dealer in drugs and druggl.ti' sundries at Nashwauk, Minn., and is a man
of high standing in his community.




Mr. F. G. Crawford is a Contract Holder in our Company, and writes as fol-
lows. after i-;li ii Florida and seeing our land:

Plainfield, N. J., April 6, 1910.
The Florida Everglades Land Company, Chicago, Ill.
Gentlemen:
I have just returned home from the South after visiting the Everglades land and feel that
any one holding or having any interest in same has a good thing. I am very much pleased
with my interest.

Yours truly,
1130 Dunellen Ave., Plainfield, N. J. F. G. CRAWFORD.

Mr. Crawford is a dealer in coal, wood and feed in his city.

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__ ___^ _^ ^ ^ t1^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^i


I





-- """--- -----..--~-< -.- ^








Read what a former resident of Kansas, who has been located in Florida for a
few months, writes to his friends in Girard, Kansas, about the land of The Florida
Everglades Land Comnpany:

Fort Lauderdale, Fla., March 21, 1910..

Mr. E. N. Richardson, Girard, Kansas.
Friend Richardson: Yours of March 16th received. I arrived here on the 5th of January
with my family and like this part of the county y very much. There is no doubt in my mind but
that the Everglades section of Florida will be ot.e of the richest agricultural sections of the United
States in the near future, and that this place wh ch is only a small town now of about 500 of white
population will in the course of two or three years be a thriving city of at least 30,000 or 40,000
people, solely on account of the drainage of the 4verglades, for when one takes into consideration
the opening up of 2,000,000 acres of the richest 14 nd in the world, and that at least 600,000 acres of
this territory is tributary to this point on accou t of its being situated on the largest river drain-
ing this land, and more canals center here than It any other point, and that Fort Lauderdale has
the best natural harbor south of Jacksonville, it :annot help but be a great distributing and manu-
facturing place.

I went up the canal out of Miami the other day, and on land that was covered with water
when I went up the first time, on the 23d of November, 1909, were growing the finest crops of
vegetables for the Northern market, especially tomatoes. One would scarcely believe that where I
saw black bass (or trout as they call them here) swimming about on this very spot I saw toma-
toes growing that would yield between 500 and 600 crates to the acre. I do not think you need to
worry any about misrepresenting this land to y)ur customers, for I think it is all and even better
than any of the companies have represented it to be that have sent out any literature that I have
seen.

As near as I can make out, the dredges airerage about one mile a month each, and there
are five, and they expect to have more at work soon, for all opposition to the draining of the
Everglades has ceased, and two years at the most will see the Everglades a vast prairie instead
of a shallow lake as most of it is at present. THE LAND THAT YOUR COMPANY IS
SELLING IS CONSIDERED BETTER THAN THAT NEAR THE COAST, FOR THE
FARTHER THE DREDGES GET FROM THE COAST THE DEEPER THE MUCK AND
MARL GETS. I have only one contract in the Everglades, for my capital is limited and I have
it invested in land in Fort Lauderdale, which I believe will be a city, made so by the draining of
the Everglades.

The climate here is lovely, just mild summer weather ever since I came. We have not
used any fuel except for cooking since our arrival here, which is quite a change from my North
Dakota winters.
Yours fraternally,
J. K. GORDON.





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--o
>.1








Read the following letter of J. E. GravJel, of marblele, Minn., who went to Florida
for the express purpose of in- r ti tiii the lands of The Florida Everglades Land
Company for himself and his associates who are contract holders in the Company.
Remember, he is reporting to his friends and fellow townsmen, who hold him in enough
esteem to elect him to a public office in his town:
Marble Minn., March 30, 1910.
To the Members of the Everglades Club,
of Marble, Minn.
Gentlemen:
As your representative, I beg to submit th following report of my trip to the Everglades
of Florida:
I left Marble Sunday morning, March 13 h, and reached Fort Meyers Friday evening
about six o'clock.
There I met the rest of the party that w to leave next morning for the trip up the
Caloosahatchee River. The party numbered ei ty delegates, from eight different States. We
left Ft. Myers at nine o'clock Saturday morni and proceeded up the river, stopping at the D.
A. R. Flowerree grove for a supply of Oranges d Grape Fruit. While talking with Mr. Cook,
the manager of the grove, I remarked that I h heard at different times on the way down that
black muck land was not adapted for the raisir of Citrus fruits. Mr. Cook then invited the
party to follow him in the grove and he would s w us how the Oranges and Grape Fruit were
doing on black muck soil. We found that all tl trees on the said soil were literally covered with
fruits, which appeared to be of the finest quality:
We then proceeded up to LaBelle, where we stopped over night, reaching Camp Sewell
about seven o'clock Sunday evening.
The next morning I went through the garden, where I found growing in profusion the fol-
lowing vegetables: Sweet Corn, Lettuce, Red Beets, Beans, Cabbage, Tomatoes, Green Peas, Cel-
ery, Peppers, Tail, Radishes, Cauliflower, Lima Beans, Onions, Squash and Potatoes. The garden
was a fine demonstration of what could be do e on this land before being drained; it was plain
that the soil was still too wet, as nothing had been done to drain the land used for this garden.
The Banana grove, planted the tenth of ay, was doing real fine, as each tree had a bunch
of fruit, some of which, I was told, would be ri e in about six weeks. Mr. Callahan's garden
adjoining Camp Sewell included, besides most f the vegetables mentioned before, a nursery stock
of Lemons, Oranges, Grape Fruit, Mangoes aid Guava buds, which seemed to be doing nicely.
The party then visited the wild Rubber ees and Paw-Paw trees growing on the east side
of Lake Okeechobee, returning to camp for diner. In the afternoon we went down the South
Canal a few miles with the launch, then wal d about a mile and a half to the observatory
erected by the company, in order to obtain a better view of the Glades.
All one could see was a vast prairie coveed with Saw grass. There the soil was the same
as at Camp Sewell, and the same as samples which my predecessors brought back with them.
I saw wild lemon trees on the shores of the canal, but there was no fruit on them. Mr.
Clarence Edsall explained that the last party that visited the trees were so anxious to bring back
a sample that they gathered all the fruit.
From all information that I could gather from different parties, the land south of Lake
Okeechobee was the only portion of Florida that was not affected by frost this winter.
In regards the drainage question, will say that judging from the current in the Caloosa-
hatchee River, there will be ample fall to lower Lake Okeechobee, and drain the Glades.
I have been informed that a contract has been signed by the State of Florida and the land
companies, whereby the drainage will be let to the lowest responsible bidder, to be completed
within three years. By virtue of this agreement the railway and land companies have paid to
the State their back taxes, which amounts to $800,000. This contract, I understand, is now in press
and will be published in a short time. In conclusion will say I have heard nothing detrimental
about the climate, health, etc., and I advise all contract holders to mature their contracts, as I
think it a splendid investment.
Sincerely Yours,
J. E. GRAVEL.

NOTE-Mr. Gravel is a practical man, by profession a shovel runner in the employ of
the Oliver Iron Mining Company at Marble, and is serving his second term as Village Recorder.
He bought one contract last fall and this spring bought another and then was elected by his asso-
ciates to go to the Everglades and make an investigation.
(9)




A














Mr. Fitch is one of the chief assistants in the City Attorney's office, Chicago, with an office in
[ the First National Bank Building.


Chicago, Ill., April 9, 1910.
The Florida Everglades Land Co.,
Chicago, Ill.

Gentlemen:
Having occasion recently to go to Florida, I concluded to inspect the land offered by you
for sale in the Everglades, and for that purpose j :ned a party of about fifty people, and the first
week in March went to your property at Camp well on the southern shore of Lake Okeechooee.
I found everything as represented in your liter ture; and that was the unanimous verdict of the
party.

After being upon your land, seeing the producing capacity of the soil as demonstrated by the
vegetables growing on your land, and also u3.a -re. bananas and other products, on your farm
or on lands immediately adjoining, no doubt re-,lin- that the soil and climate are all you claim
for it-and more. There were several practical ~irdjeer, in our party and they were enthusiastic
over the productive qualities of the soil and its a ptability to any kind of vegetables and citrous
fruits.

After traveling up the Caloosahatchie rive' and through the canal connecting it with Lake
Okeechobee, noting the flow of the water tlir.:.u:-i them, we were convinced that all that is neces-
sary to make the Everglades dry and a veritable garden spot, is the completion of the canals now
under construction, and contemplated by the plans of Major J. 0. Wright, the United States Gov-
ernment expert who is now in charge of the construction of the canals. From all the information
I could gather from responsible sources, I am satisfied that the canals under construction will be
completed by January, 1911,, and that the other canals, the whole system, will be finished in the
course of two or three years. As those canals nbw building are the ones that particularly affect
your lands, I think they will be ready for cultival-ion before next March.

Taking it all in all, I would not sell my two contracts for a thousand dollars in cash today,
unless I knew that I could get two more. Your p .-,. r.itr.rn is the best investment for a man of
moderate means I ever saw; and that was the op I.i:.rn .: all of our party.

Yours truly,
6325 Monroe Ave., Chicago. EDWARD C. FITCH.



lajur \V\ri'hit's statement as It, Draina.ge ;iven herewith is brief but to the
pint. \\ hat he savs can he c nIsidered as (.)peCl -reardi the draina- e of The
Fvergl;ldes of Florida:

Tallahassee, March 10, 1910.
The Florida Everglades Land Company, Chicago, Ill.
Gentlemen:
Your favor of March 7th received and in reply will say that there are no engineering diffi-
culties whatever to overcome in draining the Everglades. The proposition is a big one, but not a
difficult one.
The elevation of Lake Okeechobee is twenty-one feet above sea level, and it is a well estab-
lished fact that if sufficient canals are dug that water will run down hill.
Yours very tru'y,
J. O. WRIGHT, Chief Drainage Engineer.
NOTE-Major Wright, who until recently was Supervising Drainage Engineer of the
United States Bureau of Reclamation, now has complete charge of the drainage of the Everglades.
He is recognized as one of the best posted experts on drainage in the world.


(10)





-
I~~~~~ NOEMjrWihwoutlrcnl asSpriigDang niero h




W-- U-


Citrus Fruits


Florida is famous throughout the \\
Ninety-five per cent of all the gral
this winter will come from Florida and ]

Florida Withe
in Grai

According to the most eminent auI
cultural College of the University of Ca]
hope to, raise grapefruit commercially.
that froze during 1895 cannot safely ra
the southern part of the Florida peninsit

Grapefruit is being planted extensil
bears earlier and has bigger fruit, fewer
oranges because it has a much thicker


Our Lands O4
Protecte


rld for oranges and grapefruit.
fruit that will be served in American homes
miaica.

t Competitors
e Fruit

c, ity, Dr. I. J. \icksoi, dean of the Agri-
fornia, California does not, nor can she ever
exas cannot raise it. The sections of Florida
s5 it. Its profitable production is limited to
1a.

el.y even in preference to the orange. It
e uired to fill a box. It ships easier than
kin. It sells for better prices.


side Frost Zone
I by Water


\ country to be thoroughly adapted to citrus fruits must he safely outside the
frost line. Very little of the niiited States is so situated.

The United States Department of Agriculture Bulletin 2:1S, says: "Frost protec-
tion is imparted by large bodies of watef such as Lake Okeechobee."

They are not subject to sudden chiinges of temperature. In winter they are
warmer than the land and raise its temperature greatly. They continue warmer at
the approach of a freeze and combat or ilullify its effect. Cold winds blowing over
them are warmed. The Glades are practically surrounded by large bodies of water
and are immune from the Northwest winds which usually accompany freezing weather.



(11)


i




- ._ .-"- -__ --4 --- ,






There is no other place either in the Unii il States or the rest of Florida so extra-
ordinary favored for the growing of tender citrus fruits. Lemon and lime trees,
most sensitive of plants, are growing wild south of the lake. Even the leaves of the
delicate mango tree passed through the gr at freeze of 1895 without serious damage
when the entire fruit crop north of the lake was wiped out.

Besides being remunerative, orange g ,owing is fascinating. The labor i 'slight,
the tree in bearing a thing of beauty and it development a source of pleasure.' Truck
gives more immediate returns but reuiire^ .reaier labor. A citrus orchard in bearing
only requires slight cultivation and fr, ili'.i ,:,n. the crop being sold on the trees.

Grapefruit, being a delicate gr.- tIh. c' 1 i-nl', be produced commercially in the
West Indies and in a small section of Flo'da. of which the Okeechobee region, by
reason of its water protection, is the nr,:,: t'.:.r.,l spot.

Grapefruit is practically a new thing. `'-:t one-tenth of the United States has yet
eaten it. Australia, Canada, England, anm all Europe are clamoring for it. The de-
mand is practically unlimited.

Grapefruit pays as high as $1,500 an I.cre, but a conservative estimate of the net
annual profits would be .'411-1 per acre, ani grapefruit begins to bear commercially
the third year.

The cost of bringing grapefruit and ,.li, orchards into bearing is about the
same.

Our land sells at one-tenth the price of apple lands in the Northwest. How
long will this last when people realize thi facts?

The drainage of the Florida Everglades has been before the people for some
years, but not until recently has the imatl. been taken up in a public way by all
parties interested, but there has now been I..ir...i. about an agreement between-the-
land holders and the Internal Improvement' Board of the State, whereby a system
of drainage will be installed on a th..rii~~.ljl, scientific basis.







(12)


_




p- -I ---I


The system of drainage is under the
vising drainage engineer of the Agricult
taken entire charge of this work of the Ev


hMr. Wright, accompanied
Board of Florida, is now 111
glades. and arranging for the


by J. C. Lu
ii' on a co
work that


Completion of the
Canals fror
Jaecksd
It is expected that wxithini the next t
Florida Coast Line Canal at the head of N(
with the St. Johns river will be open to nav
way extending from Key \\est up the Eas

At this time there remain but 1,000 f
sixty to seventy feet wide with a depth of
for use by the month of Alay, thus .n'l.l.i
twenty-five years or more ago.


supervision of Major J Wright, super-
:al Department at Washington, who has
:glade drainage for the State of Florida.

ng-, secretary of the Internal Improvement
1plete investigation of the Florida Ever-
to be done.


Inland Waterway
1 Miami to
nville
rty days the unfinished portion of the
th river and into Pablo creek, connecting
-ation, thus completing the inside water-
Coast of Florida to the St. Johns river.

t of earth to be excavated. This canal is
ve to six feet, and will probably be ready
; this great work which was begun some


United States engineers are now maal ng a survey of the canal with the end in
view of the government taking over the ca lal and making it a national waterway, in
which event it will be widened to 100 fee and deepened so that the torpedo flotilla
of the navy can use it as an inside water ay.

The large fleet of yachts that annual, come south during the fall and winter
months will next year be able to make the trip almost entirely through an inland
waterway, and the completion of this canal will largely increase this annual fleet of
pleasure craft.






(18]














Few persons realize the true size of Florida on looking at the ordinary map. As
an example: The distance from Chicago to Mobile, Ala., by rail is 910 miles; from
Flomaton, a small station near the nIl.ih .- corner of Florida. by rail to Key West
via Jacksonville the distance is 934 miles. or twentl-four miles farther than from
Chicago to iMobile.

Florida contains the oldest I. I n :. ,' settlement made by white persons in the
iUnited States. St. Augustine being cc.. ld to be the oldest city.

1!v reason of its g eo graphical b 'li'.- and climatic conditions, with its 1,300
miles of seacoast. Florida stands alone. I >ngo the States of our Union. We grow our
potatoes, tomatoes, cabbage, celery, .- i i ')erries and other things too numerous to
Mention, while the farms in the North : resting.

Our oranges, pineapples and gr 1.. h' it need no eulog'y: they speak for them-
el ves. Florida is the only State in ti Inion prowing- pineapples, 90 per cent.
beiil pinoduced aIlomu the 1East Coast, i i lihe industry has now reached the enor-
11mous iigure of nearly 1. (1(0.00O crates ,,,,' llv. Ten years ago it was less than '250,000
crates.


Has Very Litti Competition

\\e have scarcely any competition :" r our winter crops, as we are thro-ugh
shipping by the time the States north L as come into the markets. California is
too far away.

()ur best lands pro-,duce three field c ops between Tanuary and October, it re-
quirinii' about nineety days to mature a ,p. Farmers IgrOw Trish )potatoes, corn and
sweet potatoes on the same lroiund in nIi .tion.

A farmer \'hio contemp)lates i 1oing 1. Fhlorida should make up his mind first what
he wants to gro\v, because there are fru is produced in the southern and central
parts of the State which cannot be gron 11 in the northern andi western sections, but
vegetables can be grown from the extra i.- south endt to the north end of the State
from December to May.








(14)



--








I
Our best lands for growing field crops are the lands we drain. Pineapples are
only grown on the high, rolling, sandy ridges. Citrus fruits require a little heavier
soil than pineapples, although there is land adapted to both. In fact pineapples are
often planted between orange and grapefru l trees.


Florida is largely settled by NIorthel
tion by any one contemplating a removal to
The IWoard of Internal Improvement
the Everglades. \Vhen that task is accomp
be valuable for farming.


Winter Homr

A new phase of thle farming industry
few years. MAanv farmers from the Nortl
have winter homes and farms or orange grn
member after their work is over up there, pu
fruit and by the Ist of Alay they are thrc in
know a score \hio have done this vear after
North, enjoying outdoor life all winter in 'a
ozone of the sea. blended( by the sweetest sun
and brings health. comfort and happiness.
Florida is the winter playg round of N1
the LUnited States and Canada spend from
in a tent, houseboat, cottage or a $3,n001n1 Ii
the "new rich" mingle and rub elbows. A
Florida and the country at large proba
other for having penetrated its wilderness w\
beautiful hotels in the world, helped to build
made a paradise of what was once an impe
man and captain of industry is TT. I Flagler
Not content with building his railroad
continued it over the coral islands and waters
that city the most southerly railroad terminal
to Cuba and the Panama Canal.


people. \\e invite the closest examina-
lorida.
the State has undertaken the drainage of
hed it is expected that a large area will



b in Floridae

our State has developed during the last
in fact. many business men as well.
s in Florida. They come down in on-
in a crop of vegetables or market their
S...I back in their Northern homes. I
year, avoiding the severe winters of the
puntry where the balsam of the pine. the
hine, makes every day a "golden day"

A.merica and over 10(,000 people from
ne to six months there. You can live
I-L.. There the poor and the rich and
are as happy as children.
ly owe more to one man than to any
t his railroad, built nine of the most
towns, schools, churches and roads and
etrable jungle and wilderness, and that

I the end of Florida's mainland, he has
of the ocean itself to Key W\est, making
in the United States and the gateway


Florida welcomes the honest, industriiout homeseeker. There is a certain charm


about "Dixie" that appeals to people from
there you want to go again.


