<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section
 Section


EDL NHPRC UFPKY



* ^




MAIN office: Detroit. Mich.
branches:
pontiac
dearborn Lorain
129 S. E. First Avenue Columbia Building MIAMI, FLORIDA
Dr. R. Kuelin, Philadelphia, Pa.
Dear Sir:
No doubt you know that Miami is drawing nation-wide attention. There are many facts you should know about its marvelous development that you may realize the opportunity it is presenting and profit thereby.
DO YOU KNOW -Miami is oallnd Lhe "MQgiotj-rtyV11
Miami s popuiaifca^a ^ Miami's popufatilpn to.
was only 26C
is 47,930 the % ease of any 6i
greatest percentage of
, thiQ^sJGo^A^t yd^ou^'o^^nd 3, a DO )OW)'"!llTjf a** deep waterway *whfS*?^wil J \/Iiami the' Los lAmgel^f: of. "UM^4.tlantic Cos.
at Miami is enje| vhicn thousands
ing up f peop
ndustrial er very State
the Union are looking forward?
at the pulfS'tr^am'gibes' Miami the best and most evenly* rSeffipe^efi- clftnlitre in^tfte wdrl.d--which attracts over 200,000 tourists yearly?
We will send you free""Miami by Picture" including "City, Map", explaining our "Pfee. Transportation to Miami" upon receipt of the enclosed card.
Opportunity awaits you in Miami, so mail card--T0DAY.
"Meet us in Miami"
' -JOHN A. CAMPBELL ORGANIZATION,
(From the Miami Metropolis, MariJi^r-t^Z2)
MIAMI REALTY IS GOOD INVEST
Dawson, Representing the State of Ohio,
Freely Here
Certification of Miami property and valuations into the State of Ohio, carrying the inference that dollars invested in Miami* get value received, has just been made officially by Albert Dawson, chief examiner for the state department of commerce of Ohio, division of securities.
Increases Justified
"I assure you," he said today, i'that I have been agreeably surprised. The actual increase in values in Miami and vicinity are astonishing, and they are justified. I never investigated a city where there is less inflation than in Miami. I have examined eight or ten
.Manager d Dollars
pieces of property inside the city and just outside, and find it all good anfl just as represented to tile Ohio clients. The report will be made to that effect, because dollars invested in Miami are backed by real and not fictitious values."


'"v ^g''--'5 ^*.r*crris
^ islooto", you oa:t shtn< MrHeia. Hope you nay int-v-*st him. If a .lvo,.wi&e-awa!ce prospect,lot fee know at onoo.antiw&lX ge>i iXiiOi' ovmor.
fatter ?> .not easiest sada to do husinas a. with. I'ast letter .X injetehlEg, import -.nt .raatter,about %y 2.andnever .aijsw'erod. fti'sa so with hixiu *el 1 #i sse* 30^fb may hare disgrjsjtel him,;irryway.
.trange. al>ooyt- my letters* 1 address exactly as'you flircc*. .wrote you .o,4--31 j4-m~:;~X? I am oertaini;, 6o:o-*i1>lyd4sapi50ntcd ia your not being "able to i rr your ..i plo beforeth&s. have S.otee BXO BILLB I had lipped to meAt 'with.' ids; in part, it least. The iimliisgottingvery close. I have not ;o +earii BCg 21BCH any ofthera want, save,possibly, dusky andho seems
see*
iiaraeso "go urine..
Again,your .statement re Clowiston aiui 200 acres, JABS ME WORSE STILL, brother Solaris.let r.otell you something.
Of axl the foesofGlade* progress aiidprospority, S 0 A, T 5P B'.* % ? X. O Jfw ia one ofpthe V^IOT .WORST. It means .^OBSTIPATION ANn ^-''.v*TrON#- The old^aiKl Gamp;>.pyoiifQrced soatteration of lOOO&t 12,.was the greatest cap., laiaity. the Gli;de& ever suffered. It spoiled wholA. proposition In tjit\ caking. v "e havenat even ..Bl-Wim to get oyer it yet. ..'As i see it now.we no^or shall got, ever it. It has absolutely {&LLE& OFF a huge po* cent of the old 20.GGC lyuyersiiaticy ofwhom were ae. euthusjag.tic antTin cmeiit aa any body of people i*o, ever Jived ever were ever- any grea enterprise* %,Thia scattering them all o er. the region has mndeit absolutely lirpofisible $>.-v west of them, ever to use ptheirlands* Meanwhile the waiting has out their nerve,and turned a host of them into cynics or fierce foes. My old WasJ.D.C. crowd area&neat all lost to theB&ades, new. Anfttliat .lathe J.IAIN REASON I have]
Jl, sue'*, b fierce
tine gottiegthing^ tP going. Ihe natural troubles were hpr*' enough* TIion,by the tiEie. these were gettingimdlcd,the ole: crovl w-is seru,cyclic:-1 ,V:--.:i '/.rlloat to the region.
n .o--.?,I wan^to tell -you.. fx^niay^XOa .silJl-LT'.oijrMOT' ft\RM AT 0T)E'/I;:;T0N AWLB 0KE!:L,UI'i!A. .*he .ctlstanco iafaj.' too great. The difficu tics ingettlngbaok a ferth are ,as yet,insuperable.. 3ot till we have a rock re~d bet :e the two pointo should %e even th'J.nJs: of such a thing. .<*n&w have a wait for this, ^iiesjeEiiat be another BOND ISCUE.for onething. Audthe voters h'?v. get to know somethings SiTjpjv oof ore they will enthuse q*rer votlngthe hoiidr.. i^.ey haveboon fooled toe- often and too shamelessly*
Again,Glewisttofc f?nd jreelanta stand for- WQ BIWEUBHT SYS'ins-a -> r-ir^naj. %^-y in the H?tro2 country. .Be areinthe ftSNFJlL P/JtMlNO country. One does aotwantte tackle the two diffjerentlines at the sarae tliae, ^Iviro are problems enougli ijti hancllingone.
Again.these two point.:: fA02 i^ii,,-, .i'4tIi:5Q^Si?Urfi. ,*me,0keolanta ntuff haaJ^een going that way,in prirtulately. B JB ,f ioq& at tills.
01. looks wea.tof course. ut*oui;.B ORB will ge B.E. It*s hersddd


other1s consent ; and
WHEREAS, taxation without roproeontati^n is tyranny, and the right of representation in the logislaturo is inestimable to the people, and formidable to tyrants only, and
WHEREAS, in the dawn of the twentieth century, and und*r the stars and stripes, the people of the Philippine Ialer:dg and of the District of Columbia, thenigh widely separatod In space, are intimately oonneotsd in a common hardship!, namely, the denial to both of liberties as old as liagna Oharta.j and
YjJJSREAS., roeiotmce to tyrants is ohodienco tc ftod, and they who would be free themselves must strike the bl^w, therefor-' v< it
RESOLVED, that wo "hereby roapoctfully but meat earnestly call to the attention of the Americm Congross and pooplo the stat < of political bendago and vaasalago in wMch the Inhabitants of tho Philippine Islands and the District ef Columbia now exist;
RESOLVED, that we remind our American br-^thren that tho words of Lincoln ere still true, and that those who deny liberty to others do not deser"7e*it for themselves, and, under a Just God, they cannot long retain it;
RESOLVED, that wo wastisn&&**iB the sympathetic consideration of all lovers of human freedom the logicIr ion now pendir g in Congress looking to the abolition of political slavery both in the Philippines and the Federal District, and that we 'srgo Upon all the fullest co-operation and assistance in the enactment ef such legislation, to the end that poHtloal~and ^na/ti4aitional liberty in America may be indeed a roality and n\ a protense, *nd that government of the people, for tho people, by tho p;*ple sisal* nrt perish from the earth.
oooOc i
Thianf Piously-pasaed by the Peoplc-^a-XJhurcl of Washington., D.C., June-^16., 1912,
THOS. E. WXSL,
President.
#


0UHA:
tot ilax* or Chicago*
5till
419,look at that OATTLi^ xBOPQSITION,in tfc^ other letter* we have one .*f the highest things that over hit the Glades* ably no bigger*
Sue 11
0*1 uXi^ i?o
v^ei,4v, xs .rxgiro Ah&itoxr. o nreinthe NA'TXR/iL FlU' DI1IG GB3D7CD-3* whole aeot;.* the .finest ad.ngland3 r\ earth j ready AT r$Q$ for the furmety Then,
ictsto suit;and spritch your cattle to.anojsher
: sell these i
wh$iob you h"ve been puttlngin grass*.iaeanwhilo tfsitionf
Is notfa]
nt pro]
Sou wrote- :i-4^hout y,e.ur frioni. pr^apaiug a ooaaaay* I aw.:iy, YES.*< .5--S7.)" ..Night herois t!V; Fi:na,3) fo?T{;^4, the job for it to ^aek^e^.i have a w&ix this before very soon* He oorriandsmoney*
Lnd right here 1 is .from the oat
ed right panyjand c: to lay itry,*.
1 expect hi;; to warm right up to it* He is a good fxrlondcTmino,t,oo
How. hero is the field for you andyaur company* friend* Hel me ni this through;ami we shall hav3 all tec business we alvll w--mt*
.Again,this cattle-prepared land will mean Ei2N to 'vrT5'.?3BN FAffi-HOB* -Ijiuidprepared in thiajya y will look mighty good to them* It ought to be a snap to place a lot of your Ho* and Kas farmers on -thisklnd of land* Aiid,n-eeja.while,it .oughttQ beeasy to interest them itr preparing 1 r.t,v.ith plowing.aiidi-I aitingin gr\ss,for thef cedlngof all the oat tie they want, ready to turn in* &on*t yp think sof *f thsfctwonH interest by ice western frmer,what will? .
Wetting these cattle isto he ..an easy prop* once wo have fch f j and under fence* We can huy tjio cattle with notesjhtwe t&em wqJ then up,and re-sell them to Skipper;at sane rate per lb*,redoes and_.net the difference,or of it*
ioal,
'.a. gran:
OO I ml
hut GIei;i-jtsn,while ,good,foi: itstffm lines, .s net in fln thisline* out of the track* Truck for them, and prohahly.. Sugar* *hink.thoy i for a,sugar mxll after awhile... O.K,.e;ich for hi|ine. But let's r.c the. liaes.or we sh.ill moke a moss of it*
Agali\,raising J30RK at $1* is hot goingte help, %ecl inta jget her elo-i^ vator ft'Mittie hit* Corn won't be hauledfrem Qi* to Ok* to elevjatp" Lot the Okeelar.t country have her _cattie,com,a?-id f eed.o, t'iv. o*T- r sections_have shat Jihey are best adapted for* ^aeh for his job* That* modern business*
a
a
, *ou Jivon*t. grajspeci th& question of Glade^ disi doiiD handicap a ^little di:-Jtsinoe is* ^arms rds. ticele_ yet* ^ansiiigat 01. and j>kelat'-i if? -y-w^i and St*l.3JST HAVT4 something,sou sui3:ily,helpor^,or. h-\t not. that la at the other etic TI-EHI II IL B S to n.Kn!iii(fti^ant. i
like f qrntlngai lihe you '.ill j .maathine,tool, ;f the line, Ara
e is


WHEREAS, taxation without roproeontation is tyranny, and the right of representation in the legislature is inestimable to the people, and formidable to tyrants only; and
WHEREAS, in the dawn of the twentieth century, and undr the stars and stripes, the people of the Philippine Islands and of the District nf Columbia, though widely separatod in space, are intimately connected in a common hardship) namely, the denial to both of liberties ae old as Magna Charta; and
YITJSREAS, resistance to tyrants is ohodienco tc (led, and they who would be free themselves must stride the blow, theref "xt^ tx it
RESOLVED, that wo hereby roapoctfully rut most earnestly call to the attention 3f the Americrn Congress and pooplo the stat< of poll Meal bendago and vassalage in wMch the Inhabitants of tho Philippine Islands and the District ef Columbia now exist;
RESOLVED, that we remind our American br-^thren that tho words of Lincoln -.re still true, and that those who deny liberty to others do net doser-re it for themselves, ard, under a Just God, they cannot long retain it;
RESOLVED, that wo iratettid^tn the sympathetic consideration of all lovers Of human freedom the logic 1p Ion now pendii g in Congress looking to the abolition of political slavery both in the Philippines and the Federal District, and that we "jrge Upon all the fullest co-operation and assistance in the enactment ef fluoh legislation, to the end that politloaJUand ^ra/tltutional liberty in America may be indeed a roality and n'. a protense, -r& that government of the people., for tho people, by tho p.#ple slial. nr+, perish from the earth.
oooOo;.o
Th^f ^onsly pcisaed. by the People** ^Church of Washington, DC, Juno^ld, 1912,
THOS* J3. WIIL,
President*


with oir or traati9r*aiKl a > \rn* ?** i-<^-\,.,Vlk\, *
'- yruanoux; j^ngO/?lays* "icy have h'ecr* our c"-ily *: -r
-EE^wt?* 70 K JW?t- -Sotaingaaot the worat of thon^ut,for
sa&Qj&.oit* t 001. rt any row 0110s
9a
^ ocu't complicate yt-ur job my r.rbnln_ryoiu
>QhGi:* ri\&iil ^liau's tho .word*its th-oniy salvaticn in the ujuavi->r,# m juelner r:m toll you it's theonlvfl xiy.s.tip:i anywhere* If that
icre tract is. CJINQHl^aare enough,then the* only way out i 'to lot your friend ^V|rt,anci you take yhoolhutajor mfiioh hin t,o 'qs andyci^selfto that* But .on*t sry co .drxve two horses as different as those twc-Mndau f r s they ar 3}o you know,in all thefcoyearatteaC I'Vo been fighting""tho l^des Jba%|;tles I*v;e never touched t^ecoast between Bare Beach andiron-re *
?*2? I*0!!--'?. 5ri?4rti f* "HP 2 LnrE3 Assn. "we .failed largely beoaajse
e ivxau tej&pe&jxs O&eolontaand '"ast Beach* -foe' far jpart* O'nldn't
SwSS" 555S* C?F 3? ^8. hut Bew Sork buk3 Chicago were vuy tmob. nearer, afce.^ word for iaj,and don* fc add to your- burdcns,al iaSbinri.c Your rh.vves f success* *eu*ll than!; me for wrfc&uayou u d letter ^KrS ",/i-,in ^ ry Glades farmtuag.
^ghty .sorry you did not tell .raeof ^isaoonor* But I "hops y< xjUed yonr farming prospecta yet. ~
COBChliTR-.HOS- ahd SE^Mssk^C^ Istitm "i "t,vattw *
Cordially yours.


RESOLUTIONS ON SEI^-^KJVERNMEFi1 IN
THE PHILIPPINES AND THE DISTRICT OF COLOMBIA
WHEREAS, the passion for froodom in the human breast is divine and in-ertingBlehable; and
WHEREAS, all men aro created equal, and arc ondowec by their Creator with certain imllemble rights among which are iifVj liberty and the pursuit of happiness; and
WHEREASr no man ia good enough tc gov rn another v itb nit the other's consentj and
WHEREAS, taxation without representation is tyranny, and the right of representation in the logislaturo is inestimable to the people, and formidable to tyrants only; and
WHEREAS, in the dawn of the twentieth century, and und*r the stars and stripes, the people of the Philippine Islands and of the District of Columbia, though widely eeparatod In space, are intimately connected in a common hardship) namely, the denial to both of liberties ae old as Magna Charta; and
V3S3REAS, resistance to tyrantB is ohodleneo tc Bod, and they who would be free themselves must stride the blow, thereof arc V< it
RESOLVED, that wo hereby respectfully but most earnestly eall to the attention of the American Oongross and pooplo the stat> of poIiMeal bcndago and vassalage in whleh the Inhabitants of the Philippine Islands and the District ef Columbia now exist;
RESOLVED, that we remind our American br -^thren that tho words of Lincoln ere still true, and that those who deny HBerty to others do not deserre it for themselves, and, under a Just Cod, they cannot long retain it;
RESOLVED, that wo jomferfkJM'to the sympathetic consideration of all lovers of human freedom the logiclr ion now pendir g in Congress looking to the abolition of political slavery both in the


jft%-J uderlale,Fia* pj&tae ii~19;v>*
W* ;-J* Qm Norria,
K* C.-^S*
liy deer Mr.Horriaff..
Vuraof the. 31stult at hand. On enclosed j^* (k^-point A isthetjract %enty.thousand, r 3Qf000) acres. It lies mostly >. on che went aid;-; of ,the Htjp_th .Mew River Canal,between 'Iwonty-j'uilo kend ajld' Pa3^ BeatsJi Goiinty line* It is in Tp-4%R,3&,going to Mrtih "border of fC*4Q
'She man frore whom I, expected to ohtnin the .legal description In ou-X ef town'hence,rut raend it later} soon,I think* ^he lard.JPrentsir. part en the if NR* Canal* Beseriptiona will show hiiw much*
Bote ..transportation ^drantagest-*-,
1) Oaajalj eldest through water highway in Everglades* Boats "began running in J.613.* ,'" '.. 'a ... *
2) ook Road* Broward County voted road bonds a short tir^e o "fouildto hen north line J the stretch in nEB* ihc TiSMJV, isojir A;alm Bech,-tft^yers Roadrwhloh is aspired* *|he .GRl-!!.-^ ioyot to he provided fcr Jho Red^ndjiiue should makelt easy tr get the Green*
3| '.RcAl React* Right now^andfqr a week andraoro. Jpack,tho Fla* .!.< Beast R.R* has* been surveying a mute alngthieeanql* I qro pooitivelyanrtnred this IUR* will ^tiildsoi\th .from ; Okeechobee City 'ishuild^ngBG#>-^ .to Strike the "aat .Coast at a one point*. W\P*Beaoh wantsthe roTd,bttt it would.
do the Co* little good to comebut there* It wouldget hut ahaedful of Glade; bueinese in comparison .with what it wou&rpt by mmdng dawn this canal* Minatji d">etmot w-;nt .R*B^fhopingfr another up to Qlet.'itftcn*
to ^compete with aba; F.EC*i.'. .* she has already*
file su^ey&rs are^uotjad .aq.-s.^yin^thrLrinthe ONtf LOGICAL RO&PEi* It Qertednly
is* Tho Miami Can% is gany years from completion* This canal h'snk: n*afcea\ an elegant R*F. hod.* *rom repcry5*fifc seerasBriotlcally Certain {,:< )$R from Okeechobee City wil .come to JJouth Bay, or more clirectlytc Oker,lr?nte.* haudQrdale,then>is its way out* Ihe- B*R* ppl* arokeeping mm, f/f course*
*he price of thielandwill not^enceed Iwelve^BoIlars ( 5^12*00) per acre*
Beig^jborsf-^-jEhogreat Fenna* Buga.r people have a vast area of land s*uth, S*W* and N*W* of trtirr .et;r-'linost to the 3e"Mes QtmtiL,andaravcixnoethey wlli havetheir Sugar Mill,now hsliv;"built,reriy for winter use*


!, taxation without repress ntatton la tyranny, and the right of representation in the legislature Is inestimable to tho people, and formidable to tyrants only; and
WHEREAS, In the dawn of the twentieth century, and under the stars and stripes, the people of the Philippine Islands and of the District of Columbia, though widely separatod in space, are intimately connected in a common hardship? namely, the denial to both of liberties as old as Magna Charta; and
17ESREAS, ..roei&tcnoo to tyrants is obodieno to ftod, and they who would be free themselves must atri"~e the blow, therefor-1 v< it RESOLVED, that we hereby respectfully rut most earnestly call to the attention of the American. Congress and. people the stat < of. political bendago and vassalage in which the inhabitants of tho Philippine Islands and the District ef Colombia now exist;
RESOLVED, that we remind 'our American br-'thren that tho words of Lincoln re still true, and that those who deny liberty to others dc not deserre *;t for themselves, and, under a Juet Cod, they cannot long retain it;
RESOLVED, that wo imtetfxlM'to the sympathetic consideration of all lovers cf human freedom the logic L? ion now pendi?.3 in Congress looking to the abolition of politioal slavery both in the Philippines and the Federal District, and that we ^ugo Upon all the fullest co-operation and assistance In the enactment #f suoh legislation, to the end that poli:tlcal_and^riai4^xrtiona4 liberty in America may be indeed a reality and n*'/. a pretense, -nfl that government of the people, for tho people, by the p.tple ohai;. net perish from the earth.
oooOc00
TTnan? ^onsly-^pa^aedi y the ^People-^-XIfciurcl of Washington, DC, JuneJU*, 1912,
THOS. C. WIXL,
President,


g*'~'.Jl! V-f
We it piat the Pejana- ug3r p- 1. nav-ohoc^t 10*000 na* near to- a tract A, en thiaeanal. Bare net Been afcle to* verify it. ***m land,when drained, tyil.'l ;3a]roaugni land*
Again,the great Skipper Plant iimm hcdni-huilt herein fc^.-.^ '
ta few days .ago* ,rfhy \re s-iidtc, .have a world e?'Cl. "
^cattle north oi* Okeechobee h-j^ ^ian la "to feed
nnt oost,
tt.ose .acuth of the i,afee .whereoHnner"f v. &hdthe fcriagthon down fchje %aai ta -"audi, to, thegaefctug worhingoa plane to get all efftieae eattl> into the Qheelantaeountrvhthat vreqn handlo,aedfeed them on shares, ^undexstaadtha^.y> steers ^thkii 3 to 4 ass, of finished, re sen- have of all neat aart ei a?ai"ap ur
pay-an don at.o ra jfehat rju.ut he fed lt?n-;:%vo can hw^all i*c raLt wa -e -v." p K see S&ipper eoon,in person,and^ *Jer lis, ;le\SiSs hTw^nl^o eee j.;e,hu^iie jumps about so,he is hardto catch.
'^HjM ail* oeuideaaily aid cheaply be. put. into f#:ie ge-ea^eo jEqr * reeoang ipi?et cattle* .. X an assured tlierq is.no endoffeediji^^laTe '
P^din^Kortlcf a^tteP fFtttti3^ t3l anclf .ncing tholauds
Qno-fcurth eashjane-fcurJJ: por year,sis ppr cent "e&O iutoroat. A : --annual interest payjaentajsoldoncontri^ot for deed. 1 (6
'^heyossibility ofget ting thU la-ad is at public, if Mr.J,-T.HeiP 1 xnter=sted,thereinainingdata can be furniahecu AS
CJouldhot condense what you needed into a wire* **
Sincerely yours*--''


* 'J
RESOLUTIONS ON SEI^^VERNMENT IN
THE PHILIPPINES AND THE DISTRICT OF COLOMBIA WHEREAS, the passion for froodom in the human breast la dlvlno and ln^xtl&@&gib&hlG; and
WHEREAS, all men are created equal, and aro ondowec by their Creator with certain tn^lanable rights imong which are llf 0} liberty and the pursuit of happiness; and
WHEREAS, no man is good enough tc gov;m another without the other's consentj and
WHEREAS, taction without representation Is tyranny, and the right of representation in the legislature Is Inestimable to the people, and formidable to tyrants only; and
WHEREAS, in the dawn of the twentieth century, and under the stars and stripes, the people Of the Philippine Islands and of tho District of Columbia, though widely separatod in space, are intimately connected in a common hardship) namely, the denial io both of liberties as old as Magna Charta; and
Y3J2REAS, resistance to tyrants is obodienco tc ftod, and they who would be free themselves must stride the blow, therefor-* be it RESOLVED, that wo hereby reapoc tfully rut most earnest 11 y call to the attention of the American Congrose and poople the stato cf poll Meal bondage and vassalage In which the Inhabitants of tho Philippine Islands and the District ef Columbia now exist;
RESOLVED, that we remind our American brMtfiren that the words of Lincoln ere still true, and that those who deny lifterty to others do not deserve it for themselves, and, under a Just Cod, they cannot long retain it;
RESOLVED, that wo iraterfVdU'to the sympathetic conaideration Of all lovers of human freedom the logicle ion now pendi* in Congress looking to the abolition of political slavery both in the


Pt.j.-.L. 1:.. *;-v-:, ,
A Si
WQ4erBooiGa sacUonr, on' Qaxtal.
Owner is" JiQWfclu tol'f. Q? n* -t- v-** letters. ~* Ba^ Jfot5 aaswe
ti;
toast Jtef^j?"? Oo_uas focjL^V''''-* Hj'-'j-? xs VOTittf*^ RR*2
rtat^tf r^uof %* ***** ** ***** ^
7


RESOLUTIONS ON SELF'-GOVEFJSMEN'i1 IN
THE PHILIPPINES AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
WHEREAS, the passion -for freedom in the human breast is divine and In-extingUiehable; and
WHEREAS, &X)C men aro created equal, and aro ondowec by their Creator with certain 4nefc3A/emble_ rights vmong which are lif s-f liberty and the pursuit of happiness; and
WHEREAS, no man is good enough tc govern another without the other's consent; and
WHEREAS, taxation without repress* ntation is tyranny, and the right of representation in the legislature is inestimable to the people, and formidable to tyrants only; and %
WHEREAS, In the dawn of the twentieth century, and under the


liy.aear Mr.Bunts j~ 19 '
>''....'
fclie 4 th. eqo-lisios is.60 _______ '
^.00 j total,
^% 1 huge, lot. of v^fcle tt*&imJL& to
.3#|l^00 Irs nWiv i ooe " ^^P^-tioB, M coy*.
June & is. SM^L^^t^it* JOflLat ?
' H4f A*M%*ent as..to the atrcngth of ^^oltn^Stv'of r' 1
of


T&nnd-ff
adapted to break the wild land covered with a forest of wild growth has^eon-i sumed time. Learning what to raise and when and-how to raise it has taken more time. Transportation systems have had to be developed, and little communities, whose numbers might help each other, have had to be built up. Even yetfor the farmer has been the neglected step-child of our system adequate price-fixing and marketing systems for farmers generally, including those in the 'Glades, still await the action of a tardy Government, and a farmers' banking system, established a year ago, is not yet fully operative.
Notwithstanding all this, 'Glades farming is under way. Not only patches but fields are being cultivated, and actual results accomplished. Records of many of these have recently been collated, embodied in affidavit form, signed, sworn to, and filed for ready reference. Following are synopses published in the Fort Lauderdale Sentinel for June 29, 1917:
what the everglades
have produced
It is no longer a mooted question in this part of Florida whether or not the muck soil of the Everglades'will grow crops.'
The worst knocker in the world becomes an Everglade booster when'once he examines the 'glades muck and actually sees the crops grow. Seeing is believing with the real farmer.'
But what the Everglades farmer likes better than seeingthe crops grow is the harvest of "the green that's long" and here the Sentinel furnishes its readers a few concrete examples of the harvest the reports of which were compiled by a prominent resident of Ft. Lauderdale, and backed by affidavits in his possession.[Ed.]
One Everglades farmer after losing two crops, one from inadequate drainage and one from the extreme cold of last winter, planted eight acres of Irish
season. The health of his entire family is excellent. This farmer thinks that the hog industry, with cattle and forage crops, one of the best paying of the coming industries of the Everglades. He says the fertility of the soil is beyond question. This farmer paid $80 per acre for his land and has refused 250 per acre for it.
Another man on 30 acres of land for which he paid $65 per acre, planted it to Irish potatoes, obtained a yield of 8,000 bushels, which netted him sufficient to pay for the land, clearing expenses, breaking the soil, and putting it in. shape to plant, seed, cultivation, harvesting, hampers and marketing, and he had left between $2,000 and $2,100. He fed the cull potatoes to hogs, of which he possesses about 200. On 43 acres he has planted corn for a summer crop that is now about 10 feet high, estimated yield from 80 to 100 bushel per acre.
Another farmer who came here from Oklahoma, has 5 acres rented at $8 per acre.; half acre of celery yielded 300 crates, netting him about 70 cents jier crate; one acre yielded 125 bushel of potatoes which he sold at an average of $2.50 per bushel. Has third crop of porn and thinks the soil more fertile than in Oklahoma. Hogs, cows, mules and chickens do as well as in Oklahoma.
Another farmer planted a first, crop of potatoes which was cut short by the cold but from which he harvested 350 hampers and sold them at an average price of $2.30 a hamper. He also had 4 acres of eggplant which yielded 400 crates, averaging $1.25 a crate. One acre of beans yielded 150 hampers and sold for $1.25 a hamper. One acre of peas damaged by cold produced only 50 hampers which he sold for $2.50 a hamper. Second crop, 13 acres of potatoes yielded 1,600 bushels which sold for $1.40 a hamper and one acre celery, 400 crates, which brot, net, 75 cents a crate. Third crop, 15 acres corn growing fine. Farmer says land is fertile and productive and nobody would attempt to deny it when they see the crops. Another man from total acreage plant-
peicoiony per year. ould hesitate about accepting $200 per acre for his land, and then only to buy more.
Another farmer has five acres set in grapefruit. The trees are three .veins old and some of them are 14 inches in circumference and 14 feet high. He believes this is the only soil for citrus fruit. This farmer planted one and a half acres in cabbage which sold for about $800. On a 1% acre field he has grown two crops, beans and potatoes. The th'ird'crop, potatoes, is-now growing with corn planted between the rows which will make crop No. 4 for this land this season. Off % of an acre of Irish potatoes he obtained 100 bushels and from less than % acre obtained 6S bushels. Beans yielded 300 hampers to 1% acres,' selling at. an average of $1.40 a hamper. This farmer believes soil will produce anything planted and he raised for his own use every known common variety of garden truck.
Another man from % acre beans obtained $12S worth; 3% acres potatoes yielded 602 bushels, selling at $2.40 average; S acres potatoes, planted with poor seed, yielded 910 bushels, averag-irig about $1.60 per bu.; 3 acres est i-mated yield potatoes. ,375 bu., averaging $1.60 per hamper. Dry weather and cold reduced yield. From % acre cabbage sold $200 worth, % acre celery obtained 349 crates, selling 242 crates at. $1.27 and 107 at 72 cents. At present time this7 farmer has 11 hogs, 10 head cattle and one horse which feed on wild grass native to the 'Glades.' He a'lso plants corn, millet and natal grass for feed. Has ten acres corn planted on land from which two crops of potatoes have been gathered. Keeps from 20 to 100 chickens. Eleven members to family ; health good; believes a man can suppout and raise a good sized family on a smaller'acreage in the Everglades than he can in the. northern stales, (and most assuredly live more comfortably.Editor.)
Another man owns 180 acres, for which he paid from $30 to $80 per acre. Raised all kinds of vegetable and forage. Main crop this year was potatoes j19 acres yielded better than 1,900 bu.,
in family, 6 boyMand-0 girls, all good health. Owns idlings, cow ami horse, about 70 chickens, 17 turkeys and (! ducks and all do well, especially the turkeys Would not take less than $200 per .nil- for his home place.
One commission man operating in and around Ft. Lauderdale during the 1916-1917 shipping season, handled for Everglades farmers approximately 72-204 packages of vegetables, consisting of peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, cauliflower, lettuce, cabbage, turnips, radishes, Irish potatoes, celery, romaine, squash, beets, carrots, peas, bananas, beans, etc., for which ho returned to the 'Glades farmers $120,204.91. This commission merchant believes Jie handled about 50 per cent of the vegetables shipped from this seel ion of the Everglades.
the okeelanta-
fruitcrest district
The One Successful Settlement in the Upper 'Glades.
, I. FRTJITORESTThe Banner Pro-posilion for settlement and development. Groups and organizes buyers, Combines cooperation with Individual action. Management, with tractors and machinery, leads in pioneering. Sells land at sacrifice prices.
II. NEW OKEELANTAThe Upper. 'Glades Town. On canal crossing, projected Cross-State Rail Road and at fork bf assured Cross-State Rock Road from Palm Beach to Ft. Myers. Comprises Store, Post Office, Hotel, Boarding House*,., Town Hall, Barber Shop, Bake Shop, Notary's Office, School, Sunday School, Cooperative Association, Good Times Club, two Development Organizations, etc. Centar of thriving farming community. The "One Bright Spot" between Ft. Lauderdale anil Lake Okeechobee. Address
THOS. E. WILL,
Ft. Lauderdale and Okeelanta, Fla.


Met JUJUBa&or about the time of the injunction. Ho is exceedingly vtfAl aRforraod on GIfid.ee -.natters. *& away now. X hnar .Jiass* He is a T>romnent Palm Beach and .tf.p.Beaoh ^p^taliat. ?as hfcul of 1st.Natl.Banl^arflayjr of" PB,% Be.ag?i*-< Hotel Town.) Was then ;*vn real estate S^i Pe3&*un Sake* country. Told rae then he w.3uI0* law* the Corp* through,ifit coot him 000.00 Ho ^--oia ^.huyer,but had ..bought aprio of the B ft fit'tracts later. :atth seethe, to ;;e-ar tfeaf tho fictoi^.^o^.onr.rj wor^.clmean nothing t the olq crowd... Jhat 3 something I ahoulslvmiitto Izacrr rel3^hefcre s- yingtco much to ha? -*
H.J.ChajEUin lives these days .in W.Falm Btiaoh," drawing, a salaryw*Smith snyn,from ^e Q2c.qp.rp. To-daya P.B.pQst sayshe aralhAn wifr. inrsa arclc^viu*
I tf?-Mlsht for Ottawa#Iowa,to spendthe ammvp^ tils old hoiae was 0reenfiel4,Ia.
gag atlYft she-? jflwt &,am hoping to do. It is squaroljLj^ilne with wttLV&aw ,t" &rm years ago. X would favo^ jiavrhigtho reteca from the Gift* Jia^I^roia/ ISS^^ft*^ cropairf used BEMkiPi^ae shcwnJoi-^fcs It ..if/ dear/1 fro^ uiio u^cr;^ ewes, we had in. 1912-14,that the *uatin *lon yrm to >aat ;cm land as/a J&ejto he .cut apand uavidedjm anongtjieie who H.A5 to he let in on oho uavis.,oi*jbutf to mSe-suro that thelrajifcer of .r-:uc* was'a anal I as poe-aMo.andthat t&e i,ioafc of stock of the f a$ oro#f ew was as larpe as ~ sablo.^ Ih^as A. oold me at W.P.B.,April,l9i2#thonc who sin.red wcaU r.>4~ sojo^ang worthwhile, ifo h^ labored long '&3k^sufr doubtless griefes" ti.ar, a /v?sty i^S&S^sv 2^ wxthhe_M from hm,a&ahis couf rsres.f -or Be lottS.' the just reward ..of hones*, and honorable toil. airanr,*o uso his
phrase," paid tho freight*,they should v&f thoho.r-.rost.
S.. an ..-dghty hot.ncw,a4r-iust the Ok.eorp^ioard. But, thooldlettro: uh&7^ 5 i^GPQSxngto law* fthem,iiv I&ia-l* to ptferentthon frV1 p-tMn-our .aean. fuaa:> When theplnch' ame,he helped*4hoae furcle.net' i'-> -^art biit dollar,into thoithauds. '"" ; 1 ^
feg| Pj^ce. ^io .had glyen up'her i).0. pDsition aMloal^ry, gone .0 ha^o \v.,fu.t-.y escpeetinp a cordial welcome,and opwiurity,o>i the Hera^,to doXpr real .work in h4ng ^3 Sladqa njroiendard Scat! mo^c-uso. Shewiias ^et,instead,hy a blowup tho face hv tbo hrutri
QOE>-
.... J ^^out.yiS5.bi.ei^a^ofaup^ort. Bar health f ^ied^ii ahc wo'c'ir ?SS^f%.-rt' a)ltT8ila>r^ely to aavethe t^fen*#but hers was.,ili^-ily vote
^ the wholr. crowd,Q2:.aSsn-GcxTT?^3tes,Cj^0 3^Bo rdflLr%~Co. ^,aa.a:ul,siieAOimlOagt a b .of our ideals pl.JS. /gp"
L f
watho42^3*iiae. A/icli havonot a Shadow cf do'ht llfell'h* so h,ijll-d""vcl %iloSf; vrc ^we it. IhetSr our ojd friend* on -a. i> A"^' tt^ 'is ke ou^^ mm be ahleto learn,befoi-e itis too late. &anwhii-; 1 5 ^? *
paa& on- thi^h,lSet the iliurcliei^o. t^o^^^^^i^^
Sincerely yours,


^ To*iind and finance the machinery best adapted to break the wild land covered ^wlth a forest of wild growth has-von-sumed time. Learning what to raise and when and how to raise it has taken more time. Transportation systems have had to be developed, and little communities, whose numbers might help each other, have had to be built up. Even yetfor the farmer has been the neglected step-child of our system adequate price-fixing and marketing systems for farmers generally, including those in the 'Glades, still await the action of a tardy Government, and' a farmers' banking system, established a year ago, is. not yet fully operative.
Notwithstanding all this, 'Glades farming is under way. Not only patches but fields are being cultivated, and actual results accomplished. Records of many of these have recently been collated, embodied in affidavit, form, signed, sworn to, and filed for ready reference. Following are synopses published in the Fort Lauderdale Sentinel for June 29, 1917:
what the everglades
have produced
It is no longer a mooted question in this part of Florida whether or not the muck soil of the Everglades will grow crops.
The worst knocker in the world becomes an Everglade booster when once he examines the 'glades muck and actually sees the crops grow. Seeing is believing with the real farmer:
But what the Everglades farmer likes better than seeing the crops grow is the harvest of "the green that's long" and here the Sentinel furnishes its readers a few concrete examples of the harvest the reports of which were compiled by a prominent resident of Ft. Lauderdale, and backed by affidavits in his possession.[Ed.]
One Everglades farmer after losing two crops, one from inadequate drainage and one from the extreme cold of last winter, planted eight acres of Irish
a fourth crop for the season. The health of his entire family is excellent. This farmer thinks that the hog industry, with cattle and forage crops, one of the best paying of the coming industries of the Everglades. He says the fertility of the soil is beyond question. This farmer paid $80 per acre for his land and has refused $230 per acre for it.
Another man on 30 acres of land for which he paid $65 per acre, planted-it to Irish potatoes, obtained a yield of 8,000 bushels, which netted him sufficient to pay for the land, clearing expenses, breaking the soil, and putting it in shape to plant, seed, cultivation, harvesting, hampers and marketing, and he had left between $2,000 and $2,100. He fed the cull potatoes to hogs, of which he possesses about 200. On 43 acres he has planted corn for a summer crop that is now about 10 feet high, estimated yield from SO to 100 bushel per acre.
Another farmer who came here from Oklahoma, has 5 acres rented at $8 per acre.; half acre of celery yielded 300 crates, netting him about 70 cents per crate; one acre yielded 125 bushel of potatoes which he sold at an average of $2.50 per bushel. Has third crop of corn and thinks the soil more* fertile than in. Oklahoma. Hogs, cows, mules and chickens do as well as in Oklahoma.
Another farmer planted a first crop of potatoes which was cut short by the colcf but from which he harvested 350 hampers and soldihem at an average price of $2.30 a hamper. He also had 4 acres of eggplant which yielded'400 crates, averaging $1.25 a crate. One acre of beans yielded 150 hampers and sold for $1.25 a hamper. One acre of peas damaged by cold produced only 50 hampers which.he sold for $2.50 a hamper. Second crop, 13 acres of potatoes yielded 1,600 bushels which sold for $1.40 a hamper and one acre celery, 400 crates, which brot, net, 75 cents a crate. Third crop, 15 acres corn growing fine. Farmer says land is fertile and productive and nobody would attempt to deny it when they see the crops. Another man from total acreage plant-
per colony per year. Would hesitate about accepting $200 per acre for his land, and then only to buy more.
Another farmer has five acres set in grapefruit. The trees are three years old and some of them are 14 inches in circumference and 14 feet high. He believes this is the only soil for citrus fruit. This farmer planted one and a half- acres in cabbage which sold for about $800. On a 1% acre field he has grown two crops, beans and potatoes. The third crop, potatoes, is now growing with corn planted between the rows which will make crop No. 4 for this land this season. Off % of an acre of Irish. potatoes he obtained 160 bushels and from less than Vz acre obtained 68 bushels. Beans yielded 300 hampers to 1% acres, selling at an average of $1.40 a hamper. This farmer believes soil will produce anything planted and he raised for his own use every known common variety of garden truck.
Another man from % acre beans obtained $128 worth; 3% acres potatoes yielded 602 bushels, selling at $2.40 average; 8 acres potatoes, planted with poor seed, yielded 910 bushels, averaging about $1.60 per bu.; 3 acres estimated yield potatoes 375 bu., averaging $1.60 per hamper. Dry weather and cold reduced yield. From % acre cabbage sold $200 worth, % acre celery obtained 349 crates, selling 242 crates at $1.27 and 107 at 72 cents. At present time this farmer has 11 hogs, 10 head cattle and one horse which feed on wild grass native to the 'Glades. He also plants eorn, millet and natal grass for feed. Has ten acres corn planted on land from which two crops of potatoes have been gathered. Keeps from 20 to 100 chickens. Eleven members to family ; health good; believes a man can support and raise a good sized family on a smaller acreage in the Everglades than he can in the northern states, (and most assuredly live more comfortably.Editor.)
Another man owns' 180 acres, for which he paid from $30 to $80 per acre. Raised all kinds of vegetable and forage. Main crop this year was potatoes 19 acres yielded better than 1,900 bu.,
LY S. or Canada^Ha^nvel^^TTTuTivir
in family, 6 boysiand 6 girls, all good health. Owns 22*hogs, cow and horse, about 70 chickens, 17 turkeys and 0 ducks and all do well, especially the turkeys Would not take less than $200 per acre for his home place.
One commission man operating in and around Ft. Lauderdale during the 1910-1917 shipping season, handled for Everglades farmers approximately 72-264 packages of vegetables, consisting of peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, cauliflower, lettuce, cabbage, turnips, radishes, Irish potatoes, celery, romaine, squash, beets, carrots, peas, bananas, beans, etc., for which he returned to the 'Glades farmers $120,204.91. This commission merchant believes ho handled about 50 per cent of the vegetables shipped from this section of the Everglades.
the okeelanta-
fruitcrest district
The One Successful Settlement in tho Upper 'Glades.
I. FIU'nVKESTThe ISauner Proposition for settlement and development. Groups and organizes buyers. Combines cooperation with individual action. Management, witli tractors and machinery, leads in pioneering. Sells land at, sacrifice prices.
II. NEW OKEELANTAThe Upper 'Glades Town. On canal crossing, projected Cross-State Rail Road and at fork of assured Cross-State Rock Road from Palm Beach to Ft. Myers. Comprises Store, Post Office, Hotel, Boarding Hous'e, Town Hall, Barber Shop, Bake Shop, Notary's Office, School, Sunday School, Cooperative Association, Good Times Club, two Development Organizations, etc. Center of thriving farming community. The "One Bright Spot" between Ft. Lauderdale and Lake Okeechobee. Address
THOS. E. WILL, Ft. Lauderdale and Okeelauta, Fla.