11 over the land. If you have ever been


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/


- -


C- -~ --


V
V
T








Everglades



Being Made Valuable
by Florida

Recommended by U. S.
Experts

The greatest land proposition in the United
States is being opened up by the State of Flor-
ida. The greatest opportunity for a farm ever
offered is in the Southern Peninsula of Florida.
South of Lake Okeechobee a wonderful country
lies. To the infinite stretches of horizon a high
level plateau covered with tropical grasses and
absolutely richer than the valley of the Nile, is














A Little Farm on the Glades Muck.
being reclaimed by the State for the future home
of an abundant population. Added to the soil,
deep black and uniform, the factor of climate,
health, early marketing of crops and the easy
terms of payment makes it now possible for each
to claim his rightful heritage, a piece of land.
The cry "back to the land" is ringing through-
out the large cities. In ten years the cost of liv-
ing has increased fifty per cent, whereas average


_ I


I ~








incomes have not increased more than ten per
cent. Every article of clothing, every item in
grocery 1'i11-, even house rent, has gone up, the
maintenance of social standards is threatened at
its foundation. Our population doubles every
twenty-nine years. Land is not increasing, but
rather ductive power. Manifestly, the supply of food
stuffs is not equal to the demand, and the cost of
living will not be less.
Land values are increasing each year. Soon
the middle classes cannot buy it, and there will
be but two great classes of people, those who own
land and those who do not. As in Europe, the
landless will be working for the landlords.

The Poor Man's Paradise
The Upper Everglades will grow anything that
grows in a tropical country -bananas, sugar
cane, citrus fruits and garden truck, and they
will grow them at any season of the year. Imag-
ine, for instance, fresh tomatoes in December at
Five Dollars a crate. One does not need a
warm house as in the irrigated country. Lum-
ber costs one-half as much as it does there. There
is no clearing to do. Fresh fish at two cents a
pound cleaned, and are cheaper if you catch
them yourself. In six weeks after you are on
your land you can be living off your own gar-
den. In the irrigated country conditions are
just the reverse. The necessary investment is
many times greater than in the Everglades; lum-
ber is twice as high as it is here, you must have a
team and farming tools, must build a warm
house, and wait a year for a crop, and must be
frozen in half the year, consuming and not pro-
ducing.

Climate and Health
There is no healthier spot in America than the
Upper Everglades. This is the unanimous opin-
ion of the experts, has and is being proven so
by actual experience. There is a sea breeze
almost constantly and nights are cool and com-
fortable; the soil is aerated, weighs less than
half the average Michigan soil. These facts
alone to scientific men prove the impossibility


I





















Eleven Month's Glades Bananas

My conclusions are:
1. The productivity of the land, when prop-
erly drained, is unquestionable and vast.
2. Water transportation will be provided by
the canals, good roads are already projected and
may readily be constructed from the underlying
coraline limestone thrown up by these dredges;
and, as I am assured by high railroad authority,
railroads will come as soon as needed.
The Citrus Growers' Association, less than a
year old, is modeled after and headed by the Sec-
retary of a successful similar California associa-
tion, and has already made good progress.
The influences which have retarded the drain-
age work-skepticism, lack of money, corporate
and political antagonism-have practically spent
their force; money is plenty, the fights are over,
foes of the enterprise have become its friends,
the practical administration of the work is, at this
writing, on the point of being placed in first-
class hands and the outlook for the efficient,
a.g,' i.i.c rushing of the work is most encourag-
ing.
With the natural advantages of the Everglades
region in point of soil and climate, the growth of
our population and the enormous advance in the
cost of living, I regard that region as the future
and early home of an abundant population of
thriving people-the best "poor-man's proposi-
tion" I have yet discovered.
Very truly yours,
THos. E. WILL,
Editor American Forestry.







Comparison
The average value of farm products in five
great states is as follows:
M issouri .....................$ 9.38 per acre
Iowa ........................ 12.22 per acre
Illinois ...................... 12.48 per acre
Ohio ........................ 13.36 per acre
Florida ...................... 109.76 per acre
Dade and Palm Beach Counties.. 469.00 per acre
The average in Palm Beach county is high, be-
cause the Palm Beach farmer is not snow-bound
in the winter. His land is working for him 12
months in the year. He gets his crops .into the
market in winter and early spring, when there is
no competition and when prices are high.
The Everglades is the opportunity for the man
of small means. A few acres is enough to sup-














Everglades Customers on the Canal

port a family in luxury and enable one to put
money in the bank. What others can do can be
lone by you. The best evidence that a few acres
is enough is shown by the following statistics of
average crops in Florida, compiled by Wilbur
McCoy, industrial agent:
Celery, 800 crates @ $1.25............ .1,000.00
Cabbage, 175 crates @ $1.25............. 218.00
C.;l lifi ... r, 150 crates @ $1.50....... 225.00
Cucumbers, 150 crates @ $1.50....... ...', i10
Cantaloupe, 100 crates @ $1.25......... 125.00
Lettuce, 600 baskets @ $1.25.......... ;. ,0
Tomatoes, 200 crates @ $1.25.......... 250.00
Beans, 175 crates @ $1.50............. 262.00


~~







Egg Plant, 800 crates @ $1.00 ........$ 800.00
Okra, 400 crates @ $1.25............ .500.00
Squash, 600 crates @ 60c............ 360.00
Onions, 400 bushels @ $1.00.......... 400.00
Peppers, 750 crates @ $1.00 .......... 750.00
Irish Potatoes, 50 barrels @ $3.00 ..... 150.00
Sweet Potatoes, 200 barrels @ 50c.... 100.00
Watermelons, 2/5 carload @ $150 ..... 60.00
Strawberries, 4,000 quarts @ 20c...... 800.00
Peaches, 6 tons @ $20 ............... 120.00
Sugar cane, corn, peanuts, pecans, lemons,
pears, guavas, pawpaws, berries, figs and pine-
apples are also grown in abundance.
Field crops, such as corn, field peas, peanuts,
potatoes, velvet beans and hay, can follow all veg-
etable crops. Two vegetable crops can be made
each year, one in fall and one in mid-winter and
early spring, thus enabling the farmer to grow
two to four crops on the same ground.
Watermelons are larger, sweeter, and the yield
per acre is greater than elsewhere. Cantaloupes
are as good as the Rocky Ford, and having no
competition in the market at that time, sell for
more money.
Cauliflower and either tomatoes or cucumbers
can be grown on the same land in one season.
Irish potatoes are planted in December and
come on the market in April-when new potatoes
command the highest prices. They bring from $3
to $5 a barrel. It is the usual thing to obtain fifty
barrels to the acre-a profit of from $150 to '? .I
an acre.
It must be remembered that there is compara-
tively little muck land in Florida as is true of
every other state, and that the average crop on
the muck would be much greater than the state
averages and in many cases two or three times
greater, excepting pineapples and sweet potatoes
which do quite as well on sand as muck.
Grape fruit and oranges do well on drained
Everglade muck, and southern Florida is the
only portion of the United States that can pro-
duce commercial grape fruit. This is a hardy
tree and begins bearing when three years old; a
grove at five years and older will produce a net
annual income of $500 to $1,000 per acre.


'---~~-~~~-~I








incomes have not increased more than ten per
cent. Every article of clothing, every item in
grocery bills, even house rent, has gone up, the
maintenance of social standards is threatened at
its foundation. Our population doubles every
twenty-nine years. Land is not increasing, but
rather diminishing, because of loss of its pro-
ductive power. Manifestly, the supply of food
stuffs is not equal to the demand, and the cost of
living will not be less.
Land values are increasing each year. Soon
the middle classes cannot buy it, and there will
be but two great classes of people, those who own
land and those who do not. As in Europe, the
landless will be working for the landlords.

The Poor Man's Paradise
The Upper Everglades will grow anything that
grows in a tropical country -bananas, sugar
cane, citrus fruits and garden truck, and they
will grow them at any season of the year. Imag-
ine, for instance, fresh tomatoes in December at
Five Dollars a crate. One does not need a
warm house as in the irrigated country. Lum-
ber costs one-half as much as it does there. There
is no clearing to do. Fresh fish at two cents a
pound cleaned, and are cheaper if you catch
them yourself. In six weeks after you are on
your land you can be living off your own gar-
den. In the irrigated country conditions are
just the reverse. The necessary investment is
many times greater than in the Everglades; lum-
ber is twice as high as it is here, you must have a
team and farming tools, must build a warm
house, and wait a year for a crop, and must be
frozen in half the year, consuming and not pro-
ducing.

Climate and Health
There is no healthier spot in America than the
Upper Everglades. This is the unanimous opin-
ion of the experts, has and is being proven so
by actual experience. There is a sea breeze
almost constantly and nights are cool and com-
fortable; the soil is aerated, weighs less than
half the average Michigan soil. These facts
alone to scientific men prove the impossibility








of malaria or fevers. The U. S. Weather
Bureau reports the maximum temperature at 95
degrees, while the maximum at Los Angeles is
14 degrees higher and there has never been a
frost that killed the tenderest vegetation. The
summers, of course, are longer than in the North,
but sunstrokes are unknown and every night one
sleeps under a blanket.

Markets
The produce is marketed in the Eastern Cities,
and is shipped either by rail or water. The
canals will be the means of reaching the ocean,
only a few miles away, and steam and electric
roads are already organized to supplement the
canals. Transportation to these great market
centers is rapid and cheap.

Drainage
The State of Florida is digging these great
canals at its own expense, the contract having
been let to Furst-Clark Company of Baltimore,
Md., who are under heavy bond for a speedy
completion of the work.

Physical Conditions
The Everglades are not an oozy swamp, but a
high lcvel plateau. The normal water level of
Lake Okeechobee is twenty-one feet nine inches
higher than the ocean tide. The depth of the soil
which averages from ten to fourteen feet south
of the lake decreases from the lake and runs out
to a shallow coating at the edge of the Glades.
Lake Okeechobee has no natural outlet, and dur-
ing the rainy season c-il.. -, its banks, making
the soil too wet for agriculture. The project of
reclamation is simple. The canals are not to
drain the land, but to lower the lake, and thus
avoid the danger of c-. : i I-. The soil is a de-
composed muck that has been thousands of years
in forming, and the Upper Glades (the land
south of the lake) are a veritable reservoir of
nitrogen. The soil does not have to be fertilized.
In their report of 1891, the U. S. Agricultural
Department says: "There is practically no
other body of land in the world which presents
such remarkable possibilities of development as


I I _I .,








the muck lands bordering the southern shores of
Lake Okeechobee. With the surface almost abso-
lutely level it affords promise of development
which reaches beyond the limits of prophecy."
The results obtained by the farmers there
more than verify this wonderful prediction.

Title and Terms
We are offering the lands lying adjacent to
and between the two South canals, commencing
near the timber fringe south of and near the Lake
and as our sales continue, we will progress south
along these canals, selling the saw grass land that
requires absolutely no clearing except the burning
of the grass. We are not selling lands held
under options. The title to these lands is clear of
all incumbrance, and any reasonable arrangement
will be made to accommodate the buyer. We
have no drawing, but are selling definite tracts
of five acres and multiples thereof and you know
what you are getting. Ours are the highest
lands in the Everglades and therefore are the
most perfectly drained. As to local transporta-
tion facilities, we can probably do no better than
to quote from a letter of Dr. Thos. E. Will, one
of the experts of the U. S. Agricultural Depart-
ment, in the second conclusion of the following
letter:

American Forestry Association
No. 1417 G Street, N. W.
Washington, D. C.
Office of the E.xecutive Secretacy
1417 G Street, N. W.
Washington, D. C.
February 8, 1910.
Dear Sir:
The interval between January 5 and January
19, I spent on a trip to Florida.
ly object was to inform myself as fully as
possible regarding:
1. The productivity of the Everglades land.
2. The transportation facilities for the terri-
tory to be reclaimed.
3. The marketing facilities for the products
to be raised on that territory.
4. The probable rapidity with which the
drainage work would be completed.





















Eleven Month's Glades Bananas

My conclusions are:
1. The productivity of the land. when prop-
erly drained, is unquestionable and vast.
2. Water transportation will be provided by
the canals, good roads are already projected and
may readily be constructed from the underlying
coraline limestone thrown up by these dredges;
and, as I am assured by high railroad authority,
railroads will come as soon as needed.
The Citrus Growers' Association, less than a
year old, is modeled after and headed by the Sec-
retary of a successful similar California associa-
tion. and has already made good progress.
The iil]..i .. which have retarded the drain-
age work-skepticism, lack of money, corporate
and political antagonism-have practically spent
their force; money is plenty, the fights are over,
foes of the enterprise have become its friends,
the practical administration of the work is, at this
,i.ii-. on the point of being placed in first-
class hands and the outlook for the efficient,
aggressive rushing of the work is most encourag-
ing.
With the natural advantages of the Everglades
region in point of soil and climate, the growth of
our population and the enormous advance in the
cost of living, I regard that region as the future
and early home of an abundant population of
thriving people-the best "poor-man's proposi-
tion" I have yet discovered.
Very truly yours.
TIIos. E. WILL,
Editor American Forestry.







Comparison
The average value of farm products in five
great states is as follows:
li --.. ... .. ......... ........... $ 9.38 per acre
Iowa ........................ 12.22 per acre
Illinois ...................... 12.48 per acre
Ohio ........................ 13.36 per acre
Florida ...................... 109.76 per acre
Dade and Palm Beach Counties.. 469.00 per acre
The average in Palm Beach county is high, be-
cause the Palm Beach farmer is not snow-bound
in the winter. His'land is working for him 12
months in the year. He gets his crops .into the
market in winter and early spring, when there is
no competition and when prices are high.
The Everglades is the opportunity for the man
of small means. A few acres is enough to sup-


jiA s'
'^- JW ,eSf^


Everglades Customers on the Canal


port a family in luxury and enable one to put
money in the bank. What others can do can be
done by you. The best evidence that a few acres
is enough is shown by the following statistics of
average crops in Florida, compiled by Wilbur
McCoy, industrial agent:

Celery, 800 crates @ $1.25 ............ .$ ,000.00
Cabbage, 175 crates @ $1.25 ........... 218.00
Cauliflower, 150 crates @ $1.50 ....... 225.00
Cucumbers, 150 crates @ -1 ":.......... 225.00
Cantaloupe, 100 crates @ $1.25......... 125.00
Lettuce, 600 baskets @ $1.25.......... ; '. 0
Tomatoes, 200 crates @( $1.25.......... 250.00
Beans, 175 crates @ $1.50............ '.'.0,


---- ------







Egg Plant, 800 crates @ $1.00 ........$ 800.00
Okra, 400 crates @ $1.25 ......... 500.00
Squash, 600 crates @ 60c............ 360.00
Onions, 400 bushels @ $1.00.......... 400.00
Peppers, 750 crates @ $1.00.......... 750.00
Irish Potatoes, 50 barrels @ $3.00 ..... 150.00
Sweet Potatoes,. 200 barrels @ 50c .... 100.00
Watermelons, 2/5 carload @ $150..... 60.00
Strawberries, 4,000 quarts @ 20c...... 800.00
Peaches, 6 tons @ $20............... 120.00
Sugar cane, corn, peanuts, pecans, lemons,
pears, guavas, pawpaws, berries, figs and pine-
apples are also grown in abundance.
Field crops, such as corn, field peas, peanuts,
potatoes, velvet beans and hay, can follow all veg-
etable crops. Two vegetable crops can be made
each year, one in fall and one in mid-winter and
early spring, thus enabling the farmer to grow
two to four crops on the same ground.
Watermelons are larger, sweeter, and the yield
per acre is greater than elsewhere. Cantaloupes
are as good as the Rocky Ford, and having no
competition in the market at that time, sell for
more money.
C':lliti:., :-r and either tomatoes or cucumbers
can be grown on the same land in one season.
Irish potatoes are planted in December and
come on the market in April-when new potatoes
command the highest prices. They bring from $3
to $5 a barrel. It is the usual thing to obtain fifty
barrels to the acre-a profit of from $150 to f."-"
an acre.
It must be remembered that there is compara-
tively little muck land in Florida as is true of
every other state, and that the average crop on
the muck would be much greater than the state
averages and in many cases two or three times
greater, excepting pineapples and sweet potatoes
which do quite as well on sand as muck.
Grape fruit and oranges do well on drained
Everglade muck, and southern Florida is the
only portion of the United States that can pro-
duce commercial grape fruit. This is a hardy
tree and begins bearing when three years old; a
grove at five years and older will produce a net
annual income of $500 to $1,000 per acre.


I








The large per cent of lime, silica, iron and other
minerals in Everglade muck makes it, when
drained, a sweet and healthful soil, highly adapted
to tree growth, and less congenial to insect pests
than sand or any other kind of soil.
We leave Chicago from the LaSalle Street Sta-
tion on the "Dixie Flyer" at 9 :0 p. m. the First
and Third Tuesdays of each month over the his-
torical Battle Ground, through Chattanooga,
Atlanta and Jacksonville to Fort Myers. Round
trip ticket to Fort Myers and return -* j.0.



If interested call at our office or write for
illustrated booklet



Florida Everglades Reclaimed Land Co.

1215 First National Bank Building


Tel. Randolph 2550


Chicago, Illinois


sa
: .
Ib
~.T~~W
c-


C- ~





Form 4.

The Palm Beach Farms Company


I OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
SPresident Vice-President Sec'y-Treas.
;' PERCY HAGERMAN JAMES I. COWAN C. E. TITUS
t WILLIAM A. OTIS HAROLD J. BRYANT
l \ General Counsel
HENRY C. HALL
REFERENCES
/f THE FIRST NAT. BANK
of Colorado Springs
S1 THE COLORADO TITLE AND TRUST CO.
S'.i of Colorado Springs
BANK OF PALM BEACH THE COLORADO SPRINGS
West Palm Beach, Fla. NATIONAL BANK


RYANT & GREENWOOD now
Place on sale 49,000 acres of The
Palm Beach Farms Company
Si-- lands, in Palm Beach County, Florida,
Divided into 7,000 tracts of varying
Size, no tract to be less than five acres
and all to be of as nearly equal value
as possible. In addition to the tract
each purchaser receives a townsite lot.



$250

_' In monthly payments of $10,
Sbuys a contract for a Tract and
S~~. a Townsite lot. There will be
\' "i 7,000 Tracts and 7,000 Town-
site lots.


FOR ALL INFORMATION ADDRESS
BRYANT & GREENWOOD
1407 Republic Building THE PALM BEACH FARMS CO. Chicago, Illinois /
809 G Street, N. W.
Phone Main 4260 Wa:,-n ,on, D0. *








2 The Palm Beach Farms Company


The Palm Beach Farms Company, a Colorado
corporation w i th principal offices in Colorado
Springs, Colo., now places on sale through Bryant
and Greenwood, of Chicago, Ills., 49,000 acres of
land and 7,000 townsite lots, located in Palm
Beach County, Florida.
Bryant and Greenwood, who have full authority
from the company, now offer for sale at $250 each,
7,000 contracts, each contract being for one tract of
land of not less than five acres and one lot in the
Company's proposed townsites.
The 49,000 acres of land will be platted into 7,000
tracts of varying size of as nearly equal value as
possible. In the platting all variations in the char-
acter of the soil, location, condition of surface and
other factors will be taken into consideration in
order to make the tracts of as nearly equal value as
possible.
The survey and classification now being made in-
dicates that the tracts will vary in size from not
less than five acres to about thirty or even forty
acres. In addition to the 49,000 acres which will
be platted into tracts, the Company provides free of
cost about 3,500 acres of land to be used for roads,
dykes, main ditches and townsites, and the tracts
will contain the full acreage shown on the plats
without any reservation except rights of way for
such small lateral ditches as may be necessary for
mutual protection.
As soon as possible after the closing of the sale,
and not later than December, 1911, the Opening will
be held, at which the tracts and lots will be auc-
tioned in the manner set forth in the contract.
/ The eastern boundary of the Palm Beach Farms
Company land averages about five miles from the
Florida East Coast Ry. While these lands are
among the best in southern Florida, they have
hitherto been unavailable for settlement on account
of a marsh lying a short distance west of the rail-
road which could not be crossed until expensive
roads had been built. These roads are now under


construction. The Company has appropriated the
sum of $100,000 for this purpose and for the digging
of lateral ditches necessary to thoroughly reclaim
the land. In addition to this Palm Beach County
has sold $200,000 of Bonds for building hard sur-
face roads and a considerable portion of this fund
will be used to construct said hard surface roads
running west from West Palm Beach, Delray, Boyn-
ton, Deerfield and Pompano. The State of Florida
has let a contract for the construction of a canal
from Lake Okeechobee to the Hillsboro River which
will pass through the south portion of these lands.
As soon as the hard surface roads are completed,
transportation by automobile will put these lands
within 30 minutes of the railroad. In addition to
the railroad transportation, there will be first class
water transportation to the port of Jacksonville by
the inland waterway.
These lands are level, lying on the average one
foot higher than the Everglades, and from eighteen
to twenty-one feet above sea level, thus affording
excellent facilities for drainage. The soil is for the
most part a sandy loam, containing muck which has
been deposited by overflows from the Everglades in
the past. There is a small amount of hammock
land, also muck and marl land. The early home-
seekers in Palm Beach County naturally settled
close to the railroad because there were no roads
to these lands further west. Boynton and Delray
are among the most prosperous communities in
southern Florida, and wonderful results are being
obtained on lands inferior to those now offered for
sale. These pioneers have shown what can be done
in this beautiful region.
A visit to these lands will convince anyone that
there cannot be found in Florida a finer combina-
tion of good soil, availability for early settlement,
healthful location, marvelous climate and accessibil-
ity to market than that afforded by the lands of
the Palm Beach Farms Company now offered for
sale by Bryant and Greenwood.








The Palm Beach Farms


Company 3


PALM BEACH FARMS COMPANY'S LAND
PALM BEACH FARMS COMPANY'S LAND


Back of Delray and Boynton is a
hain of fresh water lakes and marshes.
West of these marsh lands begins the
land now placed on sale, running north
nd south comprised of land with a
yellow subsoil of a sandy loam, furnish-
ing a soil especially adapted to the grow-
lag of citrus fruits.
These are the lands that border that
vast territory called the Everglades,
the lands lying between these shore or
coast lands and Lake Okeechobee, and
it is to Lake Okeechobee on the north
and northwest that Palm Beach county
is indebted for its immunity from frosts
and winter freezes.

The Climate
The climate of the east coast of Flor-
ida, particularly from the 27th parallel
southwest, has been pronounced by com-
petent judges the most pleasant and the
most healthful in the world. Lying in
the belt noted for equability of tempera-
ture, freedom from cyclones and other
severe storms, and coming under the
immediate influence of the gulf stream,
it enjoys unique advantages unparal-
leled on this continent.
The gulf stream, which hugs the east
coast with the warm water from the
tropical seas, running northward, at the
rate of four miles an hour, affords great
evenness of temperature, winter and
summer, and gives to the air directly
from the ocean a dryness and tonic ef-
fect that is at once noticeable to all
who come under its influence.
The season from November to June
is usually dry, save from an occasional


hard shower that refreshes vegetation
and makes the ever verdant landscape
more beautiful. The sun shines every
day, the breeze comes gently from the
ocean, the prevailing winds being west-
erly and southerly, soft, balmy, laden
with ozone and a tonic quality that only
the initiated can comprehend. So dry
is the air with an easterly wind that
within a quarter of a mile from the sea
a wet garment hung out in the breeze at
night will be found quite dry in the
morning.
The southeasterly trade winds, which
blow almost continuously from May to
September, temper the heat of summer
and keep the maximum range of this
region much lower than that of states
further north. It is always pleasant in
the shade on the southeast coast The
nights are cool, and such high day tem-
peratures as are common in New York
and Chicago are unknown here.
The winters, save for an occasional
norther, which is rare, bringing down a
kind of air that feels strange and un-
kind to us, are mild and June-like.
The remarkable equability of tem-
perature, the great dryness and disin-
fecting qualities of the ocean winds, the
pure and wholesome drinking water,
the absence of mud, fogs or soggy days,
the freedom from dust particles in the
atmosphere, the tonic effect of the sea
air, the great amount of sunshine, the
opportunity for salt water bathing every
day in the year. and the abundance of
such healthful food as the garden, or-
chards and waters afford, all combine
to make the southern part of Florida,


for health, one of the most favorable
spots in the world.
Such diseases as asthma, hay fever,
catarrh, rheumatism, and consumption,
in their incipient stages, and urinal
troubles, yield almost always to the in-
fluences of the climate and curative
water after a short residence near the
coast. Pneumonia, lung diseases, ty-
phoid and scarlet fever are unknown Wt
the natives.
Florida has no earthquakes, no sun-
strokes, no cyclones, and no blizzards.
The diseases common to childhood are
but lightly felt. Summer complaint is
nearly unknown, and deaths during in-
fancy are comparatively few.
The East coast with Lake Okee-
chobee to the northwest is practically
surrounded with water which has a
moderating effect upon temperature.
The death rate of Florida is extreme-
ly low. A lifetime might be spent in the
region and no malaria discovered. Pure
air that moves in gentle breezes (direct
from the Atlantic and the Gulf) is the
perfect assurance of health.

General Description
West Palm Beach
Located on Lake Worth, is the county
seat of Palm Beach county. It is a city
of some two thousand inhabitants. The
city has five miles of paved street, a
perfect sewerage system, entrance to
which by every house is required by
law; magnificent water works, electric
light, and an up-to-date ice plant.
The county high school at West Palm
Beach will compare favorably with any


wp


I









The Palm


Beach Farms Company


building of its class in the country. It
Is built of artificial stone and cost in
the neighborhood of $60,000. The fac-
ulty are governed by rigid educational
requirements and the graduates from
this school are admitted to the higher
educational institutions without prelim-
eary examination.
Right here it may be well to state that
dh splendid high and primary school fa-
dities at West Palm Beach are free to
ewry resident of Palm Beach county.
The famous Okeechobee road that is
mrant to eventually reach Lake Okee-
dobee, begins at West Palm Beach and
hs been built across the marshes, open-


Boynton
The next place south, and the last
town on Lake Worth, is thirteen miles
from West Palm Beach. This is one
of the best and most thrifty places
on the coast. It is inhabited by a class
of people who thoroughly understand
the cultivation of pineapple, citrus fruits
and vegetables. The town is well laid
out, has good schools and churches and
a number of prosperous stores and other
mercantile establishments. From this
point there is a rock road one and a
quarter miles west through the pineap-
ple section and it is now being ex-
tended several miles wide to open up
the farming lands that are already being
sought by the settler, and are lands now
available for immediate settlement.


Roads
Extending west from Boynton and
Delray to our land roads have been
graded and are being rock surfaced
and will be completed during the year
1911. The rock surfaced roads of
Palm Beach County are the wonder
of all visitors and have an immense
effect on land values and the develop-
ment of the country.
Deerfield
Twenty-eight miles south of West Palm
Beach, is located on the Hillsboro
river, and it is at this point that
one of the large drainage canals of
the State extending from Lake Okee-
chobee, will have its outlet. There are
at present several stores in Deerfield,
two hotels, a school, a church, and a


ADJOINING LAND IN CULTIVATION


ta up a magnificent farming section On the ocean beach at Boynton is number of large packing houses. Tlh
vst of the city. It is the real begin- located the Boynton Hotel, a noted win- lands west of Deerfield and Boca Ratom
sig of the rich farming lands of the ter resort, that is thronged with visitors are not only adapted to the growing of
ognty, to which West Palm Beach will throughout the season, vegetables, but many acres of them are
e the open door. Delray among the very best citrus fruit land
e the open door. eain the State.


From West Palm Beach west and
sath throughout the entire county are
te lands about which have been writ-
en so many stories of tremendous
profits per acre. Here begins the so-
alled valley of the Hillsboro, which ex-
teds south to Deerfield, including a
trct of land of some 60,000 acres of
hastimable value, all tributary to West
hia Beach and the other towns on the
Perida East Coast Railway.


Five miles south of Boynton and
eighteen miles south of West Palm
Beach, is a thrifty village on the Flor-
ida East Coast Railway, lying in the
midst of a splendid pineapple section
where there are now growing several
very fine orange and grapefruit groves.
Delray has schools, churches and a num-
ber of stores and a canning factory. It
contains a large settlement of Germans
of the best class who are thrifty and
rapidly accumulating wealth from the
land.


Ready for Settlement in 1911
The particular advantages enjoyed by
the lands extending north and south
along the eastern border of Palm Beach
county are immediate accessibility and
splendid transportation facilities.
This section of country is being rap-
idly improved. Roads are being con-
structed west from all the towns that
will open the back country and whe
these roads are paved with the natural
lime-rock they will be splendid high-


F---


-- --- -









The Palm Beach Farms Company 5


ways over which the produce of the
country can be hauled.
The cost of living in Palm Beach
county is no-greater than in any av-
erage section of the United States. The
cost of clothing is less than it would be
in any other section of the country.
Malaria is unknown in this county. In
fact it is unknown on the entire East
Coast. This is not a malarious region,
the lands are high, eighteen feet and
in some instances twenty-two feet
above the sea level.
The cost of erecting a house in this
county can be estimated on an average
of about $100 a room, for a house made
of finished lumber within and without.
This type of house will be comfort-
able and sufficient for the Florida
climate.
The principal crops now grown on
these lands are tomatoes, eggplants, pep-
", string beans, peas, squash, cucum-
s, Irish potatoes, cabbage and let-
tuce; but nearly every other kind of
vegetable is also grown in greater or
less quantities. The Irish potato indus-
try in this county is in its infancy, but
it has been demonstrated this year, and
by the few crops grown last year, that
these lands are admirably adapted to
this purpose and another year there will
be a much larger acreage planted.
The very highest prices have been ob-
tained from Irish potatoes grown on
these lands from the fact that they are
put into the Northern markets four or
five weeks earlier than those from any
other section of the United States. This
year the returns have been seven and
eight and in some instances nine dollars
per barrel.
This is also an ideal country for poul-
try and the local demand is good at
high prices.
With the drainage of the vast terri-
tory of the Everglades, in Palm Beach
county, will commence growing sugar
cane and rice, as these lands are ad-
mirably adapted to both crops.
As soon as the State completes its
drainage plans Palm Beach county will
become one of the most important agri-
cultural counties in the United States,
and it is prophesied that it will event-
ually produce a higher return in cash
than any other county in the United
States.
It is not a too optimistic prophecy to
say that within ten years' time there
will be more people in Palm Beach
county than there are now in the entire
State of Florida. It is hard to keep
within the bounds of belief in foretell-
ing the future of Palm Beach county,
as the possibilities here are probably
greater than in any other part of the
Union. The resources are unlimited
and the opportunities are unsurpassed
for all branches of agriculture and hor-
ticulture.
With the prosperity that is in view
for this section, the prices at which the
lands are being sold appear ridiculous,
but there is no question but that with
the turn affairs have now taken and
with the impetus that has been given
to immigration to this State, there will
be a rapid change, and lands will soon
be sold at higher prices commensurate
with the value of the soil. Meantime, it


behooves everyone who contemplates
coming to Florida to buy land for land
will not run away, and will keep until
-the owner is ready to come here and
settle. To the man who comes imme-
diately there is every opportunity in the
world to become independent in a land
of health.


Palm Beach and Dade Coun-
ties Lead the Whole United
States in, Good Rock Roads
The county road from Miami to
West Palm Beach is a triumph of the
road builders' art. The county in 1910
voted $200,000 to be spent for more
rock roads to develop the country west
of the present county road. Delray,
Deerfield, Boynton and West Palm
Beach each will share in these
roads. The company will build a first
class road running north and south on
its lands connecting with all the county
roads.
The county road from Miami to
West Palm Beach has been completed
more than two years and the result of
the ".ildding of this highway and oth-


ers through the county has been such
that the residents of the other coun-
ties have seen the advantages and
strenuous efforts are being put forth
to follow the pace set by Dade and
Palm Beach counties. Because of
these roads the wilderness has been
turned into fruitful fields, palatial


homes have been constructed through
the country districts, with surround-
ings that are enticing to those who
love the beautiful.
With a hard surface road from
Jacksonville to Miami, an era of pros-
perity unknown to any portion of the
state will set in, splendid farm prop-
erties will be developed, homes will
be builded and then the people will
wonder why they did not awake years
ago to the great opportunities which
awaited them, simply by being pro-
gressive and building a hard surface
road.
Palm Beach county has been the
great moving spirit in the good road
movement, which has spread through
the state and from state to state until
there is an urgent demand for a hard
surface road from Jacksonville to


MR. TEDDER IN BOYNTON TOMATO FIELD
Five Acres Yield 1910, 5,000 Crates


---- ~-"il----------------~ ---- -.---- -:--------~L.:^., a










6 The Palm Beach Farms Company


Miami and the people will soon :it, -t
this demand. The good road m --
ment has come to stay and today, :
the principal factor in building '1.
new sections on a permanent tn-i:
Any community, county or state ith.'
is not falling into line are years 1-.-
hind the times and are sure to be it
in the great forward movement: ,.i
this age.



SECRETARY WILSON
In Florida East Coast Homeseeker for
June says:
"There is no large body of land lying
within the boundary of the United
States, in fact not in any portion of:


rnents v.I l in a if .'.' \ ar: e the ioll:
,.- ,their act: and lor ith reit Io their
natural I.e:, w ill rccr,.t i hat .. hen
they had the ,.ppo...rtunit, .:. purcha!-
ing the- land; at i ni:.un-r al cure.
thei had nrot don-e s.: There is but
one East Coast of Florida in the world,
there are no other portions of the
United States where the climatic
conditions are as near perfect, It, rc
I; nr o rather sectionn of the i.'Unit,.d
Ctat,: h-erL the tillcr ...t ilrL tol] _e-
cur s o, larc.g retCurn- ,.r acre Ior
l..ind culil 'ated., ti i n' .:. other po.r-
ton ol th,2 tat, re the ,p.:.p.ortun-
11 arre gre't t.: .:'.n'ri nc : .v ith.
a -nill .to I ipiral a i' a M i : a ear'-
lha L l .r' il ",i 1 1 C [' f".. eC 1." ,


rrnced gardener- ihat it was specially
adjpied I..r truck gro:.ing, also oranges
and grape [ruin ,.ticih are immensely
profitable pro.ducti welding g as high am
1,. 1.1. lto. .-,1t)1 h pe r acre.
There were many home-seekers ad
buyers on the trip, and those that pur-
chased stated that they would arran '
to s-ttle as roon as p.:.-itble, and while
I c.nlrt bought for irnintent, I assure
you that I v.a greatly impressed with
Florida an.] its opportunities both for
the man -ho wants to make money, or
the man %ho, has money to spend, for
the whole c,:ast section is a health ad
rersrt country.
'ery Re.pectfully Yours,
F. S. HART.
N.:.. 5970 Horton Place. St. Louis, MA


., P t


THE ROYAL POINCIANA HOTEL, PALM BEACH


the w world, thatr l1. Ihi': ih- ..i ;,1 ',.i
bI com pleated. 1.- .1f s-.,: r..l .i- le a-
the once de'pil~.c Ec-r, I.l.ol- oI Flo:r-
Ida. BetweFen three jna. lIour nr lli'r.n
acres of ricl allu. al ljnd.-. I:caitd inr
a climate that is almrro:t ab-.:.lut per-
fection. \her-r cr p:'.-, can be c:r n the
entire r-eason through, v. Ier thtre are
no long cold '. itter-. n. *. e
heat in the -umimer. n, mnalarla or
other disea:e- Fronm the %.try nature
of the conditi:onr FlornJa mrri- t become
the paradise of the v.orld FHere a
thrifty careful tiller of thie :oil can
make more clear money orn ten or
twenty acres than on a farm .:i 151i:
acres in the North and \Ve-t
The doubting Thomases. who are
standing back and awaiting develop-

t ,, -- .. .... .