% dear Bra .Both s
.Toursfjftfce Sdth.ult. reed. Sast F.E.O.H.R., re rileago. Taey IS 10E H or,;.. -Mr^hty sorry.,: Sorry .,tqo,reth'e 8$$p$ dasheens... Ssbo .several other. tJftDsgai-
riot all had*the. -73 mighty good. F.C.C. surveys agoing up this
canal. Bnglne^r report;! to -he. .spyli^road. IS BIMJUILT ON .THIS CAN Ah* Ihia IS. She .logical route or .it. hiasril does ..not want it. \f.i-.Bef*oh could give it hut a petty aart, of lades tannage. Tt&& canal banh all ready* and ..a worldof tonaago to he had alongthie routes hand, eager to get road,too.
qod sngi;estion#Yia f$iat all Glade advance just WH'IirtH! the raoney e,wfc<.x*. w^v" 3v;9bj.iAq.. ,i?e should hayclearned that
Boner* I hope y.ou will push that novo. .If possible, ne^t .bond issue shld. elargo enough t^ JTiiiish tho wsyst^;- olio HO.League agreed onaadpledges shuld e laacleespliciandexaotod that each section got its share..; This shpuldcut out the wiu&3,i3g,o^iapQtisig*h^a%>>hurnings#ctQ* fi should highly resolve war again to buy a nig .in a hag in .thisroad raatter. ''e^ve had enough of
*ga
good andpieuty
^endjroJUn up head.
a, the jioveral aoction&sueuid he ^ettinghhilt at sametiiaesnot strung out. 33a, senate woitforover.
o
hone of
;engor boat, .not
;ng a $ood .service alirevi:^ cn-i thing;
raising!t rrou, tho dead ,1$, Quite another.^ I .realized what, it ncant last/, winter uho.n I wheeled .some 1# ircU.es to get petlticnsoff oi.| FI BOAT* .Kay he :.any along, day till we.get another passwjger tferviao to tlio crust. Had it ** lOl^anel till hilled ayear ago.
m ^heut convinced whole ^rcuhi-: 6omcs from Old Fla. fighting ?Tcw Fla* 1 0f* would net let ^reward have eaah for dmiuago* Hence ha hrs5 to sell wet land* That opened thei^ndora's. Bos of evils anddisq.sters. Wo areacfjurod aaany. ofthoxi dA^ot wantppi. cosaing into Fla. vIt '^^us^oiaing intri SO. Fla. That :?.c,ans aj Yank Iinrasion,and,to then,a Cfeirper, Bag Gort. "Thet'e vfrp vhey won't rcapportioniandisprahahiy why wq have hud strotoheo in Dixie Highway, n ., af^ei' paying 700 of St. Boad Funds^are'rl lowed 'but 5^ of' it aoJS: in read,-;,. Good trans* ai|dgQtt .conditions* jaean that tho Yanii lnv.a.io-i '"f-^ tlply,a.idthe d uiger of Oarpe Bag Rule will he a certainty. Our renody is STAK DIVISION. TJien O.F. o;u? haveher own Govt.,and]j.er oapot. l,unra>07ed. Jhen wecjih have adeoent rgt. of the &lades?anddo in a year more tlian wehave done in it yrs.
Slnll he glad %o get the ront^ liast he" 2 mort* or more hchiiM. '^he n^es-sary repairs, of course sand ask 8* fcp sendrent regul rly,wherever-he -la* He can remit direct,by safiil ?no-need in waitingwQpks to see yqu*
sehGo?^--?-if"SS :I asc^- 1 ?T* 3a^ AnJim and Salvage. Seens wc almost loot 01
Cordially youre,


growth-ami bacteria, come into its own. To find and finance the machinery best adapted to break the wild land covered with a forest of wild growth has consumed time. Learning what to raise and when and how to raise it has taken more time. Transportation systems have had to be developed, and little communities, whose numbers might help each other, have had to be built up. Even yetfor the farmer has been the neglected step-child of our system adequate price-fixing and marketing systems for farmers generally, including those in the 'Glades, still await the action of a tardy Government, and a farmers' banking system, established a year ago, is not yet fully operative.
Notwithstanding all this, 'Glades farming is under way. Not only patches but, fields are being cultivated, and actual results accomplished. Records of many of these have recently been collated, embodied in affidavit form, signed, sworn to, and filed for ready reference. Following are synopses published in-the Fort Lauderdale Sentinel for June 29, 1917:
what the everglades
have produced
It is no longer a mooted question- in this part of Florida whether or not the muck soil of the Everglades will grow crops.
The worst knocker in the world becomes an Everglade booster when once he examines the 'glades muck and actually sees the crops grow. Seeing is believing with the real farmer.
But what the Everglades farmer likes better than seeing the crops grow is the harvest of "the green that's long" and here the Sentinel furnishes Its readers a few concrete examples of the harvest the report's of which were compiled by a prominent resident of Ft. Lauderdale, and backed by affidavits in his possession.[Ed.]
One Everglades farmer after losing two crops, one from inadequate drainage and one from the extreme cold of last winter, planted eight acres of Irish
is now planting a fourth crop for the season. The health of his entire family is excellent. This farmer thinks that the hog industry, with cattle and forage crops, one of the best paying of the coming industries^ of the Everglades. He says the fertility of the soil is beyond question. This farmer paid $80 per acre for his land and has refused $250 per acre for it.
Another* man on 30 acres of land for which he paid $65 per acre, planted it to Irish potatoes, obtained a yield of 8,000 bushels, which netted him sufficient to pay for the land, clearing expenses, breaking the soil, and putting it in shape to plant, seed, cultivation, harvesting, hampers and marketing, and he had left between $2,000 and $2,100. He fed the cull potatoes to hogs, of which he possesses about 200. On 43 acres he has planted corn for a summer crop that is now about 10 feet high, estimated yield from 80 to 100 bushel per acre.
Another farmer who came here from Oklahoma, has 5 acres rented at $8 per acre.; half acre of celery yielded 300 crates, netting him about 70 cents per crate; one acre yielded 125 bushel of potatoes which he sold at an average of $2.50 per bushel. Has third crop of corn and thinks the soil more fertile than in Oklahoma. Hogs, cows, mules and chickens do as well as in Oklahoma.
Another farmer planted a first crop of potatoes which was cut short by the cold but from which he harvested 350 hampers and sold them at an average price of $2.30 a hamper. He also had 4 acres of eggplant which yielded 400 crates, averaging $1.25 a crate. One acre of beans yielded 150 hampers and sold for $1.25 a hamper. One acre of peas damaged by cold produced only 50 hampers which he sold for $2.50 a hamper. Second crop, 13 acres of potatoes yielded 1,600 bushels which sold for $1.40 a hamper and one acre celery, 400 crates, which brot, net, 75 cents a crate. Third crop, 15 acres corn growing fine. Farmer says land is fertile and productive and nobody would attempt to deny it when they see the crops.
Another man from total acreage plant-
Trmi ^nr-pi-onT
per colony per year. Would hesitate about accepting $200 per acre for his land, and then only to buy more.
Another farmer has five acres set in grapefruit. The trees are three years old and some of them are 14 inches in circumference and 14 feet high. He believes this is the only soil for citrus fruit. This farmer planted one and a half acres in cabbage which sold for about $800. On a 1% acre field he has grown two crops, beans and potatoes. The third crop, potatoes, is now growing with corn planted between the rows which will make crop No. 4 for this land this season. Off % of un acre of Irish potatoes he obtained 100 bushels and from less than % acre obtained 68 bushels. Beans yielded 300 hampers to 1% acres, selling at an average of $1.40 a hamper. This farmer believes soil will produce anything planted and he raised for his own use every known common variety of garden truck.
Another man from % acre beans obtained $128 worth; 3% acres potatoes yielded 602 bushels, selling at $2.40 average; 8 acres potatoes, planted with poor seed, yielded 910 bushels, averaging about $1.60 per bu.; 3 acres estimated yield potatoes 375 bu., averaging $1.60 per- hamper. Dry weather and cold reduced yield. From % acre cabbage sold $200 worth, % acre celery obtained 349 crates,-selling 242 crates at $1.27 and 107 at 72 cents. At present time this farmer has 11 hogs, 10 head cattle and one horse which feed on wild grass native to' the 'Glades. He also plants corn, millet and natal grass for feed. Has ten acres corn planted on land from which two crops of potatoes have been gathered. Keeps from 20 to 100 chickens. Eleven members to family ; health good; believes a man can support and raise a good sized family on a smaller acreage in the Everglades than he can in the northern stales, (and most assuredly live more comfortably.Editor.)
Another man owns 180 acres, for which he paid from $30 to $80 per acre. Raised all kinds of vegetable and forage. Main crop this year was potatoes 19 acres yielded better than 1,900 bu.,
Triftly fhTin any soil ho has^sePii bOTtie U. S. or Canada, lias twelve children in family. 6 boys anil (! girls, all good health. Owns 22 hogs, cow and horse, about 70 chickens. 17 turkeys and (i ducks and all do well, especially the turkeys Would not take less than $200 per acre for his home place.
One commission man operating in and arouiid Ft. Lauderdale during the 1916-1917 shipping season, handled for Everglades farmers approximately 72-264 packages of vegetables, consisting of peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, cauliflower, lettuce, cabbage, turnips, radishes, Irish potatoes, celery, romalne, squash, beets', carrots, peas, bananas, beans, etc., for which he returned to the 'Glades fanners $120,204.91. This commission merchant believes he handled about 50 per cent of (he vegetable's shipped from this section of the Everglades.
tw-
thf. okeelanta-
fruitcrest district
The One Successful Settlement in tfie Upper 'Glades.
I. FRF ITCH ESTThe Banner Proposition for selt lenient and development. Groups and organizes buyers. Combines copperati'prj willi individual
action. Mauagen.....I, with tractors and
machinery, leads in pioneering. Sells
land at, sacrifice prices.
II. NEW OKEELANTAThe Upper 'Glades Town. On canal crossing, projected Cross-State Rail Road and at fork of assured Cross-State Rock Road from Palm Reach In Ft. Myers. Comprises'Store, Post Office, Hotel, Boarding House, Towu Hall, Barber Shop, Bake Shop, Notary's Office, School, Sunday School, Cooperative Association, Good Times Club, two Development Organizations, etc. Center of thriving farming community. The "One Bright Spot" between Ft. Lauderdale and Lake Okeechobee. Address
THOS. Er WILL, Ft. Lauderdale and Okeelanta, Fla,


isdj^-'i&fy /fast
- C'1
0
JrMJ~JL
_ .1


? ^ ^^^^^^ /


if*


|ded on an
acre. He Jrop for the ptire family jthinks that and forage I'lng of the [Everglades, ffil is beyond id $80 per lefused $250
[of land for planted it a yield of
him suffici-
flearing ex-putting it
^cultivation, .marketing,
I $2,000 and
potatoes to .about 200. corn for a
|)out 10 feet 80 to 100
here from Id at $8 per fcvielded 300
cents per bushel of average of
WM JPheJH,
and % acre of peas by cold. Has 20 colonies bees which average him $10 profit per colony per year. Would hesitate about accepting $200 per acre for his land, and then only to buy more.
Another farmer has five acres set in grapefruit. The trees are three years old and some of them are 14 inches in circumference and 14 feet high. He believes this is the only soil for citrus fruit. This farmer planted one and a half acres in cabbage which sold for about $800. On a IV2 acre field he has grown two crops, beans and potatoes. The third crop, potatoes, is now growing with corn planted between the rows which will make crop No. 4 for this land this season. Off % of an acre of Irish potatoes he obtained 160 bushels and from less than % acre obtained 68 bushels. Beans yielded 300 hampers to 1% acres, selling at an average of $1.40 a hamper. This farmer believes soil will produce anything planted and he raised for his own use every known common variety of garden truck.
Another man from % acre beans obtained $128 worth; 3% acres potatoes yielded 602 bushels, selling at $2.40 average; 8 acres potatoes, planted with poor seed, yielded 910 bushels, averaging about $1.60 per bu.; 3 acres estimated yield potatoes 375 bu., averaging
will producfi heavier and inore abundantly than any soil lie lias seen in the U. S. or Canada. Has IJjS'elve children in family, 6 boys and 6 giflsf all good health. Owns 22 hogs, cow and horse, about 70 chickens, 17 turkeys and (I ducks and all do well, especjally the turkeys Would not take less than $200 per acre for his home place.
One commission man operating in and around Ft. Lauderdale during the 1916-1917 shipping season, handled for Everglades farmers approximately 72-264 packages of vegetables, consisting of peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, cauliflower, lettuce, cabbage, turnips, radishes, Irish potatoes, celery, romaiue, squash, beets, carrots, peas, bananas, beans, etc., for which he returned to the 'Glades farmers $120,204.91. This commission merchant believes he handled about 50 per cent of the vegetables shipped from this section of the Everglades.
the okeelanta-
fruitcrest district
The One Successful Settlement in the Upper 'Glades.
FRT'ITCRHSTThe Banner Pro-


^eclnnta.Fla
:'&.;A2.vln J5.Crw/#*iJas Collector,
Boar Sir:-.-*/ % v
: n \'. 4omit tie. to etato.^hat tax co&pt$i. as T34qjf8 Ji'TVo l>eon'lorati 1) j^favojr earnest J. Salvage, ror mo aaxl' alnto aPor
fl Ife^tfoi* of -!.%ud SalTagCafor 1P31.
^ou'^Il-lclmay tonloli mo toilette ri. ce:V.t;>,ror e&a& or th^ nfcoro, "by boaror, J*r*$n.cny Kwail,^c shall bo under ohli*-gation to you. -
-Very rospectMJy,


Ft haudordale, Fla Juno 101988*
20 Ti 15y dear Mi* ?hite:
. 1 1 $lq,n to noJLn W.L-Vlm Beach neat Monday* ,.V,1iile
there,! shouldb? glad to see yuu,tf co-i-jvenien: to you,on a huoines iaatter
X -will tele-phone yc-u hetween 8 and8 o'clock an
. ~ ^ery truly yor.ro,


"growth and bacteria, come-into its own. To find and finance the machinery best adapted to break the wild land covered with a forest of wild growth has consumed time. Learning what to raise and when and how to raise it has taken more time. Transportation systems have had to be developed, and little communities, whose numbers might help each other, have had to be built up. Even yetfor the farmer has been the neglected step-child of our system adequate price-fixing and marketing systems for farmers generally, including those in the 'Glades, still await the action of a tardy Government, and a farmers' banking system, established a year ago, is not yet fully operative.
Notwithstanding all this, 'Glades farming is under way. Not only patches but fields are being cultivated, and actual results accomplished. Records of many of these have recently been collated, embodied in affidavit form, signed, sworn to, and filed for ready reference. Following are synopses published in the Fort Lauderdale Sentinel for June 29, 1917:
what the everglades
have produced
It is no longer a mooted question in this part of Florida whether or not the muck soil of the Everglades will grow crops.
The worst knocker in the world becomes an Everglade booster when once he examines the 'glades muck and actually sees the crops grow. Seeing is believing with the real farmer.
But what the Everglades farmer likes better than seeing the crops grow is the harvest of "the green that's long" and here the Sentinel furnishes its readers a few concrete examples of the harvest the reports of which were compiled by a prominent resident of Ft. Lauderdale, and backed by affidavits in his possession.[Ed.]
One Everglades farmer after losing two crops, one from inadequate drainage and one from the extreme cold of last winter, planted eight acres of Irish
is now planting a fourth crop for the season. The health of his entire family is excellent. This farmer thinks that the hog industry, with cattle and forage crops, one of the best paying of the coming industries of the Everglades. He says the fertility of the soil is beyond question. This farmer paid $80 per acre for his land and has refused $250 per acre for it.
Another man on' 30 acres of land for which he paid $65 per acre, planted it to Irish potatoes, obtained a yield of 8,000 bushels, which netted him sufficient to pay for the land, clearing expenses, breaking the soil, and putting it in shape to plant, seed, cultivation, harvesting, hampers and "marketing, and he had left between $2,000 and $2,100. He fed the cull potatoes to hogs, of which he possesses about 200. On* 43 acres he has planted corn for a summer crop that is now about 10 feet high, estimated yield from 80 to 100 bushel per acre.
Another farmer who came here from Oklahoma, has 5 acres rented at $8 per acre.; half acre of celery yielded 300 crates, netting him about 70 cents per crate; one acre yielded 125 bushel of potatoes which he sold at an average of $2.50 per bushel. Has third crop of corn and thinks the soil more fertile than in Oklahoma. Hogs, cows, mules and chickens do as well as in Oklahoma.
Another farmer planted a first crop of potatoes which was cut short by the cold but from which he harvested 350 hampers and sold them at au average price of $2.30 a hamper. He also had 4 acres of eggplant which yielded 400 crates, averaging $1.25 .a crate^ One acre of beans yielded 150 hampers and sold for $1.25 a hamper. One acre of peas damaged by cold produced only 50 hampers which he sold for $2.50 a hamper. Second crop, 13 acres of potatoes yielded 1,600 bushels which sold for $1.40 a hamper and one acre celery, 400 crates, which brot, net, 75 cents a crate. Third crop, 15 acres corn growing fine. Farmer says land is fertile and productive and nobody would attempt to deny it when they see the crops.
Another man from total acreage plant-
per colony per year. Would hesitate about accepting $200 per acre for his land, and then only to buy more.
Another farmer has five acres set in grapefruit. The trees are three years old and some of them are 14 inches in circumference and 14 feet high. He believes this is the only soil for citrus fruit. This farmer planted one and a half acres in cabbage which sold for about $800. On a 1% acre field he has grown two crops, beans and potatoes. The third crop, potatoes, is now growing with corn planted between the rows which will make crop No. 4 for this land this season. Off % of an acre of Irish potatoes he obtained 160 bushels, and from less than % acre obtained 68 bushels. Beans yielded 300 hampers to 1% acres, selling at an average of $1.40 a hamper. This farmer believes soil will produce anything planted and he raised for his own use every known common variety of garden truck.
Another man from Vz acre beans' obtained $128 Worth; 3% acres potatoes yielded 602 bushels, selling at $2.40 average; 8 acres potatoes, planted with poor seed, yielded 910 bushels, averaging about $1.60 per bu.; 3 acres estimated yield potatoes 375 bu., averaging $1.60 per hamper. Dry weather and cold reduced yield. From % acre cabbage sold $200 worth, % acre celery obtained 349 crates, selling 242 crates at $1.27 and 107 at 72 cents. At present time this farmer has 11 hogs, 10 head cattle and one horse which feed on wild grass native to the 'Glades. He also plants corn, Millet and natal grass for feed. Has ten acres corn planted on jland from which two crops of potatoes j have been gathered. Keeps from 20 to 100 chickens. Eleven members to family ; health good; believes a man can support and raise a "good sized family on a smaller acreage in the Everglades than he can in the northern states, (and most assuredly live more comfortably. Editor.).
Another jnan owns 180 acres, for which he paid from $30 to $80 per acre. Raised all kinds of vegetable and forage. Main crop this year was potatoes 19 acres yielded better than 1,900 bu.,
man any son ne has seen in the U. -S. or Canada. Has twelve children in family, 6 boys and 6 girls, all good health. Owns 22 hogs, cow and horse, about 70 chickens, 17 turkeys and 6 ducks and all do well, especially the turkeys Would not take less than $200 per acre for his home place.
One commission man operating in and around Ft. Lauderdale during the 1916-1917 shipping season, handled for Everglades farmers approximately 72-264 packages of vegetables, consisting of peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, cauliflower, lettuce, cabbage, turnips, radishes, Irish potatoes, celery, romaine, squash, beets, carrots, peas, bananas, beans, etc., for which he returned to the 'Glades farmers $120,204.91. This commission merchant believes he handled about 50 per .cent of the vegetables shipped from this section of the Everglades.
the okeelanta-
fruitcrest district
The One Successful Settlement in the Upper 'Glades.
I. FRUITCUEST The Banner Proposition for settlement and development. Groups and organizes buyer's. Combines cooperation with individual action. Management, with tractors and machinery, leads in pioneering. Sells laud at sacrifice prices.
II. NEW OKEELANTAThe Upper 'Glades Town. On canal crossing, projected Cross-State Rail Road and at fork of assured Cross-State Rock Road from Palm Beach to Ft. Myers. Comprises Store, Post Office, Hotel, Boarding House, Town Hall, Barber Shop, Bake Shop, Notary's Office, School, Sunday School, Cooperative Association, Good Times Club, two Development Organizations, etc.- Cental* of thriving farming community. The "One Bright Spot" between Ft. Lauderdale and Lake Okeechobee. Address
THOS. E. WILL, Ft. Lauderdale and Okeelanta, Fla. '


7/
j
./J>^^ rf^f^t.S*y ^ w ........ r ri_ ,_ yy^
t L




- / (--L-
4> &


,0.
l L




y
J^uuL^rA^, sLC i






w$m -ctolW:^
Ft Lcl*Fin 6~1 *
My dear I is $o r ri s
Just bach from 3 das. at U.Paln J3eaoh,and gccd ones,to Ihinh i have get our ml troubles settled right. Hope so* We arc on eye of new Road Bond Issue* '^earned it will be for b650,0<>G*009 with vie.: of finishing wh;le Glades ays ten* If so, ours will '.certainly be finished, too. ;
Had a good tall: with one of "biggest Tien there* Wants t help isein any way he can* ^.uis3Qd,andf cund I a-: h-oen for Okoelanto^ladcqroat Rond,wh. certain interests havetried for. $ .years to heat no >ut of. We have $12,500 in bank now to bulldit,7r.it ;rorefused It any?ay OoC,u;r.;si> against us* Thi3:oari,said,c I'll get it for you* Bon*t you worry.* *hen he explri nod ] bocho good* ^
sa*u ion Eryan,whi is'to .surface rood from W.Palm Beach Ojujal to' B.ollo Glade* Tells me he will be. past <*eer werth by early or Middle fall* That should got his work dene to Hillshoro croeolngby 2tr.as* I shall as.: that our .02o-Glad* Rd. be .finisheel h7 RAJTRT3!I!R* It OAM bo ,iwwoil ao rot. then we oua run by oar froia Oh. to W.P.Soaoh in an hour and half* Howls that* And by Xniasf
Have work 3d out a cooperative arrangement .wit!: ^ce'worth nrl. that may be worth a lot to them andustoo. *~ny tell you mere later*
^tumbled onto a man representing -oil sorts of eorporatemoncy* Ire^arin^ to buy several sections JLuthe Square .andputthera in aveeadcor.. *nen will sell Ms bearing groves tat *1400 oer acre* Bants a big town sito.auCwantstc make Ojyeelanta I T> ;% is coming dorm hero to nee m- more' fully ^hout
it. I had in-lQ % speech int e'lletary tboday before on 3:?U3ible Boi-ile^out He has read ..it it in .the Post, and was greats pleased. *anted to sec no. ,Sng:-,:estod thot ur n^etihgiras rcvidential# a" 11 hoi:e oomething will come of it* r\
. d) .....
have "ritten ojfltJer of the 20,00: as* what you wrote me.nndJiskod hlEt to y] protect us. 'fold hira .namepf projb hie tetTscandhis game* 4avoyoursof' 6-0 and e-11 before me. ano rjy letters of rjrff alx!"'r&10 t" you.whioh c.ii-ioh.oh* ZI:pe your friend may find a way to handle hie Olewistoa. I don* J want to discourage any good rhing.. But I an very clear that SCAT-i^diTIIN iq. deatf\to .Glades business., hand there, is o.I:* Ppl. o*fc. Locatnn fine"but it, .won*t mix.,rot,with a point as for away as Ohcelanta in" pr, tcic farming. ?T.;.o,wc have alioSst ovesy thing to unl ear, andro-I earn in fannin* lines when we hit the Glades.
Sgall hoglod to learn of your three other ncrp on 'tho 20,000 a Here*
a :iIGHT5f 699B T.VCTIQ POINT|,
R.R. Griff in, an old Qkeelanta farmer andcrackqr,^*!? hardier; t 'V Itch in Lfl. Canal,near So.xdne of P.Beach 3o.ai2d20,^00 as* I haye thot that land ahou as.raw and unproductive, till ithas had a lot of draining, tv< f-r^nc*as o-::tildwoll bo .fouisd* Griffin told zz he had dug u;. FIVE witiva "rtfb
hoe, planted it,in. pott* es,and then,hotwoc-n to t*ows,no hod nlreiVxI Vorn. ;ot:tocoworo not v:ry ..rlvnty,first orop,but .good anclbig. &*ti&4 corn he saysia FINE. -Think of that on such landf Think what a bitncl of rich nen ca- ma!:eofit,if it is soo good now.
Certainly Bo.pe ^ushey et el will, co^cthru, A'hey arehardfisSi to \- ud.3ttre xcs,that cattle.groposition is Q 0 Q B. j'.hy can't you interest your fame friends in it aowf .Hard to beat that* For another type,I bqli.A-othc 'avo0 prop, .will be G^IAT- This .-remoter Sityshe has had thebost atpes* t3fi#Q ing and is SUBE our landia G.K* for that fruit.


m
3,
use following form:
ESCROW DEPOSIT FOR PLOWING LANDS
The Ft. Lauderdale State Bank, Ft, Lauderdale, Fla.
Gentlemen: >
Enclosed find__Dollars \% ) to "be deposited in escrow,as advance payment at 10.00 per acre, to Thos. E. Will
for plowing the following land: Tract NO. in Section _,
T.__S.,R._E., being _acres. Whenever the said Thos.
E Will ahall show, by competent witness, that Five Acres (5 as,) or more, of the above tract has been properly plowed, you are hereby author' ized to pay him, out ff the above deposit, at the rate of Ten Dollars ($10.00) per acre for all land plowed.
If, ninety (90) days from this date, the above land shall not have been ploughed, I am at liberty to withdraw the above deposit, pr o-vided I have first written said Thos. E. Will thirty days' notice.
Signed_P0_______
< Witness_'_ Date__.
ACCEPTANCES
Cut out those you do not accept, sign, and return acceptance to writer.
I. CORN GROWING PROPOSITION: I hereby accept the above Corn-Growing Proposition for _acres.
II. SUGAR CANE GROWING PROPOSITION:---I hereby accept the above
Sugar-Cane Growing Proposition, Offer NO._, for _acres. My land
is Tract No._, in Sec._,T_, R._?
. III. PLOWING PROPOSITION: I hereby accept the above Plowing
Proposition for _acres, namely Tract NO._, in Sec._,T._,
R._; and am senaing escrow deposit to bank.
Signed'__P.O.________
Witness___.__Date_ .....
***********************************
Thos. I. Will,
Okeelanta, Fla.
Address, Box 285,
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla,


ilfc ; ' 1"' '' r -'2. < t, t, ,w5lpp*-': j< -
b) The'remaining expenses, we will meet out of sa&es
of crop.
c) The Net, we will divide equally; statement, and your check, to be sent you direct by buyer.
II. SUGAR-CANE GROWING
What cane will'do is shown by enclosed literature. It is the coming GREAT GLADES CROP. Cane-growing costs something, the first year. Thereafter, it costs little, and it means things unutterable. Plant a small acreage if you cannot plant a larger on$.
Here are two offers. Take your choice.
1) Offer No. 1:FARMING YOUR LAND:We will handle your land, plow it, furnish and plant seed, kill weeds, and take first crop, only; OR


3.
use following form:
ESCROW DEPOSIT FOR PLOWING LANDS
The Ft. Lauderdale State Bank, Ft, Lauderdale, Fla.
Gentlemen:
Enclosed find _Dollars (& ) to be deposited in escrow,as advance payment at CIO.00 per acre, to Thos. E. Will
for plowing the following land: Tract NO._,in Section__,
T._,S.,R._,E., being__acres. Whenever the said Thos.
E, Will ahall show, by competent witness, that Five Acres (5 as,) or more, of the above tract has been properly plowed, you are hereby author ized to pay him, out >f the above deposit, at the rate of Ten Dollars ($10.00) per acre for all land plowed.
If, ninety (SO) days from this date, the above land shall not have been ploughed, I am at liberty to withdraw the above deposit, pr o-vided I have first written said Thos. E. Will thirty days' notice.
Signed___P0._._
Witness_'__;_Date_
ACCEPTANCES
Cut out those you do not' accept, sign, and return acceptance to writer.
I, CORN GROWING PROPOSITION: I hereby accept the p


talks reoes
1* Have 'Iwd 1 *ftine_*( hallo
ho_ irip),et al j&lad to keep informed. "fiwaistiglo work:-, with F.E^B.a.R* survey gnu iT.- -P lflt*t^j?.n;-. tM.: oana3 ''ay:'.hey will ? t '" j GRirv-vey only*/ ^oree to moot then coring down frnn Qfcooi ohee Qlty* ifow i tho word* with t' o R.R* ppl W*P*Boaoh still iniohlnghor n.R. ifincour L, ;3anl_ you qr impairing house* What is "' ':rrouoys addressf >
Wo do jjord .acheel JBluw .Salvage t 'if nearly 'lost ojar,. school again .,tblslast year, $heold story* 'Bat it .tnicoo deqent, trans* t get ?pvpl*in* That in what 1 hvefacod thlspast year*
Olod th< ditshlug work isf progroe rr.iig* ~: l, true that .aa^ejf f&isft' irore pied* *icjjth"off (gross Caial hy sxrrrcyoraf toldch -oni now roigra 6T3ere*Kc in tosa onto n&eft* out hyguesu* Moved Stakes shout like we.-'d3#ot Hews to rag*
Am ::iot lately,ta reea those tdH&erbik of. honn.>. soon* Jfs the-.:? under your house, if you like* if they should s,t-ay there ; onaancntlyitho carpenters might np.ke mi erctimateof tho tteooonsE-hand value of thOH'at li-accy present r-.mpTJp-jf.diioIi could he to my credit,to bo;. idonlya t your coiivonlenco* '
i Spent ..3 days in WP*3eadh lagfe week* foamed a let \ fUffld did ..soraetho->gn,.v hope, "jaw ;t\^u^&rr t. Rftide 1 clear calaraiteuo condition.jPollm/ingprouo^tpHrl^oy* re hoodIinwc'__il(thio(,) Result* Agreed that it ho handlod J_r local soifg-Jtuiitiegaa^oeing, and oonding 1 orders to Leah ^en, "below ..So*Bay hook* |write ^ig^lliott thai do.y( 13'Kfts)andho; e !h< | agree*
Harris told flirTon aiKlothQra hondia^u wSr roads yl awtg_0fl09Q wor.ldho o t3L_ to Jfinish 'whole
imt^alT^r^ k^'It'^ j'h^.^'l^ sharoa- I hal jiheen hot on -r il of .r'.;/;< xire<.''. h l?ig f !<.)&


17.11. (3>* -i
, anuchcavod. .''tis out for Roads League sieet" ing* q&mm agreed to thatch psr|eodings,anflfeecp ttjp Por_oa. Jlo,tOf>,i;.Ui $ Harris pm,f">:I'got ;tver* it. ^ghty little Paith in Harri- i P.P.Beach Jliat I found* % A gfl oj& onent and good C'sapoigr should wipe Mm out.
I Ioto been worsting u^ioug Heptg* fc Qroer,o^roso-ing hope thpv wlla n^n_x;.t_!rf_!U \ Riggers, .j_Wi:-< to he their 0 ndid. ate jfqr Log., toldme .they ftOUI -nosat* inate Greer* JpiggQjpS desorwa riighty jyoll of O&oeW lonta. Ho ^iothrall*' who wo: it in heavily on the taaic of gottingqur 01^02-*d. Road through in t01. Mesnrs. .Dutch pejtK|Robfii deceased) helped jRig.'ierr was a tower of strength tn-ine in ir$_^ght*
Met representative of Avocodo dorp, wh tells |_:e liioppl. will buy Smfl^iAL iXJHlsU^n39$- us, ;r.# | plant la hardy afeoo-acloos;so3:hlog at ^l'--'' >'' _a. Baystlioy. wont a 'J-OYflJ. .SITI'affile VfM*aV 'ft-a/ ^hee^
lanta as "ant;i 4 sect!
regi
6a_
iltere. Said ho
x his chance wonting with me as floe
.JS/Oa.* t->___jr. _____.___i_ r _i M ____ _..._
_ ^*ost reportof y Rotary CJluh s: J[_ 6-12). on' Sensible Bottlorientw,a,vd was d with it. Seomsto laocw a lot al>r*tt aioxlos.
*eat all ..thru '^k. j3orj>. lninctn.*V,oors P took "r^ioM, ti&kod fully with Geo.h.&nith^ana. lawyer Dq^'oo who,aa dlroult Judge,granted injunction* iVlkud wi with Judge 0.a.Chillii?^7ertl2,toQ. *h|hds heed ei since Janl9l9 Judgeo ogrea it 'hill .a-fciqK* till Corp. officers appear andargtto. '^h^y dj? not. Qan't sell Ioncl,or borrow on i^ ^ac.onwhile. QAU ,RER^l Jtt aadpocfcfet p^ooeeds r^.rlcli l*idth saystHey jlo. Siai't?? says .one .rentei-; ; aid,last, yea 31,^5 ro:.a,. i r/o tflaptaria gets .^3.,i'J0f)#0i} for doing .nothing, Iir m worh done, ^jeta spouses hcalde*: Other of -
cars get .^50* e^jm per .onjiniBjand :e;ior^.'v. p a- c a -lag to Fla* in winter to ;looting* MaJcesit rico.B
Judge flonnell thinh;'"eo.t coiirra- Woulxl 7; ;; ap-
:)ly for rc

LET'S HELP FEED THE STARVING.
the door.
In Europe, FAMINE stalks.
Here, even, for many, it is at
Current literature teems with its pictures. See Delineator for March (p.7).
Do we care? Hoover says, "Famine is the mother of anarchy."
These conditions MUST be met. Simply to "save" is stupid.
We MUST pHOaiUQS.
The UPPER GLADES are a Horn of Plenty. A vast area of its "weed" lands is ready NOW to farm,
peEe, a handful of pioneers, at infinite cost to themselves have now solved the chief problems, agricultural and mechanical.
The era of experimeent is past. Through actual, first-hand experience on the ground, for five years, the writer KNOWS.
On these lands, TODAY, can be produced excellent corn, magnificent sugar cane, poultry, hogs, beef cattle, dairy cows, and unlimit f eeds.


If
ar^.ngodf|Ug. tain.nrohahl:
. >L qjtat
stock ?i coat e;;io
of c
4ap par,* Ho; is frill 1% ': i
IK* ii have so v.?uch of w'.e 4 an4co,rd in&e;;o.,that hie ,.oc !fotrr$ tpAjtWj (Jehlo also qtian requires WAZ& P'' p'1 .Stigdtethesa. sr/dth thinics 1 en sold Since injunction dortj if oefindro
I Judge jDU .eajtimtes 'theireliiainary 00: adf^t^siiigf>l5!r,citlohs,trdi>ne:?. os, oto*i.c frpin $80 tS $3J0O, .... !.
Iljp wi?4' tafcoo I ,gtpjg?it |f 004 win wf Jloi or,?cantingant,< no win no pay to'*$xm)p>, thiSjin eaj?h s|0oflto earr# ittfcru Supreme.' Court.
St<
.u 1a3.M.\- .'
Shrill irriti to J5#C^ friends td.scri whdt thoy ihi*u|c yo a :!3eth0'ee who'feel lijtce fighting,if not too B^oasire* kx|reutijiors n!ay,possib]!iy,bo found*
I olertaiirt.y 'hoye fsrtablo tr:l follow.;
topi* .with Qirotalt loourtjstraight ^>,fel,000.00t oonting-2ut^$S,^OM.p-::. : 1 '
r] I 1 'iTVi -. V i > 1 '
Hlis' ^3suited that! the Qoiiting. .nt Poo; j,if I paid,would oo:nc,out op ..the Qoky. property. Renoethe"fiihds he ;raii$ed hy .litigants! wou|ld, jiresi^i-hlyjjt ah*ut : 4?190*0() to $400.00i' Shpld) ,we winJ this, too, could proeomahly ho repaid out elf tlie Corp* .property.
I X am c orto in the leader i cf the JQorjI. gsfeuv 'is a'.^lotoi and has intend^ fop 10 years,to grab t ;e4ropsrtyiif pos3ihle.
Best 1 still
S f jj
. you .rdi]p hWe L auiocespfue ..and co ri-^y tji gc so ffcr-pnlcs : > ;.vts
on Mrs. Itflii and oekf.
on o.Ie.
lord:'
^r^renco- i
Illy y&trs.


m
Vt* Laud* fl*l &*2S
Lea* romt
iriqd Sat* night to see yon
ig;3i.n,but, eutUd not nnOyon.
4gooa i>',GJL Would pit haflrp on door o:.on*.-3ftt~on doe*-so will jtiofc owing r'boufc when door is
IfcOTdl'Xi*
hlhk it r4sljt he well to ptet a hniip on f^owfe aoor,is.5sidQ#v,ilM?iit a^ftdloojLbut fnetenod inside* fhon Wo oon g.: out off door of kitchen, ant'liooL. it*
A good. Sjiidltioa:. shouldiiavo two Sce-fa* %i*h Jy| would sendae ofccoftheso, that,if I 'fijxm up ti'ope.I shall ho,^.,; no trouhloin getting*!*
Shatter is ioft of t e after Trying for
*re,plaesando Tby p*o.on?.er*
Hcjl a good.tal, wtjj Hiiolc/fco-lay# ift3or '
~c*t for ..-eikethia of t Trneon*
Good 3u*h^v dgood hy,f or this time* llono yU :.jf-.y feoop laoinfomed*
Sincerely y<*.r,


2.
The remaining expenses, we will meet qut of saies
of crop.
c) The Net, we will divide equally; statement, and your check, to be sent you direct by buyer.
II. SUGAR-CANE GROWING
What cane will do is shown by enclosed literature. It is the coming GREAT GLADES CROP. Cane-growing costs something, the first year. Thereafter, it costs little, and it means things unutterable. Plant a small acreage if you cannot plant a larger one.
Here are two offers. Take your choice.
1) Offer No. 1:FARMING YOUR LAND:We will handle your land, plow it, furnish and plant seed, kill weeds, and take first crop, only; OR
2) Offer No. 3:FARMING OUR LAND:You will handle our land, plow it, furnish and plant seed, kill weeds, and take first crop, only.
In each case, OWNER controls second, and all subsequent crops. (For mode of utilizing cane, See Sugar literature above.)
Under Offer N0.1, your land must be in or near Fruitcrest (Sec.27) or Okeelanta Addition, (sec. 35),both in T, 44, R. 36,(See plat enclosed), and not taken by elder bushes. You will advance Fifty-Five Dollars ($55.00) per acre to cover cost of plowing, seed, planting, and weed-killing, less any part of this which you may have already advanced* You take as security, a mortgage on the first crop, and, out of this crop, gast back your i&SFifty-Five Dollars (C55.00) per acre, with six per cent (6fo) interest. We take the remainder.


r


' Ft.Lmiderdale, Fla,, June 21,1022,
Mr.F, A. Shadlsger, President Gkeolanta Commnity Council, Okeeiant a,Florida,.
My dear Mr.Shadingeri--
On the 17thlnst* ,1 wrote .you of the conference hold on tho 13th.insta' ^est .Palm Beach,between Mr. Glenn V^cott^Asoistart Chief .Engineer, and myself on the control of the water level of the North New River Canal, In that letter I saidj ? .
"Have been in West palm Beach, Had a ,good conference with Engineer scott, Toldhim .all otaj -. troubles, We agreed.fully, that LOCAL JbI CONTROL is the great need. He suggest a it might boot be. exercised/ through the Oorapunity Councils .of Okeelaata,South, Boy and hollo. Glade. 'ihese agreeing ..on a policy,would give orders to the lock tenders below Lech 1, These < orders.) wouldbe final unless ;>\gineer fi&undit necessary to make changes, .Says *ompano canal is controlled in that way with perfect success, Saidhe would write Tingineor Elliot that sameday( 13th.) recorn lending thispolloy. Will await returns with hope.*
Engineer Scott, c'lied on. me here thisjnorning|and, together,we reviewed the entire subject,in all its aspects,and agiiin agreed on every vital point,
-'ore. important,Mr. Scott brought with, him a letter from Engineer Elliot in reply to Mr.Soott's letter to bim following above conference.
In thisreply,Engineer Elliot pointed out the difficulties sometimes attending ., efforts toward neighborhood agreement and cooperation,and cited the failure of a similar attempt in an unorganised neighborhood.
However,the advantages enjoyed by our three communities because of their existingcrganizations are recognised,and TIr.Elliot cordially assents to the suggestion that,in. our case,neighborhood Canal Control be tried.
On hisreturu to his office,some days hence,Mr.Scott,at my reouest,wil.l write/ me,for publication,a letter embodying the praotical,administrative features proposed.
am


BP
i
LONG BUILDING,
(INCORPORATED ) MA.JE8TrC BUILD1X&
CHICAGO
Wash
xmtr.72 philip s. d e lan y.
henry o- ralston, '
If VICE PRESIDENT V W HELM ,
VICC i-m SIDE/41
r. m price ,
acc'v, xnia8 wi lli 3 p. m u
Land Sales Company
TELEPHONE
/RANDOLPH t
noton, D. C. Office i
Ouray Building
sos g street, n. w
Telephone Main 4260
A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when he could leave the government service for something better. I wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with sufficient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily increasing income as the years rolled by.
One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just returned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it oarefully, applied for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people whoare living upon this land and working it told me of their incomes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.
' On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Interstate Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good judgment that they bought over 1500 aores on ray report. I resigned from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. TodayK every Department in the Government service is represented among ourj buyers. Hundreds of aores have been sold in Washington, and other! are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business mar practical, hardfisted farmers who KNOW soils have bought ar are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow thei: example.
Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be the following:
Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C, Ml B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C, S. P. Coi 2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,
, Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment
place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income^
'.'ducing point of view. They will be glad to answer your ,inqi, *;,,',and we can. refer you to numbers of others,
^V^^..,^ Jvj7 pUI.p088 jn bringing this subject to your attenti*
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony^^ gSri




^,Timidordale,ria*,June 29,19352
atr.eidoon Q*Rants, -
&afPaLngton,IWC*
T% dear hr,Bauts i
Yours of the ISth, at' hand. 4i glad to he able to report BUhat-iutial progress.
Last week,I spent three* days In W.Kba*Bep.e* Jly first i*ove was bo visit the oPfioo. of tv thru in. detaii,ru;*kingfuli Votes* '$mo is copy of notes, typed out. You vril "'indthss! i-'itoeostinp'roediii"','''
As to status of initiation ease* X talked with r. ludg- e: e; tfcfotygw "*U this. Note that the orp*officers are to argue* ti?.e case. Ah Why don't they argue*t *w6 good reus ao,I thln*:t*4) *hy do.ronotjtheir case is too rotten; 2} flh.ey still have a good thing,sb it is*
%fce thipis Mm a^e not enjoined from oollojj&Lng r^jto puk usi.u?:;t' o.a ao they see fib. Xfget tAe following fro-- G,H.Smith,who warn) tiierent-ooll. ;o tor for tueOorp, hof re they 3cft bin outside!
Renters usually hold from if to ,40 .acres .each!
On Seo,17( Pcdiokee)there are at peast la rentersjon i>se*9,several,Ol cs*
One rehtor,alone,in 1021rpaid' in rents ftl*3y5*.tA> '
CCiapman draws as ..salary, .1,0M),.00 per year,and $50,00 exeenee money* For thi3,horeljdsrs. no ssvioefthe work helngdone wholly hy an. arent named liugh.es, on the hake Shore. ... H
T&e eoy*,the Troas.andthe membersef tho ^xeo* Board draw ~J2&0,00 per year each, *
all offioersSreoeivo per die-as and trarellingexponses for at c ending.,ard. meetings, fhis enables them tQ rave f roc tripe t.e Fla* in the winter season* Ho money has ever been paid as dividend, or in any other way, to stock-holders as sudk /
Hence,whatever the landsmay .bemade to yield as rents,barring essential v pensesygq, into thepockets pf the ile %nageraonU If ONE, of tliis precious lot has ever heen known to spendoneiaomojit in working forthe GENERAL WELFARE of the Everglades | assisting in ur long,


ESCROW DEPOSIT FOR PLOWING LANDS
The Ft. Lauderdale State Bank, Ft, Lauderdale, Fla.
Gentlemen:
Enclosed find____Dollars ($ ) to be depos-
ited in escrow,as advance payment at ^lO.OO per acre, to Thos. E, Will
for plowing the following land: Tract NO._,in Section _,
T_.S..R. E., being _acres. Whenever the said Thos,
E Will ahall show, by competent witness, that Five Acres (5 as.) or more, of the above tract has been properly plowed, yon are hereby autho ized to pay him, out f the above deposit, at the rate of Ten Dollars ($10,00) per acre for all land plowed.
If, ninety (90) days from this date, the above land shall not have been ploughed, I am at liberty to withdraw the above deposit, pr o vided I have first written said Thos. E. Will thirty days' notice.
Signed _P.O.,_
Witness _Dat e_
ACCEPTANCES
Cut out those you do not accept, sign, and return acceptance to writer.
I. CORN GROWING PROPOSITION: I hereby accept the above Corn-' Growing proposition for _acres.
II. SUGAR CANE GROWING PROPOSITION:--I hereby accept the above
Sugar-Cane Growing Proposition, Offer NO._, for ._acres. My land'
is Tract No._in Sec._, T_, R._.
III. PLOWING PROPOSITION: I hereby accept the above Plowing
Proposition for _acres, namely Tract NO._, in Sec._,T._,
R.__; and am sending escrow deposit to bank.
Signed P.O. _
Witness_____Date__
Thos. I. Will,
Okeelanta, Fla.
Address, Box 285,
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.


Rie^rem^a^^n^expenses, we will meet out of s?--rs--. of crop.
c) The Net, we will divide equally; statement, and your check, to be sent you direct by buyer*
SUGAR-CANE GROWING
What cane Will do is shown by enclosed literature. It .is the coming- GREAT GLADES PROP.. Cahe-Jrowing coses something, the first 'year. Thereafter, it costs little^ and it means things unutterable. Plant a smell acreage if you cannot plant a larger on$.
Here are two offers. i Take your choice.
1) Offer No- 1:FARMING YOUR LAND:We will handle vour land, plow it, furnish and plant seed, kill weeds, and take first erop, only; OR
3| Offer No. 2:FARMING OUF LAND:You will handle per land, plow it, furnish and plant seed, kill weeds, and take first crop, only*
In each case, OWNER controls second, end all subsequent crops. (For mode of utilizing cane, See Sugar literature above.)
Under Offer N0.1, your land must be in or near Fruitcrest (Sec.27) or Okeelanta Addition, (sec. 35), both in T, 44', R, 36.,, (See 'plat enclosed), and not taken by elder bushes. You will advance Fifty-Five Dollars ($55.00) per acre to cover cost of plowing, seed, planting, and weed-killing, less any part of this which you may haVe already- advanced. You take as security,.a mortgage on the first crop, and, out of this crop, get back your aasFifty-Five Dollars (55.00) per acre, with six per cent (6fo) inter est-. We take the'remainder.
If you have no land, you may buy in Fruitcrest. (Literature available).
1
Under Offer NO.2, you have, again, only to send the money (Fifty-Five Dollars^55,00per acre, thns caving in full for the br*akir-r seed, planting and weed-killing; and buying a full right to the whole first crop* If desired, advances will be secured by real estate.
How can you win on Offer NO.lj or how can we, on Offer NO.2? In this way:--wnne, ordinarily, in other cane-growing states, the FIRST CROP is all that any one get?the cane, like corn, requiring to be re-planted annually-.-emder cur unusual conditions, the cane, once planted, .will continue to grow for a pericd of years, thus reducing the cost' of subsequent crops to a trifling figure.
C III glOWING;0.jil)Y.
Plowing alone, without cropping, h-lps Glades lands immensely. The demand for plowing is usually far beyond the supply. With cash in hand, the writer has begged in vain to have lands plowed, So have others. Corn- and Cane-growing should greatly intensify this demand. To learn how to plow wild lands and get the equipment, has taken 5 years. We now have good tractors and plows, but notenough.
Some may want their lands plowed but not cropped. This is the 'VERY LEAST they can. do in, their own interests-. Should you desire plowing, or del it at op.ee and save tedious delays- Caaier-a Tee Dollars (ilD.^yj pe acre. (So^e charge much more; n3ne. lees.) In ordering


plus -ioney expense,In l'Jli>-i4. In ^addition*! tvi iriLllin* amortising" iteja for suit( 3ae enclosed Expense Pint.)-
kiaflL/f. thiag already in connection with this whole Fla*
Hy advertising in aevolepcr should have brought oora^ has been little^ However, some money ;aay#pesoibly, be elsewhere.
a *t^Ljhhfi^*diroctXs and by e^e;;e^;.denoo wit; scattered B % G pec :; ohey easy biowy%:.se ;8Ci'0Gt If so,I holier- t san Per.die the r^tjer*
The stuff. 1. have sent ypu,and ara c:.io|osing,wIiioh I cotilobtil down arid, evs-teuiaie a little ssor.e closely,could be r^eue^rep'e seat out to ~ "~--ed list of old B. a._& buyers known fee'cur D.tf. pt?ple>witr nersennl 3 %e machinery is handy there* lli #eQfile jrtbo youldg^frLt know orqh of the crookedness absolutelyperao 'ting^thio whole once* With"sunt and good, strong rorsonll ettor?V4Uiiie a iuibiboi* sh6uldhe vtlldtagcp ): pecialiy when itmeans- saying a kalf^taiXliOii 'dollar property of tbejl
-^x eve
w* ,raoaberswill not help jon a. or coaplain when iaen like the ones i; can they ex
if-, i*^
U. select-*
thing or,
^8"
buy e3
ageiaeno. aaa any one receive ;t& help ihouc eld,so Hike no interest in their an racot vital concern


meat i
spend soriroc mn<& tir>"ingto tell thorn.
';ift Laxii mfktjM* you see in ngr adVs* ami d all* A little mQney help 013 that a]
the jungle",aa to 'the ii'ouso at all* *V
f|i1;^S^t^^3Si*a^1 work with andfor such ^owlc-hut
Sincerely r/ottwu


* Offer NO.3, you have, again, only to send the money (Fifty-Five Delia. $55.00-'-per acre, thus paying in full for the breaking, seed, |)lajlting arid weed-killing; and buying a full right to the whole first yQ#>'o if desired, advances will be secured by real estate.
How. can ypu win on Offer N0.1; or how can we,' on Offer NO.3? In this way:Wfl-ile, ordinarily, In other cane-growing stated, the FIR3T CROP is all that any one getsthe cane. 3 ike corn,' reouiiing to be re-planted annually---under cur unusual conditions,' the cane, once planted, will continue to grow for a period of years, thus reducing the cost of subseCiUer.it crops tc a trifling figure,
Hi PLOWING ONLY,; Plowing alone, without cropping, helps Glades lands immensely. The demand for plowing is usually far beyond 'the supply. With cash in hand, the writer has begged in vain to have lands plowed. So have others. Corn- and Cane-growing should greatly intensify this demand. To learn how to plow wild lauds -and get the equipment, h?.s taken 5 years. We new have good tractcrs and plows, but hot enough..
Some may want their lands plowed but not cropped. This is the VERY LEAST they can do in, their own interests- Should vcu desire plowing, ^derjit at o^oe and save te&iouft delays. Cuargs, Tee Dollars (i:10.'M eer""aere. Xs^ue charge much more; notie l'es&.')' In ordering


7


J'
>**- [AIL*
i^JL-t. "-^-xc. j^r^~" ^-^-^p^


%tl*E2igravi.Bg- 0oV aahingtoiiI>.C*
Ft ^auderdale, Fl a* June t
HentieaaiGiif
sseet your litt
greatly regret that 1 have been le hill of$4.34.
unable,as yett
I have passed through theraost strenuous year of riylif c, andlrnd to .rim behind*
&ost*|asstiredlyour hill is .not forgotten. '^I.e work was .excellent, as was all, t|ie work you lid for me when I lived in D.0,and was one of ^eur regular patrons*
...., *!.- I ....-.... ..." ... . .
I fcavemore. orders for you when I oon.get my .chin a.little Iiig her, above the water* *hje deflation* policy of our f inancial wise laen has hit roe hard*!
Sine erelyyours,


FtLaudordale,Fl:> .Juno 27,1922.
Okeoianta ..Cor;: unity Council? Qkeel.mia, Fla*
My doe. l-v..-"i- dingers--
EncloG3d find copy of letter from 'Chief Asst.Engineer Scot?, fully 'oonfina-
ry letter to youof the 21st,inst# It vas planned f oi'pnblic ation.and natter goeo to press herewith.
&X1 jierc 'who know ofthis arrangement,are enthusiastic* {re hanker says," "It looksooro like navigation 'than auythingl have seen in S yoe.eo."
All realize that it ' it "is up to the Upper Gladess* to vaake it succeed er lot it fail* 1* hWefnith to "believe they will mnkeio succeed*
""^10 "two chief ends to he served are, of courses
1) Head off tho high wnter which occasionally corses;
2.) ii-eep the 'boats ofiaedium draft running the yea;" round, unlcs-: temporarily stoppel,for a brief period, to cheoli a flood*
But the high water is" very rorejwbilo the need for boat tr;afflc,!we have ever with us,1'
Boat men,as We are now up to a situation in whioh suoH killing of beat traffic will be wotse,even,should!t occur,then it has been duringtho past 12 months, 1 see the Bryaas here. ,jLboy tell no,to-day, they are at work on fche Gross-State Road.andtheir work eeans an endofrcad traffic till they have finished.
Some' tliiak' will be a longtime after Jan#21,lE23. A oontroctor tell4 me A
bonds requiring contractors to h-tve finished hy a stipulated tine are worth
ei less* If the contractor is at work,he cm take almost any time ho chooses.


6\r- ^C^C /Z&lc^o *C&~y_. 3tiL- 6UlA. ~&&~0&* rrsic^-. ^w. ^^l.




Business Correspondence. June 4, 1922- June 27, 1922
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00000147/00113
Finding Guide: A Guide to the Thomas E. Will Papers
 Material Information
Title: Business Correspondence. June 4, 1922- June 27, 1922
Series Title: Business Correspondence
Physical Description: Archival
Publication Date: June 4, 1922- June 27, 1922
Physical Location:
Box: 10
Folder: Business Correspondence
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Everglades (Fla.)
Okeechobee, Lake (Fla.)
Okeelanta (Fla.)
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: AA00000147:00113

Table of Contents
    Section
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Section
        Page 3
    Section
        Page 4
    Section
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Section
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Section
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Section
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Section
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Section
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Section
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Section
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Section
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Section
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Section
        Page 33
    Section
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Section
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Section
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Section
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Section
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Section
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Section
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Section
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Section
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Section
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Section
        Page 65
    Section
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Section
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Section
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Section
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Section
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
    Section
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Section
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Section
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Section
        Page 91
        Page 92
    Section
        Page 93
        Page 94
    Section
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
    Section
        Page 98
        Page 99
    Section
        Page 100
    Section
        Page 101
    Section
        Page 102
    Section
        Page 103
        Page 104
Full Text
," *' -?- -- I
L<7 ^L^e _3^ ^~~
















A 7 dA14 .4



--
V^ ^^ e^^^-






Ae^- ,/< U~ ^
ri^fW^^ ^re ^^c^ ci, ^**<^ -t^ -cy ^-fc.< /

r.a^:: ~ ^-^J. ^^^.yt e ^*y^/^ v^.

^l^Lti ^ a~e ^-~-L^--. ^^<^f< ^^^ C^^^^4r^^S^^




y&i^ ^ ^t~I^^-^.C~C ^-i~~c- ^4-^.AZ.L~c ^/^-'^^w^^ ^Ss-'-^^
"r-ta"'! ~ (,"~^(/ ~~ t &k ;i .,S '~;-L







-'"i~oa~uurr ^CO -r- -A T- J-3

Sc/(^C~c^t~; <^z ;< taZ- 7-^ 7__
8---w l^^
4(d~81-- """" ;3"





/(' Z


^ > 7e-'- /--/ 7 _
.,4L ^^ >-^-;- :^-^ ^^: L"'f
^^ ,r-r-e-^-L ^^L- ^-< ^^t^^^^^

-'/Z- ~Z96~A ;t 62~c ~ ; ___

'.^-^^~~ -z--^ yk /c "t^ ^^^<^ ^^



_^ ~ ec s_ _& / 7- y / y < 7 ?-. .^2 ^ '



^^. -7^ ^^- ^<^^;


'2~t~4~Z'2
~X~C-, c J2te4% A I - .-'----
^ ^z^ ^ ^ ^^ '^-- ^-ZL^^' *^ ^'^
--^- A C ^ ^ ^ < ^ ^ t^ -:


^J^? ^ ?~' ^t~-O^$ ,I^ ^ tp^^^J^^^/+ ^^ /-



C; (^J^' I^^^5 -~e, 9~~. ^y' .^^^-^^-L ` ^^.*-- -'
'^.,, rt^^ .^ -^c~~9" ^^ -^ ^iQ^^
^^~e ^^^x .^^ot ^- d/Z- ^-?,^ ^-^^-l.^^
.^ ~ ~ ~ ~ .^.-^^^- ^- ^--^ ^ ^'^^^
^.2- ' 'WlUW^W' ^^z~ GL ...~-.BW^^'^^' _| /-17 PI P




*^y ^" c, .c_,/_7j2 ^ ? ^ > .


-f- - *- vv J
,7 4
*\^ 0 >^---V\ -^-y- .
/ ff


1


7f ~f24A


IrA 6/~~U X-A' I" -~~r-R -
~~t~e~O -e 6--2-~! ---r-~_


. -1.-~-~ 1


"' I Y,


^


*u^,'.


m^4 J4 /-%6-


J)~ /^vrfe ?^ i- -gc~B,,~
/ ^ ^~~ ~ ~~17' ( ^ <











129 S. E. FIRST AVENUE COLUMBIA BUILDING
MIAMI, FLORIDA


MAIN OFFICE:
DETROIT. MICH.
BRANCHES:
PONTIAC
DEARBORN
LORAIN


Dr. R. Kuehn,
Philadelphia, Pa,

Dear Sir:

Nd doubt you know that Miami is drawing nation-wide
attention.' There are many facts you should know about its
marvelous development that you may realize the opportunity it
is presenting and profit thereby.

DO YOU KNOW


t Miami's popuj a n G96 was only 2,i.
t Miami's popu ati n tod 'is 47,930--t-in
greatest perce ta of ease of any ci

Ltle [_nn. S.? Lo eY o t C
t t 'j!2 SLGGo-0 10,o S r bou to n-1
039,,0 ,'-"If a dep aterfaywhail1
4liann the LoslABge^ef ofl Viiia.tlantic C'.d.


c9~ k'


t Mimi is en en P dustrial el4
vhien thous s p opl very State 'j'
te U e ok'- f war
Lt trie r eAlest 8atL r 1nrT9
even m e in e w d--which
attracts other 200,000 tourists yearly?

We-iwill .send. you free "Miami by Picture" including
"City. Map", explaining our "FPfee. Transportation to Miami" upon
receipt of the enclosed card.

Opportunity awaits you in Miami, so mail card--TODAY.

"Meet us in Miami"

S.JOHN A. CAMPBELL ORGANIZATION,
(From the Miami Metropolis, Marcb-4i-9.U)


MIAMI REALTY IS GOOD INVETMI

Da wson, Representing the State of Ohio,
Freely Here.


EX AMINRs
SManager.
d Dollars


Cl.rtin-,trion ..if ia ini ijroperty and
'iluJiI,.in 11.1.:. ih.-- Si.tie Ohio, car-
r ipn' tli liti reri..=- i11,i: ,i-.'la rs invest-
'=r in Mi.ii L'et i.lu, re eived, has
iut-lt b.en male oniiciallv h\ Albert
I)Daw-o., *:hiet e-\..iiinir r thl- state
Iepartienrit of oIii.ercr ..f ( Ihio. .1' i--
Ion of se.curitie,.


Increases Justified
"I assure you," he said today, ".that
I have been agreeably surprised. The
actual increase in values in Miami and
vicinity are astonishing, and they are
justified. I never irne-lti-rated a city
wil.r.-- there is les- inflation than in
Mi ii.i. I IIi l eaiinnedl eight or ten


pieces of property inside the city and
just outside, and find it all good and
just as represented to the Ohio clients.
The report will be made to that effect,
because dollars invested in Miami are
b. :i,-.1 1) re d l .01l ,,.., li.ur.. ...I.
%.tl ri.r-- "


, -


.L .- :b k & .. -


~a/YV








.- o "l *
SI 4
: i- I.
.S

ii -Sut."-k d ,WL. ,,-

S . ..... .u .i s aiU ; s. d '.'. r -y : V-



on i or'n ;trr:.; r i.t .p "bout I y 15,anilnnv : woe. rtn *. ith luhi
eaty on 8cc* CU, ::'-.* h .Vt Jirg-oate. hi)3 syiy.y.

b-.uig: ?"-- --uy it, 1e' -.m '.L y ..a'.y.u : .. . v.. .u
4-15,4-2 4 -1 -.. . i1 ..... . .-27. I y .--. ,liu'
O '.-. .
a ; g "ni n 2: l37.-43.7..f.- 't-.-, 1.. yo .- u i "" .- ". r y i


&uy -l o b.rG tT.a. 1s T.^ poke B RTIT ) I. Ti. .iz ..-U.j -. :.'t" .
lthe a ceis; 1-1. t7, -t lva,-. I-, li
you'rot-h.. 1-L. t ll yo c. 't:.


.li t L i '



iaof ,tle VCHy n. m
0old "K, A ..my-.forcr I S ..-.r .tion o F. i -. I .
landt) bhe" Gl dA_ 1, ad s -..oa d;. ._: wh iAL4 od .-njiL v ,
m kin--. "e j.v e .i. Ft ovr y As I t ,,wo v or
g ,
s 'all got. L iy n :- 5 ici Thu -it: C-...;x :-.83aly iL ;J..2 7 k ,W- K Z.) .- --*; :1
..20,j: Iyt i r...t ol .hu .t e e al L oihus ..tic -. ; T.n -. y i f..
people Ct'.-[ v t :.Le *;'i -"r .Q ,-i .' ny 1" .ea: s-iti-r. q .*.i. A :o-- -':j.qn*
t.LZst bbC --oG tde region Iw 1.ditc isolu!t;lyirjr3tl c1t. '
-v-r- to g:1 th. is. -o^*../ile th..;- lii ; h: 0 out I : vioiy.'y.n-. t-i ne

allitgst to t Gehw : t g..t n'c.y t An.t. i.'t-, A,. s? I I;,..v th ~; no!. h n...
-o tt region,



No ,I yantto t .ll you fv r i .lyYOU :3-i:LTt _'JT .OT Q',_'t GPt,! *T:': bt i k




0.E"IndZ.1.* s-^ tV.Qt..nc i.^ too si la-lt. 'h.o uiffi c tico l .-t' .i. L. ,.. {
forth are g s yetinsa -ra ale. to t i e h.-'ri: roc .: .e--t ,- e'- ,- t .o
aotll. :. sto d. t.:'e j"il ; :: ,'; ti suoh i, thi'l.g. A' ,IL c h .vN a 1,31 Q" F i-a. c
i-rea -ut 'b a o- ." -'V I. T.;U. fc. n I :L t-i l3. (- ?h ,vct. ~ ,- t.- tun..
icow so tlw ng9 GItRrC.e''( Lt.fr c ch-; Lilli coiius over : vot;.k, e-, y bdo :.I ..TiyC t




toaveen foo t often ani too sh.l


fiorh are il t-s T.tOi cantray. .a t.ci.lte iMhR.',L F.'J.L. ootIy, Oneb t
dpeh noit.-t should .e&c f wo di- .'1 ;n.lins-ha t:Iu .. -"Ki; hv at -d!. i "t r ti '' t ,i






3Elpqble-n-e: catough jrt h. T- a lli, ga'o
St ot J. .C. f c y i0 a .i.ll g E. s hl
: Agan ,Gewistc andlr Oat f:io Irf" I 4'T4iP3lWtE P )i, 'in
-hWa32 :-in th-e- TRVU c. t:ti. "0 t.ttn uPI4 VR.4 IJ~al4ITiO oonntr. 0nrle



Againrtheso two po-tatA: J; Y.X.JIg f :2 p.vo F4iq. 4rne0,L'" kool Ian.tA st!Lt., -tYf
IP~~~~~~~~~~ .4..".L~:t~; ;-.;- F'. E~i U




fber' 8r_ snt; and
-:-,--WSW
S, -ata.ti."n without roppreontatitn is tyitaeny, and the
Right of representation in the logislaturo is ineatimable t% th'.

people, and formidable to tyrants fnl:., and

WHEREAS, in the dawn of the trntieth century, ani under the
stare and stripes, the people ,'" the Philippi~"e Islaerda and of the

District 'f Oolumbia, though wvid-y separatod in space, are irti-
mately connewted in a commonn hardship. nnaely, the dentnl t- both

of liberties a" old as aagna Charta.; and

iTEREAS, roeintprnce, t) tyrants is 'odLienc't tc @od, aind they
who woild be free themselves mast atri'e the bl-w, there r'- !, it

RESOLVED, that we heroby respoc 'fully 'rat most earnest..y call
to the attention if the Amcrierm Con roe and poopl3 the stat of

poli.-ial bcndago and vassal.in in whi.h the inbabitants of the

Philippine Islands and the District of COlumlia now exist;

RESOLVED, tiat we remind our IAmeritLo bhr-thren that the words
of Linoln -re still true, and that those wh. dony lierety to
o others do net deserTePtt frr themselves, ar', under a juaf God,

they cannot lorg retain it;

RESOLVED, that wn a rddMu the sympathetio consideration
of all lovers of human freedc- the logicle ton now pendGl" in

C ongress .lookIng to the abolition of political sla-ery both in the
:Philippines and the Federal Distrie.t, and that we ,rgu upon all the

fullest lo-operation and assistance in the .,n~tment of suoh

legislation, to the end that politioal-and -coratitutional liberty

in Ameri a may be indeed a reality and n"' a protense, -s f that

government rf the people, fnr tho pe."ple, by tho p. ple elAl.. nre

perish from the earth.
* 000Oc.-

nD -anO aly-paaaed, Ly the -PeWple0 Churd. of
Washington, D;C., 'un.l"6, 1912,


*iTOS. wIaL,
; "Pros ident.


-. .-- ;.




-. .- .- . .--' C . ... ....
4 2'.


--lr l ... .. C

n ..




j.-- 'o a td.. .- ... x i ... l, -- -

A .JI L i'- 1' --. "ai :l 0, ?I N p







A" g a. n- t-_" ... . ..! .S. I .- e .. .. .^ .,- . .
-r t zL.7? 2 i 3. a i g i
- o )1'(pl V- a--' ot f .' 3' G TUi- *; i eh y1. A : ... . ... .: 1 ..-. .. .



s .gs bt 7ic u i -L3oi: ; i n ti .n ->- &''. ; r -(iu 1.;.a; t h'ij
:. -S...aL u .. v w- -n g- r q, uL 1ti ..C f r ,s ..c .i'7! lA I, *i. '. . : -
:E bX'yt' t ; i r? t h e a s 't 8 t b - i.





.- t J c.. . :. 1- I. :'l-1 .
I "~.. - .. 4lf

_his tbr.oupihg p.r l we sb ll h"V? nU N): ,., 1ni-...- .- 3T 2E2 7 .';: 11

A .-. t1 Gtl ::_: i .3 .t. ,- ;1 c... 1 ji.2 .; , ... L ... '- -
l J_'rC- Pi.'cd L. t]h,'.! t .3iL i c .. .U.cty g, l *;d *.. ti f :, '. t i -l 1 is




IoSt -q s i:'.e. a j r ,%. 1 .- t r.

S tho .-l t-i.t-e oit..le iLfrt be .an -.. -ro.. i -. bt ai ':, *i gaor


.e t the O l u ei- c-u .....: "l .- " "t- .. ^.. . "-,n.. .h,,
t!2rln Dreslnes D
+-".< i n 't ,o.,? .L-"i-:e i nreo..- 7 n? it. r c,


out c'. (l.e tr k. Truok .-r t"e.lmean .-l :7,;v d,',, a 1. I ..t: ,th ..-. hoilT ,
:0, a s1 7w- r-1 T4 -?g-L G.4caci o I,,l.cj. ';1 1... Ihx.7, I:v: Asn
iho..3JiLnes oi '','e F. ;_!.d Wo- .k :: mess efi iJk
SAg r 3: :, C .i hot ". i.,- 'T.:.l. --: i *:. .,- : ,
yatov i. Ltt.b; bT.. n. rnI. t 1be t Wu ts& o 0.lv i& 0 e- .t .-:; 'lt .
jLot the Okqeliatf. c. I itry h^'o eIT I o utieblt .1i:n, ?e h.s o'! p.' ott1 -
- U.O+iW ^ TS.v. IC,, L?.,J :Pcbc. t S),: ., t,;t;. D ;-oh .Po ,'.s jOli. "hp.tgts


F.
Sdow, iaxtxQmorp ... tt,.li ie J-.t;anoe is. .. risar. a -,-.% L au.-c ".aiort i .ra i -w
t'cb4 yeT^ t." rt^. a-t "1, ..i fLl"f.t" i" J t l" rrrtnat E0.
WW- .t*LU .t1nti 1ial ,,i yoGu w o :..., 3 of ..he 1 't e : "- :.A 1i o.rt _.1ylv
di q o e r th t y PA LU j g EAn33 I oq-t l.ngs am...
m Tnlite a-rsat ni. t1jat is t- the other eadcrlgfhw 3J Ait Uun t a
T W. -E X g 7 H IL E 8 to


rl





R. EAS, taxation without reproe ntati=n is tyranny, and.the

right of representation in the logislaturo is inestimable to th.3
| people, and formidable to tyrants nl:,;. and

WHEREAS, in the dawn of the tvwntieth centuryy an:- under the
Stars and stripes, the people -' the Philippire Islards and of the

SDietrict r.f Columbia, though "id-'ly separated in space, are irti-
-mately ionnsoted in a common hardship) namely, the denial to both

of liberties aB old as Uagna Charta; and
\7Z31EAS, roaeitr..ncn to tyrants is m'odienc' tc Rod, and they

7ho would. be free themselves muct stri'ie the blw, therefar' !-, it

RESOLVED, that we herobs rspec fully 'rut most earnest.:y call

to the attention, :f the Amcrican Congross and poopJ- the stat., of

pol' ir.nal bondago and 7aasalE&ia in Mich the inhabitants of the

Philippine IslandA and the District of Olumi-la nom exist;

RESOLVED, that we romLnd oui' Amerirto br-thren that tho words
of Lincoln -re still true, and that those whn dnny lieerLy to

theree do net deer e .t frr themselves, arv, under a juvt God,
r--
they cannot lon, retain it;

RESOLVt.D, that we granddt the sympathetic tonsidemtion
of all lovers of human freedom the logirle Lon ne pendiT in

Congress looking to the abolition of political alavery both in the
S Pllippines and the Federal Distrint, and that we "'rgo tipln all the
H. fullest co-operation and assistance in the )naatment of uoh

legislation, to the end that politioaland -oonatdtutional liberty

in Amerioa may be indeed a reality and n'. a protenee, -e d that
government rf the people, for tho pe-.plo, by tho p. spie sal~.. nre

perish from the earth.
S00ooOc'

S eMn? ous1ly -pased, l*y the _Pewp.a s-Churn2 of
Wasehington, D.O., J:unr-l8, 1912,

THOSE. E. NWILL
Pros dent.