Sr L.:,i.. ? .,.. un,. 3i1th. 191U
FP-lm Ea.- h Farm C.-.. St Loui._. Mo.:
Gentlkmen -Haring juut returned
from a trip of insrpe.:iion of your lands,
lying just south of Palm Beach. Fla.
b,.g ito ,tare that Tour general literature
states the proprlnon fairly and square-
ly. both a-. t: the valuee of the lands and
th, lo.:al c:.:nditlon_
The property i- s.iuated al.,out 5 miles
aest of the railroad, and %as reached
[,> our pany in y:iur company's automo-
tile in le-s than 21' minute'.
The land lies level and is covered with
a tall grass. involving no expense to
clear, and on the various tests we made
the ri.fl was of the same uniform depth
and character-a rich sandy loam and
muck mixture-and we are told by exper-


Good Schools in Palm Beach
County'


Palm Beach county' is well equippl
with good schools. Delray is well pro-
vided in this respect and Palm Beac.
has the finest school house in southern
Florida.

Growing Citrus Fruits Easy
and Profitable '
The U. S. Department of Agriculture,
Bulletin 238, says:
"Few occupations give as remwnera-
tive returns as the growing of citrus
fruits."
Florida is famous throughout th
world for oranges and grapefruit
Ninety-five per cent. of all the grape-
fruit that will be served in.American
homes this winter will come*frdm Flor-
ida and Jamaica.


2"-"/


'
b


*I









The Palm Beach Farms Company


Florida Without Competitors
in Grapefruit
According to the most eminent au-
thority, Dr. E. J. Wickson, dean of
the Agricultural College of the Uni-
versity of California, California does
not, nor can she ever hope to, raise
grapefruit commercially. Texas can-
not raise it. The sections of Florida
that froze during 1895 cannot safely
raise it. Its profitable production is
limited to the southern part of the
Florida peninsula.
Grapefruit is being planted exten-
sively, even in preference to the
orange. It bears earlier and has big-
ger fruit, fewer required to fill a box.
It ships easier than oranges because
it has a much thicker skin. It sells
for better prices.


bor. A citrus orchard in bearing only
requires slight cultivation and fertili-
zation, the crop being sold on the
trees.
Grapefruit, being a delicate growth,
can only be produced commercially in
the West Indies and in a small sec-
tion of Florida, of which the Okee-
chobee region, by reason of its water
protection, is the most favored spot.
Grapefruit is ;.r,:'... I' a new
thing. Not one-tenth of the United
States has yet eaten it. Australia,
Canada, England, and all Europe are
clamoring for it. The demand is prac-
tically unlimited.
Grapefruit pays as high as $1,500 an
acre, but a conservative estimate of
the net annual profits would be $400
per acre, and grapefruit begins to
bear commercially the third year.


I


and for the first few years cultivate
vegetables between the rows, and
gradually increase the trees planted
until the entire ground is covered.
Five acres of land planted in
oranges or grapefruit would cost, in-
cluding the land, clearing, the plant-
ing and labor, with the fertilizer,
about $700 the first year. The labor
and fertilizer for the following years
would cost about as follows: The
second year, .175; the third year,
$200; the fourth year, $275; the fifth
year, $500; the sixth year, $475; the
seventh year, $425, etc., making a
total of approximately $2,350 for the
seven years.
The credit side of the account, tak-
ing as a basis a profit of $2 per box
for the fruit, should net the grower
approximately as follows: The fourth


NEW


*These Lands Outside Frost
Zone Protected by Water
A country to be thoroughly adapted
to citrus fruits must be safely outside
the frost line. Very little of the Unit-
ed States is so situated. There is no
other place in the United States or
the rest of Florida so extraordinarily
favored for the growing of tender
citrus fruits. Even the leaves of the
delicate mango tree passed through
the great freeze of. 1895 without seri-
ous drini:;e when the entire fruit crop
north of the lake was wiped out.
Besides being remunerative, orange
growing is fascinating. The labor is
S slight, the tree in bearing a thing of
beauty and its development a source
of pleasure. Truck gives more imme-
diate returns but requires greater-la-


HIGH SCHOOL, WEST PALM BEACH
(Just Completed)


The cost of bringing grapefruit and
apple orchards into bearing is about
the same.
Our land sells at one-tenth the
price of apple lands in the Northwest.
How long will this last when people
realize the facts?

Five Acres Enough
Five acres in vegetables is a good
crop for one man to cultivate, and it
would be necessary for him to have
help at certain times to handle this
amount, and if his land was all vege-
table land it would give him an op-
portunity to rotate his crops year
after year.
The best plan to follow for a per-
manent home would be to set out
trees on at least one-half of the land


year fifty boxes of fruit, $100; the fifth
year, 100 boxes of fruit, $200; the
sixth year, 250 boxes of fruit, $500;
the seventh year, 500 boxes of fruit,
$1,000; the eighth year, 1,000 boxes of
fruit, $2,000, making a total return
from the grove at the end of the
eighth year of $3.800, and from then
on to keep the grove in condition, cul-
tivation and fertilizer, should not cost
much over $400 per year, and the re-
turns would gradually increase as the
trees grow older and bear more
heavily.
While the trees were growing a
large income would be realized from
the growing of vegetables between
the rows of trees for the first few
years.
The profits from five acres of vege-
tables in this section, can be substan-


_____~ _~~~~--CXWWN


-I i).. :i-.-. L1 r ~.. -









The Palm Beach


Farms Company


tiated by the figures that are on file
in the office of the Tropical Sun at
West Palm Beach.
We have in mind, for instance, a
man in Delray, Palm Beach county,
who from the profits of one and a
quarter acres of string beans built and
finished a house that could not possi-
bly have cost less than $2,800 to
$3,000, and instances are known where
profits from tomatoes, egg plants,
peppers and cucumbers, etc., have
ranged from $300 to as high as $1,600
per acre.
There are many men who cultivate
forty, sixty and one hundred acres or
more of vegetables each year, but
these large planters are-the exception
and not the rule. From five to ten
and sometimes fifteen acres is the
average size of a vegetable farm.


county as a rule make more clear money
on their 10-acre farms than most North-
ern farmers make on 100 acres. Gov-
ernment reports prove this to be true.
The average value of farm products
in five great states is as follows:
Missouri ........... $ 9.38 per acre
Iowa .................. 12.22 per acre
Illinois ................ 12.48 per acre
Ohio .................. 13.36 per acre
Florida ............. 109.76 per acre
Dade and Palm Beach
Counties .............469.00 per acre
The average in Palm Beach county is
high, because the Palm Beach farmer is
not snow-bound in the winter. His land
is working for him 12 months in the
year. He gets his crops into the market
in winter and early spring, when there is
no competition and when prices are high.


Onions, 400 bushels @ $1.00...$400.00
Peppers, 750 crates @ $1.00... 750.00
Irish Potatoes, 50 bbls. @ $3.. 150.00
Sweet Potatoes, 50 bbls. @ $3. 150.00
Watermelons, 2-5 carload @
$1.50 ..................... 60.00
Strawberries, 4,000 quarts @
20c .................. ...... 800.00
Sugar cane, corn, peanuts, pecans,
lemons, pears, guavas, pawpaws, ber-
ries, figs and pineapples are also
grown in abundance.
Field crops, such as corn, field peas,
peanuts, potatoes, velvet beans and
hay, can follow all vegetable crops.
Two vegetable crops can be made
each year, one in fall and one in mid-
winter and early spring, thus enabling
the farmer to grow two to four crops
on the same ground.


GRAPE FRUIT AND BANANAS, WEST PALM BEACH


Climate the Big Asset
In California They Give You the Land
and Sell the Climate.
When you buy land you buy more
than so much earth; you buy the clim-
ate that goes with it.
The highest-priced agricultural land
in the world is in California, where de-
veloped orange groves sell as high as
$2,000 per acre.
Perhaps $50 per acre represents the
full value of the land itself, based upon
its fertility, leaving $1,950 as the pro-
ducing valuation of the climate.
Climate is the prime factor in creat-
ing land values. It determines what you
can make your land earn.
Faruts in the north and northwest
produce one crop a year. Why?
Because the climate limits their pro-
duction to five months a year, and that
at a time when all the country is pro-
ducing and the markets are glutted.
Truck farmers in the Palm Beach


No Other State Equals Florida
in Average Production
The Florida Department of Agricul-
ture reports that the cultivated land of
the state, not including orchards and
a few other crops, show an average
production of $130 an acre; no other
state equals this record.
WHAT TRUCK GROWERS are mak-
ing-Average Crops in Florida, Not
Extraordinary Yields.
Statistics carefully compiled by Wil-
bur McCoy, industrial agent:
Celery, 800 crates @ $1.25.....$1,000.00
Cabbage, 175 crates @ $1.25.... 218.00
Cauliflower, 150 crates @ $1.50. 225.00
Cucumbers, 150 crates @ $1.50. 225.00
Cantaloupe, 100 crates @ $1r25.. 125.00
Lettuce, 600 baskets @ $1.25.. 750.00
Tomatoes, 200 crates @ $1.25.. 250.00
Beans, 175 crates @ $1.50..... 262.00
Egg Plant, 800 crates 7) $1.00.. 800.00
Okra, 400 crates @ $1.25....... 500.00
Squash, 600 crates @ 60c....... 360.00


Watermelons are larger, sweeter, aad
the yield per acre is greater than else
where. Cantaloupes are as good as the
Rocky -Ford, and having no competi-
tion in the market at that time sell for
more money.
Cauliflower and either tomatoes or
cucumbers can be grown on the same
land in one season.
Irish potatoes are planted in Decem-
ber and come on the market in April-
when new potatoes command the high-
est prices. They bring from $3 to $5
a barrel.,, It is the usual thing to obtain
fifty barrels to the acre--a profit of
from $150 to $250 an acre.

Alfalfa in Florida
Alfalfa will grow in Palm Beach
county. This fact has been demon-
strated beyond question at West Palm
Beach by Capt. James Morrison, a win-
ter resident and large property owner In
that city. i|1
The growing of alfalfa has been ex-


I


Y i; --1" x


ilip"









The Palm Beach Farms Company 9


perimented with more or less on the
east coast of Florida, but the credit is
due to Captain Morrison for making
a practical demonstration and suc-
cessfully growing this valuable plant.
In the garden of his winter home at
West Palm Beach four years ago he
planted a small patch of alfalfa from
seed procured from Montana, where
this seed has flourished. The plants
are now four years old, and have been
S cut three or four times a year.
Captain Morrison says that to grow
this plant successfully the seed should
be planted in cold weather in January,


son states that no fertilizer was used
in growing the crop.
Every poultry grower on the east
coast can plant a patch of alfalfa and
have the very best of green food for
his poultry throughout the entire year.

Making $1,000 an Acre
The following is taken from page 188
of a bulletin of the State Department
of Agriculture:
"The success of vegetable growing in
Florida is too well known to justify
going into lengthy details as to methods


returns. Tomatoes, for instance, have
yielded as much as $1,000 per acre, bt
the average runs from $300 to $50;
Irish potatoes will average near $100;
lettuce- from- $300 to $800 per acre, saf
celery as much as $1,500 per acre."

Actual Results in Florida
"I own ten acres of muck land three
miles out of Dania, Fla, which I am
renting at $15 per acre per year to veg-
etable farmers. It is new land which
has been drained only six months. The
renters raise eggplant, okra, pepper,


EXHIBIT OF CROPS GROWN ON EAST COAST
(County Fair, March 15th)


the object being to give the plant time
to grow above the ground sufficiently
to shade the ground about its roots
when hot weather arrives. Were the
seed planted in hot weather the plants
would be liable to be killed by the
heat of the surface soil, as they are
very tender when they first come up.
Planted in cool weather they get a
good start before the hot weather
comes on.
This patch of alfalfa has not been
affected in any way by insects and has
grown to perfection and Capt. Morri-


of cultivation or transportation. Among
the most profitable crops are tomatoes,
beans, Irish potatoes, celery, cabbage,
lettuce, peppers, egg plant.
"From the growing of each of these
products thousands of people reap a rich
reward for their labor every year, and
many of them make comfortable for-
tunes; most, if not all of these vege-
tables, are grown at seasons of the year
which enables them to command a
monopoly of the markets, as well as
prices.
"Many of these crops bring handsome


lettuce and tomatoes, and they make
from $200 to $300 off their lettuce, eg
plant, okra and peppers, and from $401
to $1,000 per acre off tomatoes. Nature
is so lavish in this section that poor
farmers succeed despite their slovenly
methods."-Elizabeth T. Baker.
"I have made some banner crops her%
such as an average of $800 per actr
from a five-acre field under intensive
culture for four years in succession. I
started in this country ten years aW
with about $1,000. In that length of
time I have brought my income up as
it would try the mettle of the largest


~ _~~~~_1___ ~-.~I---l-~T1?I_~I. _


- I










10 The Palm Beach Farms Company


farmers in the United States to make
an equal showing, and on property
that would probably cost many times
as much as our land here, and, on
many times the acreage. Wax beans,
with Irish potatoes between the rows,
and followed by wax beans again, has
been one of my most profitable crops,
and the trio have netted me as high as
$1,000 an acre. Tomatoes fluctuate,
but I have made as high as $1,300 an
acre net on them when both crop and
market were in good condition. Egg-
plant and peppers have, in exceptional
cases, yielded as high as $2,000 per
acre. In the season of 1907-8, when
pepper prices held very low, and
though I received the very low price
of $1.25 average per half barrel crate,
I made an exceptional crop, and the


above $400 an acre. My net returns in
peppers has been $635 an acre."-W.
W. Prout, President of the Miami
Board of Trade.
"The time is coming when the land-
less family will be at a tremendous
disadvantage, because each new indi-
vidual must shift for himself. We
have seen the last of cheap white
bread in this country."-Dean Daven-
port. University of Illinois.
"Every day for five years the valua-
tion of farms in the United States has
increased $3,500,000. Ten years hence
there will be little, if any, good agri-
cultural land that can be purchased at
double present prices.'-James Wil-
son, Secretary of Agriculture.
"It will be only a comparatively few
years before an irrigation project,


tried and has not been found wanting
in one particular.
Hundreds of satisfied settlers can
be found there living in fine homes
and enjoying every comfort of life.
These settlers extend a welcome' to
others and co-operate with the new-
comer by showing all the details
necessary to farming or fruit culture.
Locating in Palm Beach county is
like going to a settlement of old
friends. There are no strict lines of
society to overcome. The man of
energy and honesty is given a helping
hand from the first moment he lands
in the county, and thus his acquaint-
ance with the land and the people
rapidly broadens.
It needs no scientific training or
agricultural education to make a suc-


SHIPPING PRODUCE ON INLAND WATERWAY


net was over $900 an acre. Irish po-
tatoes are easy to grow and will yield
from 200 to 400 hampers an acre un-
der good culture, and usually sell at
$1.90 to $2 per hamper, f. o. b. Miami."
-From Walter Waldin, in the Daily
Metropolis of Miami.
"I have lived in this section for
thirteen years, and my figures are
given from my own personal experi-
ence, the results of my own plant-
ing.on reclaimed soil. My best net
Teturin from an acre of tomatoes was
4680, my poorest was $30; the aver-
age has been above $300 an acre.
Best net returns from beans has been
$780 an acre, my poorest was slightly
under $60, and my average has been
which will cost as high as $200 per


acre, will be considered practicable."
-Commissioner Fred Dennett, of the
U. S. Land Office.
City people, as a class, are poor.
They live up all they earn; they ac-
cumulate nothing.
Farmers, as a class, are prosperous;
they accumulate something.
The farmers have the money; the
city man is paying the freight.

Not a Speculation
Purchasing a tract of land in Palm
Beach county is not a speculation, and
must not be connected with the sales
of land which lack proof of their
worth. Palm Beach county has been


cess in this land. One can find hun-
dreds who engaged in truck raising
and fruit growing with no other
knowledge of the pursuits than could
be gained from watching their neigh-
bor's efforts. Today they have the
added benefits of their own experi-
ences, which from year to year give
them larger and more certain profits
from their farms. The farmer and
fruit grower in Palm Beach county is
more independent as a rule than any
other class of Americans, and his in-
.dependence was won in just a few
months of toil. Nature has lavishly
supplied him with nearly everything
necessary to success. The only thing
needed to perfect this condition is
energy and common sense.


II I I


---- ----- n


- ~,~.:n,. ., ri.; r 1











The Palm Beach Farms Company 11


Read This Letter
Ogden, Utah, Jan. 7, 1911.
Bryant & Greenwood,
Chicago.
Gentlemen:
I left Ogden, Utah, December 18th for
a trip to Florida for the purpose of in-
specting the lands of the Palm Beach
Farms Company. Arriving there on the
morning of the 24th, I found the weather
very stormy. It was raining quite hard,
but immediately after noon I found my-
self sailing on beautiful Lake Worth with
Mr. Edsall of your company and several
other gentlemen, in weather which I con-
sider perfect, the sun shining beauti-
fully. We had no storm between that
time and the time I took leave from
there, in all about six days.
Can say that I was much pleased with
most everything I saw in Palm Beach
and vicinity. The land offered by the
Palm Beach-Farms Company for sale is
far better than anything I had pictured.
I visited many farms that are under high
grade of cultivation with fruit and vege-
tables in great profusion and some of
the farmers there estimate some of their
crops now on the ground at $1,000 per
acre; a price that we, in this country,
consider out of proportion. I tested and
took samples of the soil on these farms
and compared it with that of your lands
and I found a vast difference in quality
in your favor. The land you have is a
black, loamy, sandy soil, while that I
saw in many other places with all its
crops being so heavy was a very inferior
class of soil.
I visited Mr. Brown's place and saw so
many things that would interest anyone
who was looking for land. I found beans
almost ready to be gathered and was
told by a Mr. Doyle, who owned a farm
in that vicinity, that beans were quoted
at $15.00 per crate. He also told me that
they had been known to sell for more
than that; other products going at sim-
ilar prices. Mr. Brown's land was cov-
ered with garden produce and looked
beautiful.
I visited your townsite and can say
that I never saw a more beautiful loca-
tion for a city even in its wild and nat-
ural state. 'It presents a picture of
grandeur, decorated as it is with the
royal palms and ornamental shrubs. I
noticed, too, the mounds of oyster shells
on the beach on the lake front.
I do not remember enjoying a Christ-



I & \1 \


mas, dinner more in my life than I did at
your experimental farm Christmas day.
From what I saw there, I am confident
that after the work is completed that
has been laid out by your eminent man-
ager, it will be a place of great impor-
tance to those looking for instruction
and information relative to laying out
their little farms.
I was told by many whom I made in-
quiry from as to the health of that part
of the state, that it was the most health-
ful part of the state. Met with many
who had gone there with rheumatism
and other ailments and had become per-
fectly well in a short time. One lady, a
Mrs. Stone, who lived in Palm Beach,
told me that she was carried from the
cars to her hotel and that her husband,
also an invalid with rheumatism, had
become with herself strong and healthful
in four years, and they could not be
driven from that beautiful climate.