... "





, !'' "* . . .. .. '- '. .- '..- ;.- -" .- "- ", ' '
S* '7 .. .'
-.. -.

r!.. j ,
Vill

o.N.(C) A D '.A

W i'ti: .CT'ix or- t naor nt- i r. 7 .; ', .":;'. "i i :.,v,;,,,--- .. ....... ,L,-, 4 /;



F'ii's
Jr 1 .. .' f L rf 1
'. t ,Z %-I .,.- .f- t -t .. .a ,
-;-;- . ..- i jo L0 d y "c r - ,- - "


.a .. . ... -.



W n -t 1 -1" -. ILL. _! Ji
"- "- .-.. ;" ". -... .. .- .- ."- '' " "- .. . -- .





O m ,,_I iz _y .-,, ,. t :- -


; 4
-^ ^ 3 -.- n--'
S 1JA4'4 .-




-O':' ". ,--C, ~-. :' , -- ;-,- *- . .. .... t..











BESOL~UlIONS ON SELF-0OVERN MEf
IN
THE PHILIPPINES AID THE DISTRICT OF OOLUUBIA

SHEREAS, the passion for froodom in the human breast ai divlno

and- inr-extigui hable; and

SHEREAS, all men ar> created equal, and aro. ondowe by thfir r

Orator vith certain ULta~ia .ble rights unong which are litf-

liberty and the pursuit of happineoe; and

SWHIEREAS, no man is good enough to govern an other .ith._ut tho

Svther' consent; and

WHEREAS, taxation without ropr~-~enitattn is tyranny, ani the
Right ^f representation in the logislaturo is inestimable tn th,'

People, and formldablo t- Ltrants lnl.,; and

E WHEREAS, in the dawn of the twentieth century an-n under the
stare and stripes, the people -i' the Philippllne Islard and of the

District rof Oolumbia, though vid-ly separated in space, are inti-

mately oonneaoted in a common hardships nanely, the denial t- both

of liberties aT old as Hagna Charta; and

'.I ":SREAS, rosiLtrice t6 tyrants is dodieno# tc fod, and they
:. awho wou2d be free themselves must atri.'t: the bl'w, therefr- -, it

RESOLVED, that wo herobs rqspoctfully but most earnestly mail
to the attention if the Amcricrn COongrose and poopl3 the stat-. of

Spoli:'ral bcidago and vaesalavrn in tr1ioh the inhabitants of tho

Philippine Islands and the District of COlumlia now exist;
R-- RESOLVED, that we remind our Amer~la; br-thren that the words

"f Lincoln -re still true, and that those wh" dnny liberty to

"| othrse do net deserve it fer themselves, ard, under a juef Got,

- they cannot lonr retain it;

SRESOLVD, that wo I achndtn the sympathetiL oonmideration

of a11 lovers of human freedoL the logirle ion new pendiT in

SCongres. looking to the abolition of political slavery both in the
: -- ..


















y1Y ) - .
*r.: i No R E -1 !:

14- ut ne It is Ui t- ]-"4'










1i lot Io ]t.!t.B-or itat j onm te .1
:'-

































3i.) lwa-tr Ae yIYJ r .7 averes. I t .2t zid.ng
in :





















ki* 4 -ty voted r"u J ."--A- .:., .Ihr* o .b.- :
t h e o- e tr. nrtth Zo o bt4 ih .n t.Ehe 11,w 1o c'
.oat i.u shobnidr .-r.r aeeit .ey t t +--L Gren.s
) U.. .al; ..s t .r._lga L w .tor i ',, i. I .e 1 t '
this k.pq, Rl Br-n:.i. u 1 y r vote d r. o En 1 'hr; t : y: --

dt.o ..L Go* rl1 iw:Loh ao~rlrinct the rP I' wra.li" ..i r i' d t
R 'lade i bllue should r3aco -reiot siy tr. ih.t t.b G'~ t' by een- .. .,,:

t ) om i R ,. with .'Ah t Eihtt. i .- "p h- ...- -.F






11 r yr!t -c. 13.-- 0ip hi Tit a t l' -,,ily
RIs. :-A T i ien .r- o eing ty "i rr tr+ :fl n-t0h- c>:'- I h. 1 _14 -%- l w lp



An elegant R1.ts1 bo t roe romL Aeil Z2nal1:, R&T^1 B^ .- ... f.mmAn
do .:- go. iO ttl-i: ?ood. to oira r.ou'- tR .. i ,e ,--1 .. t --a. T'.,
Glotne.:I s 1i 3 bsii oomr.,no ih wt31'.t itr t uPrpl.-.'. biy .*dr,. .n.;,,t -g. l.' -, -


ei nws.ioat ..9..m But -r f z. -l ti;a .- "s- area. ... .,
i )c w;,+,:.t-o Pt.o ,. hq 3r cwr?-"1 oc..iFy. Plvof h < rc-.r ( nA p Q: J-,-^., -s .-* ..1


iLa, Th 1 i-ar, no ~ lin? 5 y x foin c "E i o-r Thhi c;jJrn2 *hWu;" ^-pi*ILs ^o-o t^. .*






S~VW. and' y.1 3l~ 1;t.hofto-r tt;zLroct to J.1 t ,,.lg, OCnl1 ~a _t;it ,tT t. ,. will
iha ethe ir &r. Iri anowr buing bu.itrewy for win't.r use
I Se ?lir oaaintJ ; sii ycn,r3" fror-Ly co.n-'E -+**?-or ( '.. ?,-^ +) ^;-- "ie




.M, taaraEtion without roprocwntatt-)in yrafnny, anl the
right f representation in the legislature is inestimable tm th'-

people, and formidable to tyrants mnl ; and

WHEREAS, in the dawn of the tmentieth century an-1 undAr the
stars and stripes, the people i' the Philippn Ielsdar and If the

Dietriet of Oolumbia, though rld!d3y separatod In apace, arP inti-

mately fonnerted in a rrmmon hardships nm:ely, the denV.1l t- both

of liberties a.- old as Iagna Clarta; and

171SREAS, roaiotcr.nc tm tyrants is *'odiene tc %od, ai.d they
who' woxild be free theneelves na.st atri'-3 the bl-w, ther.fr" r!- it

REOLVED, that we herobl'. rsipoctfully rut moist oarntest.y cali
to the attenti-:rn f the Amcric.-. .f'ngroes and porop: the stat of.

pll.teial bc'ndago and a assalcr in v.iech the inhabitar.ts if thn

Philippine Islands and the District *f OCluwi~ra new exist;

RESOLVED, that we remind u* .n- IzrLoal i b hr-thre that the wrds
Uf Lincoln re still true, and that those wh. don, li.erLty to
S .thers do nc. deserve .t frr themselves, ari, under a jusf Giod

they cannot lor.m retain it;

RESOLV"D, that w Iarnr4bto the sympathBtio consideration

of all lovers of human freedc. the logirle Lon now penzdi7 in

Congress looking to tihe aboliti-s of political aBl&very 'both in thP
Philippines and the Federal District, and that we -"Igu 'UpPn all the

fullest co-operation and assistance in the uniatment of suoh
legislation, to the end that politioal-~amd.-oonatiutitonal liberty

in Ameriea may be indeed a reality and n"'. a pretense, "ni that

government rf the people, f-r the peaplP, by tho p..ple sl-l, n-.

perish from the earth.
oooOc "

nan! n aaly-paaaed, bty the ?',p. -ChuroL ofA
WaOBhiZngton, DeC., Jafl.12 1982,


THOSE, E. WIrL,
Pro ident.


.li---; -


'''








S--. -.so






lan'.l r.he~n dr-Lnerwill .t-ri.,?-,nG:ea.. I .nl.n,

Agai3,tlle gre3st. 3crso'Kca c'N PiX.t bn.l.i' bd.nbt.t .h r.in Ia? .
d.Ie. ,T Yrild. Ut fIwr ct- ya c,{o. Thy 'I sr .iU dtxr^ hs e 'ray -o di .:1
Shey oc.' r.at .t rs Ec. -.^l. norf o g :oh b -- ', .... ;- d
tIoSe scLUth t!he '- o v r.:rb' ;er fZ -xi.ct:: bQ L'tie A : -ai n t.3
O a 'thi IIn b" ri, g -h.- .. .i- t.. l t':. ... .h . t...t....... . I a"
workl1.ipon pD.af- t.o gst .1 eof'eso e".tt'L. i.a:to t:.e Oteel.4 ::.emuntrr bt1h-t
we a .n h.ct i d .'-,andfed th3 on sh!-.Q-1 s1 I .IUitcPst.jz't:t2 .,. 3-:.'9 vi tin
3 to 4 mos, or finish' da c' T-'.- ".:- 5Ys 'Wf 1 r -2.t : -it 'to n .i W 'r"-'-
a n st.e r:. ,hut !M :;t ac P: ...d, g "-a ,." i'* m h 7... 1 i, lent 'aS .uL. :j,
n -eo .so;. Ski .... 3_ sc ,- i:! ;ePson .ai4. g .-r -- .~ : t- -:" r -
see .s ,blt juri:7s 'a"b t 3sh. : -:; 3 !-f .tJ:.V- .,L,


-'23 z Or a. olf:uie,-ily cfTl ch.:-ly bk. ,! jaito fl.- e "f .3 ,ei .p

-done. 1; 'i ts 3s 'tt ,, y '," e: A. tain 2 'J:.L ..;:. 2: no :n .o:fei:g eZ-
4.07.if,- LA4" L.:'


pr-PQVlnmj It'1pC et o

b' oterqr, oD V i 1l nd. :3et- :L .
h --- ourth 11 i ash .n -fu .t yia' ai$ : :. -nrCer: t. 23
PronL .... s, .-),.l-' i Cone tc 0.-0
a^T--K~3"l i -L^^.it; '. ^i S i.ol o~~n' i jioy ci-u* (
de 0-


- GintC1steLd.-thereo -i- ingi.t1t.; oa 4 be AJiuiA..I. -

.onl he- t cor .eu -- uh:. y.: Ji..' i .L.....


.2 ~ is

4.


incorCly yirc? -


* .
&.:* ?-


!L



I:L
.-.)


I
.2

*':


.,"4


Ap -










r .1 -

RESOLUTIONS ON SELF-GCOVERIRMEa
IN
r THE PHILIPPINES AND THE DISTRICT OF OOLUIBIA
WEEREAS, the paselon for froodom in the human breast La dJLVno

and in-esti1giacdajhable; and

WHEREAS, all men ar> created equal, and aro ondowec by thetr

Oreator with certain tna~ ina.e b.le rights umong which are lift)-

liberty and the pursuit, of happiness; and

WHEREAS, no man is good enough to govern another u.ithbut the

mther's consent; and

WHEREAS, taxation without roprae.-ntation is tyranny, ani the
right "f representation in the legislature is inestimable t th-'

people, and formidable t-o Lyrants nnl.; and

WHEREAS, in the dawr. of the trwntieth ientur'y, ani under the
stare and stripes, the people -X'r the Fhilipine Islards and of the

District rf Oolumbia, though vid-ly separated in space, are ir.ti-

mately nonnooted in a common hardship; namely, the dennal t- both

Of liberties a" old as Uagna Charta; and

7H13REAS, roeitrlnce to tyrants is rhodience tc od., and they
7ho would be free themselves must stri:.e the bl'w, therc-f )r? t, it

RESOLVED, that we herob, raspec cflly rut most earnest."y eall

to the attention :f the Americer. 0,'ngrose and poopi. the stat.- of

pnll:inal bondago and 'aessalan in %vich the inhabitants of thn

Philippine Islands and. the District of Olumzba now exist;

RESOLVED, that we remind our .Amriloi; br-thren that hoe words
of Lincoln :.re still true, and that those wh.- dony: liberty to

Others do not deserve tt frr themselves, and, under a juet God,

they cannot long retain it;

RESOLVED, that wo anhfld4t B the sympathbtio consideration

6f all lovers of human freedo- the logirje ion naw pendit r in

~ k ogSre e 1Loo9f6g to the. gbofitinn of political slavery both in the









S. ...-.- -
.,. a A l s'f"f:, r,' ai-


Pe G 24ri-ie 8t


.' . # ... ... o .3 .-4

0 n,. L, :t':

.J t p t i. a --..a' -* *."4J A 4 .4'J a &



ot0 .' s .. r .... a "




'f : it ,4-. .- : .0 ". .1 ir t .- .^ .,o.-
j ar ts ir o
tigucr3 Tb .1 C .1 LT t n'o1
"U "f"l- .. ...AI +-r t n j

Roc.k D, -- l.l 3 O b'n o .'.i l.J. rn '"'t"
ec AT:.r ..o ". &, : '." m-;,. .-. ".3 .-- .
voY;yrnlf.ll it. al04-, 3 *l2 TrI -,Ir o/itr flis 0- 1




aj y ,^ I- ^ 'se 3
T C ,u.;ubi-..:. : e..


2.:Lc '- r." y._ nr.r
Q.'.lll 3ai~ ~jl Tl~le~rS~~f
'.-rcl

.~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~L of..a iIM, t--s..... ..-- ? -.: .rm..




- . . .... . . .
. .





RESOLUTIONS ON SELF-GOVERE2INT
IN
THE PHILIPPINES AND THE DISTRICT OF COtULHIA

WHEREAS, the passion for froodom in the human breast is divino

and in-exti~nguiable; and

WEEREAS, ac men ar e orated equal, and aro ondowec by thbpir

COreator vith certain inamlJnable rights imong which are lifs;

liberty and the pursuit of happinese; and

WHEREAS, no man io good enough tn govern another vit~hut the

other's consent; a ,

WHEREAS, taxation without ropr-meantmati-n is tyranny, and the

right ^f representatlor in the logislaturo is inestimable tm th:-

people, and formidable t, tyrants nl::;, and

WHEREAS, in the dawn of the twfitieth centuryy, an' undar the






2>'1
Z7- -.. /
r


-I


A
i L'v+C cD.. ,
ei a.r, e ->1 /r-}', "- .-


V t t. h. cos.fi- g_ 'O- o , ,,i.. t, aT5 h 0 oTh tC yaa

v ^ , -- .uJ2t:I X s -
,.i' a r ; e j u .1w ,'- )- .' I 7' t ..1 .Y.'

"-L "'i.. .I. P .:-. "I. ... YOM1...r.. ,,3) ... m i,
I 'k"l- 0 .10Z ..

Ce '' .0o T .n .,
sIu have tteutt 0T IU 0 te



. 7 .i .ti n --- .. . 'r *. c f - -. - , -. .. ...
E ,Ci g. P , .,r . .:
-a c.



s m... .' s !d *
BPI. '. Off -

a ll t!i_..t ; . c. c., ';t; a -,.t QL ,
g- i -, a -:- .tt e n..ti w i tr-'- '. r tI h: a. 1i-''t '- 1.; ltcl t L-t r g


ai t l U O L C C P f w rr n TTr -.pr w ,- r r..-.' . U"L" . . ..
B a : 'J- , i ') y u.u "i - l'.' tI1 -,- u 9 a et !J ; 1' --i 1 78 C n Ill .
1 1 g l ant Av t e n fl o 1 4 r. Itl. t kIot r b .t Ltit

rq.eed ,to Flex% o n That land0' TaV
i t h e i riittyb e C t rywp L'y.b I I r t r o" e n k b tl osq S ei
Sthe ilrdsnle w would gS0 The deal toe ro1lcn Per o 1,.r
'\ 1 Pe


Liu.:Ii.Ptle,i i3 76-4-y.20








St-


adapted to break tbe wild lni.il :ovceredi
with it forest of wild growth b sha:o -
sumed time Learning what t., ra.'te
and when alid-rlhov to raise it has taken
more time. Transportariicn ys.tem-
have had t, be developed, and little
comimunitles. whose numbler- might he!p


eacll other, have had ti Ie., built tup
Even yet-for the farmer has been the
iLeglected step-ehild of our -ystem-
adequate price-fixiug and m.rketina
systems for farmers generally. ilu nl i g
those in the 'Glades, still await the
action of a tardy Government. and a
farmers' banking system, established a
year ago, is not yet fully operative.
Notwithltanding all this. 'GIlades
farm g is under way Not only pA.te-hes
but fields are being cultivated, aud.
aiictiial re-ult.; accomplished. Re.ords
of many of these have recenttly heeni o.il-
lated, embodied in affidavit form, -inu-
el, sworu to. aud tiled for reiadrl refer
ence. F-llowing are -yncpsi- pulli-.
ed in the Fiort Lauderdale Senitneal for
J.une 29, 1917 :


WHAT THE EVERGLADES
HAVE PRODUCED


It is no longer a moott- i que-tion int
this part of Florila wlhetrhe r on t thel
muck soil of the Ev-rg-l:,ierwill gro,:w
crops.
The worst knocker il the w-rlid Ibe-
com,:s an Everglarle looster when otnc-e
he examines the 'glade- muck anbi a'-
tually sees the cropsr grow. S.eln i- be-
lieving with the re;l farmer.
But what the Everglades f,.rmInir likes
better than Qeeing-the er',-ip grow is the
harvest of "the greeni that'; long" and
here the Sentinel furnishes it- readers
a few c:ci create examples of the harvest
the reports of which were compiled by
a prominert residletit of Ft. Lauderdale.
ianrd b.:ackedl by adfidavitslin his posses.-
iun --[Ed.]
hOne' Everglades farmer after losing
t~-'o crops, one from inadequate drain-
age and one from the extreme cold of
S last winter, planted eight acres of Irish


*-.*I-1. ii CL triLi.LiV pIt )-II,. I ,IUiii UC"iLILCt
jeaon. The health. of his entire family about accepting $20)0 jper acre for ilis
is excellent This farmer thinks that land, and then only to Ibuy more.
Sthe hog indu-try, with cattle and forage Another farmer has five acres set in
crop-, oue of the best paying :of the grapefruit. The trees are three years
e, mingm industries of the Everglades. old and some of them are 14 inches in
He says-the fertility of the soil is l.eyr:Iod circumference and 14 feet high. He
question. This farmer paid $5'l per believes this is the only -oil for citru-
Sacre for his land and ha.. refused $250 .fruit. This farmer planted on' alld .a
Super acre for It. Half acres in cabbage which scld for
Another man on 30 acres of land for about $S*i-i. fin a 1.,' acre field be haIn
whbch he paid $65 per acre, planted it gr tw o two crcp. beans and paoatoe-.d.
to Irish potatoes. obtained a yield of The third'erop, potatoes, isnow growing
S8.00(: bushelk. which netted him suffici- with *.:.rn planted between the rows-
ert to pay fr the land. clearing ex- which will make cr.op No for thi.
perns-es. breaking the soil. and putting it land thi snoanu. Off a4 ,.f an acre of
in- shape to plant, seed, cultivtiion, IrilI p.r'tatoes h obtained l I0 l .usbels
harvesting. hampers and marketing, and from less than acre obtained 6c S
and he had left Ietween $2,000 aud buhln el-. Bean yielded il 1.tl haniper'
S$2.10i0. He fed the cull potatoes to to 11- acre', -elling t atn average of
hog'. of whioh he possesses ahout 2100. $1 401 a hamper. This farmer believes
Ou 43 acre- he has planted corn for a -..il will produce anything planted and
rilimlmer orop that is niw about 1 feet he raised for this own use every kn.:niw
high. e'timarted yield from mS to 100 common variety of garden truck.
tuliel per acre. Another man from 2 ac:-re breans oh-
Anothi.r farmer wbo came here from tainced l .125 w',.rth: 3;1, ar-re potatoes
O(klahojmat, ha' 5 acre' rented at $. per yielid.-d (I 2 I .ushel-., -eoliirl at $2.40-
lc:re.; half acre ...if e-lery yieide.d 3:li average: acrer l p:ratioes., planted with
c.rate'. netting Iim aliout 711 ceut- der rp.:i r s., C:at ,; oroe acre ield.il. 12.., buushel f lt n.z abu t $1 1n per ni.: 3 acres esti-
potat-',es which be .so!d at an average if nautd yield pr-.tatie 375.i bu.. averaginL
$2..'.0 per bus.hel. Has third cr...p crf $1..i" per hamper. Dry weather and
Iw'irn and thinks the soil m.,re' fertile ,...dl redir:4-.1 yield. From a nacre callh-
tllan il Ikla;iio.ma. Hogi. -covw. mules bage soll .$i20dl worth, 3ij acre celery
anil chie'kLtus h.o as well as in Oklahoma. obtalit.-il 341i .?rates, selling 242 crates
AnrhilEr farmer plantled a fir:t croip ar $1.27 and 10 ; at 72 cents. At present
of pot.atie-' wlhi;h w-a cut ishrt by the time thi_ farmer has 11 hog.s, 10 head
,cbid but fr...mn which he Liaree-,tl-d 35!." cattle and Ir:n horse which feed on wild
lampers- and sdlil them at an average gras- native t., the 'Glades.' He also
price :f '22311 a hamper He- al:o hail plants corn., millet and natal grass for
4 acres of c-rplant which yielded 40i feed. Has tel( acre- curn planted ion
cr,:.tes. averaging $125 a crate. Oine landrd from which two iropep of potatue-
aorre o:f beauis yielded 1i51 hampe-rz; and itave liecu gathered. Keep- from 20 to.,
,ldi f...r $1.2'5 a hamper 4Oine acre .f 100 chickens. Eleven members to, fat.
peas danmager i ly .-ild pr.odue l only ily: health good; believes a man canl
50 hampers whibh he sold fi'r '2 150 a support and rai-e a grid size. family
hamper. Second crop, 13 ncres of-po- ou a smaller acreage in the Evergladi-
tatoes yielded 1.6OiW l.u-iels which sold than he cau iu the. northern state',
for 41.40 a hamper and one acre celery. land most assuredly live more c.omfor-
4010 crates, whic-h IJ'r.t; net. 75 cents a tably.-Editor. i
crate. Thi.r'crop, 15 acres corn grow- Another man own? 1)0i ac-re, for
ini. tfie. Farmer says land is fertile whieh he paid from $30 to $.P per acre.
and prr.durtire and l.?obody would at- 'Raised all kinds of vegetable and for*
tempt to: deny it whbe they see the crops. age.-. Main crop tbis .ar was potatoes
Another mani from total acreage plant- -19 acres yielded better than 1,000 bu.,


K -. t.i . - -


j


I


7-,. ." . - "" : .. ; ,'..,


in family. 6 b ai cid-.1 girl', all Lij..d
beaith. Ons .l.lc;s, Icow and horse.
about 7I chickens. 17 turkeys and 6
ducks and all do well, especially the
turkeys Would not take less than
$20I per acre for his home place.
(ne ao'mmission man operating in and
arn.dul Ft Lauderdale during the 1916-
1017 shipping season, handed for
Evrrgladlc farmers approximately 72-
264 packages of vegetables, consisting
of peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, cauli-
fiowerc. lettuce, cabbage, turnips, rad-
ihe-, Irish potatoes, celery, romaine,
.qjua-h. Ibeets, carrots, peas. bananas.
beans, etl., for which he returned to
the *';iaile- farmers $120,204.91. This
commission merchant believes he
handled al.but 50 per cent of the vege-
table -hbippedl from this section of the
Evertiadle-.


THE OKEELANTA-
FRUITCREST DISTRICT

The One Successful Settlement in the
Upper 'Glades.

I FlT'ITCli-ENT--The T n.tr-:i"-i Pi..
positiihli for --etr!le-.im t a dll ,.-. ,i ..p-
mert. cr,,upis uacil orrcanize.- I uyer-.
Corl.ni .iies o... .r,.tiic \itli iil, viiual
actiou. M ccriity.-cmin i itih tr.cinlr-- acil
maichici.ry. Ic-nl- ihI pi..'un-.riri-c 4 Sell-.
land at -acirrifice ilrices.
II. NEW i.iKEEL.\NTA-The UppIer
'i .ie ted f'] r<. ---State Rutcil r.iad anld at
fork ;of a.I-ilreld ('cr--Srtte RH:k Roacd
from Palm Beanb to Ft. Myers. C(o.m-
pri-es, St..re. P'ot OIffie. Hotel, Boaril-
Ilig H.. use, uwn Hall. Barlcer Shop,
Bake Sh.-p. Nta ry's Otliine. School, Sun-
ilay S.i-.,li i., C-ooperati've A.ssoilatiuu,
('ood Times Club, two- Develoiumert ( 'r-
ganizations, etc. Cit.rer of thriving
farming community. The "'One Bright
Spot" between Ft. Lauderdale and Luke
Okeecboblee. Address
S THOSE. E. WILL,
Ft. Lauderdale and Okeelanta, Fla.









.()J Qt i I s0j 1~ tte ) "aw a ,- y a "n- .. g a' n o n 4e n 5h.

T ..t. le vz :-.p $ C o rfl<.ti-roi gh & o-t l+r- 16"O .-Ooo1. B c -
..l2--,.:0 b : g.t ...: to
auv rE c. a rez3r,
P'l-, J13 '. f-. 4 -.



rfro ops- Lcwu..tr Pac Y c 2?1o vr t LU 2r eorv



- "to- U't -- -. -
;h'w: .t72a^ t .I '--^gc^. with-i ______

,.- n .c L 0.r f;. u R ttl..-v,,:. . .
;i1 La ae
:tr '2r ctTelnucas a-t c. T.

- -ul b. .. t -, it- -, i





- o. .. t- b ., a .*. . .. _. -, r -
i! .. j A. a-- l ip.t t .m-a P fl .p '-, i ;'7 p1 K 2-2 t-z


...i j r .. r ~~s t hi, .. 4 oci p
... .-.
. . - -P L+ w h ,'. , 3c ) , ., e,, l a .. ... -. L







Ast -, V r .. ..., .- 71- d, - ..,. n" -,,


c .. b. C Ll .- b

Lb-. *i : .. Q,_, n r-: -,,L .. .
-.-.F' : '1 .0 . -! .-d






SO ., h p V S b .. , ... 2,
hr -c *JP, ';, ,'- k.. . - 4 ,ot, ,.
"--1" +Z .+ i i. ,-k. C--,-
2 it"U 7 ewr o ti a


B u t .T ,' .
Shcr mu <, -". 4 U -. o t G ll :

da.Corp f;"L
b t, *& w .i 4 -


:L'bl O bc... i i s 1 ~ a v. *% .. ; c



t-w





a a fourth crop for the per colony per year. Would heit:ate
Tol-find andl finance the machinlery best "neaon T'he health o:f his entire family about accepting $2(;0 per acre fo:r his
adapted to break the wild land cov.red is excellrt. This farmer thinks that land. an] then only to buy more.
*with a forest of wild growth ha-y-1,on- the h,:g industry. with cattle and f'urage Another farmer has dure acres 'et in
sumed time. Learninga what t:r raie crops. one of .the best paying of rhe grapefruit. The trees are three years
and when and hown to rai-e it ha-, taken coming industries of the Everglades old and some of them are 14 inches in
more time. Transpor:rati, il systems He says the fertility of the soil is beyond circumference and 14 feet high He
have hadl tio Ie leveliped. aud little question. This farmer paid $SO per belieres this i. the unly s-.il for u.itrus
'-immunities, who5e numilers might help acre for his land and has refused $250 fruit. This farmer pl.ltedi one ain. a
each other, have hal to: be I.uilt tip. per acre for It. half acres in cabiiage which soll fur
Even yet-for the farmer h.is hlien the Another maln on 30 acres of land for about .$SOO. COn a 1, acere field he ha'
neglected .step-child of our system- whlch he paid $65 per acre, planted-it grown two crop. beans and potartes.
adequate price-rixing and mrarketina to Irish pntatoes. obtained a yield of The third crup. potatug-. is now growing
systems for farmers generally. including S.11'.1 bushels, which netted him suffici- with corn planted lietween the r.:ws
those in the 'Glades, still await the eat to pay f..r the land. clearing ex- whi-b will make i rop No. 4 for this
action of a tardy rGovernment. and a peuses, breaking the soil. andi putting it loaad this snasio. Off 3' of an are of
farmers' banking system, e;tablishedi a in shape to plant, seed, iultirtin Irih poitt.e_ he l oibtaillle 160 bushels
year ago. is.not yt fully operative. harvesting, hampers and marketing, anid from less lhan 2 acre ol'tailjed] 6S
Notwithstanding all this. 'Glades and he had left between $2,001.1 arid lui-hels. Beans yielded 300 hampers
farrmin- is under way. Not only patcheb $2.1l00 He fed the cull p.taitoes to to 1 2 acrps. selling at ia average of
but fields are heing cultivated, and hogs, of which he poi.esiese- about 210. $1.40. a hamper. This farmer believes
actual results accomplished "Re,,o.rds Ou 43 acnre- lie has planted corn for a soil will pruilu.?c anythllg planted anll
of many of thee hare recently bIeen cil- summer cro.p that is n.ow about 10) feet he raised for his own use every known
late, embodied in affidavit form. sign- lighi. estimated yield from ~i0 to 100 commonin variety of garden truck.
ed, sworu to. and nilet for ready refer- bushel per acre. Anu.ther iaan from .i arre beaus ,li,-
ence. Following are synop't- publis- Ano.ther farmer who came here from tainei .1l-'S worth: 31_ a(.e' paratles
ed. in the Fort Laiderdale Sentin- l fi..r ('klahl.ma. has 5 acres rented at $S per yiellI 6ii2 1 I.iushele. elling. at $2.41)
.June 21). 1917: aire.: half at:re of celery yielded 3urII avi:raae; s acre- p.itatoe-. plante.l with
I'ruates. nlitting iim al.ut 711 cents per poor seed, yel, deid 9(1 hulh-i--l. averaz-
WHAT THE EVERGLADES crate: one acre yielded 12-3 bushel of Ing abour t$1.6l per i.uL.: ::3 nrt e-ti-


HAVE PRODUCED

It is no longer a mooted que-tion in
this part of Florrida whether or not the
mnuck oil of the Everglailes %will grow
'rops.
The wori:t knocker in the wr-rild Ile-
cormcs an Everglade hbooster hen once
he examines the 'glades murck. and a'--
tually sees the c'rops rr.-.w Seeing i' I-e.


potatoes whri-.l lie solui at all average of mated yield portit>?es 375; lu. ,aerainug
$2.50 per bu-ihel Bas third crop of $1 iit per hamper. Dry weather and
C.urn and thinks; the soil more fl;rtile c. ld redu,-ed yi,-ld. Frnm 4 a,.-re .alh-
than in, Oklahoma. Hogs. cons, rmule-- bage suld $2.'ll worth. 3 ar-re cele-ry
aiid clhic. keis do a,- well a- in Okllahoma. olita.ined] 34!i crate-, 2-ellin 242 crate,
Another farmer plantel1 a nirlt cr.-.p at $1 27 andl 117 at 72 cents. At pre-eut
of potatoels hicth was cut shirt by the time this farmer has 11 hrogs. 10 head
coll but from whilh he harvestu-d 350 i a.ttle ald iDe h1..r-c whiih feed on wild
hamper' and soldi em at au average gra-s native tr the 'Glades. He also
price of $2:'11 a nampier. He allso iad pilarnts ce-irn. mrillet and natal grasM for
4 acres i..f eggplant which Tiilled -4)i0 fi ,l_ His n a .-lrea ..ri i' i .-r ,


liev'ing with the real farmer crates, averaging .1 25 a crate. One land from whi.-h two crops of potati.es
But what the Everglatles farmer like- acre of bean- yielded l151. hauipers and Ihave leeni gathered. Keeps from ":10 to
better thanseeing the i.rops grow is the -iolu for $1.25 a hamper. One acre of 1010 chikenrs. Eleven members to fam-
harvest of "the green tbat'.s long" and peas- damaged by uold plroducded only ily health good : believes a mant canl
here the Sentinel furni-hes, its readers bi). hampers which .he sold for .$2.50 a support aud rai-e a good sized family
a few co:nc-rete examples of the harvest hamper. Second crop, 13 a:-re-. of pio- -n a smaller acreage in thie Everglade-
the reports of whibc were -compiled lqb tat;oes yiiTeedl 1,6ll bushel which sold than he can in the uorthi-ru states.
a prominent resident if Ft.- Lauderdale, for $1:40 a hamper and one acre celery, I and most assuredly live mu.re cimfor-
anid blackeil by affilavit.s i iIs lposses- -I41U) rate', which l.rot. net. 7.t ce;jts a tably.-Editor. r
sion.-[Ed.] crate. Third crop. 15 acres eorn grow- Another man owns' I0 acres, for
One Everglades farmer after losing- ing line. Farmer says land is fertile which he paid from $30 to $0SO per acre.
two crops, one from inadequate draiu- and productive rlnd" nobody would at- R ised all kinds of vegetable and for-
age and onte from the extreme cJld of- tempt to deny it-wien they see the..rops. age. Main crop this.year was potatoes
last winter, planted eight acres of Iri-h A.nother man from total acreageplant- 19 acres yielded better than 1,900 bu.,
,' j


U. . or iaunuanl. 1ns twelve chil. -en -"
in family. i bioy, rs .id 6 girls, all go' d
health. Own,- 2'2 LIgs, cow and horse,
about 70) bichikens. 17 turkeys and 6
ducks and all do well, especially the
turkeys Wolld not take less than
$2.111 per arre for his home place.
One eommnis-i.on mail operating in and
around Ft. Lauderdale during the 1916-
19'17 shipping season, handled for
Everglahies farmer- approximately 72-
-264 package of vegetables, consisting
of pepper., eggplant, tomatoes, cauli-
flower, lettuce. eal:bbage, turnips. rad-
i.lhe Irih pI,.tatoes. celery, romaine.
qlua-h, beets. carrot-, peas. baunanus,
bIeans, etc., f..r which he returned to
the '" lades farmers $120.204.91. This
commi s- i mi ercllant eli lees he
handled abi'llt .r0l per cerit of the vege-
tables shipped from this settion of the
Evrerg iadels.


THE OKEELANTA-
FRUITCREST DISTRICT

The One Successful Settlement iJ the
tipper 'Glades.

I F lriITrI.ICnST -The IH.ln ,r Pro.
pisi[tiolj for -rtrlielUr enr aiIl develop-
merI t. I;'r.iI 1s ;nll .rganizes buyers
I_'m'liin.is ....u.iporatiohu wrth indlividual
actin Mi ;inl]a'i,'-_ .i it. with tlrati:.r- and
machinery, lead-, in pi ,nceririL_. Sell.
land at s;i:l-rii.ei prli. -s.
II NEIV i.,KEELANTA-The Tipper
t'.;lries T -.-' n. i-i I nanal 'ro-'ii-h', pri-
jet--ed r('r -..-S rate Rui! R.aul al-I at
fork of assurpl Iro.-State Rc,:k Ruail
from Palm Bna. h t, Ft. Myer-. Colm-
prisr.is St...re, Post 01ice. Hutel, Board-
in, H.iju-'e, Tuun Hall. Barber Shop,
Bake Sih p. Notary' Oftfice. School, Sun-.
dlay S-Choil. Cooperative Assin.l-laton.
Go:i.ll Times Club. two Development Or.
ganizations, etc. Center of thriving
farming community. The "'One Bright
Spot" between Ft. Lauderdale and Lake
Okeechobee. Address
THOSE. E. WILL,
Ft. Lauderdae' and Okeelanta, Fla.


-** i


'a






S'y dear _Brc.Hothz- -

Tours sth t dhot..ult. rG od. Sa% P1O.E, '..",R. r ?r" l .3ane. They I T'P im a.
Mighty sorry. Sor y7 tGour3ttjo C' ap-o-k. dauIeen s. dkaas s-..r i othi: th.ingsUt-
b lEra ws^'.2i arstoA (a. 1no thal4st .th-. p:.'mrstadt Y-n 1 v.:41,L. rl tv
|lattur *gor l tPf., da y bub n O ba.d -grl bn,d;c,7 a T told.. Sp-ill.r. .t Ga.oinUT
Sloct :ille.d mut. Ptat'- il.3iClt, .ro: drought .?t la-;e .* ai -,ct earlier.
Catl',s loving; hio i nay Uoc blu ti-neUotc
-J.
Hot a.11 b.-Y,- ',u, l:. iT7j m~rity go,-.. F..C. aLurvcyos ,g:,ing ui tflis
nan.. u -ngsuwr iyortc.: to 13c- uryiurrc IS B12 BUWF7?" Ph7T3 AL:..j
ThtJl i2, bw lccje-1 r nu.-t.f ii.3. CI.I.J Co.0 .;vt ;aLt i.. *. ..- .j.. cL ld
giv- i but W qt'y .'-:., r G,- : .tr.:..g.. T 7 L nl- .-y
ars .- w..ur ,2. t m a. C : :.O.gi. r te.- La '.E ... got e: ,too.
ano. ;c-,;.ise G... .li;.oimu i.. C he 0.0... ou .Ndgt r .o. .c? fl,:j 0,4r
1 20o. aft or rc razage. ...I e: .cdro r rst&. : :'c--. -':.*,"^.el, 8.;.:.I it r:
p.i I a. ll, 1 i. Zh... r .port soo c.1 ` .- igh; .-. :,3h i

An -to ruad L.Ui1JhUoM..duh: g.o.. Jiiy gao saug1ytionViZ. tt-- all Gl..I es
21. PJ:5Of::: to .iist tht ,t>y XNQ?? I aL-raucv just Twm: tco :.:c. ;y
twill go.a.-i ,-a iNiU gu i$...ctL sc5ti,. .;e aho L h.'vclaruned- that
tos0lir. lho- "wu ll4. :iruh that novel. .TT pcs"sibl.ent .o' isue sht.
1 .", "g pl-=' i -:..- L 11 l
+ Oflarg l etotgh 2-izizL.&u. ..hazs : .LC rii.L. ogre ;a.geAwg cG.aa-.n\42ploG^/ sh-- 4
be nlaexi ULi-: a4nao.t thh;: a ,h seotio ct itt sh r,',, 'iA. a n-..Un!dc ut

eer agni t, bu.y a y.g in a C; g i; th .ro r n-'t.,tt-r. "- c=! . su of' Ia
that .c A..1ty. -'e4ohi& i, head..

Mmlnpt:c 2&*rc. ;" otiyo.ishlLitJd u.; j t J4 C iii -i;;L, tii;ot S'uag out,
in taxa1lOW w:t Sofrr.
o'.'.l "' .. .. . .. ..


No hop?- of ., oengi, boat ,:. -:.'n.rr '-- d 0i :i:. --' i : -i t1is g;
raislezru ::-;. o 1.JA it, (i.ata am: th P.icr. I vcrlizc- ii it u'* 't Insnt'u.,
w*ntc& w. hj I wo.7.' sore, 14 3'.les t:. r:; -~-.c1ti ,nf. t' o; Fi;lT } May .
b e c-y .Afl c:: I C. *.-. n .oth.r :. isgc- io the c ,ast it
is I1SC.,alv. till UlledI. e-yar C go.

: ;J:.3u" c, viaL & hol.' -rcub2 "Crr 'c Tld Fi .7 Tie.p t c a
O.XF. ;c.u.ld ro,. .L B&ow.p -. h: e~ ca C-i fotr dlrdigor;o. HeO;ce h1.: v-'5 t ell set
l ti Th':. ope nr .t1hePauiora'l Box of eCvi.; an-.iset-ri-rs. ;.: ,-' ":.u l.d
-many oCtac. (4"1At inmpr4.. con.ng :alt-; lia. 4lt :.;ea.oc.I:Grng itt-. FS. Fla*
hat lu man : Y a invasioua ,in:i,t3o there, C-i-;J'- Brla G7-t. T,&.t's 7ay b
they iwo n't re-.poi;c-p-rcin idifpr4Q:,iy why LwQ ?tvC 1.da S.y oiol- 3: Di)-sc
,,.-. .-Y-1 76% f ii. ..
ig-;yn-Ir,':f e 7 .7in: 704 of St. Ra'l P-a3 ,',llo.t:el "t.'." 7 o* itt .o-C in
rcA,. .cr d.ai n th:is t Yoi Lvyii k- d-
tiply,ancitml1. d- _. 0 Co-.rjo ;;ag Kule ,r711 bc a oertninty. '-u l v-,l--" is
,* .STA T. DIVISION. -Th.en- .F. 1 .VchIr on Go.vt.,and.er cap..t -mo-e "..P
T en !Qr n 'v i con t '. Ot& I."...:-.. L doG in r1 year :. .- ;l9 wehVe done
Shall b.:b glad ,e g'ht -te rent, Must be 2 :,s. or more 7>beif, .!:Q "f).3- '
sary r.epai r,of cGrse.a_ a. k 3. ,c seorf-it regu4 ..ly,' '*.ov.r-ae L3.- He I

.y f to .ss Uadgeaamlnd r AnjjiMpt and BSlwrpg mers r~c rInost lost at
S s i. Cordiall you .|
*"- L] I' I- I-------
Q~"r'-' i3TVBT3 CQI ,Percr 3srr ~~~~ai~1~.4.
CG1WiP rCajj'7 YLltjjP-_jk~




-I .. ..a r *-----r---r-- .J.~s


with a forest of wild gr,-oth hat c-:-,n- the ho:g industry, with cattle and fm.,rage Another farmer has fire acres set ini
tuned time. Learning what to rai-e crops. one of the best paying of the grapefruit. The trees are three years
and when and how to, r.i-e it has taken comi:ug industries of the Everglades. old and some of them are 14 inches in
more time. Tran-purtatim.-n sy-tems He says the fertility of the soil is beyoud circumference and 14 feet hieh. He
have had to be developed, and little question. This farmer paid $.5 per believes this is the only soil for citrus
communities, whose nulmbers might help acre for his land and has refused $250 fruit. This farmer planted one and a
each other, halve had t., I.e built up. per acre for It. half acres in cabbage which sold for
Even yet-for the farmer has bn en the Anothei man on 30 acres of land for about .$00. On a l1; acre field lie has
neglected step-bhlld ..f our system-- which he paid $65 per acre, planted it grown two crlops, beans and potatoes.
adequate price-fixing and marketing to Iri-h potatoes. obtained a yield of The third crmip. potatoes, is now growing
systems for farmers generally. including 3.01.il1 bushels, which netted him suffici- with eorni planted between the rows
those in the 'Gladles. still await the eut to pay for the land. clearing ex- which will make crop No. 4 for this
-action of a tardy ;Government, and a penses, breaking the soil, and putting it laun this season. Off a4 of an acre of
farmers' lantking system, establiQlied a in share to plaut, seed. cultivation. Irish pitatmoes be obtained 160 lbuhels'
year ago, is not yet fully operative. harve.-ting, hampers and marketing, and fr..,m less than .l acre obtained 6sl
Notwithstanding all this 'Glades and be hail left between $2.000 and bushels. Beans yielded 3100 hampers
farming is under way. Not only piatE:hbe $2.1ll0. He fed the cull potatoes to to 112 acres, selling at an average of
hut fields are being cultivated, and hos-, of which he possesses about 200. $1 40 a hamper. This farmer believes
actual results an-rlmmplished. Rec-ordl On( 43 acre- be has planted corn for a soil will produce anything planted and
of many of these have recently been ce.i- summer crop that is no.,w about 10 feet he raised f.r his own use every known
lated, embodied in affidavit form. si'-'- high. esrimated yield from S) to- 100 common variety of garden truck.
c.i, -worn to. nlil filed for ready refer- bui-he per acre. Another man from '2 acre beans oh-
ence F.,ilowing aure ynuips-c piitli-b- Anuother farmer who came here from gained $12;' worth: 314 acres-potatoes
el in -the Fort Lauli:rdalm? Sentionl fi.r Oklahoma. has 5. as res rented at $5 per yielded -i)2 bu.hels, selliiig at $2.40
June "29. 1917: a-re. half acri- of celery yielded 311ii average : s an:re potat.-es, planted with
.crate.- iet-ting him aii,,ut 71 centt per poir c .d, y leldeil, fl0 bushels, averag-
WHAT THE EVERGLADES erate: one a-re yielded 125 bu-hei of fing almut $1.60 per bu.; 3 acres esti-
HAVE PRODUCED p''tat...'- whric be c:,d1 at an average -if mated-yield potatoe .375 bu., averaging
$2 1) per bushel. Has third crop of $1 liI per hamper. Dry weather and
c -.r' andi tbirii; the csil more fertile ol.dd remdurcd yield Fri.m 34 acre cab-
It is no longer a m:.tte. quetli.n. in thanl iu Oklahli.ma. HgMes. cow-, mule- hbae sold $i'- 01i worth, 34 acre celery
this part of Florida whether r ir nt theI and chick,.leu dm. as weil as in Oklahoma. mobtaiued 1349 crates, selling 242 crates
muck soil of the Ererglad.Jes wil gro-w Au .th-.r farmer planted a firt cropi at $1.27 and 1.17 at 72 cents. At present
crops. of pj,:tat.-s which w-as (:lit -hort by the rime thick farmer has 11 hogs. 10 head
The worst :knocker in Itb? world bIe- m.. ol but fr...m whie-h he harm-ested 351r little and one'hiorse which feed on wild
conms an Everglade b:oter when ionce liatlU.im s and at.m1J then at a! nan erage |grais native rto the 'Glades. He also:
he examines the 'glamic u.k an'] i- price 'f $2.;'31 a hamper. t-le al.l halad i lauts c.-rn. Willet andJ natal gra-s for
I;ually sees the crimop- irow. S-eL ng i- ble- 4 ac-res of eggplant which yielded 4III. feed. Has ten acres r-rn planted (on
living with the real farmer. ,rate-. averaging $1.25 a riate ne e land fr-m whicb two crops of potatoes
Bnt what Itme Everglades farmi-r likes acre o-f lean~u yielded .15i0 hamper and have I,:-eli gathered. Keep- from 2i to:
better than seeing the ,rmmps grow is the soldl for $1 2.'3 a hamper. One- acre of 100 chickens. .Eleven members to fam-
harvest of "the green that's long" and pean damaged bIy c-ld produced only ily: health good: believes a man can
here the Sentinel furnishes Its readers 50 hampers which he -old, for .$2.50 a .-upport and raise a good sized family
a few concrete examples of the harv\cst hamper. Second crop, 13 ac-res of p-.l nn a smaller acreage in the Everelade;
the rep,:rts of which were compiledd by .tatoes yielded 1,61.0 bu-lhels which sold than he can in the unrtheru state-,
a prominent resident of Ft. Lauderdale. for $1 40 a hamper and one acre celery, (and most assuredly live more iromfi-r-
and backed by affidavits in his posse- 4001 cratesl which brot, nett. 75, rents a tably.-Editor.i
sioi.-[Edl ] crate. Third crop,. 15 acres c...rn grow- Another man owns 1S,0 acres, for
One Everglades farmer after lo-ing ing fine. Farmer say land is fertile which he paid from $30 td $.O per acre.
two crops. one from inadequate drain- and productive and nobody would at- Raised all kinds, of vegetable and for-
age and one from the extreme cold of tempt to deny it when they see the crops. age. Main crop this year was potatoes
last winter, planted eight acres of Irish Apuother man from total acreage plant- -19 acres- yielded better than 1.900 bu.,
~, ,- "


I- ,













. .


I*


. .


I


...zrowth a!.. ... ..
growh almacti'ria, conic hito its'mjwn. Is now planting a fourth crop for the per colony per year. Would hesitate
Tim find and finance the machinery be-mt -eason. The health of his entire family about accepting $200 per acre for hi"
ailspteil to lmrenk the w iii litnil toerene is cx ellen LThi.onrrirnst~ miii dte riaimi moe


Tull v thuh -ap -.01 a s ccR
-T. S.or 'Canada. 'as' twelve c-hilt; 4.
iu family, 6 loys and 6 girls, all go.
health. Owns 22 hogs, cow and horse.
about 7 chickens.. 17 turkeys and 6
ducks aud all do well, especially the
turkeys Would not take less than
.$2i:0 per acre for his home place.
Oine commission man operating in and
arun id Ft. Lauderdale during the 1916-
1917 shipping season, handled for
Everglades farmers approximately 72-.
264 packages ofr vegetables, consisrtil
of peppers, eggplalit. tomato, cauli-
flo:-wr lettui., cabbage, turnips, rad-
ishes. Iri-h potatoes, celery, romaine,
squash. bee-t'. carrots, peas., bananas,
Ieans, etc., fur Lwhi,.h he returned to
the '1laile- farmers $120.2l04.91. This
commission merch;:nt believe-, he
handled alb.ut 50 per 'cet of the vere-
tables -shipped fr.m. this sectionn of the
Evergladles.


THE OKEELANTA-
FRUITCREST DISTRICT

The One Successful Setllrneent in Ihe
Upper 'Glades.




-----~
I. FrI ITE<'IRES'T-T-lhe BMiier Pr,.-
p,.s ition f...r -ettlei iit .il iJdeCt-:l ij-
ment. i:;ri.ul.' anil ,i'i I niz.'s l.lym-r-.
Cmoralmine- cm.,-pra'ti..n with iniiividual
ac-ri,-_u alanl -'-J et[r. w ith tr;i' ..lr-. i and
nmacn hie -ry. l-e:li, ih pin, ri-rii Sell-
l;nid at sia.ri ite lri[,? c-.
II. NEW iKEELA.NTA--TIc Upipper
'GlNu es T,..%wJ Clanal '-r.-sl g,. pro-
jectedl Cr.-.--St.ate- Rail Road and at
fork -if assured (n'r Js-Stte Ric-k Road
from Palm Bea:rh to Ft Myers. Com-
l)rises Store. Post 1Office. Hotel, Board-
ing HouJne, Town Hall. Barber Shop,
Bakle -Ship. Ntary's Ofiice, School, Sun-
day ,Sc:hol,. Cooperative A.sociation,
Gool Times Club. two Development Or-
ganizations, etc. Center of thriving
farming community. The "Ouie Bright
Spot" between Ft. Lauderdale and] Lake
Okeechobee. Address
THOSE. E. WILL,
Ft. Lauderdale and Okeelanta, Fla.


FUSTrl*NIIC~es~5U C;-~ r~-r_~-n_ ~~slr~I~PCUT-i


.- . ; I '- ,i;.. -.,^ .^ -, - -- . ... .














.:, ., -',. .:- ."*^
', 6- "
) .,, . r -o
,. -"
'" ...:..." , ."..." ', .


,' .,-, 7


A Il
y 'jA-1 ^ *^ **' 'IF



tEE.^^^j ^^a^It


4i: .. .
! T'


A.,- "itt.

So'jat -A it'*r f AL/ A Lt.'^


i2ALJI Aj ^ A-c~ a#iWS Wa~e~trF


rT ":


~ahI ~j rr


~Z~d~6 ~4AfS


..... rr


* 1,'4


vi.- a'
r~ t /tJ-4
t~r~s42~Ecr..v~v.v~~n..*t~tca x AL "t 4


itp&$ t C. V/ . .'-u ~ ~


F.t
aV t\


- I..


S- ;
^ii'^j,.it^S^


A~i1C C


liP---~c-- Y f ~i
)* _/ ~ ,t
) ~L~Y~CI


"` 1
~,,~ji, rl


~~,;n~:


~LrL


.. . .. & ,


J


A


^ ^ ^ y ^ W.,i -- IN J p


; ... ,- / . ,-.


'-: '^-,-i- .... ".* Z*' " /

... .... ... ^ Ji_
-YYS 'iL^ W^ ^S ^ zi
r ol
`"r-~4


'

4,

I~


n


.i '? '- -~~,~,!,j~GS=~ :~?~I-I


~,u~"~' - ~rr-- ---- - ------------- --- --;-~--- 1


~


-: -u. I- - -II- -- -- - F~-- -~- ~---- ------- -- --- --- --~i~-


r


~ -- -- ------- - ------ -- - -- --- ------


--- --- --


--p, V
oA L4 -


n~hc~~


- i


1- ~-


Y


7 L~ ~Lr


--~--~ --I-~


a


ILUY-I1L --~d


Flc~i~ c T~*-;

~. ~Y








...,I


/4

. a ,"
-4 .a A
,,;., f ,. __


,Ina






7A .4

















.~
r /e .



'9'
.. ..- I






-, C ...

__ -_"_ -" N" I
C-r


/ ..


,i.i. ,


I_._. . _


iI r > '
T: -





) '"




. '
it~k




1/ /. 1' *1**


/ -. '.- .
d C/ t i114~~l. ~ r m~ a~~x n -v~ad
a-7J

rA
I sP~N


Cd 440ece
LkcLB ri t
* CdL~c~~


-**.li








I',' / I)


(y'-^^^^*^:I^ p *"'


.. .;.. / ,
. ... f * -.- .
r


r/
.*' *- /t.-a-


r q

aLr~/~-n#+ 4Ir4-





/2>, If


fI /,


-c


-V


fk;%'- ----






___ __ __ ,.. -- .




II -



3-I
p- ~ 1- 4--


*. I. Z 4


I"


**- '















-uYva A~~ "" u-I.-


Lfr/Y'eLhY







J;r-


Il
J.4, ,* .


L7A~~22Z2


~s~aaa~


I





S


I







W Idtcm a b
|p'Mtc .?3 .n.' obi'. CR-* -





ded on an and ,i acre of pea< by cold. Has 20 col-
acre. He :onieq bees which average him $11.1 profit
rop for the per colonyy per year. Would hesitate
rtire family ab,,ut ai.ceeptinij $200 per acre for his
think. that land. and then only to buy more.
a3l forage Another farmer has five acres set in
ing of the grapefruit. The trees are three years
Evergladez. old and .some of them are 14 inches in
i] is beyond circumference and 14 feet high. He
d $$0 per believes this is the only soil for citrus
refused $250 fruit. This farmer -planted one and a
half acres in cabbage which sold for
of land for about $800. On a 1% acre field he has
Planted it grown two crops,-beans and potatoes.
a yield of The third crop. p.:ittoes. i- now growing
him sii,.i- with corn pinntedl between the rowP.,
hearing ex- which will make crn.p No. I for this
Putting it land think .iu. Off of an acre rof
cultivation, Irij h ptat,.Ies he obltaii-d 160 Ir i. elJ-
marketing, and frum I-;s than ': a1.re iolrtaiuled t lJ
",1:11:111 and bushel. Beans yieldedl ')0 hbauper.
potatoes too 1-" acre. ~eliiing at an avera're of
Sabou 200.. $1.40l a Lamper. This farmer believes
corn for a s.oil will prordu.:ce auylhbiuL planted and
out 10 feet he rai-ed for his own use every known
S0 to 1i00 :conim'n variety -.f garden truck.
SAnut her man from ;'- an:re bean's h-
here from tuiined $l"2 w,: rth: 31 acre. potnates
d at $S per vieidiC iJ o'ir u Ihel., eliiugj at -$2.40
ield.'l 300) uarerage: 17 a':-r:i potatoe ., planted with
cent pr r p,-,,r seel, yielded 910 bushel;, nverag-
buslel of ling adl'ur $.1160 per lu 3 arrest e'ti-
average .,'f niata'd yiolb potatte-e 37i5 Iu., averagcilg


I


I


will produce heavier niid mwore ailuiil-
antly than any .-,il lie L It-seen in thi:
U. S. or Canada. IlS 0 .lve elili :-nu
in family, 6 b.y. aiijd 6 git.L'all _o,. J
health. Owns *'*2 hola~i-,*e ind. horse.
about 70 chickenii. 17 turkeys and 6 :
ducks and all rio we-ll. espeo aily the
turkeys Would not tak>o less than
$200 per acre for his home place.
One commission man opera t ig ,n and
around Ft. Lauderdale during the 1016-
1917 shipping season, handled for
Everglades farmers approximately 72-
264 packages of vegetables, consisting
of peppers, eg-plant. tomatoes, cauli-
flower, lettuce cabbage, turnips, rad-
i hes, Irish potatoes, celery, romaine,
-quash. beet-. carrots, peas, bananasa, .
heajns, et>., for which he returned to
the '.lacdes farmers $120,2014.1. This
c.onamii.sion mnerclhant believes he
hantlled about 5." per -enut i:f the vege-
talliees shipped from this -,ection of the
Eveirglades. .


THE OKEELANTA-
FRUITCREST DISTRICT

The One Successful Settlement in the
tipper 'Glades.

I FRiITi"RE.:T-Tlhi I.lllnr Pr'-


_I__ __1~ __











0o 01 -.nto^Fl Fl
Bjjr-'~~'s v;tut 10, .0 .
Mr".-2Lvin .i.Or /,,'2.'!: A 'Pot-,
&- .. B 0'1r 'ts'.GllFl-

- o rn-- fu ::?*' *'


4-,t la. to .t -.t, .: .: tx m~r -
C'.0l^ ; !. ", P.O:..i.n,7. !H.-l j ^.e0:1 ",i- ..{- 't
3) 1 f'ovo. C --.... au J.:- .1", -wc. r .. i)
" aasl r. .no f ~i, :t ;t "

8. v 'or ' Thl. Zr. v tgc-,i r 2* '2i


LI you 'will klctny
- ; C fc', A .-r eal if
Lg.tion t1 ryou, -
4-


:~~Timnrt~ : *!-jn *+cE
L 4 ".3 L~ ~3v ; c b > ofl'c~r


V o-:


1 it





, - - -- r w t .. . . ... ... .. - .. . .. "- .
growth aud bacteria. c(ime into its.ovwn
To ind and finance the machinery best
adapted to break the wild laud covered
with a forest of wild gro, t'h has con-
sumedl time. Learning what to raise
and when and how to raise it has taken
more time. Tran-lp rtdaion systems
have had to be developed. and little
c..mmujitie., whose numbe-rs; might help
each other, have had to be built up.
Even yet-for the farmer has been the
neglected step-child of our sys-tem-
adequate price-fixing nad marketing
-rystem. for farmer; generally. in,:luliing
those in the 'Glade,. still await the
action of a tardy ( Uorerunenut, anu a
farmers' banking system. ettal.lished a
year ageo. iS not yet fully operative
Norwithstanding all this, '"ladles
farming is under way. Not only patche-s
lut field; are heing cultivated, and
actual result- a:ce'implit hed. ReI..c-'rd
of many of these have recently beeI col.
lated, embodied in affidavit form, i-zu-


I


ld, sworn to, and tiled for really refer- bu-hel per acre. Another
e:nce. Following are ;yn llip,?' -Tl-. Ainrther farmer who came here from tainted $12
Hf1 in the Fort Lauderd:-le Sentiei-l f...r Okllah...ma. has 5 acres rented at $8 per yielded 60
June -29. 1917: wa:re : half acre of celery yiellied 300 average; 8
Sr.rates. rietting him about 70 cents per poor seed,
WHAT THE EVERGLADES <.rat:'; i-ne anre yielded 125 bushel of ing about
HAVE PRODUCED p"'~natres which he sold at an average of mated yield
$2.50 per Iu~bhel. Has third crop of $1.60 per I
*.ru an d rthiink the soil more fertile cold reduce
It is no longer a i ......ted querii in than in Oklahoma. Hogs, cows, mules bage sold
this part of Florida letterr i.r not the and chickens do as well as in Oklahoma. obtained 341
muck -oil of the Everglanle- will grri.v Another farmer-planted a first crop at $1.27 and
crops. of potatoes which was cut short by, the time this fa
The ,.,rst ki-..-eker in the world be- cold lut from which he harvested 350 cattle and or
coim.- an Everglade booster when once hampers and sold them at an average grass native
he examines the bladess muck and ac- price of $2.30 a hamper. He also had plants corn,
tually sees the eri.,p; grow. Seeing i be. 4 acrei.- .if eg-qplant whiei yieldiJd- 4i.10 f.i-d. Ha-
lieving with the real fuaruer. crater:, avraging $1 25 a .-rate. Onie land from n
But what the Everglades. farimer likls a-re of beans yieldeil 150: hampers and bhaye l.een .
better than seeing the ':rops rowuj ik the It-ild fir $' 25 a hamper One acre if 100 chickens
harvest of "the green tlhat'S ioirg" and peas dilama-?dl ..y .:-,.,ld produced only ily ; health
here the Sentinel furlni-be it~ readers i50 hampers which he ,illl for $2 5on a support ainl
a few conurete examplee. the repl)'rt:s of wlhi,:h were .:i.nmpiledl ly tatoer.- yielded 1,6111.1 tushel which sold than he ca
a prominii-tit re'.iidt i.if Ft. Lauderdale. for $1.40 a hamper anid one acre celery, (and most a-
alld Ili-ked by affiJavits in hid pos< 4 rat hiih Ib .. .r. not. 75 cents ua tably.-Edito
.i.rn -[Ed.] Irate. Thir er, 1.5 acres .ir grow- Another u
One Everglades farmer after loingi hj: fine. Farmer say; laIl i,; fertile which lie pail
two crops, one from inadequate drain- and pru.lii-tive and nolioly would at- Raised all k,
age and one from the extreme cold of tempt to deny it when they wee the crops. age. jlain e
last winter, planted eight acres of Irish Another man from total acreage plant- -19 acres yl.


I


I


_ w ,Pi -rag Iti'sm-1p'I- per acre. tie
Ifs :w lplaiting a fourth crop for the
-eason The health of his entire family
is excellent. This farmerP think- that
the h,.,g indu-try, with cattle and forage
crops. one of the be'.t paying of the
coming industries of the Everglades.
Be says the fertility of the soil i- beyond
question. This farmer paid $Si0 per
acre for hi; land and has refu-ed $250
per acre for It.
Another man on 30 acres of laud for
which he paid $65 per acre, planted it
t.- Irish putatoe-. obtained a yield of
S.il00 bu'hels. which netted him uffici-
ent to pay for the land, clearing ex-
pen-:e-, breaking the soil, and putting it
in shape to plant, seed, cultivation,
harves inrj, hampers -and marketing,
and he had left between $2,000 and
$2.11). He fed the cull potatoes to
h...o, of which he possesses about 200.
On 43 ac res he has planted corn for a
-ummer irop that, is now about 10 feet
high. estimated yield from 80 to "100


ouiles nees
per colony
about acec
land, and
Another
grapefruit.
old and so
circumfere
believes tL
fruit. Th
half acres
about $,001
grown two
Thethird
with corn
which will
land this s
Irish pota
and from 1
bushels. I
to 1% acrf
$1.40.a hai
soil will pr
he raised fc
common va-







It


Ftu .iut. Ale T.*Jn ', i *,


'-. -',!-,Whxte, .

;,uPl. B, :D., h_,Fl~:t

4y c.--r. i.*a,, ite:--


'. ,i. .,re
* A ,L' U.


.I p1..n ,:in v,- '-l -Boach nc: :t .ol-.y, I:'i
" .' to 'i, G .';... to youipo .,,..-n. -


i. ill t :'..c. bon:. v u between 6 .iW re s' eoo as. i


'--*y t"u'.v -... -3,,


t *


n

-cc~i~






-grwt'i h na, a,:it;tera. ,,mue.-int-oits op:n. i-- n,,w planting, a I,.,urth rop for .the .per colony per year. Would tbesitate
STo find ar1 tinance the mathidn,?ry 1,,?-t ean. The health of hsntire family al.,-ut accepting $"G) per a+.re f,,r hi-,
:- rptl Tth break tlhe \,il.l hland c, ,d i ,r:lh] :1ral tltn tnl" t JillP I rl.


It UI uO li .A'Lz-er a mr....t- > quil:. .ll. ini
this- part of Fluri..ai whit-th r or i.,t. ilie
runtlk .coil of Tihe Ev.erjla.l-- will ;r..,w
c.rops.
The w.ir.t kilL.:ker iil rtli- wi.rli I -e.
coum-_, ant Evergluad. l,1:-. -r hi- ,-,cei-
he examines the '.lad.e- tnu.-k ainJ i -
rually sees tihe -rop -r>.,v. _ij i2 I%0e-
lievijz with the re-al farmer
But wbh.-r the Evelrelal,' i farmer likes
,letter than iiing the i-riop is r.'w is the
harvest of "the green that'- lr-,':_ anud
here the Seutiuiel furni-be, its 'renders
a few coueret- ex iatple-s of the har-vest
the repl.:rt oif ,whii-h were :.-,ipiled by
a prohmninenr re.sidei-nt .f Ft. Lauder.dale.
,ludl aliakeid by alffidivits in his poAses-
-.... i..i..-[Ed I
One Everglades farmer after loinj'-
two, crops, one from inadequate drain-
age and oue from the extreme cold of
last winter, planted eight acres of Irish


thbrii in 1l:inlinia. H.-~ ,cow-. mule-. hlnge .s,,1d .jii10 worth, ", acre ceei-ry
aiLh "hi('lbl-- ,1, a- wi-l a, in Oklahoma. olit.inled 341.' '*rate-, .s ellitg 242 crates-
A.lhirlti-r fa'iruiLr planted a .t crt Crip $1t '127 and 1117 ar 72 i-ents. At preeiitt
of p.,t-.t, .i- w-hiib w a 'out short by thie lime this fariuer ha.s 11 hqgs., 11.1 head
uoll L nt fr..mn whi-li be Liarvce(ied 3,1l.1 .,-itrli aiid iie ti- or-e which f.eed on wlil
hl:imp,-i's adll i coll tlh.-L at ahi a\i--ral'.e -ra--s nativi- to: the cGlades. He ni-io
price ,-f $'230.l a hamper. Hi l.l b;id plaiits .orn, raille-t and natal 'rass for
4 .ni-ri: of e-'v plaint which i yielidi, 41111 f.-ed. HI-Is te l acrl-'1 c.1ii- plinitel ,ii
crare-. ave-raging $1 2.5 a i-rate. Onhd Ino from which two :r.rip ..f I,-ntct,-;
arile of beans yielded 15ll0 hiuiper- and ha;ie leill garilered. Keep- fr.mn 20i to
...id ft'r $1 2.1- a hamper. (One ricrc uif 100 chickens. Eleven members t,. faim-
perai damaiigid liy ,*-.jil produced onid y ily; health 'good believes a ma i can
:50 hbampers wbieh he sold fir .$-'5 ai support anrd raike a 'good i edl family
hamper. Seriid] crop, 13 at:res ,if po-:i n a unaller a-reane in thli Eve.r',ludt.-
taites yielded 1,tli'I I .Iusliel- which sold than he can in the lnotrth.-rn states,
for $1 l40 a hamper and onL -e -cre celery, land most a-ssurelly live mli-'r c,~mf..r-
41110 .rat.--.. whlichl i.rot. ie't, 7-5 :?;t-. n tably.- Editor. I.
crate. Third crop. 1." acres corn grow- Another man owns 15.I acre., for
ill tiiine. Farmer says land is fertile which he paid from $30 to $.S( per acre.
and produ.itive and body would at- Raised all kinds of vegetable and for-
tempt to detry it wheL they see the crops. age. Main crop this year was potatoes
iAnoither man frm total acreage plant- -19 acres yielded better than 1,900 bu.,


with a forest of w il.l r..rwth ha;, c"n- tlie hob ildus.try. wiith cattle and foraige Another farmer tb.s five acre-- sumre time. Learning w-hat t. r.ice cr.,p~. one if the bett paying if the grapefruit. The trees are three years
and when and how ti rai-e it lha. taken coming industri,-s of the Everglade-.. old and uome of them are 14 iuinhes in
mt.,re time Tr.ans-portationii *yte-m-. He says the fertility of the .-ili i. beyond *ircumferlnre and 14 feet high. He
have hanl to I:be developed. aud little quesri-.,u. This farmer pai.] $SO per believes tlii- i- the only soil If.r citrul-
c.,mmunitio.-, vb>.ise number; might help acre for hik- land and has refused $-250 fruit Thi- farmer pl.ntitl oIie ianl a
ea,-h other, have had to hi- built up. per acre fur IL half acres L u cabllage which s'id f.ir
Even yet-for the farmnur hab, ibei- the -Another man ,..n 30 acres of land for abi.,ut .$50. iu a 1I' a,-.re field he laui
ueglectAel s.tep-chlid of our ?y.tem- whblch he paid $6-t per acre, planted it gr.iw1u twvi crOip'q. liena anid piotati.e-:
adeq.uate price-fixing and marketing to Iri-h !lotat..,e,. obtained a yield *:-f Tbh third cr .p, p..itaitoes. ii now growing
sy.Ttem-s fo.r ffarmer-s genrrajly, includiung -.ilO ) Iuu-sh+.l. whit h netted him .-ufi.ci-I with ,rn phlaited lietlreenl the rrw-i
those in the 'Iladle.. stiil await thle ent to pay for the land, clearing ex- which will make crop No. 4 for this
aitio.u of a tardy ~i-Ter!niimrlt. and a pren-. i.,ieakiung the soil, and putting it land this season. Off % of an acre of
farmers' banktinL -ystem. establilhbd a bi shape to plant, seed,, cultivation, Irish potatoes he obtained 160 bushels,
year ago,, i- not yet fully ,opPrative. harvesting. hampers and marketing, and from less than % acre obtained 68
Notwithstanding all this. 'Glades and he had left between $2,000 and bushels. Beans yielded 300 hampers
farming i- under way. Not only patclhes $2.111l. He fed the cull potatoes to to 1% acres, selling at an average of
but fields are lieile cultivated. ian hogs, of which he possesses about 200. $1.40 a hamper. This farmer believes
actual results acco-mpliheld. Records On*43 acres he has planted corn for a soil will produce anything planted and
of many of these have recently been col- summer crop that is now about 10 feet he raised for his own use every known
lati], emlb.odiel in affidavit form, sign- high, estimated yield from 80 to 100 common variety of garden truck.
ed, sworn to, and filed for ready refer- bushel per acre.- Another man from % acre beans ob-
,-nee. Following are synopses publish- Another farmer who came here from tained $128 worth; 3% acres potatoes
ed in the Fort Lauderdale Sentinel for Oklahoma, has 5 acres rented at $8 per yielded 602.. bushels, selling at $2.40
June 29, 1917: -acre.; half acre of celery yielded 300 average; 8 acres potatoes, planted with
.___ crates, netting him about 70 cents per poor seed, yielded 910 bushels, averag-
WHAT THE EVERGLADES crate; one acre yielded 125 bushel of ing about $1.60 per bu.; 3 acres esti-
HAVE PRODUCED P."t',"' w"ic'i he sold at an average of mated yield potatoes 375 bu., averaging
$2'5' per bu..bhel Has third crop of $1.60 per hamper. Dry weather and
Sc-ru In] tliik ti ll tice s oil more- fertile c.l-. reduct-d i yi-id. From 'l aurc? re it-
~~~ I_ =


U. $ :.r ('ani;ln. Has twelve chbildJu
il family, li l..oy, amil i L'irl, nil gi J
heairIT. v-\1 1.; 22 II : cIw and b-irse,
abl.ut 7Tii lhi l;eit-, 17 turkeys alnd 6
ducks anll all do wi 1l, especiallyy the
turkey.r Wuuldl Int take less than
$ I201i li-er .re fir hii Ii r u e pliice.
O>ne_ ,.:iu- mi.i i..ri i i,-i operating in and
nrouiil Ft. Lauii.lierdal dUling the u1:13-
1917 -hiplingll -a~o:in, hamlilled for
Evertllailt- f.rni er. alpproxiilmatly 72-
264 pal .ktytge. ,,' .,(gtali|e c1ljfisting
,.f peppers, eI r;plaait, tim. attes, cauli-
flower, lettuce, cabbage, turnips, rad-
ishes, Irish potatoes, celery, romaine,
squash, beets, carrots, peas, bananas,
beans, etc., for which he returned to
the 'Glades farmers $120,204.91. This
commission merchant believes he
handled about 50 per cent of the vege-
tables shipped from this section of the
Everglades.


THE OKEELANTA-
FRUITCREST DISTRICT

The One Successful Settlement in the
Upper 'Glades.

I. FRUITCIRESTThe Banner Pro-
p.-riti-,n fir .i.t(1 ,.i ,.iit .11 il v,.1telp
mri llt I r. tiu.< il 1 ..r i:. i; 1 l i ri'l .
'"o|.ih]..iin.- ..,..., .li l i. I n i i i ivillu !i


ml,:t bi le-r! ,, ii.th1- la liist-e; ll' 1- :ll
r iii i ', t i. l 111 i i i .'
lJnhtJi ,l d .Il ril' ., [ p i e- .
II. NEW i iKFI..AN '.1-The. Tipprt.
g' l.Iinl:- Tl.. I. Il t ,li 1i l ,'ro-'-inii', Ii ru-
jfti (.'r l,--.;Stat It il Il.1.l and at
f',rk ,,f ;ac-- r, i (cr..-.Sta:te Roek I-lund
fr.,Im Pali B I.i-io r tI Ft MNyelr C('lm-
pri.el St' re t '. H.-tel, Board-
Ing II,.us-e. TuwIn Hall. EBrlier Shop.
Blll;f P. N.tary'.s O.lice, S.li .1,S uli-
day S,:h',Il. Cooperative .\, ,1chliriu,,
i;o.d rTlrmers Club. two Developmient ''r-
ganizations. ete: Centei' 1f thriviicn
farmuinL commuiiity. The "'li-tj ltihiir
Sput" between Ft Liurderdial- aid Lake
I-
Okeechohee. Address
THOSE. E. WILL,
Ft. Lauderdale anid Okeelauta, Fla.




















-\une 10, 15,






.-ir. "Ho"I U --- ;_rtn, ....

908 Aeservoir Ava'*.

Norfolk, Va.
DeJlr Si3 12-1
seaniln, to Dar. ,:rI, 0a Fort LAeu.v.,.1,, you.







Noroflr, truly,.
lottX'r of0 10. 1am &aizro th2z*4 Will wil "rritelO yt.

PrO t \ e a 12 o ot



S

S rr itor;



















Aaa
prn'i~l-' rtt .,.'e 7zia.a t.LA'-u o.. t--'-~r.:z 12'n^flo~/4
'" w ^* rt'/



do s wrte t -d *-,l~V







f 'fiS
A A
-<( *- f, i 7-
- +' / r /: ',


p /C4yyt' ^ '?'
*~~ ~ ;i*i ./
I -' . / / l "" "
,j ,,."-r~~ A
"/" .- .. \- . .... '- ,-= -, / ,*=' /
S-. ... t/ ..,.
i -. .

-. / ---- /.-
",' .-

_/ i A. i .
- .. . . .....


/ , # .-'" ,' -..' ,. ,- _..'..1.1 :
1 / -
'A. '. .- ". "
,.ii .)
I- Jr /
S"-f' ... .
- d / --
"11 ,.2 ,
_. . .. -- ..". ... .... . . -
/ a9, & "' V.
*/ *. . . .A'
.I "- > .-/ * . ;"
S. -- I- -
'-- ' ": r " f ' <-- --' I .... ,_- ,'- -'
,t _..,
/ i


y -/
,, .,- / A' -
1' _
.' 7 -- --- ..- .
-- ci2 .-
/- - ," / . '- "" " -

.. .
"- -"" -'

. .. .. - ..... I! i,
t -- zs.. -/-"'J'// ""

L '/ L
.:-,,' .. ,-; : "' .. .

.... / I . ,
I.
-t . /
a. / ( 7'i .
4- "- . I --c, -. - . .-
'l 'at ,,. ., i '# / ,' # / / /1 ' I 7 _. /, / .I / ,


/ ~ it1~o
." r.- ,- **/' ,,. .'_ .
A. :y ; ,, f__/ ..,




/I
. ...f ( S . .$-a- :- -/ I sr-- - -: --" .. ..- -_ "



aI I 1! 1 7 4
It i- -_ . -," ., ,- / 1 I' .
/" t "Tt/' ' ','



Y~ 7 j
/zC .6/nr
a-=, 'L -4-.... __ .., . .. .:. . .. .. .. .
--,,;t /* .,"J la.. ._. "" --" .



I-. I, ,, / .
,,:-' / _2 '. .'"- "
/ ..., _/






-7:T



\ -___' /


/*^ ,- ., -- .


i


x--


4-I
/~
-4--.4 -


.

.'

I' I
V.L-v

C---


/ //
L- i--'
I


-.-1

'4=.
4, 1
- -- - ---zt. -


I --


.ri;' -y;
. .- .-"
- 1'7 '= ."-"

qf **- -* -
,_ _'..:,

t ^t ,"- i/"" ._ i.....

..^ AI/ i_~.


^ e ;..' -:
^?-> ^^**** .


Vt-~


/ / 7
- *- 'y


./ /1-c

/c ,
. . / i .


* ;4'

//4
.,' --'
'_\ ; -" .,
t._... I ,'---
.4 / -
/. t . ,


-,.


I,




-' N
=1

9-
6i? *L!


h-Oif..'.


J//i
U"
*jt'-


.9
-- 'I


98

'(a

ad- d


.( ---- /*
L / .:" .'. " _'. ,


.. . /, _./..__ _-.- _


r *"/ .

.., -, /.
_ u -, -, i* -- 7"- ... -. ...

C' . -.



S. (-nv/ ^ -'' ^ i A-^ .I .
p / -
-' ,.i I -
.. ,. .. ..
/

I/ of j #
.# f,'z, /-' k. _ . . ,
-.___.__.. o


if

/~ (I~


44 1 }t
-' *j *4'


, -.
,. ;-

'1


.-" / .* ." '. 1. *'
Y ,. ..


Z-.-,-.^ //7 -' .
/1 /
/ ~ ~ c i.s; /


..=-,.I


%- /


Ad .- "


* #


*a ~-/'
t c~a4~ F.


b
--C-IY~
j J C
V .49


-' / i *"


*.d
,- -.,


I-fl



L


- 1 *
.


I


491 -i .


/. U f "

r " , r
I-
/.4 -' / L _


/*


-' . 7 , '.4 .W '/


C 4. .4,


44 ,


44
/l1~~L


I x


i 7>, 7i





J9 4
'..:


-.
7',


-4


I-


', ... . -


*~~~ '1 *''


44"~. '


C~ -

Jr -.


~


I


C-,.8


57 .


--s


3
















/5


c~aa


eZili /.f'Yf (~ 5


Ii I t ,
/ 5 L.2

'F-EI


-tne


I'"



i IA-


. ,


I..L


P-


-
* ---i f/ 'f :I


/ / ,

,,,_., _." .. .. -: .-* ,. -., ..

--- jK- -p--- . L ,- / _. '__ :". -- :

jr-Ar-
/ ... :- .. ^ .." _. .*,, y _-

// /', / f / ,' ,' /" ..* " A ,. -' , .
. / ._ .. ._.- _. -.. .
/ I t ?. ,.A / /"---,

/ / a w / 1 _. / -/ > /- ..... 1 ,.
. ... '-- .- z-" . 6 .. .. ,t ** -- I _j _..

. ., ,, ,_.-r -> ._ .-- ^ . ^ .; .
, ./l / -.#,. /. -


/. t "If/ - .4 / . "., .' '
, ,.1 .


/


p' -


t. -
- F
I.


- I


I.*
i-I.'- -


1. I


''-'
'"4


.5
'A--


I j


I 4'





4/ I



-4-- / / -F --- t

*~~ ~ ~ ,..
r- "~ .' '


/ ,.,
--_ - ,- _- _L - -






-^ -.r- "' ., :.. ..


.44'


/


I-

/ -7' / 1-, *
i *.u.urtrww
.' ., /--
A -, ,' ..

-, t i ,, ,/ ./
,/V :"

i "" i iii..' "i ,.._- .:


'-4


V.I /~I ".


F p 4


/


* " **
-.- -, .3


'--i s. ;/
-+.-,, 1 .. .


4' "--
~.-u -.
-J-4~A ~ -


-,


-K


L-4- -_


.J ,


/


/'


1I'


1*r* c


=


, ,


~unT*i~


-"1, ,'


.





_; . .. . . . . . . . .


-m -- -- ^^.- .1 ^ *- -- *. -- -
_r_ -" --7-' --". '. ;"
_II
1-- ./ 7,.. , -* ... _- . ..' U .....; ..*



,',-L- / -/ I- : ;-
i-.- _' ' 2 -" " % L. " "
_-- - -- .. -.


I' -
:r" / ,"--- "-, , \ ? i.



I. /




L. ..*' /. i ; .. ,.. . .. . .u . ,'.- *_ __ .' '. .. .. ,' ,
. . __ _. _ ', -" .' .. -*






/ _ 'A.. .. _ -.- .
- .- ... .. .. : L ,* ._ ... ,_" .. _-..__: "__ [ -.l/ ; .' _. t .. / .. ^. !
:" /, --

___-.- * _-I_/ *_ --- _--. -... ,. ..

/ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ - ,-* /- ** *-* ( **'^--tjaCi




/ 1 /5 .I- -/ A
S A .- -. ,.. ,/ --/ .
.. ... .. ..... ,,-,,,,=,-' .- .. .. '_ .._L, '_. .... .. .... . ,' ._







t / L
,- "- -; tx









tsP ^ '-n,-4 / */: *.*'/ --'*\
____ / -, -. ,- -L *. A -

S. .. ,, ." A- .._ ,' I ,' / '. - ) . -- ** ,
. . .. C | ; -. ; ,- - _ - - - -- A V -- _- - . -. [ _'.; / . ' I
". .--- "









/ . .,
. ( '", .. _,, ... ,, .- ..
_.,, .'' "
















.. . 9 i A
....-' . .. -.._ _... _.









S- - - -l --L --t-. 1 I .-
-I N,,
9 -J.// 1 $ ,
, . ,









I It-
41 9 ; ,

/i
'". r
~ ~~~-- L i .: .. .. .. "' -
/" ,.-- .LII~?L~i' -" ; .. - .. ... j. t .
--/ .,, -; '-".-. t .' / ,, ( / _ :._ ., __. ... ,_..._, ...
"- '.. ,:.,-'_-_ .: .. . .. ,_, T -' ".
-"-- ....... ' ""':~;r- "c/ ..."
... ..."-;'"-. _,- ...'J __ " '' / ,3, tZ / ".
,. ,_ .. . .- .
,i ~ ~~~~~~ /. W,""....


c ,/ :I / K .",'
,~ . ,,- -.,
." / ,'.

/< .L ,.,-- '; ,,. / .-. ,,.
) ,. P ,fT / ... .< ..,.
,i 'I ,< o->,
-- - / ," " .,_ 'r- '' .,- e-

,'. ", .I ./f -.. -/ S C'L
''- t- ( %
i ,d




'- ql.qpHi -- _,J -;--- -C~






(II
Q,7







". ,/ --'
*' 7 1'* .






- --- 1 4 -- ^__ -j ,'f7

--- -E '--rCi. Y_15rL~9 ../ 3--I .-IE- a-cr-- .,-9-,
/*- ~ *- ,.. .... ... ... .. ... ... 1. 2 ..... ;:>" / .<>c~a.-"- ._ ^ 2 ,,


A ,, 7 '