I met a party of gentlemen from Chi-
cago and other parts of Illinois, who, I
will say here, were the most joyful
people I have ever had the pleasure of
associating with, and after we had vis-
ited the land and finished our inspection,
when at the hotel, I asked the gentlemen
what their vote was and it was unani-
mously voted that it was the best propo-
sition we had ever seen. They took leave
the following morning, but I stayed one
day longer, as I wanted to visit the'north
end of the tract you are selling.
I shall never regret taking the trip, as
it was one continual round of pleasure
from beginning to end. In conclusion I
will say that the gentlemen who you
have in charge of your affairs there, Mr.
Edsall and Mr. Means, certainly know
how to treat royally.
.Yours virly truly,
ISAAC L.LA IF


FIRST CROP OF CUCUMBERS ON LAND WEST OF PALM BEACH


AN ORANGE GROVE










12 The Palm Beach Farms Company


Our ,

Demonstration

Farm .. -- ..

as an actual demonstra- .
tion of what can be done.
We may state that certain .
crops are suitable for this
soil and climate, and can be
raised at a handsome profit,
but our statement will be
immeasurably strengthened
by a demonstration -by
actually raising the crops.
This is what we propose to
Oo. Photographs are given
on this page of the buildings
which have been erected on
our farm located on section
21 west of Delray. The farm
is in charge of Mr. De
Gottrau who has had many
years of experience in
Florida agriculture. He is
a recognized authority in
truck and fruit raising. We
are raising crops of toma-
toes, string beans,egg plant,
peppers, Irish potato es.
sweet potatoes, squash, let-
PACKING HOUSE

Roads
Nothing is more important to the farmer than good roads. This is
being recognized in all progressive rural districts and the good roads move-
ment is widespread. It enables the farmer to market his crops, send his
children to school and reach centers of population, without loss of time and
efforts. Bad roads are an enemy to progress and right living conditions.
Recognizing these facts we are spending a large sum of money to connect
the Palm Beach tract by good roads with the main hard surfaced road run-
ning from West Palm Beach to Miami. We are constructing hard surfaced
roads from Boynton and Delray to the land and the County has 5% miles
of the Okeechobee road completed running from West Palm Beach on the
northern boundary of our land. The next work to be taken up will be the
road from Yamato to the land. The illustration shows the fill,across the
low land lying between our land and the East Coast Railway.
If this work was left for the community to do it would be years before it
could be accomplished, as such movements are necessarily slow in a new
community. Our purchasers will be spared this expense, and the community
will have an object lesson of good roads and up-to-date conditions which
will make it progressive, and will have a beneficial effect on land values
and profits of tilling the soil.
FILL ON BOYNTON ROAD

tuce, cucumbers, cabbage,
onions-in fact every var-
iety of truck. Also small ...
grain, millet, kaffir corn.
alfalfa and native hay.
This farm will not only
demonstrate what can be .
raised, but will be an object '-
lesson to our buyers of -
what can be raised most
profitably. It is important Z
that their efforts should -s .
not be wasted in experi-
ments but that they should
at once put in crops that -
will do the best and give the
highest financial returns.
The Demonstration Farm
will accomplish this result,
and we are prepared to
assist settlers with advice
about crops to be planted,
based on actual results ob-
tained. We propose to make
this a model farm and have
built suitable house, barn,
etc., and will spare no ef-
forts to make it a valuable
demonstration of the won-
derful results which can be
obtained in truck and fruit
rising on t his splendid
Palm Beach land. FARM HOUSE JUST COMPLETED


- -- --- --E










The Palm Beach Farms Company 13






A Home on Lake Worth



SWe will have two Townsites-one on the land, and the other
on the west shore of Lake Worth, on the East Coast Railway
and about 8 miles south of West Palm Beach.


We propose to give one of the Lake Worth town lots with
each five acre tract, and one of the lots in the townsite located
Son the land with each tract larger than five acres.


Only those who have seen beautiful Palm Beach and the pri-
vate homes on Lake Worth can realize what it will mean to own.
a lot in this favored spot. Let us consider what the future of
this town will be. We start with some 5,000 owners of town,
lots, all of whom are owners of five acre tracts of land only a
few miles away. Many of these people will build on their town
lots and run out to their orange or grape-fruit groves or truck
farms (whatever they decide to devote their land to) either
daily or weekly, or, at least, will have a home for their families
in the Lake Worth town. Other purchasers who have bought
the land for the increase in value will build homes in the town.
There is the basis here for a larger town than now exists on the
East coast of Florida south of Jacksonville. Yf one-third of the
owners of lots build their homes here, it would make a popula-
tion of over 5,000 people.


What is the value of a lot in the Lake Worth townsite? We
believe that by the time the sale of our contracts is closed, a
," jI. lot will be worth the price of a contract and will increase rapidly
in value as the improvement: on. We base this opinion on
the price at which lots are --. i1, in West Palm Beach. Our
townsite will be just as attractive and will commence with a
larger number of lot owners. The owners of the land will also
be owners of lots, and it will be to their interest to throw their
trade to the Lake Worth town as fast as merchants get in readi-
ness to take care of their wants. This will be another factor in
building up the town. We will have a larger number of land
owners personally interested in our town than any other town
it in that country now has.


The accompanying bird's-eye view will give an idea of the
Zl' location of the Lake Worth town with reference to the land and
other surroundings. Lake Worth is an arm of the sea and is a.
.part of the inland waterway now nearly completed, which will
furnish inland water transportation from Miami to Jacksonville.
This is an important feature in the future development of the
East coast of Florida as it assures cheap water transportation
O in competition with the railways, and thus will compel the latter
Sto make low rates. Lake Worth is separated from the ocean
by a narrow strip of land on which. the famous Royal Poinciana,
the largest hotel in the world, is situated. On both banks of the
n lake south of West Palm' Beach and the Royal Poinciana are
beautiful private estates among others being that of Richard
Croker, known as the "Boss of Tammany Hall."


Lake Osborne, to the west of the town, is a fresh- water lake.
.The fishermen can find fresh water fish in Lake Osborne, and
salt water firsh in Lake Worth, or can sail out through the
inlet connecting Lake Worth with the ocean and have deep water
.. fishing.


The location of the town is conducive to health and the resi-
-"dents will experience the pleasures of living in the only truly
tropical country in the United States. The macadamized road
from West Palm Beach to Miami runs through the town con-
necting with the rock roads we are now building to the farm
lands.


The townsite on the land will appeal to those who want to live
-"closer to the land they are cultivating and will provide a trading
center. It will be located centrally.


Residence lots will be 50x135 feet and business lots 25x135
feet, and provision will be made for streets, parks, churches,
schools, etc.













Read These Letters


Alton, Ill., Jan. 28, 1911.
Messrs. Bryant & Greenwood,
Chicago, Ill.
Gentlemen:
I have just returned from Palm Beach,
Florida. While there I spent several
days inspecting the tract of land now
being sold by your Company in Palm
Beach county, and I take this oppor-
tunity to express my entire satisfaction
with your proposition.
Your Demonstration Farm is very in-
teresting and instructive. The crops
now being grown there are proof posi-
tive of the availability of these lands
for immediate settlement and cultiva-
tion. The truck and fruit farms adjoin-
ing your tract are in a healthy and pros-
perous condition. Satisfaction, Health
and Prosperity seems to prevail in the
entire eommn unity. I .. -,. u.-
and unhesitatingly i. ....r....- I. I ri,.- I rni
as a safe investment, and as a first class
farming proposition.
Very ir.- H, i ',ll ,' ,
.. YOUNG.


Colorado Springs, Colo., Jan. 31, 1911.
The Hutchison-Hill Land Sales Co.,
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Gentlemen:
I have just returned from inspecting
the lands of the Palm Beach Farms
Company, in Palm Beach County, Flor-
ida, and offered for sale by you, and I
desire to state that your lands are much
better than represented by you and the
general sales agents, Bryant & Green-
wood. I also wish to state that I am
going to buy as many of these contracts
as I can possibly carry, as I believe the
possibilities of that country are simply
wonderful.
Your lands are unquestionably very
fertile and capable of producing untold
results. The climate is certainly de-
lightful. Your townsite is a beautiful
one and will undoubtedly make a beau-
tiful town.
I am going to advise all my friends
who can earn $10.00 per month to buy
one of these contracts and buy it quickly
as they will surely one and all make
money. I consider this one of the best
investments ever offered me.
Yours very truly,
ADNA W. MOORE.


The best security on earth is a portion
of the earth itself. There is but one
crop of land and the soil is man's nat-
ural heritage. The "Call of the City"
during the past twenty-five years has
not only forfeited for thousands their
birthright, but has denied to them even
a decent living, and the struggle for
existence has become so acute that men
are again, before it is too late, claiming
the return, of "God's gift to man," a
piece of land.
The cry, "Back to the land," is ring-
ing throughout the large cities, and is
the call destined to be the means of
transforming thousands of lives from
conditions hardly better than servitude
into the fullness of independent man-
hood.
Our population doubles every twenty-
nine years, but land is not increasing,
but rather diminishing, because it is
losing productive power.

Twenty-five years ago theie were
two farmers to every family in town
or city. Today there is one farmer to
every two families in town or city.


7 9 /0

/1 /7 /6 /5 /4 /3 /8

/9 20 2/ Z 23 24 /9

7 26 /5 30 2 /

35 36 3/ 32 33

4llS/ |^^^3 4

12 // 7 9 9

/6 5 /4 /3 /8 /7

23 23 1 /9 20 11
7 26 25 30 28

1 35 36 3/ 33

3 Zr< 6/ 4

1 12 / 7 9
/4 /3 / 8 8 f/it

23 04 /9 2/


lfi~7 26 2S 30 83
9 35 367 3,3


/1 // /2 7

16 1/5 /4 /13RA

22 23 24 1

226 25


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11 "t


it
c-


M 33 34 35 36


/6 /1 /4 13


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5 4 3/

1 9 V /0


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/4

23

25

35 36


20 2
2
33~


CA4 RArTO


WEsr



















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' r^~


imo/ \

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5


6 5

7


/9 /



J PANO


MAP OF THE LAND


^.-- i- --U
/8 /7 / S /3
LE-VAqT/ON /i FE1 r


R ?4/1 R4?E


f 43 f


_ __ ___~


-/// /^/ -- U -~i.-H Mw/I /"/A f/


-^ < V__--~ -- .- -4-^ 111


-- ----


IIII


I J I I


-- i


R43 -


R 47 E P 42 E


rY










The Palm Beach Farms Company


THE COLORADO TITLE ANDTRUST COMPANY.


CAPITAL AND SURPLUS S350.000.


zgiy~or~~tNatiostcdi~Hk.


COLORADO SPRIONS, COLORADO.


C*riC*W>
SS-'S! "
sa .''S (.,-


June 16th, 1910.


TO WHOU IT 1AY CONCERN:-
the Palm Beach Farms Company was in-
corporated in Colorado 3pringe by gentlemen in good
standing in this community, who have been actively en-
gaged in the development of many enterprties in the
West. eany of them hive been customers of tnis in-
stitution for a good iany y-ars and some are 'en of
large ieans. We would readily trust them to carry
out any contract which they might enter into.


THE COLORADO TITLE AND TRUST COWPAIY
Bydent
P0eoident.


li nm enrllJune 25,ar 1910Qlo

June 25, 1910


TO *HOM IT MAY CONCERN:-

The Directors and many of the stookholder
of the Palm Beach Farms Company have long been well and favorably

known to us, and we have transacted large amounts of business with

then. They are mon of wide experience and high standing in our

community. In our belief they would not undertake any obligatisue

which they are unable to carry out.


Very truly yours,




I Ic^


Cashier.


S olora, ^prin.- .Natina ..an.

CCOLOA lO NO S S7O
* 0. cCft-tLxe. **I.ac-


Messrs. BEyant & Greenwood,
1407 Republic Bldg.,
Chicago. Ill.
Dear. Sirs:-
Pursuant to existing contracts between yourselves and the
Ondersigned Company, you are accorded the exclusive right to sell
the lands and townsite lots in Palm Beach County, Florida, which
this Company is placing on the market, and are authorized to accept
all applications to purchase the same pursuant to contracts endors-
ed thereon and to execute certificates of purchase, all on the
printed forms now in use in your office and which have been approved
by this Company. Under your said contracts with this Company you
are to receive and receipt for all moneys payable on said land sales.
All such certificatess of purchase executed by you will, on com-
pliance with the terms thereof, be honored by this Company, and
upon due completion of payment to you as therein provided this Com-
pany will execu-to and deliver to the purchaser good and sufficient
warranty deed of conveyance conveying title as when provided in
said certificate of purchase.


A S a!iS/


Secretary.


June 16, 1910


TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:


The Palm Beach Farms Company is an

organization composed of some of the responsible

business men of this community, and can be relied

upon to fulfill it's obligations.

Respectfully,

Colorado Springs National Bank.


By


Cashier.


Very truly yours,
THE PALL BEACH FARMS COMPANY,


l President


Tables Showing Rainfall and Temperature of Palm Beach County

Rainfall Monthly Mean and Annual Temperatures Expreed ian Dewree Fahrmbelt


Winter Spring Summer Fall Average
9.3 inches 10.7 inches 16.6 inches 21.7 inches 58.7 inches


Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Aanud
67? 67! 70 74 1 760 801 829 821 80- 7. | 72 68 7UJ


15


June 17th, 19f1D


111 I


- -


--


1










16 The Palm Beach Farms Company


LAKE


FEET ABOVE SE .;i' I
'I'll1


IN
SMALL FARMS C
SOLD
IN
k 1909--10
1909- 10


0 THE PALM BEACH FARMS COMPANY LANDs







Remember, that while they last, $240, pay-
able $10 per month, buys one of the farms
shown in the following subdivision, and a lot,
with other rights:


SUB DIVISION:


2 Farms
8 Farms
20 Farms
100 Farms
250 Farms
3,620 Farms
8,000 Farms


of 640 acres each
of 320 acres each
of 160 acres each
of 80 acres each
of 40 acres each
of 20 acres each
of 10 acres each


ONE TOWN LOT WITH EACH FARM,
FREE.


Od




/,,%(lRd0 d


If you desire further information, inquire of
our agent.


or write to
The Florida Fruit Lands Company,
Suite 103 Massachusetts Building,
Kansas City, Mo.


TiE IORYII Ol


l[ls @


_ :_:- -L ..... I


I I -









The Reclaimed Everglades

of Florida.

Unquestionably one of the richest bodies of
land on the North American Continent not
under cultivation today, embracing 180,000
acres in Southern Florida, is now being
reclaimed and opened for settlement for the
American people.
This is practically your only opportunity to
get choice, cheap lands with ideal climatic con-
ditions in the United States.
Two hundred and forty dollars, payable
$10.00 per month, buys from us a contract for
one of these undivided farms, and other rights;
the farms ranging in size from ten acres to six
hundred and forty acres of magnificent fruit,
vegetable and sugar cane land. Along with
each farm goes a town lot in a central town-
site to be established on the most available
spot on said lands.

The Florida Fruit Lands Co.,
Suite 103 Massachusetts Building,
KANSAS CITY, MO.

A. D. HART . President.
JOHN MATTHEW, Secretary-Treasurer.
R. J. AORIN }Managing Directors.

REFERENCES.
Gate City Bank ............ Kansas City, Mo
Pioneer Trust Co ...... .... Kansas City, Mo.
First National Bank ...... Colorado Springs, Colo.
Florida National Bank ........ Jacksonville, Fla.
N. B. Broward, Ex-Governor ...... Jacksonville, Fla.

$1,000 is offered, and all expenses of Inspection, if it is
not as good as represented in the printed literature of this
Company,


III


I









The Reclaimed Everglades

of Florida.