~~~~~~~~ ...-_ ...... ....... ..." ,,

/A
Af g 7mun-






S -/ ..irm 7^ "' -
-- - .*/ '---- I -


-I _ /T l- ./ - y. "^/'' T*

. .. ........... ... ^o. r - . ... .,, ... ... .. ..


~ "' -- -p
4-i^-t-.-1L--^_ k-C_-<-__LI ^--Jj ^-ZL--^^.-LY-e ^-^_A7-,^^ ^-P-Z~^- /'--_^_^^


/-^' rx T ,/ ^ y 7 -^



AL _/lLC *"'g "j--n f yT
i ^/^ -^_^ ^-^_<^ ^,' ^





J,





*T- /
t






---L~---I~ 4D~~~~ ~

. -- ; _- ----



*1 -.. 51% ~ -C._, C L _e",





A ^^ -- .-- -
ii^~~~) -^y /\-^









p1_ 7~ ________~D~- -C Z~.-~zl---
( 17





A I"-
y/ y 7" / ^.






(^ - -- a -<-- ,^- -- -.-&-- - .... I_. i ^----...-<^ ",'-
y- ^^ c- L^ uL, ^*^T~L



"^ &c~ _



4,s a asaa s w
C T^^M ^ J/'A





C/
--^L-- F

------^J _-
j2 ~ -; F ;~ j
/~~~i' ib--^-^/ ^/ ^. '*^* .
/ ;'''"'

..^/_^//-i r ^ -^i yO^. /? ..._ M---- --

l-~R /'~ '' A-- '-BL b_~





<-^ ^--- .-,(>_ ^- /3^^,'
^^7 <;!te^&^ttWXil^"- *y^





/~ z




i- S3~




qii~
JNI
~-- ---2L

~L~-- __e--c~~_9
3--~~ ~i z~P~Af7 ~-
/ /;7
ik ____c-- 7?Ic .7t2-
p ~ ~ ---





st~ ~ ~ ~ ZZ '?Fi-L u/ L,~L3
/,vl J'~-r-CCB~

A (









Aii /


/ 1 /


~p 4L4S~
/ f "ICT.,-r --^ ^--






'^ ^- ^ ^ ^ /" A.






//
^^^L^ A f/^


















J/* -^
^^^^-*^^ ^.jil~l3-L_.'rp .^::^.^ ^-jrjf
/ *^i ~~~~'^'- \ '
I-^ ^ F Ye ^ ^ ^ "^ e ^

'"* 1^' -' ^ *' ''*'Q '
..j ^- *--z^ ^ r^
*1 l ^ *>
^ t-. *.f. -. yj -^ .t- -/
^c^~^^--^^^"


- r-z-.
~ -C~-'~-;~ -LC1~


-^^^s" "
I ~ ~ ~ r <'^ ^ ^: -


-~ .--w-




- 4i-~j ~--4 __n .


I -- '" ew-~~ V.I;


jr5


-d


-~-c'
9 r\ LJ`. C
L--
1 . -~t :
)it-~~
1 C~2-


J


-9z




















[! II ^- ^^^


* 1 r .4 / / ,.'
ca)4^ sA *y'i1" a Ai



\^-&arar ~ ~ ~ ~ A V'Scass^ ^--^^ j .;C^ a


tit
ct










. -\.s
...- 'i- i _, ^'^- T ^,











"-'4
I. e..



.-.- _..* ., ^ *. ., -,...' ** -! ; .






-., .. ^ "- -1 >.
**. ~" ^ a j " '* ^ A T I


N~U --.'~" 4.-,."""""""""~~

%-







4~ *




* ~ ~ ~ c ca._ltb._

r-- ,:-~ -~S~. U











Ft.Lt*jFla*8t-dfi ,.
0he; I, BSa



ils.;,Florenac atsons
Olreclant'c.,rla.

hk7 derr Mis! Wt.acnst--

Ycars ufthze Pth.n at "iand. Just aik from O.,S e&t.
Selingluritih .1 st. lat1.rns, Wis been lik'- tryizgtr fly nit3cut ..ings,
0or sw ,a oUrt i water& HMaWo ue-eer a-.s-eIed through slaol a year in :ry life,

Met sa :2in y..r..-day- whlc .y hielQ t..a situ lion in our n-AS.iborhnod;brt
can't b.- scre till iitldone, Loo!s GOOD thloug

As to miney,! weut to pB r'9w r y ?e&t'. 'he marin questio-n is,Can it be done?

I cer'tsal, vch I saw a vA;y ofitlipijng yougnt I do not"

Sc-ue,; r nota li Btersnl y,I n-er fo'ungr a rnoro Pes'ntely.
hcaltfup l a lse t 14y wbich to lir.i -.- rglife tian Ofeelr.tnt.* If I caiik J.remy
sle'epas I l4 ys c~el~thAre-- msarvor the ni gh'~ 'k; n plenty of ood.
whoi 3ane fooe, I3 could Cerl y the vordtheflelh endth .v dil:;i.
On fo4asa .on .La.uY Qtihel t] ings*'S loPi'nedmlongsfnoeto be g HIEML. I had
read ef things t- d5,ans1it to a Y);Vrn olloGrd t,0e7 tl nW n11 tona-ch l 1s *
0e.a y futu wa r .t4Q.t eu. i.I turned ?. son'rslgtt, athre tlcrus
.nto t!O -at.tle' basaet,~broke a .lot ofthermate what .T wantedsall I Ciw+nted,
plenty tf, it7he]rrTc I -V.i humvsrn o.iauld Ir: itrested after mealg,
forgot T habd a 3-itoianolan.i GOT WEiL.a That ras about 37 years ago. Practie-
ally ry day sifnccI 5iHLcstayed well


Dordially yours,

*j







4. .'- '9




LEr'S HELP FEED THE STAVTING.

In Europe, FAMINE stalks. Here, even, for many, it is at
the door.

Current literature teems with its pictures. See Delineator
for March (p.7).

Do we tare? Hoover says, "Famine is the mother of anarchy."

These conditions MUST be met. Simply to "save" is stupid.
We MUST ITC~i'U-3.

The UPPER GLADES are a Horn of Plenty. A vast area of its
"weed" lands is rei:ty NOW to farm.

pere, a handful of pioneers, at infinite cost to themselves
have. now s..olved the chief problems, agricultural and mechs.nical.

The era of experiment is paEt. Through actual, first-hand
experience on the -.rourn, for five years, the writer KNUWS.

On these lands, TODAY, can be produced excellent corn, mg.gnif-
Sicent sugar cane, poultry, hogs, boef cattle, datry cows, and unlimited
f needs.

S-low it is necessary but the "thrust in the sickle, and reap...
for the harvest...is ripe."

While millions perish, shtll we loiter and temporize?

"What shall w- do?" I submit twoPHRACTICAL PROPOSITIONS, cov-
Sering, respeTiveley, con anci cane.

SI CORN-OROW ING


a~I~--~- -I


--





II



ft .Ld- F, aa6-15-22.
My dear I-:No pris--
Jut back fora 3 .dn. at .Pailn J.eaoh ^aC good ones,too*
Think I havq g ox our nal troubles settled right. HWope so.o
We are on evre qfn-IT7 Rand Bond Issne. learnae it will be for SOC qO.t0,
with. ier C1" finivbing ta-le Oialas asstep If soPoars wJll' certainlyy
be fintshc4, t oo. -.
Had % good tall with 0oi ofblggest ai themre-, Wuta helPp Iin. ay way he
can. Qtizzd3,aEixcun.g I ai .koen' or Okeflirntoaaflogresat RonI,vh. ort-taui
in.' e ,'.-4 4ta yctri.ct for a .ye-ii' to Cwat .us a ut xfo. We ihavo a50) In
ba:Si nor. to bulldit, bt :irerefusea. ixt anymy.* Oo.Cor=sra a';in.st us.
Thisruna;aa2i4' I'll get it for youa Dont you worry.* 'hen he aeplL ned oL
Look good., .
Sais Ton B"EyanWPi ~s t~ .sufTace road frrom W.Palic Bench ,.,Aal to ielle
.Gli4l* o. ll me he will be past Seer wqrtih by e rly or middle fall* That
shoula get his work dpne to Hl3ts;borao e5oe1g.nby trai1 .1 shall 9asL.-that
our 4Clad qM4 be .ftilitiPeG by aJIUT iUE. It CAN he asswell avs not Then
we -at. :'rm by car fro.m ()k.oo W.P.Deanh in an hotr and hall* Bowisthat ,
And Ty XmLas? -
Iavre uorPLd nit a roopo-rI" .]ngt.gett .it?; Go:torTj! ppl. that a-y be
vor'h a lot to thLn an;aistoo. r-r tei1 you more latcm.
Stumble cnto a ra-an rc.-r.sc2i/in5 .aIU sJort" cf cor'nra'rtemonyov Pr J;arnng to
buy crveral j. otioQir JZathCe bqUre d*r1itateni in. rvdcr:+coa, hen i -7.7 sell
his lbea.vaing grey4q o,,t 4 e :2'a0 ..anrint; a big town. site,,arWuantsate
nak!e OJcULntv I T. Is eqRring 4gon be'.: sonn t'e' rne novo ft-ly.jbtit
it. I had- .ri, 4 S;OeQL: iut e totary tl;:oda b c2r.: :, n Sansible Setlee nt.
IRe h!as read. .it i. in .tbe Post,-.ina wna treaty :~qisedd* W"anted t: see meo
Sug~.-estc. tl.::t ur rt ...i r a rvideCntial. o'll hope aoamthing
will come cfit* A
Have .v'tlue2 qixer o? '-Se 20W09. as*, atC you wrote "n,,.nd-a.kd -I U : to
protat us. TQld hiv.erof rQbg. ;-r,? aihila -ae, 4a&eyoursor
at! ,-11 s before me. ao Ea m leotte- of :- ir () e10 t--, youagwhol
c.ai-b.to.i B:.-e. your ftrc r ipn a .vay .to fharunl tl ..s QlCriston. I
don' want to, dirsurage anm good rhitt But I an. very elear tht SB(kT- ,
TrAATIr: iq Aea2 ti ladess business.. nd t3hc' is o. l1. s.t. L:oostAn
finaebut it..ro7n't mix,yet,-~vith a point as f-_r a'Fpy at st keelmanta in piran-ciqal'
S:-r.ig I.rTc alrs;te evaylJthingto unloaraaenl e-1.oarni f'a 1,-m2ing
lines when wo hit the .Glades.
SIa!l bTrgld to learn o your ethlrc6 other inhnP on ti;o 20,000 a., HereA
a :_IGH', G':-D TATaIIti PCIrTf-, .. .
li.R.Gritfin an old Qkeeat famcr dcrascorT hn-,.dles t': C0. in IOke an
Canal4,nar So.rin3 orf P.Baaei Oovind?,QUiG .a, I .lsrq that tia.- lTi ndt-). bout
as Paw and unpurodotive,till ithas hId a Lot ofr-4miningal. rr .grin..s
oomldloell tbo .c iu.. r.I fi-n tcld C, he -h.d d Fug a; : -sh1 S Fwith a gr~,.
A lloeeplnated it in potft es,auad thenbctEve;,n tp u ashe hod plants oorp ..
ot.-,.tocsrrre not V -y l.l-nty,?first oropn but l o' andbig AThsd-A .:cn) he
t-' +3i' + a,,.- na..0tr nbh A-
sayis FINE. Thinkz of .that on such lint T"k whrct buh o' ri h ICn
c.a utli-ofriQi, it is cos goad Pows
ert.,inly s-pe DuSa. et. al -1 will ..c .ethri, thy 2h.ish t3 .l..srl lr
esthat Lt1t le..opQsitio n 1U Q 0 0 DB, ly can't you interest your ftnamer.
friends in it nqwt .Eard tuo -beat that'. taor anotcier try-3,1 1%'lieve ot4Gc A
prop. .il.11 be aVIEY9i Thi3 praaomotr L:.yaha h-!.R h-.d thoeboit expert awie *a
iag a-and is SRE ocr. iadis Q. for that fruit.

fa^^^M^^^ *.^^ ^il-











.5.
. e folloi.g forr.:--

ESCROW DEPOSIT FOR PLO'INIG LANES

The Ft. Lauderdale State Bank,
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.

Gentlemen:--
Enclosed find _Dollars ('. ) to be depos-
ited in escrow,as advance payment at ;10.00 per acre, to Thos, E. Will
S for plowing the following land:--Tract NO. ,in Section __
T. ,S.,R. E., being acres. Whenever the s.id Thos.
E. Will hall show, by competent witness, that Five Acres (5 as.) or
more, of the above tract has been properly plowed, you are hereby author-
ized .to pay him, out ff the above deposit, at the rate of Ten Dollars
(0I.00) per acre fcr all land plowed.

If, ninety (SO) d.ys from this date, the above land shall not
S nave been ploughed, I am at liberty to withdraw the above deposit, pr o-
vided I h.-ve first written s?.id Thos. E. Will thirty days' notice.

Signed P.O._

Witness Date

ACCEPT NCES

CuC out those you do not accept, sign, and return acceptance
to writer.

I, LORN GROWING PPOPOSITION:-- I hereby accept the above Corn-
Growing Proposition for acres.

II. SUGAR CANE GROWING PROPOSITION:---I hereby accept the above
Sugar-C?.ne Growing Proposition, Offer NO. for acres. My land
is Tract No. in Sec. ,T R.

III. PLOWIiG PROPOSITION:-- I hereby accept the above Plowing
Proposition fo_ acres, namely Tr.ct NO. in Sec. ,T._ ,
R. ; and at. sending escrow deposit to bank.

Signed P.O.

Witness Date

*e * * * * * * * * * .* * I* * * * *



Thos. N. Will, .
Okeelanta, Fla.

SAddress, Box 285,
. Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.

IIT- ;,,o -,i






A


S.O.d.(21
Th:-frut Litself q--n't be beaten ;utiia a&slly Si itei I'uP, wilxtork i4:lled%
but. hWr.pd ones Ihate sirQhb.en forani.thSa w e are AS-?RED will sott-.dth;I :.-rther'.
if mrsdc W:A ir- yung srug S-,t0q.voagot a bonanzari'lht t' :re. rn t.'.e" are
the chickeens3 c;:xtie-,carn, etcb 4
Can' t anderstandtj2erpanio condition you have. Don't se, that icti oP stuff
in ? r.,c. Talk is quite hTopetful. A'r:ther.eLO.AL cenrdi .r.ntl

R.!I. _rokpefctj fo G :eclmant a still loonk fitne

iow tiher you bive a. lot of goq4,boo3stng stufP. ,.Ree: uP your courage*
* they that be for as arcwle than am. beagainst us.*


An vnr y:gtrs5


III


- 1-Y- -- - -- --- ------ --- -- --- --




I.4.


LS


b) The;remaining expenses, we will meet out of sa3es
of crop.
Pc) The Net, we will divide equally; statement, and
your check, to be sent you direct by buyer.

II. SUGAR-CANE CROWING

What cane will do is shown by enclosed literature. It is the
coming GREAT GLAD-ES CROP. Cane-growing costs something, the first
year. Thereafter, it costs little, and it means things unutterable.
Piant a small acreage if you cannot plant a larger one.

Here are two offers. Take your choice.

1) Offer No. 1:FARI.NG YOUR LAND:--We will handle your land,
plow it, furnish and plant seed, kill weeds, and take first crop, only; OR



















Pt

RE;KPblc c1cg.s

-At It-ist ty r rthn *' rt
*c 12 1 .


this s- your o..f.C oCn hI,"Id -I if : 7:fl ,2r- ::: ;T -:

Chisf i.3 ,: tP- .?0,00, as -.s --n tm -uder. U. -:.m l b i 'ht P"o- F,, ".::,.o

Mly i.gent ir. KMmuaa City hbmtcd. up n buyer fo- tintr-ct;wrct mc t' t 1-i'.
hol gc l *Ct ii'.an.a t on 1 n Ir mn-'. itu 0, 1 4- I' T. I 'I r r - z.
prospective. buygcri, J ,oeleno will not J.y !.o r!ml :agc:rnt,bnt ,- ir.: ;he
.: 2 r.Tf hlie -C n as to 1ut the .icnon ut ;t ,i ._ . ,..3 ....... to
oliva at ImAo)oK sa fl ra b 1 lrne aRow in .rJL3 -l C'r4-ST -I.

y t '. o -
3zwt3e ?gurOB.Zld(Zt ncMC O, .it irtO09t. Hoer.'rr,tha3 ;:nrt 2 OE-
Sid* cn ht is fo.LT. o'win \i3Loe ri er' upt tgh now, through so;. S:t t, 7
rBi-ocjan'will look you p.
No :.th~a ist-3 ostalll tm~T ps :- cut my ager.t lLatz7a.:Clfnt fpt!. tr ~
etion, We will pr'r~ ablyliver no clrtunity to-~t she hin, t!:.'.nl :' t..l ,
thbe sale. Howeoer-pli9e loctkymf, or your .ro"pes ?nti..v4e:.np ctu:_1.t7u.,
buysth i' t. not2.y you of tt,-urt -e hwv pl ii- te Mri5L'.to. 'ct

tbi. '-.tter. ee se, t-_2.F .. e tE 'D., t'43t'. l."

AgainI h.. an import I sontrmio?':. yetr r-ly ii t, tcropr:esctntative .f
very la.rSe interests who iSrosing to bu- n Lvr:? 3.r'ti-o i T.I: 'C.L.

soil ripecnops, ty or 'm. bs ?frbo. SoRDly7 tso I;oL eC!"n-Ithhgh1 hcr".t u 2 the

yoU .my rprefor s-ale in te S ;'.nasoth P t. B o na .1 .: , ,
miles, pQ .'~loYiEsIr d to o -171 oin 1LC "n ai feow da ysL;andLe ie to knul very -rell
wit bhe is icabout Ha been s ia nudrt. iti v nc.ioni i,,on sloverA l months.
If you ar away hope ylour orC-hor
Very truly youra,





". qil [ Ie.lnds. WUl( n yIeL PL O O0e 'nan
ragoe of i11i. hampers per acre. He
,;iiw planiting a fourth crop for the
S.',. The alth i.f hi, entire family
excellent. Thi. farmer thinks that
Shug industry. with cattle arnd f..raLge
,'ips. one of the best paying of the
iming *inlustries of the Evcergladg-.
e says the fertility of the soil i4 beyond
t-estion -This farmer paid $5ei per
ire for hi-. land and has refused $250
er acre Pfr It.
Another man on 30 acres ofland for
lne.le't (eL p-cuii ... .. blcb he paid $65 per acre. planted it
adequate price-fxi=n anil marketing to Irish potatoes. obtained a yield of
systems for farmers generally. Luicluding $.0f1Il0 bushels, which netted him suifici-
those int the '*la-iles still amrit the eat to pay for the land. clearing ex-
nctiuu of a tardy iG rverument, and a pense-s, breaking the soil. and putting it
farmers' banking system. ettablibhel a in shape to plant, seed. eulrivt tii.m,
year ago, is not yet fully operative. harrvetiug, hampers anid marketing,
Noitwithstanding all this. 'Glades and he had left between .$2,1.111i and
farminiz i< unilder way. Not only pat[.-hesz $2.100. He fed 'the ciil p,.tatoes to
hut'. field are teing cu!rivated, alnd hoi.s. of which he poesq,<-s about 200.
actual re'ultl acc-,,ompli-L-d. iRe,-.'rdIs IOu 4:3 ae-r t* he IlIa plantedl rorn for a
if majiy of the- ehare recently been i: .l- -uimmer crop that is nr, n alout 10 feet
luted, embodied in affidavit form. s;i_,- hi-h. i-timated yield from S:u t, 100
le, iwcoru to, and filed for ready refer- bubhel per a-re.
ence. Foill,-iihg are .yiin.w.e- pualii-l An.,ther firmer who ca hliere frmni
eil in the Fort L.iurl-r'llle Seinthel f,..r Okl.a hlima. hal 5 acires rentd at $'- per
.Juinle .K. 1917: a, re half a-re of '-elery yiel,h' d :-tll:
i-rdIe-. ettiin hlm no aotu7r 70 i:eit', per
WHAT THE EVERGLADES .rat,-: "ne a-re yelled 12.-5 inzel -of
L A \iR DD l l Errn piotat Il- w'iilb he ',ild at an auvrace of


- Alrf V 1-i \VYiAVtj-.iL


It i nro longer a nmoo'ted liuu-.tii.,li in
thi-. part of Fl'rida wbhtther r r u...t the
umuck soil of tih Everaiile n iil l-r,,.v

The worst kriocker in th, w..rld I'e--
co-mes an Everlaile I,":'st.:r when ,,once
he examines the 'glat es nrtic, aind a':-
tually -ee the crops rrow. SeeiniAl is le-
ileving with the real tf:rmer.
Bunt mrhnr t}m.h -v-rr.lm-e. f.rPnir ike--


1anu acre or peas by Vold. Has "-'I) col-
onies bees which average him r$10 profit
per :col.mny per year. W\muld le-itate
ali-irt accepting $21;ii per acre for hii
:inid. anld then tnly to buy more.
Another farmer has five acres set in
grapefruit The trees are three years
old and some of them are 14 inches in
circumference and 14 feet high. He
believ-e' this is the only soil for citrus
fruit. -This farmer planted onean,] a
half aIre. in cabbage which sold, for
about $SO. On a 1% acre field he ha'
gru.wn two crops. beans and potaroe'
The third crop. potatoes, i- now growing
with c-.rnn plaited tetweeu the r.-ws
which will make crop No. 4 for this
land thi; season. Off "I .of an acre ,of
Irih .p.,taroes be obtained 1601. Iushlek
and from less than l 2 at-re 'Altainell- 6S
lIuhliel- Be:aus yieldled ll ti hauipers
to 11-2 acres. selling at on average of
$1 40 a hamper. This farmer believe-
soil will pritiluce anything piaitM-d antl
he rai-ed for hi- o-wnu u'e every known
a:'immon variety -.-f garden truck
Aj,.tlher man frum I- ant-re a t.linedl $12' n\.rthl : 3 at re ., pltatioe-_
yielded iu0 2 I.' heis, cellin-? at .'2 41"
av-rgte: atre' potat'.-, planui lI with
pI.r seed. ylelded l 9111 lIuhel-, averay-
lig about $1 Cit per I1u.: 2 at-re- .--ti-
mq Itel viehl n,.t.atr-'ts i75 lii a-i- rnrmhii-


$2-50 per bi-ltel Ha. third er.,p ,.f .$1 il per lihiper. Dry weather and
..l'rn andt think the ':il mire fertile '..li redli.ed yield. From :t4 nfr-r c;al-
thaii in ahil l =i_-u- .i,, a' well a- in iOi hiahmin a. ,l,.tairiel 349. irate-, sellingg 242 crate-
.itli'r fairuter Iaittitrl a fir-t c-r.,p at $1 -'7 and 7IT at 72 i-ents. At present
of I,.tat...t-s wlrliec -ais it .-birrt l. the time this farmer has 11 hogs, 1ii lhinad
I.:...1 lut fr,m. w ichi, he harvt .ted 3i5t I-:ttle and one Ih.re Mhilth feel on wild
hamiiiper- atid -I:ld them at an niertali gritEI Lnlti\'e to the 'tlades. He also
pri'-c ,f $2i ,1 b.i.onipr. _Ieh al bhaid |pIlanuts irti. millet anid nartarl rna-s ft.r
4 acr.- of eg-ipant wilich yi..tldei 41111 feed. Ha.- ten ac-re~- '..ra planted ofl
crate,. at raging .1 2.5 a -*rate. iOne tland -f,,m wlit-li tw,-. cr-.p'. .f pilat.,,-
r,-r o f ,, vh ,s rielh-.d 1.- ir l.. . ....I 1-t..-... r-',..-.n .1.h..


letter than -eeilr the 'r,,-p gr-row is the -soll fo-r $1 2.; a hamper. One acre --f 100 c.hic-kenr. Eleven memlicers ti faio-
harve-t of "the Lgren- tbat'- in-ng" an peas damaged y' d prd -r*. old prodr ed only iiy : health g.oj : believes a an .a
here the Sentinel furnishes its readers 561 halipers whi,-b he s.oldl ftr $2.50 a -upport and raise a goo:d sizel family
a few cotnicrete examples if the harvest hamper. Second crop, 13 acres of po- on a smallerr acreoae in the Everzlatle--
the reports ,f'whith were compiledd by tatoes yielded 1.6111. bushels which sold than he can in the tnorthern state
a prominent re'idlent of Ft. Lauderdale. for $1.40 a hamper and one acre celery. land most assuredly live more -.inmfi.r-
iian I .ieked iby affrldavits iu his pioses- 400 : Irate.i wbhih brot. net. 75 t. ilto a tably.--Editor.
si1n.-[ Ed.] crate. Third crop, 15 acres corn grow,- Another man owns ilSO acres, for
One Everglade4 farmer after losing ing fiie. Farmer 'ays land i- fertile which he paid from $30 to $s0 per acre.
two crops. one from inadequate drain- and produce tive and nol.ody would at- Raised all kinds of vegetable and for-
age and one from the extreme cold of tempt to deny it when they see the erps. age. Main crop this year was potatoe-s
last winter, planted eight acres of Irish Another man r om total acreage plant- -19 acres yielded better than 1,900 bu.,


wml I'rtilUle neavler at.Csoere lIfT-- Ml-
aintly trb n any t '.. il IIe hIl -i; on in tlhe
U..' or i.' n.ihda. [-.i-t tv iIve ,lildlh ..n
iIn ftiiily, ij iy- a. il l girls, .all go,.JI
health. Owns 22 hogs, cow and horse,
about 70 chickens, 17 turkeys and 6
ducks anki all do well, especially the
turkeys Would not take less than
$200 per acre for his home police.
One commission man operating in and
around Ft. Lauderdale during the 1916-
1917 shipping season, handled for
Evergladei_ farmers approximately 72-
264 pai'ckages of vegetables, consisting
tof peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, cauli-
flower, lettuce, cabbage, turnips, rad-
isbes. IrI-h potatoes, celery, romaine,
isqUlisin. beets, carrots, peas, bananas,
I.eans, et,., for which he returned to
tbhe 't;ludes farmers $120,204.91. This
cot:miNisi-. u merchant believes he
hniti.led about 50 per cent of the vege-
tal.le h.lipped from this section of the
E. IrI hlle.-,. *


THE OKEELANTA-
FRUITCREST DISTRICT

The One Successful Settlement in the
Upper 'Glades.

I. F'tIITCREST-The Banner Pro-
p,-,-ilriii for settlement and develop-
mel. i;roups and organizes buyers.
"'oi'ii'e' oe,,,,'.-r:iilr with individual
nct..ii. Management, with tractors and
manlih.-ry, leads in pioneering. Sells
iaIl at -t'. rifice prices.
II. NEW OKEELANTA-The Upper
'Gl.le- T.,wn. On canal crossing, pro-
je.-rel I'r.ss-State Rail Road and at
fork ..f '.-ured Cross-State Rock Road
froil Palm Beach to Ft. Myers. Comn-
rlrses .Store, Post Office, Hotel, Board-
IIg Hi.u-e, Town Hall, Barber Shop,
BRki h,-,. Notary's Office, School, Sun-
ilay S,. hit;1, Cooperative Association,
<.;'od Times Club, two Development Or-
ganizations, etc. Center of thriving
farming community. The "One Bright
Spot" between Ft Laulerdale and Lake
Okeecholee. Address
THOSE. E. WILL,
Ft. Lauderdale anid COkeelanta, Fla .


_. ~T




* -


FtL..al.....erdalelae ,Jue ,111922.

d
o es e artiq( Mapt.n Solene),




Rugrxgag-rem Wl.ap- BinatC4ifl. your lettos of ".410 to So.jla. Dervlopr-oy
aid copy of reply thYretoqdteo 6-0-10-2.

tollog e-

-sat---- ---3-1-34 ._ ~- -
.8 91 Ro:lmaes 3^838, < ..... -
4..g.l9. SU1 -- 3.a a ._ M asdsa ?lsil)
i ei t s,,4 w,, ._ "
A- .re aresnaer-ous otJi3r letters Jin the file,oyveringv r'irou1s a-sp ots ta
our cound-in -Ti3ea-a.- - ..---n- -
Thesw ltte~ rat"at 3ayf ansQerg4" jou sevg.e-ril queSatMqrvry
cartf~ ,llyUpc lOally an'd lu &etLd., 9As 4 -ou Iet--u-~t~ -.c; rr- pqinto
lag p, sf DL^ Th *tat oupias a J4:(T ARLf'Ji:JttrTyr- io1 an or;ik-
nary Iai4 selli-v iS rpositQnet Ti'l ; I'uI nt --4ttr- ill -w1%hich- W- afllr -~ in -
-ether to grve p oaaoran' eni,* In =mne letter,( porrl),I dtith. Yoq,
.rsmembar thit lqapo 4 -B tT3marntrct- A-etafrth tht. tkhe_ deajLLcW_
after fle bayer..bas pai4auithq tirt a60o81 ywj. alaqs bqi 64ML .'Tor *.f
th&R1*rb frlrdfEr l7409 -ta _g ve4_ been aeedeoa .irst to
me, glby meiTollawitg n aegreesient ye entered into.. tliy. irwv begai
-Aede.r---- Ptrefeas. -o holdror the buyro tll tho en tire seoticn hras
been y l.dfor.
od6 lh..1,T ponslted out tilat( pXp^parx,43" q1LLtorelt has a :ato of property other ownybut I wyrItto 9ee s. u1tlah o0 it as pr:.sticable s' vOd
for d(.wcloprment: worl#tjint 1, I was pusJrl.nly hardcto complete t'!ora.ymrnt ,on
the sQqtion atndsoQe thct the .deeds are. iQt sne4- ;,and thItmto ,oxap(ia.ite :'attera
anr..ooseyrothlo r interest propertLqsjX amn ma cLns a very ppuitl ,'ropo1Es
tAon to naoberse ofthe rntitorest Assn.) whrebIy I wou ult frnidrr frorn T.
t.L -ft^~iaaa^







ROPEtlTIESIl NEW OKEELANTA,lots'--suTficient to. pay ..he enti'retbnance e
Sduc on F. .(Sec.27 ;on oo ndition theimber'swouldhelp put the transaction
t trough;&ther by buyingthem themselves,or sllinitIlem;every dolln of
-tion prooeedsi WoulA4-o- directly -to our creditor in payment of the said
balance due on eo6Y2.





iSpae,byour Trustees of the deeds to us all; myself as well as to you.