One hundred and eighty thousand acres of
rich bottom land in Southern llorida, which
for the past four hundred years have been
impossible of development and cultivation, are
being reclaimed and opened for settlement.
The Florida Fruit Lands Company, the pur-
chasers, announce that the entire acreage is to
be developed and sold at prices and on terms
that are alike attractive to the speculator and
the homeseeker.
The land to be placed on the market lies in
alterate sections in Dade County, near the
southeast coast of Florida, beginning on the
Miama River, about six miles from the city of
Miami and extending west and north, paral-
leling the Florida East Coast Railway, to a
point nine miles west of Palm Beach. This
land is now being entered by three canals:
one at the head of the Miami River and two
at the two forks of the New River, which
flows by Fort Lauderdale, and another will
soon be started from the Hillsboro River, a
short distance south and west of Palm Beach.
"Miami, Fla., Jan. 7, 1908.-Where the swift
Miami River, draining the Everglades, dis-
charges its limpid flood into the crystal waters
of Biscayne Bay, stands what its people delight
to call 'the magic city of Miami.' Miami has a
story like that of a mushroom town of the
great West. It was born a full-grown city.
In the old days of the Seminole War the Gov-
ernment built Fort Dallas at this site. A por-
tion of the old barracks remains to tell the
story. Fifteen years ago there was one store
at Fort Dallas, a trading post for the Semi-
noles of the Everglades. There were three
families of white people, and the only connec-
tion with the outside world was by schooner
and the long sail behind the keys to Key West.
"In April, 1896, the railroad came to Fort
Dallas, and the city of Miami was created. In
six months it had 2,000 people. Now it has
10,000 the year round, and, to dazzle the eyes
of the wondering stranger within the gates, as
likely a lot of paved streets, water works,
electric lights and public buildings as an enthu-


-M








siastic board of trade secretary could wish. It
is more like an Oklahoma city than one expects
to find on the Atlantic Ocean, and the surprise
is so great that one finds himself lending a
willing, if not credulous, ear to the glowing
predictions of the town 'booster.'
"Miami is not entirely given over to sight-
seeing and to play. Its thrifty home popula-
tion is intent upon building up a good city and
upon developing the surrounding country. So
much has been done in the past thirteen years
that it is easy to believe the rosy things pre-
dicted for the future. No other section has
such advantages in the culture of grapefruit,
the pineapple farms are unsurpassed, and there
is a constantly increasing tide of immigration
from sections of the North.
"Many people who came here only to estab-
lish their winter homes,, have yielded to the
charm of the tropics and now live here the
entire year. In the protection of the free trade
winds they have settled down permanently,
knowing that they need fear neither extremes
of heat nor cold. The lure of the tropics is
not a misnomer. The drowsy, sun-lit days,
and the gorgeous nights are like succeeding
pages in the book of enchantment. No won-
der the spendthrift tourists come trooping to
Miami on Biscayne Bay."-Frederic J. Has-
kins in Kansas City Journal.
History and Description.
The-popular impression of the Everglades of
Florida has been of a stagnant, malarial, fever-
stricken swamp, full of gnarled cypress trees,
impenetrable undergrowth and stagnant water,
absolutely useless for any purpose whatever
except as a hiding place for criminals and
Indians.
The United States Government and State
authorities, as well as many reputable individ-
uals who have made thorough investigations of
this supposedly "terra incognito" (unknown
land), are unanimous in testifying to an entirely
different condition of affairs.
According- to the United States Government
and other reliable authorities, the Everglades
consist of an immense basin, covering some
hundreds of thousands of acres of land, sur-
rounded on the Gulf and Atlantic coast sides
by an elevated rim of rotten limestone. This
immense basin has a floor of limestone mixed








with pebbles and phosphates, the latter being
the finest fertilizer in the world, and is profit-
ably mined in many portions of the State. This
basin is filled with a rich alluvial soil running
in depth from eight inches to fourteen feet.
The soil deposited in this basin from the
rivers on the north emptying into Lake Okee-
chobee has raised the center of this basin to
from 21 to 25 feet above the level of the sea.
During the rainy season the lake has over-
flowed annually, covering the Everglades with
fresh, constantly moving water.
The State of Florida is now dredging four
main canals from Lake Okeechobee to differ-
ent points on the Atlantic Coast (from 40 to
60 miles distant), cutting outlets through the
rim rock and of sufficient capacity to take up
all of the surplus water, making dry land of
what for centuries has been submerged land
during certain seasons of the year.
Two other features of this drainage proposi-
tion are as follows: First-These canals are
navigable, enabling the farmer or fruit grower
to float his produce to the seaport, the current
naturally being in the direction that the load
goes. Second-These canals are to be equip-
ped with a series of locks or gates whereby
during the dry season and when necessary the
water can be held back for sub-irrigation pur-
poses.
The State has ample means at hand for the
construction of these canals, and is actively at
work on them at the present time. At present
writing three large specially constructed
dredges are working, and before the season is
over two more of these dredges will be placed
in commission and the work will be pushed
from each end of the canals.
One canal now completed, running from
Lake Okeechobee west into the Caloosahat-
chee River, has already lowered the level of
the lake fourteen inches.
The reclamation of these lands will open up
for settlement the richest and most productive
lands in the world. As evidence of this fact
it can be authoritatively stated that other
portions of the Everglades that have been
reclaimed, notably along the Kissemee River,
are now selling at from $100 to $1,000 per acre.


I ) __ ~_


I








Climate.
The climate of the Everglades is most mild
and equable. The vegetation shows by the hab-
it of growth that frost is practically unknown.
In fact, this land is considerably south of the
27th parallel, which is called "the frost line."
Only moderately high temperature prevails in
the summer, and this is much modified by the
prevailing breezes from the Gulf of Mexico on
the west and the Atlantic Ocean on the east.
As to the climate in the winter, it is only
necessary to call attention to the fact that our
lands are in the same latitude as Palm Beach
and Miami, only a few miles distant, and
acknowledged to be the greatest winter resorts
in America, where hundreds of thousands of
people go annually, and which have admittedly
the finest winter climate on our Continent.
The mean temperature is 73 degrees. It is
seldom warmer than 83 degrees in the sum-
mer or colder than 50 degrees in winter, with
a minimum of 38.27 degrees, and a maximum
of 83.7. The climate of this section of Florida
compares favorably with the world famed
Southern California. The figures given above
are from the Climatological Service of the
Weather Bureau of the United States Govern-
ment.
Products.
Among the almost innumerable products that
can be profitably raised on this land, particular
mention may be made of oranges, grapefruit,
lemons, limes, avocadoes, pawpaws, persim-
mons, mulberries, figs, guavas, beans, cabbages,
tomatoes, celery, eggplant, bananas, the plan-
tain, sugar cane, cotton, tobacco, rice, coffee,
hemp, flax, Indian corn, barley, hops, buck-
wheat, cassava, pineapples, strawberries, water-
melons, cantaloupes, peaches, pears, citrons,
squash, okra, beets, cucumbers, cauliflower,
lettuce, onions, sweet and white potatoes, and
peanuts. Two crops of vegetables per year
are raised.
The opportunities offered by the many ad-
vantages to be had by locating in Southern
Florida would take volumes to describe. All
of our statements, however, can be verified by
reference to the United States Government and
Florida State reports and the standard ency-
clopaedias. It is the object of this Company


to mention only a small number in the short-
est possible manner. Located as we are within
a few hours from the greatest of the world's
markets, with soil of unequaled richness, and
an unrivaled climate, he who secures property
under these favorable conditions is certainly
taking full advantage of his opportunities.
Where the water is pure, soft and plentiful.
Where one never feels the need of a vaca-
tion.
Where you have neither cyclones nor bliz-
zards.
Where the average fruit farm is from five to
twenty acres.
Where a year from now this land will be out
of your reach.
Where the taxes .are so low the amount is
never missed.
Where the laws protect both the investor
and the settler.
Where the air is pure, is filled with ozone
and invigorating.
Where the overworked business man- can
rest and recuperate.
Where that hacking cough will cease and
sore throat never appear.
Where the country is advancing and prop-
erty values rapidly increasing.
Where the land yield is enormous and the
prices are always remunerative.
Where not only the greatest variety of fruit
and vegetables are grown, but the very best
quality of each.
Where pure air and pure water enables your
stomach to successfully perform its work and
indigestion is no more.
Where the growing season is twelve months
every year and two crops of vegetables can be
grown each year.


" '~~~" '" '"~ "


I ---~---~ --- -- -- ---- -;------- ;--------~------------





I 4 BOWRI BROTHERS.
1XNERAL AQOEPrS,
ROOM ~W OOLOFRADO SLOG.. ,
8 PHONZ MAIN 1081,
/ WASHIOatQTON, D. 0.


3J1lrinia 3ruit iLanbi itinir

THE FLORIDA FRUIT LANDS CO., Publishers. KANSAS CITY, MO., NOVEMBER, 1909. Vol. 1, No. 4




HE RICHEST LAND


Snot Under Cultivation


r TO-DAY r
Is that portion of Southern Florida near the Southeast coast of Florida,
north and west of the city of Miami, and it is the purpose of this paper
to truthfully set forth the climate, resources and advanages for settle-
ment of this region, which is claimed by the most noted experts to be
the richest tract of land to be found in the United States, and some have
gone so far as to say, in the world. With a charming climate and at
the very doors of the world's best markets, nothing like it can be found
on this continent today. There is now offered for sale a tract of 180,000
acres of this fine land. This magnificent property, large enough for 12,-
000 farms and homes, is being practically given away to 12,000 persons
who apply for farms before they are all sold. Remember that while
they last.

THERE WILL BE

8,000 Ten-Acre Farms
Everglades Paw-Paw Tree.00 Ten-Acre Farms
These will be the Best Locations,

NEAR THE TOWNSITE
-i and THE MAIN CANALS
I
The remaining 4,000 Farms will be
of larger and varying size. All farms
will be so divided as to be of as near
the same value as possible.
This value we have fixed at $240,
which amount is payable $10 down
and $10 per month.

In addition to the Farm, each Purchaser is given a Business or
Residence Lot in the town to be established on this Land. .- -
The farms range in size from 10 acres and up, according to character
,f land and location, and a contract calling for one undivided farm and one
I,.t and other rights, together, will be sold for only $240.00, payable $10.00
1'.r month. There is practically no limit to the variety of crops that can be
rlied on this land. The soil being very rich and fertile, is a veritable mine
:,f agricultural wealth, and the yield and production of fruits, vegetables-in
Ift.r, almost any kind of crop known to the modern farmer, can hardly be
C v,:elled. It has been said that one good investment beats a lifetime of labor.
Il:re is your opportunity. Put your monthly savings where you will have
..-mething worth while at the end of the year. For information write to
The Florida Fruit Lands CoTrnainy,
Or Any of its Agents, 103 Massachusetts Building, Kansas City, Mo.

A. D. HART.......President. REFERENCES:
Gate City Bank ............ Kansas City, Mo.
H E NRY RUSSELL WRAY V-Pres. Pioneer Trust Company, ....... Kansas City, Mo.
JOBn MATTHEW .Sec'y-Treas. Florida National Bank ........ Jacksonville, Fla.
southern Florida Pineapples. Four Pounds Each. N. B. Broward, Ex-Governor,. Jacksonville, Fla.
Southern Florida Papples Four Pounds ac First National Bank ... Colorado Springs, Colo.

im -~










THE FLORIDA FRUIT LANDS REVIEW


BEAUTIFUL SOUTHERN FLORIDA.


0 section of the United States has been better
known, nor longer neglected, than that area
of Florida, situated on the south and east of
I ake Okeechobee.
This region, known as the Everglades, was
authentically surveyed and reported upon by the
War Department for the General Government as
early as 1856. The wonderful fertility of the lands
exosed, and the great possibilities from the
slightly submerged lands when drained, had been
known before this first official Government re-
por-t.
Almost yearly, following the first investigation,
the Government ordered new surveys, and its
engineers suggested systems of wholesale recla-
mation, the feasibility of which could not be ques-
tioned,-but the work was not carried out for
years, owing to lack of definite authority, concen-
trated, well-defined action and necessary capital.
TITLE TO THE LANDS OF THE EVER-
GLADES.
Up to the time the Federal Government gave
to the State of Florida a clear title to all the
overflowed lands in that state, hundreds of set-
tlers there had in a way reclaimed small tracts
from the Everglades. This land was cultivated
first close to the eastern and western coasts of
the Peninsula. Gradually these pioneers, who
lived near the shores of the Atlantic or the
Gulf, encroached farther inland. The records of
the Agricultural Department clearly show from
the crops, fruits and garden products raised and
marketed, the great fortunes these early settlers
made. The plantations, worth first but a few
dollars an acre, rose in value to a hundred and
more an acre, and at last the eyes of the world
were opened to the fact-so long and earnestly
asserted by the Government officials-that the
lands of the Everglades of Florida were among
the richest producing lands in the world.
This muck land has been covered for centuries
with the purest of water, in which vegetation has
grown, bloomed, died and rotted.

REPORTS OF EXPERTS.
Prof. H. W. Wiley, Chief of the Bureau of
Chemistry, United States Department of Agricul-
ture, says:
"The Okccclobee muck, however, is underlaid
with a thick stratum of shell marl, containing peb-
bles very rich in phosphorus, and this rests upon
a corralline or limestone formation. This lime-
stone formation is very porous in structure, full
of cavities of varying sizes, capable of being
ground with extreme ease, and thus prepared for
application to the soil. *
"There is practically no other body of land in
the world which presents such remarkable possi-
bilities of development as the muck lands border-
ing the southern shores of Lake Okeechobee.
With a depth of soil averaging, perhaps, 8 feet
and with a surface almost absolutely level, it af-
fords promise of development which reaches be-
yond the limits of prophecy."
In extent these Everglades run several miles
south and east from the margin of Lake Okee-
chobee. They lie in a great basin. During the
rainy season parts of these glades are covered
with from one to several inches of entirely fresh
moving water, due to the heavy rains, which
swell the northern streams, draining into Lake
Okeechobee, and causing it to overflow.
It is the purpose of the present state dredging
system to lower the waters of Lake Okeechobee
so as to take care of these flood waters. In the
dry season today the Everglades are to a great
extent entirely free from water.
Government engineers, in their reports, show
that tli elcvi'tio.n of tlhe -ibmt:rc il I iidi ii o..r
21 fe'.t about the seai' hI-e, b a fvi .tem A m
canal cutting tlhri-ngh the rni r.:.ck. liiwch forms
the :a nt and i.cst coast- of Florida, the entire
area will he flraire,'


I I


j., it-p


Dad I 'i a, ax > -o-l ,


Exhibitb'of Everglades Products at Dade County Pair, Miami, Fla.


This area of the Everglades is not a swamp nor
a marsh, as popularly supposed, but an elevated
basin created by a rim of coral around the east,
south and west coasts of the state, which is partly
covered with pure water that is in constant mo-
tion, but which is given a marshy appearance by
the ever-present saw grass, and which somewhat,
resembles a swamp, also owing to the character-
istic growths of cypress and cocoa palm, on its
edges.
Dr. John N. Maggonigle in an allfess-:-,'.fie-
the EightJ International .Geographic Congress
said:
"The climate and productiveness of the Ever-
glades are not surpassed in the world, presenting
conditions in both winter and summer by which the
MAXIMUM RESULTS OF LABOR ARE PRO-
CURED BY THE MINIMUM OF EFFORT.
"The water in the Glades is always pure and
clear and drinkable. Nowhere is it stagnant; no-
where does it seem to be wholly at rest. It seenTs
to move in one mass from the northeast toward
the southwest. *
"The climate of the Glades is most mild and
equable. The vegetation shows by the habits of
growth that frost is unknown. Only moderately
high temperatures prevail in summer and these
are much modified by the prevailing breezes."
Governor Napoleon B. Broward of the State df
Florida is perhaps as conversant an authority on
the Everglades as any man alive. In a recent
report, speaking of the Everglades, he said:
"It may be needless for me to assert that the
richness and fertility of the soils of the Ever-
glades has been demonstrated by the investiga-
tions of the soil and climate experts. Since 1906,
when plans to reclaim the lands were undertaken
by the State of Florida through the trustees of
the Internal Improvement Fund, the project has
progressed so far that all doubt of its ultimate
success has been removed, and we know that it
is only a matter of time when most of this vast
area will be made fit for cultivation. I have
ib-en much thought to this great utbject, and
whicn I was. nominated in 1005 1 pI pledged myself
t.: drain the Evcrglade' and made thic the main
is-.uc f the campaign The project was taken.up._
immediately after election \\e have two dredges


constructed from im. designs. They began opera-
tion in 1906.
"Each dredge is excavatung a canal which aver-
ages 60 feet in width and has a depth ranging
from 12 to 15 feet. So far about 10 miles of
each canal have been completed, but the work is
to proceed much more r ipilly;,as we shall have
at least six excavators within the next year."
Elwcod Mead, Chief of Irrincti-.n and Drainage
Trivr-i.,tioiti,-n for the United Stac-vi..Department
-.""i .T i:iitur, four years ago said:
"The prestige of Florida fruit in the market is
encouraging and indicates that the- state MAY
EASILY LEAD in the quality of many of her
fruits. The value of fruit products during the
last two years, as reliably reported, has been
$200 to $1,000 an acre, which amount would justi-
fy considerable expenditure for reclamation im-
provements."
PRODUCTS AND SOIL.
It may be stated conservatively that any known
product of the garden grown in the temperate
zone can be produced as well, if not better, in the
recl-imit d fnkls of the Everglades south and east
of Lake- Okeechobee. Independent of these, the
fruits of the semi-tropics thrive and yield large
crops from December to May.
VEGETABLES AND FRUITS.
Profitable vegetables would include in the par-
tial list beans, cabbage, squash, tomatoes, okra,
celery, eggplant, beets, cucumbers, cauliflower,
sweet and white potatoes and peanuts. Two
crops of vegetables a year are raised.
In this wonderful muck, alluvial and diluvial
soils, are grown the banana, the plantain, sugar
cane, cotton, tobacco, rice, coffee, hemp, flax,
Indian 'corn, barley, hops, buckwheat, cassava,
grape fruit, pineapples, strawberries, lemons,
limes, avocadoes, pawpas, persimmons, mulberries,
figs, gauvas, watermelons, cantaloupes, peaches,
pears and citrons.
The fruit and vegetable grower in Florida profit-
ably employs the entire year.
In addition to the fruit-bearing species, the
pimento is. grown, as well as pepper, clove and
other spice trees.
STHE RAISING.OF SUGAR .CANE.
One of the most important industries today in


,GBIG LAIES


4 '-












THE FLORIDA' FRUIT LANDS REVIEW


Florida is that of raising sugar cane.
Prof. H. W. Wiley. Chief of the Bureau of,
Cheris'tr'y, in his report for 1901 'to hle Secretary
of the Depaitment of Agriculture, commented on
this product as follows:
"The problems connected with sugar and starch
are four or five in number:
"The soils of Florida have been deposited from
water, well adapted for producing sugar and
starch.
"The second problem is that of fertilizers. Per-
haps there is no state more favorably situated
than Florida in respect to fertilizer- You have
here inexhaustible deposits 'of phosphates. '.It
would be hard to find any other portion of our,
country where fertilizers could be sold more
cheaply than in this state.
"The third problem is the character of the mar-
ket. This country is the greatest sugar and
starch consumer in the world. We use more than
2,000,000 tons of sugar annually. Of this quantity,
before the Spanish war, we made only about 300,-
000 tons-about one-seventh of all.
"Since the Spanish war we have' acquired Ha-
waii, Porto Rico and the Philippines, all of which
give us large additional quantities of sugar. This
year we will produce about 100,000 tons of beet
sugar, so that at the present time it may be said
that we produce about one-third of all the sugar
we consume. But still there is a vast foreign
market which we might supply with the home
product. There is no. danger, therefore, of over-
stocking our home market with increased sugar
production, nor is there danger of the beet sugar
driving the cane sugar out of the market. For
many purposes, as for instance the manufacture of
syrup, beet sugar is unsuitable, and there will
always be a demand for all the cane sugar that
can be made:
S"The sugar crop of the whole, world for the
present year is about 10,000,000 tons, of which
nearly 7,000,000 are made from the-sugar beet."
Some years have elapsed since Dr. Wiley made
this report, and during that time these figures
have been materially changed.
America today consumes almost 3,000,000 tons
of sugar annually.
SLast year we produced 500,000 gross tons or
about one-sixth of all we use.
The sugar crop for the world has increased in
these seven years from 10,000,000 to 14,000,000
tons. This production is about equally divided
between beet and sugar cane.