9s l* Wlhat aqu~lTabe a qre ,single aaairt If3W ouri* minberswf11 !tlqp.l l
rE~iish I~ts ae'lp^_t -t --3asLt; -whioJL 4OitQQStur yseW- bat-I -dn want ^b S/
.equgh As Wnitra n tov_ _vqLhg wole, yse-- t, --- a.-

Str eott....r -r You kzw Cpom
ir.A-t,I ;wis 'reart. and8E soul a s- T bS nt Ipion cooperj.tio1 with you .i
mndertaer_ is -4--Mor-o tn--sthe-thr- -- -r1t.) .- ..
. .. Fi n
12w&8-f, ,Iwmotefou: tta s AalYO-aZl- to get addmrtb or w" ete -

? 2-24,22,you wrote 0 1in roRly to). y lcttqer oJg-Z*m LSauurl
of s-.a-riiavrce-slcct gzeaa t zr:stery to me by cal-ing at tentiwon
ayse .4. I stated.. that .1 tad lost -:y original rirtract Uer durinagjjje*
hLLJId ]a2eeoll t& -1f-e rlr;e oginzjts.... Oldt yp Id Lqidly please
a duplicate to f ro.iarto. me... Hoig to ha.rfrr:n you ,t oonvonionce c
_iin Y-urs with great _a .iatioaattal e:eFra- t anl ciOnfd .~ttn__ ,

S-8-22, I sen you the di, Jng- tc c o o'thI? .t ,-S a .. .
m-eager t e af tgien theflnal :ayment imn be madethe daeds iswued..
asbeeZ thts!dest ycaawrinriial, of jmy lirfe not ESoGptinith i ani.
-ofI89314- I einted httar-n rtp Heiac bsh: vecb,*'rei .f -e
aur Membebrsi eqxtr.torcdin'sy,. "J.ey .,;eoat 4c to .do alltho vworkatClL -
he bJls I_e~ l olased t 1 a,- r-- reeeit 1tt~.;Irurcze p it g..L ycoto g -....
as a as-per.tive. merie-Tbcr orau.o g z.ztiLn Or uuca on a rn:tua. basis. Korap 1
orr-on gocd o.f. q.1 .onceri_ ti3 ne tt.er- .oe ly-. n. r-ply. Yur v
comnmaItion waic o the 0So.la. Deenloyper~,dt-id y 10,192 '

w--T.so.gtWan 1WyeitrTh mit' rabQrs- wo ildr delp jr3tii 06riconcr b trtAAa
SA very Se r 1 rerCentgta ofthem do a little jEost do not anrtldIng., I
:~-agar than --- nue--e.se3^ pr IlY afr^-e ,esca-ee l o imsly t s.r- t-.--
r reason than to rellgre myself of tlhe trm burden. Not a Uine AS our .4 r
t minaxesime xrs oniliy r-speonsibl l frl tl tIQsoLC O-iCEontia tnqi tn' i n*
awhile- deeds w:!.t have n.ray.s shn ,tht- tx..ws ',-id. In -"re Instancs
bser s1o2 t 0 a1l lilt3gW-ss to f' thq tas 0o: na jJxIld-vhA11II rlainfl@you hve
-at n iwwaited arTIh rIfIlFM ahltfile tiQ Uieli even to h!t extent he PZ
erty waulc.9 AsinoC Jre..T be n iaaor.-ifcd ?or ts=c3. o Last yoartLh: Prti.t
-fia--t- ws -$6B0&,a thisl- piddeorv y tcnt ant it sy apri teporsoanal
ot. Youindtwo. QttorP )'&'.befrp:'d their 1 ,Ow. t.- x b b'at o 4U. The't is all
_rcape- tbat _a GOASJaLLTIVi AEOCIATIGNH isn E.rg.idrzftiei ft ibish all aretn
osed to help.
Cordally yours, _- --- --
e4Vfj ,v(..









B . .. . . .a" *-. I .-' ; 7, ,2 ,' - i "

lir..A.i : Tha'-.ci.p9





9' ";" .,, "... ,": .- . ... .. - :- '- .-.-'.:- t b t b e ... ...... thr.
: tL -.- p. s .e L" ... '-. "- 0, C-
i *3:o: .: 1.: slyi .;l m-' v to'-:- x-; :L -- wie -' Bb .;L ML'i.,*-j. pV't .

"r- -. '. .. i. .. .. ;. ... .. -..T ,.,. ; -uri. '. d."I..:.


__ T*' 'jyho.i
: 3-. L~" -5.s:^, "' i "- ' o- - b i8 .. -


.H. ,. -'-, 4. .- t- -


-"*-"-.- .-. . 2- '*.- : r' *. ..,. *.. ..... ".:. ." '' .^ ,-.. : 1,, ,
_,," .'. : .'"+"'-^ .i'gl.-.^. -* "_. ,;:, t= :_. -"". -: _..1+ b: *. ", '.*.""




"l . '-,,' I V .... 2 Q ,i -t'" .A .. .. '- .' ... -' 0 .. ... ""
.. .. .. .. .... .. - . ". -' .. .. "



.. .. .. ... .

.: -. ..-
--~~ ... .. '.s.. ... . ... .. i "..
.- +.?3~ ..-., .,. . _'-'
15 +~


- L












uEe .:~-olowiL-g iorTL:--

ESCROW DEPOSIT FOR PLO'VINC LANIIS


The Ft. Lauderdale State Bank,
SFt. Lauderdale, Fl?.,


Gentlemen:--
S. Enclosed find _Dollars (, ) to be depos-
ited in escrow,a's advance payment at 10.00 per acre, to Thos. E. Will
for plowing th. following land:--Tract NO. ,in Section ,
T. ,S.,R. .,__ being acres. Whenever the said Thos.
E. Will hall show, by competent witness, that Five Acres (5 as,) or
S more, of the above trsct has been properly plowed, you are hereby author-
-ized to pay hirm, out df the above deposit, at the rate of Ten Dollars
(..L0.00) per acre fur all land plowed.

If, ninety (90) ti-.ys irom this d.te, the above land shall not
have been plcughed, I am at liberty to withdraw the above deposit, pr o-
vided I h:..ve first written s:.id Thos. E. Will thirty days' notice.


Signed

witness


DtP.O.
Date


ACCEPTANCE


Cut out those yo
to writer.

* I. GCOR'] GROWING
Growing Prroposition -f


u do not-accept, sign, and return acceptance


PPOPG3ITIOG:-- i hereby accept the baa


I








4e00. ro- i a t--
ro t n e ar _.: _d. :!-'(. I w-,- *,- ..
talks recently 1 it? "ir.lH.U.,.-. lokh:Q-rCt 'b t
F.tiE trp),ot al .';T:1 Lo k ," :-]2.rl..- 1,-

rey cn4 y. Foroi L r*.it th e. i rta z. ''.. r- i"-"...
ao'obeS Q0iy* *i TIL; is o. ,S J.r,, w* a t.i. p.1

..ad.,ew 'sa "

We dio 2,-d. d. 1 O;m, 0 :l t ?'t. .
lost glar senoo3, agd.iA' tUl.f' ',t y:carl *('jj4 u'-\';y.
Watt it t-c.i d. C'At trL.s"e .- f3 ...'.l_..1. ..:"t ii'
ihant I h-refacvil t.h if:-;. .y r.

Glad,. t. a- it ia g ,'ir.ic i' r::, r .-n:. -,, :1 ..'1e
t -hat a-r'-y l:ntq, ;fwre pici ''- a of 0: .'".J :.1l
l .sm-rryorast A dto-2ohto. ni': n "- vr.z... ,-
like Wea" tCg oat. News. to mO.s
Allnd ]i:!:s^y to ecl tbose tWtr!>n *i 1hn.
soon03 ,3ae theri: wIedor. your hiouso,rf y-7u 1.?
they sho.Tld "tty t hcir' 'nw rm;-.ntlygt, -, r-ct-- *
might r3fco 0i erVltIfllAcIeof t Pe or-7i3E-'I. 7;1uo y.
thou at tia# prcseut r'n1pYnao.o3 J ChouL.Z be t-,
My creittt, to bc&' :ido-Jlyi *' your Clo-xln no,

j Spent 3 e l-. i IT.-:., fl i- 3 1..' ., s r ; ;'.
txt did ",-ethi :Y',g hcps, M ."; ^,-' -'"C* !. ...
oGler t., Ates l elii.st .1.01.:u olu, T :.-- ..
re Ihn.n(M:.Ige n(ltl(ahi3a) oestult: A-.er; K't i; be
hajs .nil IT a -l. :L ..... -,. .,ht .-i :
Orders .t Ltc -a en,.-. .Sou$Bay toocl ;..*': '4. ubric
jwrilte huel'll.-1tt th--.; di-y( 18tia?)--.iho Jr'*j. ".

Sar s tJo::: [.a- ; lStLiQrE-i *bfit.Athu 2., .(-h r- r.
-f 50i 0 wrl?- 1- lTLm, .. 0 V.m.Jh who l
bb-at *.-r.i.. g.t.n W-eA.tiL W : -r T h' 1 -
kbeen hot c, -rt,,.i. of c,:., ,r.20> .1*, L i '. .oa




a-,-


II. SUGAR CANE GROWING PROPOSITION:---I hereby accept the above
I-Csne Gzowing Proposition, Offer NO. for acres. My land
act No. in Sec. ,T R.

III. PLOWING PROPOSITION:- I hereby accept the above Plowing
proposition fo.. __ cres, namely Tra.ct NO. in Sec. T.
S ;. and i.. senirng escrow deposit to bank.

igned P.O.

witness Date






Thos. E. Will,
Okeelanta, Fla.

Address, Box 285,
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla,









-."


'- -" +*' 1 *" ^^ ^ ^ ^ iiiiiitii







i oi. v r .( .) .- .
g .- .ic'he'vrte. 'as on(::, -r ro, : .- t.. .n, ." .1- ...
S.imog ,O a;,r;, t- ,r.toh troYr e'o,,.-v, .7n.f,-n, r1
informede, ";ost,1 113 il-,ri p"e;"" 't, ...:r7 it.
ir J 7ty 1jtf.t & ti .; it, ul -, .' V., P.. ,oh t I
S o rxim i A got.2 sio ,oni':t nd o,; c iar~---'r" ..C. r'l.!
pe hbira out -

S -'o ba3pen t wor' g ioi .. f Gri ,_r'.r I" r...: -
"ang lt.ope t-.,' ~L.'. itTiL n'.titt'. B-i.--.-i-., Ir 6,
be t 1i .hol q. t. a4R fZ; L.?g., t',le tn.y ; ,"-'J -1.
1n4,re 0rcr,. i'grorn d-?,erius rri.ghty .rTc?. ri ';3:t- -
lana., H itheDOiT" 4AV Who we:t Ir hln-rt. tarT *i, T'
tnacs of gtt-i-tcqur Ok-.-rl A.to 11 tlv..W 3ah .lT 1,1. P,
Mesa.s.r .DItthin FrxWroot( "clooaEod) hC:':.c-ar"ot.f;.l-. t ,.r
*wa a tot/ir atof strctgth to e ic !r rini.

Met z.pr s a't-atLv of I,, rG.oc.ul- Orrp. Wi. ftQ' .-
I hdr-p3pli* rill buy S:.LinA *: 3^:3%u-? wi,vc:l
I plrn t in h.ir.ly ti ko-doos *. 140 .o' -. r!' i' ,.
Sayntiey, want -a TOf ;.SITIiary ro re-'-.c-r .l
la a as -1;.%-t.M-* .'nt. 4 s r ctir 'Pli:; lt!." ,;i: ho
IegalEcd os 1l~~. uc r.i(t ,ing -T, lt :-j I .,Ta r n .,, r, ,.`' .
aMad'.-^ Lost reorn'^ o .C y UR<.t.ary Qiub saec0h
S-A*l on Sensibl-e aBettLemcnt*, ,-L. w iL .4,. oty
with it. eulm;:.to .laioT a lot .lu-t GQl:ndos.

Seapt aL thri. i-.: Ing,.'r r f, nr. rn O ,-
talked jpil17 withi (oo.):tIhatr1L:nryor 'o.'.
wofnza3 Udicuit i42ogr(irntecd Airjmnntion. T-131c. ,;:L I
with Juagc: CS.EQ4ing.7ort.h,too0 1gl2h'o.u beAM r:
itme Ja&.16919, .Judges 2-ro) tt -,:,ll no1 .91,..l
COrp. otffleern a ippo iri n.t. cp.' t.
asell land,or' borcrc on 1$ im canrtle. '.i V '- lit
and.poist;ftjirooood5 rnitstd .ahs UYh e:i:juthy Y. *p' c
-aagu.onc apontr: :.LI."st yc;.I ji, 3 '1 r1: t 1 jy
-tapamn gotA ?.10QPXq roar doirn nntbt:.n, il:',s
iw-ock dqpe, 4;jtr .p;hO, 4pa-t.-as bi:nCitl'. Y:.*' at.-
-8to.'ts g .* 6.cg p1701 ? IaW e:PnR l :2p-.*msE; io:.' CD.-
Ang to rL.* in Wint.er o .Aoetiny. IIT .:it -:tce.'"

ol dge pu igell t 'vof.. '", c anrc.Z i t,'jrs I( c Io ap-
lJeS roe, 7.^;^ .; .r
14;lenv of u317:' Rg. .












LET'S HELP FEED THE STARV IG.

In Europe, FAMINE stalks. Here, even, for many, it is at
thi door.

Current literature teems with its pictures. See Delineator
for March (p.7).

Do we care? Hoover says, "Famine is the mother of anarchy."

ThEse conditions MUST be met. Simply to "save" is stupid.
We MLUST MCr'L'JE.

The UTPER GLADE3 are a Horn of Plenty. A vast area of its
"weed" lands is re?..ly UOW to farm.

pere, a handful of pioneers, at infinite cost to themselves
have now solved the chief problems, agricultural and mechanical.

The era of experiment is past. Through actual, first-hand
experience on the ground, for five years, the writer KNOWS.

On these lands, TODAY, can be produced excellent corn, magnif-
icent sugar cane, poultry, hogs, beeef cattle, datry cows, and unlimit
feeds.

Now it is necpssar h
for the ~h"r 4




I I T

I 'P ,' ,h f 1 ,,
Ca nge_ ,,-' *.. .1 ;: L '.'* ; ,_"- ; ,, ;. ,


I' Q 1 j'u!.io .. .. '..
-f,:, '." .v' ,F ,., ...:- l, 3 r : 'i -
catpo '.'. t .l c'- ' i5 ' : 4
1 a d .|. w. a |
ooGtAiupt tsi cr.Y
r' J t .*. i. i ,




SP w ll ^.C'j c -e~', 8 i t
0orkcoian ysLt( to in y t' *-15),' !
Cth.Li a. each O l-..,t.: r it 'u ..
If st ps '/. *C ou-o 4 G n +r.. ",r-', .
S o titti g : .,n ~ ,-' ,. -' '
T I .. ,,* h : ri I i . r .
i o: )ut thb 39 4r. ,r; *r- .oe
," -.0 he GA- .- fi .+ ... rto -. :"c,' - i

a 1g
b ie. r.'zLi -+ -aZtL' iit.. 7 :L, e -' 'b ,, '+ r I

S to :i j". r ,


Si., +, Fa ''-
S lontc


ea z t: I ,. ,: ; i
I ': 1". 1 "" t .. I




I I "

OI I S
, i i










*;t :.Liaiia. / ,-1 .
.r" u' Aoa. E.t Zavin-
bk"-* Uz .*






o t
.4. ;:.-m.1.r yo wi ', .; *- f.-r .h ..,c3 tlr,- *-

7'h l,. .9it ulwa it by iot-;d. -' '1 r a ... t f COt
- -'" 1 uotrinsi;.c wyointt4 -Aipaloolsccut fr .btn2;.a.
Il'tsi.eA. Vin v o. n g out .'? .or. c.


gao.4, jp.J..Icto e2ra.l'jxu:r w t *.':' *T'. wv:hh yqp I'
7olld sendnro o'coftthirs, -'it.IJ Tf 'in:1 uir
rt 'Or ~ .: "h. ..-i. Ir;: u- *i-'o.bli "' . -,d'.i. "


:- -oJ gle-'mr s niri-u; by p.-o.atf.4r.

.: a1 goXL tJ.. t Uh 1TiOcI ,towi!-y, 2pl'or
St..&jG ..2cCtci2:t ,.. ':*.*:. n,

L^oi 2.uai:, g'.'. 'd biy,.'r tz.r t2w.y, ?Lcp
you !.0ty i:o r' I ii tx.r.u'rx..


4" *
"^~~r




-''


*1


. -.


b) The remaining expenses, we will meat Qut of sales
of crop.
c) The Net, we will divide equally; statement, and
your check, to be sent you direct by buyer.

II. SUGAR-CANE GROWING
What cane will do is sho7n by enclosed literature. It is the
coming GREAT GLADES CROP. Cane-groving costs something, tne first
year. Thereafter, it costs little, and it means tnings unutterable.
Plant a small acreage if you cannot plant a larger one.


Here are two offers.


Take your choice.


1) Offer No. 1:FAR;.ING YOUR LAND:--We will handle your land,
plow it, furnish and plant seed, kill weeds, and take first crop, only; OR

2) Offer No. 2:--FAR.MING OUR LAND:--You will handle our land,
plow it, furnish and plant seed, kill weeds, and take first crop, only.

In each casse, OWNER controls second, and all subsequent crops.
(For mode of utilizing cane, See Sugar literature above.)

Under Offer NO.1, your land must be in or near Fruitcrest (Sec.27
or Okeelanta Addition, (sec. 35),both in T. 44, R. 36,(See plat enclos
and not taken by elder bushes. You will advance Fifty-Five Dollars
($55.00) per acre to cover cost of plowing, seed, planting, and. weed-
killing, less any part of this which you may have already advancedl '-un.
take as security, a mortgage on the first crop, and, outof .thijp co, .'..
get back your tiSFifty-Five Dollars (r3. 00) p.er cre, with six pe '.'
cent (6f) interest. We .take the r.emai.l-r. I-jr


If .vou


I--..


I


.-





1Zj /C^^^-(%
I ~~ /t'I~ A:' ~/ 6 (



z ///Af 2/




J -1 -~ e3 4 C- l ? u - -










-^.C-~i~i~ kA^ ^ f^
<^2<^~- e^f *=1-
f ffBC~CL/e -E^ C / ---
' -/^z^^U^ J'e-^C .f^^ ^Ut~/Z:~-^^t<^--Se, *-
pv/2r$rte a-h"73irnc?~~IfL3~






p

,-, /7 I- V





^^ a^-'-ZK^C -^ -?^ -- ^-y > ,r -y -^' / /



^<^ ^-e Ce cv-sfct^^C Aii^_^ ^rf^~e.^zc^g
^ ^




k~ "4. ^,~C cu~d~C





c/aT ^ --
^^6^ ^ /ssgsy1-^- k-ziecr -^- J'^Zy
/' -^. ^


I









Jltori a tratl Estatr JJournal
PHONE 1690 327-331 N. W. FIRST AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA
June 20, 1922


Mr. Thomas E. Will
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.

Dear Mr. Will --

I have been in the North for the past five weeks
and for this reason your letter of May 18th has
remained unanswered.

Of course you :mov.r that we did not meanto take a
slam at Okeelanta. In other words, we are not out
to slam any particular town or section. What I
tried to get in the map published was the entire
Glade section, including the lake and the only map
I could find giving that complete section was the
one we used.

I think it would be a good idea for somebody to get
up a map of this kind which would be up to date
and would show all of the roads -- now completed
and proposed.

I can assure you we will al'.ays be glad to get
anything concerning the Glades which will prove
of general interest to our readers.

With best wishes, we are,

Yours very truly,

iEAL ESTATE JOI.iiLL.2 .B. CO.













lk I It sumnad ere-a hqit
~$euaq iaglne e .desen et.'tnbetr~9 vjrone ar of ej~ At we hre
- boEZonaat ir w dodp t w tbeu. ftlit dhqau4 Nea sWOWSnr!V -
~ ~asst* y4.4s .nm.aws ar. as Troas ,t U y r sHeein neoadsfay tio 1wal st ..
ithgsa9 imwrtfpse twiagot.n pedhatept jaf e Hlirb i.noasentuaw Pept4tiaqsn f
flaft wyBjf IrsEwar 3 r gah nowriB w to speTndfthotCtKw a mniocy usel. it saeea

*8tqlraaw.Mt 41tii.reah Qjz& w 3r1. 4rz ysp z wa
ere tay a trqrers. ther
Vtgant be tahti ,pwft Or be4 W fe-dt AioBep qrth oteLrea J8
,e ?gsem~en^ .gsgatet 4fel oci -nmno;t wql4 somts than loaz
tast .g-ee h ce ann say tK G0,or g *
: .-. *.t rr *iai^ f no a s a pgoll as .Tie.Bips game .one .40oo aR0.-''


Si a Wty-ta ewn ever it mrqent r t* e Tnhe e,.rr
Tk-iit otfafap .sona quartqrsj .this cniznot F thr. the G7ve.
am 'A 6 es^q aPr tWurre iar wedgea 2 8t wvre .watr4 in Wqn- i
etioAn m ottq peuargoo.t ie a .n t &itt be ha ls cont antaftlon with

t ]at ,paiagt,.plivagett Ag4W f ist LtZ pogy^.i .4o AeQ Aoui* La3p r iP thQ
gM s.on e sprt$. opk Ltn ,GiSoua Wchr! arnd Stnlatdie tnala an
.''a aabweiWntg meet eO the ?rist*d &, au, i- .'
.W ,, - . ** _j 1 ' M-_ t ,i


iKSiott eqrs A loe4 llee 07.i 3-duat hMa M od 1oB bt 214 the .wl,3.
li.auAea?.crr s to 4* ins1I tnt4d. L2A* Ti n as.q tae san .oaL
atel .qem41 SSaWIM. Am t, n lawl surz;io saeana ian 18s a*gflnIcaue *a.
tw aet .0C the 4*nawl Be .a0a Y6tis oan0td tOaV thart nttat J eseneeA 1 3a -my G, Thae tbanf bill any ly et a
taS waa from.- frean .nothIe .q eE4arg3 o m.5the0
A&agt aq olate d t Qet Bi pu .agr ,ea Isti .w e ndoa-rse twc Ml :
stonnG urJoage Gagrtstes eo pvasa ,tp v t o s.ya 4J a -
"}'P ywsxai oB^odrrstad.ttee "mmmAal .4 'hiie.yoa eAq WL2 awun Bo oam
S.y' 3ee -.Sfc?% span hro^3asn| TQIv nB^,qhprewxl(<
d.a. tof fta~itaril s mfquaraL Bn O onfin* wSith Eim aa t~r*n ^eot t


d"atagw eai/ MiS twSyt .aawe SC aC watSW* in Blaleass cr.t i ..ots .IaiI sez
1 oats iEiiwtrgoeqtnat ePerg-iqnad b0e pet OSrtfiq ai .
Stsew lic2n3 are satedulfttor 2a .lAjIhmBo nay ca0re t40h VinUSi
me kano what 1 caE 9 ftrear slope daktfrii'tiox my n"t taper.*
-j -. 2_ s.- ....a :In.-. -~~_n~~~ -, _~ _~_U~L--





Con -
























FtLLauderda e, Fla., Juno 2 19 :?,

Mr, F. A. Shadlnge. 1r, President
Okonlkianl;i Co.'lUmnity Courcil,
Okeel ari a, lorida..

My dear' Mr. Sh.a.!dingert-

On the ;Lfthsinait*,I wrote youi of tVle conference .i'-lr qn the X3th.ii.tatst
Weat ,?l3m Bcaoh,bootwon .Ir. Glen V-.oIty.Asiist' t Ast C; a'Ain.Cr, .ni mnys.oWf
on 1hem control of' the water level ofthe Nort..h T-ow RPiver Oannl In that letter
I a aid- .
"Have beon ji'n i'est Pplm niei.o Hl a a good oonfreace with Ln ineer
Scott. TolIhin.:,all ouW' tr...'"e3. WeagrVoe.fully,-' i L1:.L
OONTROL in the great noted. He _mug--9sts it rtl.;h, i.; b e. ex.rci'so
through the Oon::i-nuIty Qour.cils .of O(Aeel-- ta,Souiti, ] rr .41 ;,'".q
Glade. These a~:'cing .qn a polloy, ,rul.. give Jrder'" to the loho
teolnder beblo'v Loeok 1., TI.! ": ( .- -l'-) wroulf1."? final uinles-, "i;illneer
ftiunIit necessary to mail-c o-h ngei s. S.ay.ys "'orpano corn'il js confroJled
1in thc L' wiy with per'fEc t ?nc3'i*o -v .; '. 'Aild uri1t1 'y gieee
Elliot tha:i se-mr-eday( 13th.) r-;, v:. ;mrding thispolioy* dill
a.w,'it rl~,turn- wilT!h he;,,.1 .-
Engineer ,Soott. lied orn eiii ;e? tmhiA2rnui:' ia ni.,i t 'thorwe 'rV:ieCid tie
entire snbjcctin all i's acE;iocts~, and ,ai ag'e on every vti: .I point.

-orc irLjortant,i!r.Soott r1oud-t -i4th Li a Ictter Pi A' on -inineer *, ,. niot tn
re',ly to Ir.r.Soot.ts letter to !ui following above oonfcrlnce.

In tli ro lyI iJLnootl Glliot -iointed out, the tiffloultieg sometime )it'einding
offo rls tol rd ii.-ighL'-crho<.d. ",.ro ':i'.nf t ".'.' con.i r:'- ltionr in' i oitl t ? fVi -'i lo
of a sinmilr attoapt inn an unerg-rizji :ia-igborho-l...

Howeverlthqc tadvantbges enjoyed by our- three corn .-o itieo beor'i -. (of thp-;',
existi1ngorgnniz. tion t-:: .ocpCiiZod,..nd :-. lliot oordinlly ra~sou t. to tbe
suggestion thatin our casenoighborhood Ganal Control be tried.

On hisroturn to ]ii ofgioe,some UI.ys h.noeTfr.oot',at xrmy reu4m1estgwir.ll wNit'e
Liofnr Ipubliotion,a letter' ebfodying t1i p1'aticfladinistr;tiv0 features
proposed.





** *-










. 1A
H 7 s-f,-.rby f.rrjj ;.- -,.: ??r.2.10H .us'TT i-.^ ^ *Lgc ,t lo'U: :3

S :..;,:.t, T is'le vis --

I-- IJ '. *
o: .- '. .. -i -. -'.e the Oc-::r y c u cic 3 f ',. .. .. ,. 3 .. -: .. -., .
hqi .O1'KT2 J Vi.. (' 0 I 0T ON0 T : F T'il.:I:: :IV

i7 .-- -ta.GU 'IVr -
- L'D ; r... ia." ':C--Lut C. '1 .' o"". tteh -, t :-- t -r: r *



, .-- :; TIk iG : :. :ra .j'L*- t i t';o :0 ;-.^,^ o -1:'., ***r-
b! ual._ ,'" c 1. i **-ic.u 5 o ; l .. ..0 "' .. "

.V-a Jibi L. -'. ;hc Txecztiv~< 1 i .- -. cot.: U .D < ; i .. t. -.
bir{-j- -;1 e'-- O-s.p to 4- -..- .' r .* +;'



ob-y
will ;iotiy .?eo trrt-:r;Thm 2.1% '. c-',:Gti JL-incor G~oot '. r ; .,' -, : 1'' 1,
w-'-.> n..tif. t" he! "t-r L : W" n.L 0 ", to 4 "' '-:" i -' :..S tu3, 4 '--7 '. .-
tici.lly .-..-.ot fc..,, tr ob"Ty iet T ri If .- 2A ANYn St


VI---3 :
5-;3 itL "~.wn -. . ,- -' .. : -. L *. a-',
,,! o-" t .' ..... ",,: r '- .""-n *- '- 1-, t'O "- --.,,P ',. ro s- ."' .: ,, ," -. ':, ts -
t. u. .-:s. : -;t-uT uZ o, ; .. res C-- . ''' t t...- ,


IBy tha nav">J 'pl. nt0 t:-1 ': ^pr^- CZ-^.:. .c .u .ioa^ ^I0.1: ;(I;l "
. .ar- ..r.. .. . o ," T.t t 1. v- "r '" ..."L -*.- r'. In -'
L V
ev.n f s
a '' "' "".. o.no:-.'..-l l. .n .--:tir *- . . .


S. .. ... e -? ' :* ". .
for ; :ilu's "ilit V1 1 ufllS r i::^ :" Ctv-;7 9---. l.- ,7' r~.f:I
t:.m' t it .7 L ,-,-v < the 2n >t,, : ic 7 cof! N '':ioUM t .'3."K.,
11 ?ueh evont,I -i .n t rmr rh Ui -" c- -.S '.i u:d_ t2. u_ .. ,
,, ^o

- ..... ",- "' "" ... -. .











II










? 4,


. ...A.. t : : e -a .. . .... . ... ,





I thu- tou f' .yr tL-ttcr .f t7:1 2th, I h',i -' y .u no
St.ationin thEr p MnttProth1 l thn c bet.a

he Ilord.- D valoprer geth up a fine !yp of the i. *R Qin.aogd
It covers rnft ; jn6 ..-it ,r :3 :r';... ( .:'), nt. g 3 Ii


I !ye .an thr.r out( ine.) I hat rr'parl .01e tt n. tbeolc;biit At
fno; needr: revision*
"- .. -
Sknow of none ov'rifng.tihe fDriag- ilayriot rih Thc t1 pa A
:;gicnecr o in oXo211; u Tt .-' :et;jil *ant
well up to d te.

I v- gind yorr ---1r i open tL GlL.sc mrpttersa. I ay ony you
trfe shnir UI: itfV:-.cl fi7t1I _sm, I t3lerP': 0 nse. I 1a
d&sappointad to Cnldthe Mirmi r aOlies so hf.rdi, entor with
Glaodej rt er. StttP thit gues rigjt 2mg wth LHe= Piil
W-P'rla.m 1eaoh? and hLkek Worth p.papr rarely seS the light in a

'lnosz n Seungb] SntUl...ii,5a it- in1 c='ls.. f et 0r1
h dojr ncr copypthi n subjeait. iyin i-, rn the .nost r1t I
at :n*-nsont s? all 5ei atufifL. Miami4 ugiht to se0 the pailt
ani get belriulit. We all reg;ti-hor as the GR.'RT Icww- sg t
Coast4 Oity. BRlscnWan cker aiLothorj.hL toldhcOt pf tqh3 aor;ance
to .her,of the Glaedogs;an"'.sensibleurrotpalsclaae set Atlvaunt is
thnc qn thing rm i 4 oh ;ITth jicart- Jh:. .1iou0 c(l spto'19sly
f:ii.llr down.. Minni i-iught tQ heir g; mt. nir te mi re.
hope yo0u rvA.y interest the brotnron A32 te preasi In this subject.

;inor'ly yours5 4






_-i ~ KANSAS CITY, MO. PHI Is a'
.... j iS2 l IX :,W' ,,-. *PHILIP S.DELAMNY,
'\ \'?'''~lL'S-*'C ..HENRY 0. RASON r,
V.W. HELM,
'"~_t ,.R.M. PRICE,



LA NO SALES COMPANY
..,* ,^"" 'fINCORPORATED)
S"v "- o TELEPHONE,
RPANDOLPH 1773
lAIA.-ESTIC UIf tLDING&
CHI CAG-O

E C. HOWE. WASHINGTON, D. C. OFFICE;
C- ~a AE..T ,-E OURAY BUILDING
C' L. 809 G STREET, N. W
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
oient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. Itread it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
~-, who'are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
*...' comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of i.t.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
.. judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and other
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business me
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought a
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

1 Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be
the following:

,-,' Dr. 0. M. Muniaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., M"
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. 0., S. P. Co
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

S., Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment
'."i",-' place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income
'^ i.; during point of view. They will be glad to answer your inq
'A':--'-"and we can.refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attenti
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have
prospects of getting away frop the deadly monotonvM gd












HOLI'.IS MARTIN. ( ;0@6800090
C .1ARTI.: HOLMES )
908o0000 'NBiF AVE

22. j 'f



MY DEAR .'IR WILL.

YOURS OF JUNE 15. I APOLCGISL TO YOU FOR OLEBBQ0AP
0~,6 .Q O H]EEDLESSLY BOTHERING YOU THE WAY I HAVE DOTE
AND IF ALL THE REST OF THE ABSENTEES HAVE DOLIE THE SAME
I WOULD NOT LIKED TO HAVE BEEN IN YOUR PLACE.


I WAS HOT RLSPO.ISIBLE FOR THE WORLD WAR AITD *VHEI IT BR3)
KE LIKE ATHUNDERBOLT FROM A CLOUDLESS SKY I WAS LIKE
A GOOD CITIZEN FIGHTING FOR THE HOMES AND FIRE ,ES
OF THE SOIL TO WHICH I BELONG LIKE I HAD DONE FOITHE
25. YEARS UP TO THAT TIME.

AND IF THERE IS ANY THIITG THAT GLADDENS MY HEART IS THE
WORK THAT I HAVE DOIE FOR THE NATION IN THE SAME SSNS5
AS A MAN WHO PROTECTS AND PROSPERS HIS OWN I.rlMEDIATE
FAMILY.

LOOK BACK TO FORTY YEARS AGO AND COMPARE THE U. S.A.
TO THE PRESENT DAY. TO MAY WE ARE A WORLD POWER
INSTEAD OF A FENICED-IN UNKNOWN COUNTRY.


FORTY YEARS AGO THE WRITER WAS A CABINBOY ON A WIND

JAMER AND IN DUE COURSE OF TIME WAS GRADUATED TO AN
-ABLE SEMAN AND SPENT MANY A DARK STORMY NIGHT ON A

I WEATHER YARD ARMII REEFIf TOPSAILS. THEN AFTER THE

HUNDRPJDET TIME OF CRUISE& THE SEVEN SEAS DECIDED TO
MAN THE YARD ARMS OF A U MAN 0. WAR/


J,'
r "*












THE OLD IRONSIDES YES YES. WOODEN SHIPS AND IRON NI)\
AND LET ME TELL YOU IT WAS THE CREAM OF THESE TRAT CQ
CAME IN HANDY IN THE LATE WAR. THEY FORMED THE COM'IMAI
DING OFFICERS OF THE ARMED GUARD OF CIVILIAN MArUED
SHIPS CARRIYNG PROVISIONS AND AMMIIITIONS TO THE MEN
OVERSEAS. THEY :NEVER SLEPT BUT PACED.BRIOGE WITH THE
BINOCULARS GLUED TO THE FACE NIGHT AND DAY SCANNING THE
HORIZON FOR PERISCOPES. THE GUNS WERE MAUTED AND THE
FIRST WORD BREATHED CONIMENCE FIRING T SUCH AND S
SUCH RANGE.

AND NOW IT IS A FACT NEVER PUB THAT WE SANK THE GERI~
SUBS FASTER THEN THEY COULD BUILD THEM AND THAT WAS TIE
SECRET CAUSE OF THE GC'T..TS THROWED UP THEIR ANDS AS
THEY DID.

THE WRITER WAS OE OOF THESE.CO. MANIDERS OF AN ARMED U
TILL THE CLOSE OF THE WAR AND RETIRED.
~C -.-
THEN THERE j CHICKEN RANCH I HAD DREAMED OF AND SCAN
NED THE HORIZON FOR. WITH ITS BREAKWATER AND ANCHORACG
BUT ALAS OTHER WINDS CAME.AND BLOWN OFF THE COURSE,ITS
A CASE OF TACKING OF~A WEATHER SHORE UNTIL THE WIND IB
BRINGING FAIR TO MAKE THE PORT.


MY DEAR MR WILL .. I AM RESTING ON MY OARS. I CAN N(~
PULL AGAINST TRE TIDE. NONE OF US CAN SAFELY DICTATE
WHAT SHAL BE NEXT. THE 8. S. GOV. AN DS OUT ElUH FOR
ME TO LIVE ON ITS NO USE KICKING MYSELF TIRED. SO PLE.M ,
FORBEAR BITH YOURS FAITHFULLY.


I Z~r^^fc^^





























*.- .: -
- 4


PA AZf4,


,sre~






W*1I


Al ~,necd-w
- A;t~ 4 f;~L A,


f'I
/'^; .


/


Ib /

* ~ ..j.,. -r
I i *'
*,* I;


K -,


-I-.-
(r ,z-~L


-v
'r

























-4-
~A ~P/









A' w iest 0 r
elec 1:rii.* Hetm, r-

S1ear Bo70o1teorE
ai.a thVie I rpt stpp et you g'ive fO In qspte of
.AOU gare h.q n SatD of0
-aigti ut. f'.beaja had. u0o uyt as-- yr
t at I will al rj c q s1reoc!to ani relcute ytyinr oour!-.
se2,< j, nast&ro,/ Stour f4eiale.,iector fhu'ris*
-It --,


IW- a t
seas tfit betro re2a.c in toza aesr~t 'thy ho0 shnul jN




itj Wc cts s': ba shown t.
yflae youftmir ,'w^d of CQsTnnoerxo ajts biri stri-.

zt iui. st2n e -EtSiu t or tll til :is 15i.-.

t Ft^ represenit^-tive,1 *e Ib e 2ttlarg y no rel-
rtsenLatE loe i feerlatn oi its is.gighoffeod.

*'lett. er rougivess tIo- the ahoe 7o s ter blades' ponrEry-lienui'tp? Bealr- ( 'icjt,
Seith.JLagral is Mais agtait Idiam TIvl -tr a .r
thtiQ t ,apfc? ]eo@^ UhgflQ t bor C -flptblaa-.t itonit.( .iL Tai.rluh V *--
thigthlz q sq:v3. of ours l o]e'.) Has-lo 1.1 >.=l yl,
Saon 3Eth nhod ncot bbo 'c -rai4d l i'n bblo


Sqoaroxp, I- ae-9eom-ds, to 'be h"a'Ml e !;9

ho too lOtekor the Devo ofthis week,I trust the sa
storyif availaol.Ietmay appear in the loet this week.




.. J, 1 1 ..I !I .111 1 i.... .. .. .. ... .I
cent (6o) it st, We take the remainder.
If you have no -land, you may bay in Fruitcrest. (Literature avAil-
able).

Under Offer NO.2, you hiav, a.gin', only to. send the money (Fifty-
Fiv- Dollars---55.00 --per acre, trhur paY ing in f full for the br-.akinr
seedd: pl~n-ir- an. weed-killint; rand buying .? full riht+-to tthe holee
firIt crIfo -; desired, A.vces vwill be secured t.y real estate.