In conclusion Prof. Wiley said:
"That Florida must depend upon the sugar cane
for sugar and upon the cassava and potato for
starch.
"In one particular industry Florida stands pre-
eminent, and that is the manufacture of tabl,-
syrups from sugar cane. By the development o0
these great industries, sugar and starch making,
including table syrups, untold wealth will, in lhe
near future, flow into Florida. From by-products
of the factories immense quantities of cattle food
can be obtained, both from sugar cane and the
starch producing plants. Thus. a dairy in-
dustry can be established in connection with sugar
and starch making which will add much to the
wealth of the state.
"In regard to the depth of the soil, it varies
from the merest covering at the edges of the
sand to from 15 to 16 feet in its deepest portions.
The greater part of the muck lands will vary from
3 to 6 feet deep. The soil varies in color from
jet black to black-brown.
"The 'Florida planter can confidently count on
a continuous manufacturing season, being rarely
interrupted by rains.
"The climatic conditions of temperature ap-
proach those of tile island of Cuba. This being
true of the central portion of the peninsula, it is
true in a much greater degree of the lower por-
tions, viz.: the Okeechobee section. The cocoanut
and date palm flourish, and tropical plants of
almost every description predominate over the
sub-tropical. Here sugar cane is absolutely free
from any danger of frosts. It may be said, then,
with confidence that in the region of the Lake
Okeechobec the lands which may be reclaimed for
sugar making purposes have all the advantages of
the climate of Cuba.
"The manufacture of sugar from the cane in
this region may be postponed witl, perfect safety
until the beginning of February, as the months of
February, March and Apr;l are those of greatest
activity in sugar manufacture."
Parties having sugar mills in the neighborhood
of this company's land will be able to contract at
$5.00 a ton for the cane. Sugar cane grows from
30 to 50 tons to the acre. At 30 tons to the acre
this would give $150.00 per acre.
Sugar cane needs little or no cultivation. It is
cheap.y planted and only replaced once in seven
or eight years. On this company's ground un-


doubtedly 40 tons to the acre can be grown, and
five acres of land will, with little cultivation, sup-
port a family well by the product of any of the
number of fruits or ,-il.l,1;k mentioned.
The following facts and figures were taken from
and may be corroborated by reports of the United
States Department of Agriculture and the Depart-
ment of the Interior; Florida's Agricultural Col-
lege and Experiment Station; Florida's State
Chemist; Florida's C mmissioner of Agriculture,
and the Ft. Myers Hoard of Trade, as well as
from the statements made by railroads and indi-
viduals:
BANANAS. PINEAPPLES AND OTHER
CROPS.
Bananas. Planting bananas 10 feet apart, as the
trees are small, and getting only one bunch from
each hill, the owner would have on each acre 400
bunches, which at $1.00 a bunch would pay $400.00
per acre per annum.
Pineapples. Pineapples yield from seven to ten
crops without replanting. The lirst and principal
cost is for tile land. The income from the see
ond, third, fourth, fifth and sixth crops is profit,
From nearby lands one acre of pineapples contain
ing liilian plants yielded 300 crates, averaging 30
to the crate, or 9,000 apples. They neted over
transportation and cotllimission $2.00 per crate, or
$600.00 per acre. From this saie acre 32,000
planting slips were secured, which sold at $0.00
per 1,000, adding 1o tlie prolilt of this sale acre
$192.00, or a total of $792.00.
Tomatoes. On 2'. acres there averaged 420
crates of tomatoes to the acre. The cost was 50
cents per crate. lFrom the 1,117 crates there was
netted, after deducting commission, freight, etc.,
$1,849.83; from this amount the cost of growing,
picking and packing is deducted, $558.50, leaving a
profit of $1,291.33, for four months' work ,on only
2?4 acres of land. Suppose the owner had farmed
10 acres, the smallest fariis in the division sug-
gested? lie would have had over $4,000.00 fo,-
part of his year's work.
Strawberries. From one acre of slrawlerrics
$500.00 was realized. Considering the small capi-
tal invested, this is one of the most profitable
crops of the section.
Potatoes. Potatoes yield about $200.00 per acre
per crop. Two crops a year may be grown.
The profits from grape fruit, cocoa, mangoes,
oranges, lemons, limes and all garden truck are
now matters of record in Dade conuty.
The official statistics of Dade county show 2,410
acres in tomatoes, valued at about three-quarlers
of a million dollars; 108 acres of beans valued
at $30,(X00; 21 acres of eggplant, valued at $10,-
000; 20 acres of cuculnlbers, valued at $9,000); 27
acres in peppers, valued at over $20,000; 21 acres
in white potatoes, valued at about $5,000(, and
some small acreage devoted to raising cabbage,
English peas, etc.
The shipments from tlis section come into
market when highest prices prevail and good
produce always brings good prices.
Rice. Two crops of rice can be raised an-
nually and one may conservatively count upon
50 bushels to the acre from eaci' crop. Independ-,
ent of this revenue there is profit in the volultn
teer rice for fodder crops and grazing.
The price of the rice at the plantlationl averages
75 cents per bushel, or an annual per acre yield
value of $75.00.
Peaches Peaches yield a profit of from $100.00
to $150.00 per acre.
On these lands this crop could be harvested
and sold from the middle of April to the ...11.-
of May, or about one month earlier than the
maturing of peaches in the northern part of the
state.
Celery. Celery will yield from $500.00 to
$1,0(X).00 per acre, for the reason that on these
lands the plant would mature when all Northern
celery was out of the market.
But it is needless to further illustrate. The
remarkable soil with little expense of prepara-


Tomato Picking Near Miami on Everglades Soil.


/ .


rrrs"- -~-rriru __
i'


_ _---_


--1.












THE FLORIDA FRUIT LANDS REVIEW


ticn and no fertilization will produce any crop to
which the country is adapted, on a basis of profit
heretofore almost unknown.
Semi-tropical fruits grown in the Okeechobee
region, south and east of the lake, have a su-
perior flavor to those produced in any other sec-
tion of the world.
Staple crops and vegetables may be grown on
these lands every month of the year. This is a
guarantee to the settler of a living and a com-
petence, provided, of course, that he possesses
some degree of energy.
These facts, together with the immunity from
frosts enjoyed by the products raised, will nat-
urally enhance the value of the land in this
section.
It is indeed the ideal poor man's haven, where
on a small investment of money and work he
can secure a permanent subsistence from crops
that cannot be overproduced, and in a delightful
climate.
Ramie (hemp). This valuable manufacturing
product yields about 3,C00 pounds of clean fibre,
valued at 5 cents per pound, or $150.00 per acre.
Jute, sisal hemp, bear grass and other fibrous
plants produce largely.
Tobacco. Another industry which has devel-
oped with rapid strides during the past ten years
in Florida is growing of Havana and Sumatra
tobacco. The soil is perfectly adapted for the
raising of these high-priced products.
Secretary of Agriculture, the Honorable James
Wilson, in a recent speech said:
"We use tobacco extensively and pay around
$30,000,000 for importations from Cuba and Suma-
tra, Porto Rico, Mediterranean countries and Bra-
zilian ports. We raised Sumatra wrappers last
year to the extent of $7,000,000 worth. We found
in the Ccnnecticut valley and in Florida the same
soil that grows the wrapper tobacco in Sumatra,.
after visiting that country and studying their
methods and soils. We hope in time to grow all
the tobacco now imported from Cuba and Su-
matra into the United States."
The marginal lands are particularly recom-
mended for tobacco cultivation. Here large crops
of both filler and wrapper, as well as leaf for
plug tobacco, may be grown.
Samples, from crops on the Caloosahatchee
river have been commended, as before stated, to
be the equal in quality and flavor to tobacco
/ grown sn the island of Cuba and Sumatra.
CLIMATE AND TEMPERATURE.
It is now a well established fact that the con-
stant winds from the southeast and the inter-
changing air currents from the Gulf to the At-
lantic give to the Peninsula of Florida an ideal
summer climate. The humidity is not as great
in July and August as it is in some of the Mid-
dle states. A summer tour to Cuba is a common
thing now, yet the climate and temperature of
Florida are similar to that of Cuba.
The fact that the peninsula is almost surround-
.- ed by the Atlantic ocean and the Gulf of Mex-
\ e\ ico produces a mean temperature of 73 degrees.
It seldom is warmer than 85 degrees in summer
or colder than 50 degrees in winter. With a
minimum of 38.27 degrees and a maximum of
83.7 degrees this section of Florida compares
most favorably with the world-famed Southern
California. This is not an idle statement, but
one which is proven by comparative figures as
issued by the Climatological Service of the
Weather Bureau of the United States Govern-
ment.
As to the healthfulness of the reclaimed regions
Prof. W. L. Van Duzer of Kissimmee says:
"The healthfulness of a region is of the utmost
importance to any enterprise, and especially is
this true when the operatives must become per
manent residents. It can be positively stated that
the reclaimed lands of the Kissimmee valley are
free from malaria. The employes of the drainage
Company were white men exclusively. These
men were recruited from all parts of the coun-
try. Many of them entered into the service of
the company before they became acclimated. Dur-


ing a period of over eleven years the company
never employed a physician nor lost an em-
pioye from death; never did any of the men leave
the service of the company from the fact that they
could not stand the climate. Malaria and chills
are absolutely unknown."
TRANSPORTATION.
Few states in the Union possess better local
and foreign transportation facilities than does
Florida. On the face of her labyrinth of canals
ply fleet steamers. Trunk lines intersect the state,
and the recent inauguration of, express trains and
steamers for the conveying r.f fruits and vege-
tables means that her numero s products are de-
livered with expedition, fresh and unspoiled, into
the best markets of the Middle and New England
states. The proximity of these metropolitan cen-
ters assures a profitable market for the grower.
INVESTMENT.
It is not necessary to expatiate on these lands
from a standpoint of investment. Land which
today may be bought for a few dollars an acre will,
on the completion of the canals and a complete un-
watering, be worth from $100.00 to $1,000.00 per
acre. This has been the history of the past-there
is no logical reason to suppose it will not be the
history of the future.
The company anticipates being permanently in-
terested in these Florida lands, mainly from the
standpoint of sugar culture and manufacture.
Such being the case, it is vitally concerned in the
formation of desirable communities surrounding
its own holdings.
People who from conditions of health or age
desire a climate equable all the year and free
from extremes of heat or cold, should secure
at least a small home farm in Florida.
OBSERVATIONS.
Since the days, centuries ago, when Ponce de
Leon and his Spanish conquiscadores roamed
over what is now the state of Florida, in search
of the mythical "Fountain of Youth," this portion
of our country has been world famous for its
salubrious climate; its beautiful winter resorts;
the variety and excellence of its products, such
as tropical and semi-tropical fruits; its vegetables,
and its magnificent flowers, from which latter
the state takes its name-all of which are at their
best when the major portion of the United States
is shrouded in snow and ice.
The annual mid-winter pilgrimage of hundreds


of thousands of. people from the North, who
throng its perfect beaches, its beautiful rivers and
lakes, and its health-giving springs, are indisputa-
ble evidences of the fascination of this beautiful
country.
Commercially, Florida in the past few years has
forged rapidly to the front. Owing to the fact
that it can put its fruits and vegetables into the
markets weeks ahead of any other portion of the
country, thus enabling the growers to obtain
fancy prices for their products, and the further
fact that this country is only a few hours away
from the best and largest markets in the world,
with water transportation, costing the producer
but one-seventh of the rail rate to get his prod-
ucts to the market, fortunes have been and are
being made there every year from comparatively
small tracts of land.
The result of all of this development has in-
creased the value of farm, fruit and vegetable
lands in the developed portion of Florida until
it is beyond the poor man's reach.
For many years the United States Government,
through the Department of Agriculture, and the
state authorities have been investigating and ex-
perimenting with the soil, the climate and possi-
ble productions of the far-famed Everglades of
Florida, with the result that they have demon-
strated beyond a question of doubt that these
lands, when drained and reclaimed, are the rich-
est and most productive lands in the entire world,
surpassing California and the valley of the Nile.
As a consequence, the state of Florida took the
matter in hand, made liberal appropriations and
proceeded to build hundreds of miles of navigable
drainage canals, one of which is completed,
and vigorous construction work is now being
prosecuted on a number of others. As fast as
these lands have been reclaimed they have been
sold to and occupied by actual settlers, and, as a
result, many of these reclaimed lands are now
selling at from $100 to $1,000 an acre and bringing
a net revenue that warrants an even higher price
-lands that only a few years ago were considered
absolutely valueless.
Realizing all of these conditions, this company
went in ahead of the dredgers and purchased
180,000 acres of these prospectively valuable lands
in alternate sections and at a price which enables
them to place the land on the market in small
holdings at an absurdly low price, considering
their actual value.


South Canal Looking East, 16% Miles in the Everglades.










THE FLORIDA FRUIT LANDS REVIEW f

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THE FLORIDA FRUIT LANDS REVIEW


DRAINING


THE EVERGLADES.
By N. B. Broward, Governor of Florida.


In the state of Florida, in the region commonly
known as the Everglades, we have five million
acres of land suitable for a most profitable form
of agriculture, but valueless at the present time
because it is covered by water. It may be need-
less for me to assert that its richness and fertility
have been demonstrated by the investigations of
soil and climatic experts.
I can say that at last we have settled this point.
For, since the year of 1906, when plans to reclaim
the land were undertaken by the 'state through
trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund, the
project has progressed so far that all doubt of
its ultimate success has been removed, and we
,now that it is only a matter of time when most
of this vast area will be made fit for cultivation.
To give a clear conception of how this great
.inage work will be accomplished, it will be
necessary for me to refer briefly to the position of
the Everglades and their character. They are
,rci.:nti, elevated above the sea to permit all
.f the surface water to be removed if an adequate
system of outlets is constructed, while Lake
Jkeechobee can be kept at such a level that it
cannot t overflow the surrounding country when
.s feeders are filled with flood water. We do not
r-pect to drain the lake. It is not necessary and
the task would be too great, for the lake's present
area is about 650,000 acres, but we can confine
its waters to their normal area by carrying off the
overflow through the canal system, we are con-
structing.
The Everglades lie in an immense basin whose
rim, probably of volcanic origin, is composed of
coral and limestone rock. There are times when
the surface of the Everglades is so slightly sub-
merged that the rim is above the water, while
during the flood season it may be partially or
wholly covered. This barrier is what creates the
Svergladc-, as but a small portion of the water
ran escape through it. Measurements made at
various points by State and Government engineers
show the elevation of the 'ubmerged land. is fully
20 feet above the sea at the lowest point, and
there is a contiinual ldec'nt from. Lake Okeecho-
bee to tide water..
Consequently, the problem to solve has been
how to make passages through this rim which
would be of sufficient capacity to allow the water
it confines to find a lower level and thus escape.
This was the problem that my associates and my-
self-the trustees of the Internal Improvement
Fund-have attempted to overcome. I have given
such study to it that when I was nominated for
Governor in 1905 I pledged myself to drain the
Everglades and made this the main issue of the
campaign. The project was taken up immediately
after election. We had two dredges constructed
from designs of my own. They began operation
in July, 1906, at the head of what is called the
New River, about 20 miles from the city of
Miami. The New River flows directly into the
sea. Each dredge is excavating, through the rim
I have described, a canal which averages 60 feet
in width and has a depth ranging from 12 feet
to 15 feet. So far nearly three miles of each canal
have been completed, but the work is to proceed
much more rapidly, as we shall have at least six
excavators in .service within the next year. A
tax of 5 cents an acre on lands sold to settlers
gives us an income of about $220,000 annually, and
will enable us to increase our operations, as the
excavation-of the canals is being done with great
economy-about one-seventh of the usual cost
of such labor.
To provide a complete drainage system will
necessitate the construction of about 600 miles
of outlets. Most of this work, however, will be
merely mud excavation. It is intended to pierce
the rim at several other points with canals which
will connect with tidal rivers like the New'River,
and the success we have attained warrants the


Dredge "Okeechobbee" in the Everglades. Removes 4%2 Cubic Yards of Muck Every
Forty-five Seconds.


undertaking. As the channels are dug, the sur-
face water in the vicinity finds its way into them
and flows seaward, so that already we have over
2,000 acres of what has been submerged soil re-
claimed and'being sold to the settler for cultiva-
tion. Thus, as the drainage proceeds, the farmer
will follow to ..c*.:upy the land.
Is it worth while to make} this region fit for
human habitation? If anyone so questions, let
him consider for a moment the benefit it will con-
fer, not only on'the Souti," but upon the whole
country, from merely one standpoint. There is
now imported into the United States more than
2,400,000 tons of foreign sugar, for which we pay,
in duty and to the foreign producer, more than
$150,000,000 yearly. Our total exports per annum
of the following articles, corn, wheat, flour, beef
and naval stores combined, amounts to but $144,-
000,000. In other words, we are paying for for-
eign sugar, in American money, more than the
people of foreign countries pay the people of the
United States for all of the corn, wheat, flour,
beef and naval stores shipped them from the
United States. There are in this submerged
Florida 5,000,000 acres of land suitable for the
cultivation of sugar cane; 3,000,000 acres of which
land is free of trees and shrubs, containing only
grass; 3,000,000 acres of muck land, varying i:
depth of muck from 2 feet at the edges to 20 feet
in the middle. A small portion of the territory.
when reclaimed by private enterprise and culti-
vated, some years ago, actually produced 63 tons
of cane to an acre of ground-care which yielded
12,600 pounds. If even 500,000 acres of this soil
were put into sugar cane, it would yield more
than the 2,400,COO tons of sugar now annually
imported from abroad.
In proof of the assertion that South Florida
affords the site for another great industry, I
will briefly refer to the opinions of Dr. H. W.
Wiley, the head of the United States Bureau of
Chemistry, who has analyzed samples of sugar
cane raised on land reclaimed from this section.
Dr. Wiley says: "All of these samples are of
over 88 per cent purity and are the most remark-
able samples we have ever examined. They con-
tain no glucose (a sign of inferiority) whatever
when tested."


Mr. Claus Speckels, the noted sugar plantation'
owner and refiner, writes as follows regarding his
inspection of these reclaimed sugar lands: "I
take pleasure in saying that during my recent
trip to inspect your sugar operations my surprise
was great at finding such a country for the
growth of sugar cane. The soil is as rich as any
that I have ever seen, and with proper cultivation
the yield should be equal to that of any other
country on the face of the globe."
What has been already done in the raising of
fruit and vegetables on the small areas of soil
which have been drained by private enterprise
show that such work will be repaid many fold.
Not only is this part of the state adequate for
the production of every pound of the nation's
sugar, but it can be covered with fruit orchards
and vegetable gardens. The 5,000,000 acres to
which I have referred, however, represent only a
small portion of the swamp land, granted to
Florida by the United States, on which millions
of people might find homes and occupations if
it were properly drained, which it is possible to
do at a very small expense, considering the value.
of this land for settlement.
Let me give a few statistics to further show the
extent of this land, now a great waste which
might be made of such value. It covers a space
equal to the total area of three states of the
Union-Connecticut. Rhode Island and Delaware
-and comprises over one-half of the surface of
the state of Florida.
Did not England reclaim the lands in the val-
ley of the Nile? Then can we not reclaim the
lands of Florida? Centuries ago the people of
Holland found themselves cramped for room, be-
cause of the rapid increase of population. In-
stead of falling upon some neighboring people
and taking from them their territory, they looked
out over the reaches of the sea and said: "Here
is land in plenty, which the sea does not need;
we will take it." They built dikes, shut out the
sea, pumped out the water-and today the bot-
tom of the ocean has become the garden spot of
Europe, the home of a multitude of happy and
prosperous people, and the very sea, whose land
was taken, has been confined between canal
banks and made the carrier of a nation's com-
merce. Much of Holland is below the level of
the surface of the ocean. Our Everglades, as I
have said. are above the level of the ocean, so
our only task is to let the water run out of them
to make habitable a region which is one of the
richest in the world and can be made one of the
most productive in America.-The New York In-
dependent, June 25, 1908.


F"-~ : T.


U


C' --




-lowl


THE FLORIDA FRUIT LANDS REVIEW


There is 'probably no section of this continent
that offers greater or more varied opportunities
to the poor man or the man of moderate means
than the Southern Florida of today. It is a land
teeming with possibilities. Take it acre for acre
with any land in the eastern, middle or Missis-
sippi valley states and ten acres of this land will
produce more, with less effort, than many times
the acreage in any of the states mentioned,
and yet these lands today can be purchased at a
price that would be laughed at in any of these
states.
i Living is not only pleasanter, but cheaper in
Florida than in any state north of the Mason and'
Dixon line. One does not have to provide houses,
fuel or clothing against the hard winters, as is
the case farther north. Owing to the tempering
effect of the ocean breezes from the east and the
gulf breezes from the west, one does not suffer
from the prostrating summer heat of the northern
states.
Southern Florida has twelve months growing
season every year, against from five to six months
growing season in the north, consequently the
ordinary small fruits and vegetables produce at
least two crops per year.
The fruits and vegetables of this section come
to maturity weeks ahead of any other portion of


Southern Florida Bananas.


the country, at a time when the very highest
prices are realized by the growers. Added to
this the further fact that they are within a few
hours of the best and largest markets in the
world, by water, making them independent of the
railways with their high rates.
Our lands will not only produce in perfection
everything grown in other portions of the United
States, except wheat and apples, but in addition
will produce all semi-tropical and most tropical
fruits, vegetables, etc.; in fact, almost anything
that will grow in rich soil under genial skies can
be grown, both. in profusion and perfection, and
with minimum effort, in Southern Florida.
Nature has for centuries been preparing the
everplades of Florida for occupancy by man. For
untold centuries the rain-swollen rivers of the
central and northern portions of the state have
been depositing alluvium on these lands; vegeta-
tion has grown, died and decayed, becoming
mixed with and enriching the soil until today
it is the richest soil on earth, comparable only
with the alluvial soil of the famous Nile delta,
this soil in places is over ten feet deep and abso-
lutely inexhaustible.
It has only remained for the engineering genius
of man to reclaim this land, relieve it of its
excess of moisture and deliver over to a waiting
people a potential Garden of Eden.
For fifty years the United States Government
has been testing and making experiments with
this land; its engineers have figured out plans
for its reclamation, but only within a very few
years has the work of drainage and recla-
mation been in actual progress, with the result
that wherever the land has been reclaimed it has
been immediately purchased and occupied by pro-
gressive and energetic farmers, fruit and
garden truck growers. As a consequence this
reclaimed land has increased in value by leaps
and bounds until today it is valued at from $100
to $1,000 per acre.
Realizing the immense future in these lands.
this company went in ahead of the reclamation
work, bought 180,000 acres of the very best of
these lands; buying their land in a wholesale lot
they got it at a price that enables them to place
it on the market at what seems to be an absurdly
low price, considering its actual and prospective
value.
The State of Florida is pushing its reclamation
work with great vigor. Having employed the
ablest engineers obtainable, they have three enor-
mous dredges at work now digging navigable
drainage canals, and two more will be put in
operation during the present winter.
The reclamation of the Everglades and plac-


ing of this wonderfully rich country where it
can be occupied by settlers, is due mostly to the
efforts of two men-Hon. W. S. Jennings and
Hon. N. B. Broward, two last governors of the
state of Florida, Mr. Broward having given
up his commission as late as the 5th of January,
1909. It was not until after some hard fights
were made that these men obtained this land
for the use of the farmer. When Mr. Jennings
entered the oltice of _-.... I io r he found that,
while the United States had given this land to
the state of Florida for the purpose of reclaim-
ing it, different 1. Li-l lm had -*il.-.ini ii ly
given grants of this land to various enterprises
other than for the reclamation of these lands
He immediately took the position that thest
grants were not legal. Then began a hard legal
fight to determine who owned these lands-the
state or the special interests. Through the ef-
forts and legal ability of Mr. Jennings the state
won. Then plans for the reclamation of same
were formed, but this brought the administration
of Mr. Jennings to a close, and as no governor
of the state of Florida can succeed himself, the
people of Florida who were interested in the
reclamation of these lands put forward Mr. N.
B. Broward for governor, and he was elected
by an overwhelming majority. Mr. Broward
pushed the reclamation with equal vigor as it
was begun by Mr. J.-lniilini Of course, it took
a long while to get things ready to begin work
in earnest, and a great deal remained to be done
when the term of Mr. Broward also came to a
close. But to assure the final success of the
driini.ige and reclamation of the Fverglades, the
dramage board entered into a c.,ntiil t with some
private parties by which a large portion of the
lands of the Everglades was sold to these private
individuals and the money paid for same was
contracted by the drainage board to be spent in
the reclamation of these lands, so in the present
condition, the state of Florida is under contract
with the Florida l'ruit Lands Colni .iiv and other
purchasers, for the drainage and reclamation of
these lands, and $500,000 is now available for
that purpose, or such an amount as is necessary
to complete the work. The lands coming under
the project other than those now being offered
for sale by this company, are owned by the
Florida State Land & Drainage Company, and
are not for sale at any price, also by Mr. Davie
and associates, of the American Sugar Refining
Company of Colorado, who. have purchased a
part of these lands and c..iitnipdllle the raising
of sugar cane and the erection of a large sugar
mill.
When one takes all of these facts into consid-
eration and then notes the low price and easy
terms on which this land can be purchased under
our plan, we believe we will not be accused of
"drawing the long bow" when we state, as we do,
without fear of successful contradiction, that we
are offering the greatest value for the amount of
money invested, ever offered to the American
public, and whether you are seeking a home
where you can not only make a living and lay
up a c-m.ii. t1.-1e for your family, but live with
ideal and l.-liL.li ffi surroundings, or are seeking
a safe and 1r. .it:ili..- investment for your savings
or surplus .*r',iiL'-. 'ou are overlooking the
opportunity oi li 'l,-i1,, if you do not investigate.

SOME OF OUR ADVANTAGES.
By the use of a system of canals running from
Lake Okeechobee 1lirnllih the heart of our lands
to the Atlantic ocean, with feeders ramifying the
entire tract, we attain the following results:
1st. We lower the level of the lake sufficiently
to prevent the annual overflow of these lands
during the rainy season, thoroughly draining
same at the time they need the drainage.
2nd. By using locks or gates in the canals, we
are enabled, during the try season when the
water is needed for the crops, to throw the water
back on the land in the way of irrigation.
3rd. As the state is constructing these canals
so that they are 60 feet wide at the bottom and
from 12 to 15 feet in depth, they furnish nav-
igable waterways to enable the farmer and fruit
grower to get their products to the ocean ports
by the very cheapest method of transportation
known to mal.
4th. As our land is between 12 and 20 feet
above the ocean level and the distance by canal
to the nearest port averages about 10 or 12
miles, this gives sufficient current not only to
thoroughly drain the land, but to assist in carry-
ing the growers' products to the port.
When one adds to these advantages the climate
and healthfulness of this portion of the country,
the richness of the soil, the variety and profusion
of the products, its proximity to the best markets
and the fact that the products reach the market
so far in advance of any of its American corn'
petitors, we challenge the world to produce its
equal.


Grape Fruit Grown on Muck Soil on Miami RiM.


SOME PERTINENT REMARKS.











THE FLORIDA FRUIT LANDS REVIEW


The Maligned Everglades.
By William Todd.
Central Africa will always be "Darkest" Africa
to the ignorant despite its broad sunny plains.
The rich luxuriant growth of our Dismal Swamp
will be forever "dismal" to those who have not
seen its beauty, and for the same reason the
Florida Everglades continues to be a,"miasma
swamp" because man has not taken the trouble
to see for himself.
Those who love this rare garden, hesitate to
disapprove this misconception, for it explains its
solitude to-day and why it now remains one of
the few spots in this land where one can be alone
amid the beatitudes of nature.
The Glades were originally a shallow lake some
seventy by one hundred and fifty miles with a
coral rock bottom. Being shallow, grass gradu-
ally grew over it, tall, rich tropical grass that
waves perpetually in a balmy breeze. The water
moving toward the coast slowly wrought for it-
self winding channels through this meadow which
to-day are lined with the rich purple of the float-
ing hyacinth and peopled with bass. Contrary
as it is to existing knowledge, this water is quite
clear and safe to drink.
An elevation of something over thirty feet
above tidewater gives a perceptible and some-
times strong current to the streams. Thui the
Miami, draining the Everglades on the east, is
a short but swift river, and the Caloosahatchee,
the main western outlet, is not to be negotiated
in the rainy season except with a power boat
which can breast its deep strong flow. Where
the Glades proper approach the high land there
is always an intervening stretch of high land
prairie-"Savannahs"-De Soto called them-
back of which lies the timber growth. There are
no mosquitoes in winter and strange to say few
in summer compared to the coast. I have never
heard this satisfactorily c.plaini-l except that, the
larvae may thrive more prolificly ':r the brackish
water of the salt water marshes.
The Great Landscape Gardener to ease the
monotony of so much sameness in his meadow,
dotted it with islets-hummocks they are called
-heavy with tropical growth and plumed usually
with one or two palmetto palms which rise
smooth for thirty feet, and then burst into a
bouquet of long waving branches. To give it
-olor the birds came with feathers of every
shade-the white heronr the hlNe heron, the white
i:rlew. the pinl: *-urlc-= aj hii- .:...u- iii. rhe
bronze ibis with a deC,'-L .:, lii h hi!ack like a Turk-
*'h rug. There are e\ ry varis.t% ,f .v ling bird
from the ~ann.1 piper t l., t .r .ari l: b'u. :r.:.n. h".
stands 1'.. = feet, and .. li in pcrrlorar,: one's
...:ll with his bill, but lie it gift. w. h :, kint dly


disposition. In the winter time the ducks join
this noisy throng.
Add to this many strange flowers of beautiful
colors and fragrant perfumes and the picture of
the much-maligned Everglades is complete.-
"Outing," March, 1908.

MIAMI.
Miami is the county seat of Dade County. It
is a most attractive city, having miles of pae:l
streets which connect with one hundred filty
miles of rock roads throughout the country.
Miami has a fine artesian water supply for it-
water works. It is well equipped with an elc:-
tric light and power plant. It is well sewercdl
and probably has more miles of good conc-rl:..
sidewalks than any town of its size in the So:il,
It has beautiful public buildings-the coint;
court house is of white Miami rock and cost
$60,000. There are numerous large hotels-here
i r f..un, rlth ",P y.' l PF l ." ...... of il.- ] ri c :rt
a nd i r :t i _.rt l ,:.r. r ,: ,.t .-i' -r .,f 1 .-.r lI it
h a : a li r e nI [i l .,ler .:. I,.. full lH.rn : l. c r;I- r.
la I.'li-. ;'l, l I ir, a ] tlro p i 'l l ,-.l. rv: hl. h :
t, u l.,i .: .. hI .:. I. -. r ),, o', r ll c ., :..I i :r r-
bor ir i: r,, ie c.,:r r. r ,ipiJly ",- l n.:.' ha_ a
po-pu .:.. -. ,n .-,-.pli, l:,.-i, t I100.i.iin to huri rT .
,vi ilt thi- i,,_tion dur L th.: w|inti:r *,: -...n "T h,:


2.201 Crate of Tomatom Grown in the verglades.


back country is very rich and is growing very
rapidly. It is estimated by careful men that the
pineapples, citrus fruits and vegetable crops of
Dade County produce over $2,000,000 per annum.
Dade County is practically free from killing
frosts. Miami is near enough to the origin of the
trade winds to feel their influence and is cooler
in summer than many northern resorts. A drive
through the country back of Miami is most inter-
esting, and will afford views ._.f or.inm~c and
..'r'pe.fru t growing, as well as miang:e., a\a,:..rid
pear- an.i sapodillos, and other tropica' fruits
which secm especially adapted t, thli particular
soil and this climate.-Florida East Coast Rail-
way Lit,:r -ture.t
On. c.if the surprising features in regard to the
climate it Miami is that. while it is located near
the coast, the air is dry, and the clammy, sticky
sensation that is often found in-most coast cities
is eritirely absent here. Instead of a close, dense
alrr:-phere, the air is balmy and invigorating.
Malaria, chills and fever, and kindred diseases,
are practically unknown in this section. One
rises in the morning full of life and energy, in-
stead of the listless, tired feeling that is often
experien-ced in southern countries.
The lanil for sale by the Florida Fruit Lands
Companyir.i begins about six miles west of Miami
and .extends north and west. This description
-of tlh1 I-inls around Miami, which is published
by tl, Ea-t Coast Railway Company, will easily
apply tr,: our lands; as we adjoin these lands on
the '.e-t Jand north

INFORMATION TO PURCHASERS
TIh- Fl.-rida Fruit Lands Company is a corpora-
ticin and is composed of men of wide business
experience. well known, careful and successful in
their ui dl.:rtakings.
01,, pr.-ron may purchase ten farms and lots,
but lie must sign a separate application for each
farm and lot applied for. Sign the application,
paying the agent $5(11: in .-alih and gir ;1 d.rl fr .-.r
money order for $5)00, made pa:.atbl: t.:. u.:. an; I
give -.anr. t.: th ei-nt t.-. be ft-,r'ar.id .:1 to, rhi
company wiih tih application The -cond. _:,-
m ent ill be dui: .-.: n r-,rn th fr...m ri e dI r. :, .i i..
appli:ati.:,n and tihe _i aml1,: ,1y cI.ach m month h ti.,-.-
after until fully paid, anld tllh se paiym iient -.l:.il.l
be made by you direct to this ,onc, :each m,-,,-i
,The title to this property is alh.-.h'lit ly perll::
and tunchl illeittl-d and each purc:li. ir wvill ;.:r -1
warranty d'e l for ea; h armn arnl lot ippli,,l 'i n.1
paid for. T he ibtriact w ill F.- ,:r: I-.rift f,:,i rlite
reason thi rt lit rin tr.-' th l ir,: h i1 ir,.:
from the State of FIri.l-. Thlr- ; i n.. int.r.:-r
on delferri:l pa, lments .:.r ty.- i -',r .I t. an,
purchaser until he ha',, re, i-i l i, dIci d No ap-
plication will be received :i r,.:J d .1 negr:i.


For Further Information, write to The Florida Fruit Lands Co., 103 Massachusetts Bldg, Kansas City, Mo., or its Agents.


`~~-- -------;L~l~T. ----------
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-- I -------------------------


Fruit Packing House at Miami, Fla.


~





- h 1


THE CAMERA IN



so utfhteir Fliorinda
BOWEN BROTHER
GENERAl. AGENTS,
ROOM 02r COLORADO
N D.















PRESENTED BY

THE FLORIDA FRUIT LANDS CO.
INCORPORATED
KANSAS CITY, MO.
COMPANY'S SALES OFFICE. 103 MASSACHUSETTS BUILDING.


A. D. HART, President.' REFERENCES:
JOHN MATTHEW, Sec.-Treas. GATE CITY BANK, Kansas City, Missouri
R. J. MARTIN, FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK, Jacksonville, Fla.
J. H. BORDERS, N.B. BROWARD, Ex-Gov. Jacksonville, Fla.
Managing Directors. FIRST NATIONAL BANK, Colorado Springs, Col.


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Gathering the Golden Orange (Southern Florida).


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One of Our Canals.


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Diversified Market Gardening, for Early Market (Southern Florida).


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One of the Dredges Working.


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Partial View of a Grapefruit Tree in Bearing-Each Bunch Means Dollars.


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A Temporary Dam, Showing Fall in Canal.