Ho'v can ycu .Vin on Offer NO0.1; or how can .we, on Offer 13.2? In
this way --'ile, o:,rinrily,- in other c..ne--rowirkg s-i--, the FTPST
Cu:'P is -.1 .h anE.i orn gety---the ce. like corn, re.rir g to be
re'-Fpanted a.rn"ly- u.nl~-, our unusual .ordi'.icns, th-- c:'n, once plant-
ea, asl onrt.in --., grw for a period oi years, thus reducing the cost
of s;tsequent crops to a trifling figru e. .

11- PII FLOWIG OILY.
lowing alone, without croppi~Tn, hesir Glades'la.nd's "immensely.
The .demrni for plowing is usually far be-yQn the iupry;. With cah, in
gnd., the writer has begged in vain. thave, l.rnds plowe.) S h
oShers. Corn- and Cane-grokning shoT, l gr. intensif'th s- d-en.nI nd
T'o 1arn how to plow il1d lands and get th' .e ~ipmre1, has", ken .5 years.
'We now have aood tractcrs and plows, but -not eu .
Some may wznt their lands plowed but not cropped. ThE is the
VERT LEAST they can do i, tneir own intie;tsE. S'~ou.lc you d sie plow
r it Cat o and sav"e tedio d-te. Chaig. Tea Drill'e
413.IV() Yrr ,.cre, .S*o-le charge ,,u.c.a Lore; :one lis c.) In ordlerin .



I 111111 11111 11111 i I11 11 111 L6 i-





*-'. "' ', -"' ...' ,. : ' "" 'i' ,' *1.- '
771M





. .q' :- '' a ..





Mr.ide *a tr, 2 $11,f ,








Xogrs ct the 18th; at hant. Am glad tl be abl-- rc'ort subltnt4rl prog-r
ress.
Last wee*t, spntir thre las in W*lamReaechf My first avoe w-SI to vrtit tiLe
offtio .si tI. gc3nn0 t tte Intjunotton pagers re the CQ orpaia go.
tru n d ilr n is opy notestyped out. You
tbru idn d.lent k ais cog
ill r-th int Gsinrdin
As to stjats of in iJtiton ca.se. I A3lkeC with j iudg .an.' .I" ain-Jugn
this. Note hat tr opeios ar to argae -u e caso, Lhq have
lot -Joee rc a .d i r- yM I i .:;t,- en.t Sin:f so, ft ,tor.e .e.. li g -ts ]
sayldoos not hurt th)e-injajnoGtone It sticks 'just thie same. .
p4 As Eas- ud f Aare not ;thoefr
Why Aon't they argu1P o gard reas -..s-3 thia.-m-) 'ta firenot'their






On ;;oo.17( .t'ookqle)tlhore are at jeaut Ve ren ; on Soe0O#aeveral,.Lio L:'
On., rlobr.'.a-,alonain 1'.Vpiatl- in ev MAP" :
*-al.s ui3 too aroten 8) Aoy still 4r* a per ge trltss It i0*
iote J rbd arg no 10 ntEvi etin work bingdone wholly by agun iunt uined.n aghest #:.-
on fthc Laikge Shoofre
Tc- h;eoy.t 0hobf re oand ebersc i tde -eo rd dra per
year eadUA
: o c, %o ,,.--" ,, C '1o s r, tvlelingpe.,-oses for a't _,. -eu d.'*ng ir'
t aRe nt t tQ o fOe trin to. ,ro i tothe A40nter sesnea
No ;amanoy has ovea abern ypad as dlvid.per yjotn any other waytao stooneyh deors
on the LaO 6re .. i


Tenoeweater tRo Teas.lntany eodbers to teld as rnsbarieaig s tl 2Sent.100 per -
pyonsSa o tob epo2ot. ,o 10 th.g .i. .. a
l 91K f ioarther d s pnsd tqu 4ol vellir geae poB for ma to p md AenssAt
eting orthe GSENeAL WIE ARE otthe aergladet o as A i .he winter saonr n
ing forthe OENERUL WELPARE of the BEragladefi) assisttlag A@ai& l0ngg





the door.

Current literature teems with its pictures. See Delineator
for March (p.7).

Dp we care? Hoover says, "Famine is the mother of, anarchy," -

These conditions MUST be met. Simply to "save" is stupid.
We MUST -ODIiUC-E.

The UPPER GLADES are a Horn of Plenty. A vast area o' its
"weed" lands is reAs..ly'TOW to farm.

pere, a handful of pioneers, at infinite cost to themselves
have now solved the chief problems, agricultural and'mech..nical. .

S The era of experiment is past.. -Through actual, first-hand
experience on the ground, for five years, the writer KNOWS.

On these lands, TODAY, can be produced excellent corn, magnif-
icent sular cane, poultry, hogs, beef c-'ttle, dairy cows, and unlimited.
feeds.

Now it is necessary but the "thrust in the sickle, and reap.,.
for the harvest. .is ripe."

While millions perish, sh-ll we loiter and temporize?

"What shall we do?" I submit two ERACTICAL PROPOSITIONS, cov-
ering, respectively, corn and cane.

I CORN-GROWI'1G

Corn-gtowing on-this land has been tested. Results are fine.
The cost is low. Active corn-growing Will not only relieve hunger
abroad, but will bring to us an elevator, hogs, cattle, population,
roads, great. development, and then wealth and comfort.

1) COST;--Here are liberal figures;--For plowing new land,
seed, planting cultivating and bringing to maturity, per acre, Six-
teen Dollars (T13.00)

2) FINANiCING THE CROP:--
a) Advances:--The above ,1 6.00 mustbe paid in advance.
b) Expenses met from Receipts:--Husiing, hauling, ship-
ping, and marketing expenses can all be met out of receipts from sa.les '
of crop.

3) RETURNS:--Forty (40) bushels per acre, at -'2.00 per bushel, "
is a reasonable estimate of returns on new, vweod land as ripe as Fruit-
.crest.

4) PROPOSITION :--
S. a) Qn an acreage of Eighty Acres (80 as..') ,r less,
I will be responsible for- ll the work, and will pay half the Sixteer
Dollars, (I"1'.!; of a kdvkancs,, f you will pay the other half ; 8.00).




29d
W k

--, . *7..*. -.- *.* ,' .... .- :.. . -4
. .. -. .. ,... 4 .. . . .. , ., .. . , .. : : . ".* .- a :. ..*




- r. ..


I


Jufg; Dornncljthe Judgic' who hosatht- apc1o4tion 1o' r i juioUnotxa r ig: ltea
By hbi, cin ohcase,1u l I3 os 1inc'Jt4raed to tlo ElibaiYaidi a bomber or a b .bz
law t1rfEBlackeZell,Dcnnell ,si. Thelallk :zrvp v1ry eitiz2;ctiory to noraon
no Chargew14as ma24Eo T.heu ratliter r.q gotteC into good shape however, t
proceed if we so decided. -
Ue tidhka our renefy i A ROEIV2RSBXP* By tmhi oe aa se% 'the rQks
asideohavothe stooe distribted andthle affairs cethe CQPP2 a


t Oe I \ '
fe h* ', .oh .. .. t .. . - .-
e 14 tur figh fc o ssupa eriji.^itnagnceanl in'orcneentyettlenmiPtr
-dzrelopment not to. npntlon Uladas ctblyAtI ihaveynever ^to hcQ.rd ofit .
iCrrapian helpe ea little wh-w i eT.tn at Eaqr. Be h;lt a he .3 gaci. 'ix
Sotherabwyebeen absolute roanieintittes. Ifo one Wr.oulhaf4p kuovn, tJQLr WorCoDn
eartls. Aandhis ia 't3he op.oraton hltbh,a P..i. of aater 13 ghowtr;:Q
wsrre.3 novin3b.e- an-eaft .i.. 191h3 4 iA.o 21 a E %SKBLS I.1TCR.TN U5P'T Jx...S
S,.n t rnrrrn.0 mqr, WO-CI .at has ptr 4- anitslute fi-seo; n petty,
pcaionr l tco3teptible grttit8;g -a8e8mesPa6 e and si mple.
.. Is .oui laWljea S ,iact..fthi .'"ig- --I s.ont yu.a .i t, In.ay lrst. 1, .theact
hodc'T rjqu.ir-es t-cat thle CQrpp shall ktay pti`ir Thiua-ite- 3.cok auc3.to o in,
Florisda S3uith says Zhcy ihavenerer kept e-eiter hci;. ,ip' i.
Theilaw Lequiresthatthet y sbll hoiall. tLhai. .a etig; ..I la. ie ih srayq
they .havchz d isoetigain GabLage _ai u a- alcAc.. '",, "J.. lyJst "'t' Ci.
bIsinesae 'w -dqne sn tiat a y. S Ba er, ( i-junato-La) setq orthhF.qard
ould ina tlhat -aydo all a crts ,of ~iis ~i' ,Eth, l:inC resti. thr stock..
htolcders,abnci he latter would have been hil'lja.
*1e ..Xanaotf-n t rbist.eir rni-v.q thiir r;a'soOA;, fro- Fins. -ralt~h fa ny
.they Drvedoae Dtesne5SzP3rtbheleqS. Snies t!h--y 2Pe-flt rf c- ont!or:;- 0rf courts
as tLQeI judg'- t m-lls me iho graont- -thenjunuotoi:- ag.tit thiem
'Th"ey a sold ~O -as-.~.. aLatribnts''. and- itdvertincd sto si. Sm ti h
I7 -i..0 rY.r(eSI&.%,fr, 0U 'iC.. A,-3 2 cLt.g. The injui.nctio:n. tlcrr3s they
7re, goet4ig r'm4g to do t,- is'?:.- stofetL .bj LijfdQCn;O. At tIe M of ro p,$ $4sit sry meotiig.at fitce thde ihjunct -n w'a s vcmc.-t1ty vyted
to tflin :AultoK4. a zyogid A po.. isatiat 1e4- tut -
-- tI o MsIh 'es 3*3Lis &si-, &ha' P'Z; rQ-d 1 'sr7 fIQD, 'E ttorc the;y 41.
S it just jejoge tho tinjiution a. tsveydoi 1;i n Joerv-xd. In the
Iittierp qsprq aot ogt e viqLateq thclw but a .T: JU' TfoI4,ttct ;!l.oh for-
badte thc selling# othe assets 'of; the OO'.3a. 9 n.
Here is a r1i 14.J ; o. t"i" r haa h. a:iley soJltI.-a. 0.,iO .*h riaesi
af stoCk to h.s MRrotsetniIaz. A3 l in bA:lfI'1YrStlyVyg 500. 0 go sdlJe tictA
T'hey soldi it ./t 2.225. iper *4La'i .,A.Baa oli_'U3 this (l..ald is .woLth
Sol0,00U.t I that anca btoroJet e0Q'jS3v. If c4Uroztutoh fh&:'e is 'nrth
a'cupt Iai24'i^^ 7Zet 2iey pflure2 tizTeS lr.4s.gt a]y.Qtin:ti lu a;i5 hivi2 g W .
soldi.t..at an ?ale .stborearvirct nscic. 5s th tellE riatCy 'Tere quortng.
it Wt'i3QC yor afrp^to4ak ia .ttc4iJ jlgpcuttk. : Ls i a ir:t yaue
Yetc,thl'cir *t$qf pg. g otr; issuing it. Ias noet mvrn r.-. aL ausnssmac bt't
; r-r* es,; :alQ ohGrgo, for 'prnting it andgettingitto tte owfer5a *"hat aV,
tangled eob we wearve,*etao7
A A. to OC0oiint [ -.Zt. s.ontroit: iL last letter),I fin d *4ic taking advortiged
2:: noct c-T: s r; 1i' i lti-re.,issetscp ,tho OGqn',but the A ntitce, ,i
*entiocu -ly fo:l.'.tter psaietm 'fhey'lieragno4 yet rcay tA c J.&i
shate@ of stoak jfo ri aUomally-no t g to ami nattenjc:theih tha
U.1to htoint here t? 1w- atu etu ai.tle &tiiiident ottan .-
I Qt v a-aL- con %4sa f e r e . t
h I -ad a Il a-2'e2ioe, l f.i 4)rith a hih-olts ittrndny i YtF.Bead A1


..


" . "


~ Ilr~~
:;' ;. -'. i-:
I .. r~l~r*L
~;~' iv
~ z. :i
~":~'jc 1:


:,


_~_~~,.,~.--Y -II-IFCrY --..-I.---I1


.

.1^


Ir





ESCROW DEPOSIT FOR PLOWING LANES

The Ft. Lauderdale State Bank,
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.

Gentlemen:--
Enclosed find Dollars ($. ) to 'be depos-
ited in escrow,as advance payment at '1000l per acre, to?-Thos. E. Will
for plowing the following land:--Tract NO. ,in Section: .. ,
T. ,S.,R. E., being "'-' acres. Whenever the said1hos.
E. Will hall show, by competent witness, that Five Acres (5 as.) or
more, of the above tra.ct has been properly plowed, you are hereby author-
ized to pay hirm, out 6f the above deposit, at the rate of Ten Dollars
(10.00) per acre for all land plowed.

If, ninety (90) d'.ys from this date, the above land shall not
nave been ploughed, I am at liberty to withdraw the above deposit, pr o- .
vided I h-.ve first written said Thos. E. Will thirty days' notice.

Signed P.O.__

Witness .Date

ACCEPTANCFS

Cut out those you do not accept, sign, and return acceptance
to writer.

I. CORN GROWING PPOPOSITION:-- I hereby accept the above Corn-
Growing Proposition for acres.

II. SUGAR CANE GROWING PROPOSITION:---I hereby accept the abo e
S Sugar-Cane Growing Proposition, Offer NO._, for acres. My land
is Tract No._, in Sec.__ ,T R. .

III. PLOWING PROPOSITION:-- I hereby accept the above Plowing
Proposition fo- ___acres, namely Tract NO.__,, in Sec.__ ,T. ,
R. ; and a, sending escrow deposit -to bank.

Signed P.O*.

Witness _Date

* *esa * * * * ** ** * * * * * * * * ** *



Thos. Z. Will,
Okeelanta, Fla.

Address, Box 2,85,
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.


'
-. ... .?. -





1.7'. i.
: .:,,:,,.:,. ,,. :: ., : ,. : :. /: .'..: :,,,,- ,: -..,,,.,.. .:... -. :.-..-.,. :..,,_ ..., ... ... .; "A.M.,





ir tWLs,tlic First is for tihq .pinion,,* 1HiuslnSmT for Athtt In $14:.02
me ..l:iiSd,hQ::d-sr,'tat; e.i2ight gqt timnt at arlower ou$'.L$ iA 1 wui
be pereaotly sa.isi'otory to hin. In vy jiPvs heron c rnfident X hwe
Onoughi t-i"tor., asjg acoua.tbleiandi;deaxed,to enabio 4, a aUd.a dalq er to
rindt-t wo.hTare a caset 1 belavIoy w-e ,an goi htu Oqiuia l a gqF -
ably .10s than g0QQ.u'uSeesL ta hr hqr WVo" thQ pae p0SW q *1*a viai4thiea
is no &.0Irgm -.av' e aspent S 100.00 ctim ae -k we
not to mention adrartuieng( fcted in letter CI "a tameS

^^^^^^^-^^^.^^iMM^^MMMMA


otant' ~ orp.t ct to fimt.aning ih t'h int rc"3 -. o hldr
Det.'il .i sate CEa 2orim.el_ .ihen ae-eihe


| Alf ,ti.LV sbtA tahwl S.l ait brd~in itet, as to. nol w.iigei.rat booQn
loI'uc.L ** fttreittflhat thci sto*e Iolreirs rUc12 2k cMY.t TS cXrviorvie 4ght.-
flly thc zs5c. pawers of Okorp. ractic-' r:t s i ,o. a o-,
PZI -',,:," 'I" r," 1~8 '1i; '". '. "-" "-7.T ..- '.:" N
styruoiyv.- Ocitfti2W ias evr been expefcl d), -:'.t:-' :-.. : i: pr.c tr
thnt- .ill saT ai3 .rio.r.ty pill l osethei r,. .:.o.; ..;riy in tlz osporatoa..,
alewCo:kO C. Gourt is prayed ty t.akethertt.e in .hr. dIl r 1n0o imjutitoc. Its
S.ar"racedurztn ia &uci a case"isto a- point m. o. v::
The -TuJe2 rel yi:at it won4iibe e'Iwcaliy a'Tod'titeIf j) you t baktih-t ap-j
S A plio .t iorq u.. sataiA a do-llention-. tr .- -fl: 7 -7- *- Pi yo
a'e .nTwtee The cl reeEpon3rciri irht t.: :, .V3 E ,S. 'T t. Z y-u M
Vc ?r gp-tX .s:'oised1 baoI i 3 end 19142 to T'c .. t o
tt eir jrty .by. tli c6nt t t hol Aetari c. ahV.u LUc w L:1.0'S StaJ. 1 A'a o. at. .ace
Sit-the TrQst fThv '3d tTczue g twei t serzet : '"'"' -' "r-.'l' e,a- no ','- ti-too -
'|- M l u ..to.a.tz.by you .zilsn '.: '. .". ,: :, tih
at.-t c. -'ied- oUt At th-ast you w e *. ...': .i .;. .- I i
done hLiiOe. t uLogiau :t.-.-ign ae deewi ?- l t' -*.:,l 0 D S FI Ia
o ^he BriLA o3 ;-,41 -1hesM tta nattp t i"y dlb7 i-- ink::M'
.o'i 2-... ed r hbid tthe -,.i l .e E r.- .. o-.'. ... -t ,'
._1 .c Ur J -l4i L.#i.a yn1 eztat they :' r AS Traz -tee
yu casill ir-4111 Sisdt tb.4t tbe origUinl di+ty -x2 I Ldi.; ti 3tuo be :rifoorned,
tr- u.u o4 at WAthteo itat tte qtaol L:r *":ci ..iZ. ;>V. for^t'tA ,' aJ ld
at a aarifiSi 't-, aa interested r*---roty.
These letter faot w.ll haveto g"t to t* u;-ot do'e*
then# s0 a Coantrile Ja- leroyri t c'n rcn o lcy y;'. atI.iL *,inoing
you Uthti Uy:Z waatUdc yqr stOokyout mfLt p 7,'t.i ...e c .PC;.A
that yQou uOuldant CLo Ttin-i. Yorm o3. je t &AtC.: iL u ,iZ. .Li,'or IVi0c
and .I :-ar.'.2 o;ies. witih .^ustin wt hanm. :t lc Td .v4 -ILz .A2.ag :
a lianA I let' tihe i Sh.re& gofoPhoh I I: :JA ih-j A4.uo( .Las)ntes)
Wb0 L)Jo wiig?..,etv? unodeor their arbitrary riles.
il tiggrgcn: *' t2c1ny "D
.FLtn. -. z; w .tir'4U acu
Sauy c. aaqcte aytillcb J? T.Go ain;Ertg!i ty litle :v : alaf;bl nra lose ..
* Ant r2 an4y, tfurdi4al2 the e4sontikl JegXelaz mney thia dod.s no,. go . i-'
the attorney Jwdge Db-anell.eonll r iT1-vr ti?:' th2 am1Ljir awmaa o4t tkc
* !az-1,th.. cGhao.i alelnargcr pr4- Jt e. is willing tQ dot tt ii ouir"; ',
ciroumstnanos. Hence,.the only anagy pIlet 1 otr tic iiialri


E


1


i


' ,el


' | ,




ppwwm. ----*Juy-he ren ain.n ; expenses, we.gill, meet out of s?.2~Fs
c-f crop. -
Scr c) The Net, we will avide equally; statement, and .
your check, to be sent you direct by buyer.

II. SQRA,- CANE G'RO,'ING
What cane will do is ho: n '.yv enci.;sd literature. It is the
c.,ninn GRE;.T CGLFF7 -CFCS;( C. rr,-'r ni cL.rsL s omeOif j e r. the first
ye-.v. T r >:-I-, :r, i', ?u:.S :i e aild tt means thirds unuttciole.
P.-bat s? i :-,r.ret. ,-z if you cannot plant a larger onII. .:

Here are two offers. Take your choice.

1) Offer No. l:FAEikliJG YOUR LANOJ.--We will handle your land,
ploi it, furnish CLnd plant seed, kill weeds, a.nd take first crop, only; OR
< 23) Offer No. 2:--FAR'MING JUP LAND:---You -.vill handle -oir land,
plow it, furnish nrid plant seed, KFil weeds, and take first cro:, only

In each case, OWNDR controls se-ord, and all subsequent crops.
(For mode of utilij.r.g ,car.e, See Sugar literature above.)

Under Offer I0C.1, your land must be ii or near Fruitcrest (Sec.27)
or Okeelair:ta Additicn, ,ec. 35),btth iin -4, 3, (-,se Tlat enclosed),
and not t r.';en :"-y el'-r b'tiori.s. Yo-t ivill advance Fif;-v-Five Dolla se
($55.C'O) per ,.cre to cover c st of p .-7.O.-g seed, pl-.ntir.g, and 6eed-
killii:g, less i..-,y p..rt o: tli' .e wh h vu' ,i'.y have alre-:.dy -. ric aned. You
take as sec.rl-t a r.r-'.rt a e -. e .e fi.r.-t crop, a7id, out of this crop,
get back vc..;r -i.Fifty .-Lve iollarc ( ..0 per acre, with six per
cent (6~-. nter;et, We take the rem-inder.

If you have no land, you may bay in Fruitcrest. (Literature avail-
able).

Under Offer O0.2, you have, again, only to send the money (Fifty-
Five Dc1lars--5.,O--per acre, thuc p'i.ving in full for the bre l-inr,
ceed, plt1i- .nl w-ed-killing.; and bc'yir, e.. fu right to the whole
S firsZt cro.- I dered advances will be secured by real estAte.

How can you .vin on Offer NO.1; or how can ':e, on OTfer 110.2? In
this way: ---'Wnile, ordinarily, in other c&ane--rowing st-.tes, the FIRST
CROP is all-th.at a-.n ore et3---the cane, like corn, reluiring to be
e-- plant ed ar.r u-irll --urdel c.ur unusual cor.titi..rcns, the cane, once plant- ,
., wI.l1 cointin.i tro grcw for a pericd 0o- years, thus reducing the cost
of suoeequent cct.ps to a trifling figL ue.

III PLO'"IPG OlILY.
Plowing alone, without cror-ing. -h-, pv i Glades lands immensely,
The demand for plowing is usually far teycnd the supply. With cash in
.ha.nd, the writer has begedrt in .vari to h-;e l.nds plowd. .o have
S.others. Corn- and Calie-growing shouldd greatly inter sify this dene.rnd,
S To lear how to plow #n11 lands and get the equipment, has taken 5 years.
i' 7e ntw have Dood. raotcrs and plows, but not enou-h.

Some may want their lands plowed but not cropped. This is the
'VER- LEAST they cah7 do in. their own iTiterests. oIGUl5 yo-cu desire plow-
.. crUi it at o ..e ard sa.:e tedlou a leey's. Chat e. Ten -.r lla.s
A. I ...
E. '' .:. .. c ,-.. c. a re, 14 e ,-:.. I ordering




;,"" .. _.. ..... ... ... ....- ;. . . .. ... .... .. . ,.'. :.- .., '.,.d.:.
. ...,.-..
it;! ~ s : ;d i~1.4















\But : can t Ao al3, the ihwurw audpjy atl thabills I h-ah.on fvr to tihtq


Mr ayert5ising in 3)veloper abhuildt.a .vQ brv-gt sc-. goed resoie So. Tic;'e
hasi becn little. spoersr, joLC c'iey u^y, p 4eisewhere6
- -- . ,
No0- h Tpire tso1 a:i uby OqiL- e A .lno vit.: 'Q;ttc-.'c ". % oo1 .'.
oney a-n siuwp_ae 42CL, Lr s3,I B zcievc re or L'rdlh tbre T-'tter.
..... ,. tm di tb v r' t l ',er e
The sttuft have rkent yrp&,ad am 'canooingiwisLh r crt 2ti 3.L dto.wn ant y
V eulteiUe a 1Lio jnoszc goaselsoold.OJ eou yi:_5,,-Qt 2.:- oi sut o c.. s-lect-.
ed li3t ofl 0a:4 &,-,G bWyrs J-.n tro cur ,.. 2. 7, o', r:-.-, lctors. -
*ue 'iaiefly-is haMy thisr&e, 'hq &?Let yhc4 aurdgOt t a or; prr.b-:bly uWthi~n
of those cOiookc4nesti aibcaloltztyylye;r ting.thi-7 wh01 oWr.co. ith lnh ap or*
and gC-Iod s trznag a'rosai? ettCMnttr e imuaib' b&uulL .il.if l tI4c.ps
pecially w>in Li-mna- saying a haCf.1i &; CcLlhr'1. property o2 t," i.r own.

Ifiqyereramct.iibeeslr ll inot -3i.lon a A'r- %cl. *' lh t!'y sbcu'l u-t ondnray
or aomplan when ieu liUke tlis.ipa esA in iidiai -Gb lhem;,riht rcndloft. Wlat e4se
esc tby e peutt

.;,' . - .. r n
Arl What .ena ougonr a F .t- -: R ,
b1yera I? they Cnk.3 no titcoat in their tl ,.: h. v:.-i enc.rnt A

L- .h~i. 2 J;y cz:'z,


* .~ "4- -


rr


14,
*4 ..'-. : .


*' ' ^ :t' -- *. .: 4 < ,<
* 1L .-


'C ~,. -~


'.~r

- Tk.


-V7.4t


S -C.'
It -r


*-II
.


.- eG~ttB*(4a) '
Plus ojoey expeanseain 19144; In pkd:iCWto&JI aTw spilling to ea ani the
Saftertxisinge Itm for init( See eewstosued --Btnsaz Lis,,It. -


~
.;
..


. Y, '




'fc-Ai *r M> il, ,-" ... ... .I. I I I I I I
ESCROW DEPOSIT FS'R QNQ dLAh GI -

The Ft. Laudefdale State Bank,
Ft. Lauderda.le, Fla.

Gentlemen:--
Enclosed find Dollars ($. ) tq be depos-
ited in escrow,as advance ament at 10.00 per acre, to Thos. E, Wiill
for plowing the following landt--Tract NO. ,in Section
..T. ,S ,R. ., being acres. VWhenever the s-id T os.
S E. Will -,.hll "shohw, b o-ompetent w$i esa, that Five Acres ( r
tmiore, of the above tract has been.properly plowed, you are author-
ized to pay him, out ff the above deposit, at the rate of Ten Dollars
("10.00) per acre for all land plowed. ,

A.t If, ninety (SO) dj.ys irom this date, the above land shall-not
rave been ploughed, I am at liberty to withdrawo; the above deposit"' pr o-
vided I h:.ve first written s?.id Thos. E. Will thirty days' notice.
Signed P.O.

Witness Date
ACCEPT IC FS

Cut out those you do not accept, sign, and return acceptance
to writer.

I. CORN GROWING PPOPOSITION:-- I hereby accept the above Corn-
Growing Proposition for _acres.

II. SUGAR CANE GROWING P5OPOSITION11---I hereby accept the above
Sugar-Cane Growing Proposition, Offer NO. for acres. My land
is Tract No._, in Sec. _,T R.

III. PLOWIIG PROPOSITION:-- I hereby accept the above Plowing
Proposition fo'r acres, namely Tract NO. in Sec. ,T. ,
4 R. ; and !:i, s enS'ing escrow deposit to bank.

Signed OP.O.

S Witness. .. Date

.* * *1 * * ** * * * * * * * *


Thos. K. Will,
Okeelanta, Fla.

SAddress, Box 285,
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla,

i-k





M-,


S .-* -- -








Ft Lauz rd 1 ,9L..L O 4 .

Ie.:. lin R~ H cn( 7o.. iL ti.) -
S" U .
<-p I ea dii ate yoar ltter ofkthe 2Bd, X4q :14v,?Qgrt.if31Y hadt an cs4torioeqoe.
r. uqu a,3 t-.g-dgIt ra -' yr-;" Yrn! tt1r4e it ist8 !: trmff .rn ;hty y.not
Sbe G-lo: w uatK, tinglcui ui: }iiltans ojr either' 4eserving ones of-wihorm 1'.
mr)a.1 is noti; nsitd. .; hiar At least,you li3I y.:,'. duty as qeyou g: it.
lhbc 3 : do i-;rye
*.wr-Vy, i'Q-m iYJ own sate of L.tion'.i.t ,I ~ i;'i.Cll for one in.your pJos-tion
t-, u .' t cth3 bler" v 'A '-- *- -
r *- ._ hal Li,.R ^^ 10m.a ..2::..: p '-:\. ;vehc:-I bloc':- 1 uj- :C.1. 'I" :ly..,
utu sc: t..'irz-: intr .'- tle.'- s3iul hi .-.bh ee-- unifie.-,
S" "- c is rQfus--..for Jr--. ::.* l~nc: .o-'.l had ad t z ",-t iV by -.el.tIng
a hilli9on crs: r'.re;; lid.& Thls wa-,s r--stld tc- srl:? buy7 .ns 3os t rY. 'trw:
S-ha.v -o y:-" 'u.! I.L'- ur, 3ite .

I ",-..;:.:.; -:-?i- -. :" -" F f.1 ; :ry,.t, nusno.2.IlY0" thi-eggs ;by 1. a.noMhi; -!22t~y
b'... Lr la9 i a. good saot,%T~t -tf lItti, hsi9 or-'uniis*
Bcfsr. atwytinuricin.2U7'' rirz:-t- hcexaewbuiiiadingnrryinp*, ri Q.-quie'-v .(.2'.g:i*fl. -
i gr .". ;.. ]- ,'~~,~uhe'. thi--g I-- d to e o.o. OF'-'. i"t -'. .. ,-s-- a r '." .1.
.brio~~t ..'Jth. tut. strat,
"os q ft esoRIC 'w"'JoS :e -.. to be do'vie by ?cm-. one of our nLmerons govqi'fln
-L"" ro]-cu 'these had probl-3_rm f th-lir ,n.T-- th.- wUjar- eing'n.'-- ; n .'wr-r' nv3t
to L'Urrieod.

I ~ ; tp oy.i.t .Ii:s bc n for' t", a as o-f r--:-.--S:af-. shi --- Y--_on 7 I T, ild
not do- qr sf: r.ygb.,-teeU ad o,-yi-y. _i.lfad,-L'w.. -a r..Ul p.nr-t'/ which u':t.s

If c:r. invclvc r. r :d zw'.: if?.liingto 'hiC..Ldh Othngs ouuil-a!Iy v. :U t3i.'-,- :i
'':..i"dlyy. ee:7 3e hiVhIwnrY !o-t sit ply. 3 aitz4 atI Cx- Ptr13. t; co' -.11
Stlite'ornt anilpay 'f11 the Cbills. Ycu oan gresowl t *e ltst
Wf are -o- ;'o i',oLonsttutly.pwith saploutd .iaoritunit-iiea .to promote our oom-...
:ion.c asA iv fi -Ui 0"i, cL on funii-A-ni I t-Ly a s wel,or be;:tt'.-", Q.Qto
| r.antalidLors for -.thse.e S e- emirbers. Monot .thimaa de G, l hvea
just won a victory for Oladespooo l.rh thoas.mandsi of doll-rs. 'nToy do not










I06





S These condition: MUST be met. Simply
SWe MUST 1RO806W .
i' i.,: ... . .... . .1 ". .

,The UPPER GLADES are a Horn of Plenty.
"weed" lands is ready NOW to farm.
Here, a handful of pioneers, at infini
have now solved the chief problems, agriculture
The era of experiment is paEt. Throw
experience on the ground, for five years, the w
On these lands, TOLAY, can be produced
icent sugar cane, poultry, hogs, beef cattle, d
C,.~


W' ar.e?' -Boovetr'says, "Famine is the mother of anarchy.


Sto "save" is stupid.

A vast area of its

te cost to themselves
.1 and mechanical.
iugh actual, first-hand
writer KNOWS,
Excellent corn, magnif-
Lairy cows, and unlimited-


How it is necessary but the "thrust in the sickle, and reap...
for the harvest...is ripe."


While millions perish, shall we loiter and temporize?


"What shall we do?" I submit two PRACTICAL PROPOSITIONS, cov-
ering, respectiveley, c.orn and cane.


I CORN-GROWIHG


Corn-glowing on this land has been tested. Results are fine.
The cost is low. Active corn-growing will not only relieve hunger
abroad, but will bring to us an elevator, hogs, cattle, population,
roads, great development, and then wealth and comfort.


1) COST;--Here are liberal figures;--For plowing new land,
seed, planting cultivating and bringing to maturity, per acre, Six-
teen Dollars (~Ic.00)
2) FINANCING THE CROPt--
a) Advances:--The above $16.00 must be paid in advance.
b) Expenses met from F.eceipts:--Husning, hauling, ship-
ping, and marketing expenses can all be met out of receipts from sales
of crop.
3) RETURNS:--Forty (40) bushels per acre, at i2..00 per bushel,
is a re-sonable estiaate of returns on new, weed land as ripe as Fruit-
cr est.


4). PROPOSITION:--
a) On an acreage of Eighty Acres (80 as.), or less,
I will be responsible for .11 the 'work, and will pay halt' t.he S5.xteer
Dollars, (':.i.03; of Jahvancs, af you will pay the other he.alf \'8.0).
Dollars ou


It

it -


i.


ee1 TsUb


I


- "- --


V


"'' ~




I e- J



a.iC (2)
S now; u:r .ioe' not pay 's, P lI so:cCc 2n0 ",-5e-o tell .:T .
ilia' l Wd tU C
- &. ( 'i ti yoiu s a. a la d.not umnda: st anl r-a
SLii .as ve u appeal to.t .rtt I: '-ot- anr lbbit it suni &t t r
a. ve g-.e* QrVo.eou!n.ser m s LtiolCigo. fur lmme .. .. fr, r -otkcr ,





szwttndet-e Y 3t. ct*6rr ie1i 73Ui3
.'-J
.X oril asowecsve a *a e






r;. '/




P*' -.. *
I* '


~ ""
i.
.


/-


--LET'S HELP FEED THR STARVING.

In Europe, FAMINE stalks. Here, even, for many, it is t
the door.

Current literature teems with its pictures. See elin1eato.
for March (p.7).

Do we care? Hoover -says, "Famine is the mother of anarchy," .

These conditions MUST be met. Simply to "save" is stupid.
We MUST -PROUOC.

The UPPEP*GLADE` are a Horn of Plenty. A vat -
-. r -











iJt :4,19 : ,


X or oi'tho 2fitndA hrA. Ti' tto fr

:ir Ity aA s L v C-r - . ,Y ,

aol. &.7 v. ; :W.r e. . - .t .. ,L ,-,-
-- : V'"' -.

i y *o. ..* ;I :..r J,- .
helr judgments.

.. P4, noa-t. iec, v 3 :ry. t -' to a' UnTh f. l .,
tortul.t i-1 i, iu-tinO c,+ nt .- .b2; bun .


.. .d1q . ... .. r ; ~ ri-
gie vo n.c en-"t;.,* .'..- l v .m nr. a r. _t._...-s.
Out ve i *tr" t r. th"
ibt- a 3t. fltJi:1t .-




.r t k -s !x '-A kE. 1, aTi ., .,


nozF-'J".'.- my motI vesI). t o I '
t.... % j,. ; ... t-- I d,,
b 'f rY^ v I nt 71, 3i;'m-;t-

ZcA~tersi A^bt-M irawn45 ; or' a




tryto .rS tbrr rc:.-r
..^^^8 t^ aerelr rcuI. -
p^ ^^ au,
70"Efts or'





A L V 'b J. .L.


Of f.r II0.2, you have, again, only to send the money (Fifty-
F-ve Dclia. --,- ..uG--pFr a.c-re, thur rri-in in fu!l ffr the breaking,
:eed, a -i.-klling i E. f-.i rit tT. the twhoie
f-ir._t & ^ iTeirTel, ?ed?.lces i'iL bie secure e. by re al ectate.

Htiw can you_.L in on Offer NO.1; or how? can we,'.on OffIer. 1O.2? In
this *w1.y -- ile, or.-ln-,.'ly, -.n other O ine.--rowing 3su.tE" the FIRST
r'I...P .., .11 th.. y T/ C.r? e t3---the c, ne. ] :.- i c r-':, re rin.- r .to be
r.-:i.-.,e- ..r ,.,:. '-- r.. c .r un.iu.. 1 r or. .-i n O thpi c ue, once plant-
:o, :; .;.rtifnl :- -v for a pe iC o .f years, thus reducirig. the cost
of cSL .lequ-rit ::c.' tc a trif ir fir: .I

IIT PL ".IT:. tY.
Plowing Alocre, without cicr,- _.'., '-Lp,7,3 Glaides lands: immrinsely.
The demand. I fcr pl o'nng is usu' l' .. i'.- . p,,'y. ,jith cash in
hand, toe write he. Vx't in '3?.i o i-'-e --as ,'.'". h .'-:
oLhrs. C r-- 1.nd Ca.r, .-r .'in. oul.i -r. tl. i :-.- y thiz J:-r:-and.
To learn ho.j to ,plon 1y nil. -: t Tri &.i taken b years.
ar; v have oc'1i trrcL' tc s ar% J. p i.s, but no t r'-.'i,

Some may .':.nrt their lands pionei b-ct not c*n..ped. This is the
V'EFR LE-T they c:.n -ji, i treir O"r ntre ts '*'. u -il. r plowl
in.C,, ci- it ..t .-i aar '-e t- ioi, ic'.-,-- '-.'.--. Te ,
( D.L$'; ~-r ...' 7',i','e cYarh e a.,'- L r -LCr; c -wI' .. I, orf.-r ing-


- If


**w **




























9, Is




3 i (o3gTa0e Ste,







04 .4




'- -
't'anot .&roaeosi
i -o..tr h *rxtes, ml




,. -








S:; b) The re1a:'.r'.ng. ex>:pnses, 7v.:. ill 3 meet out of s?..-
o- f crop.
c- c) The Net, we- will divide equall-y; statement, and
Sour check, to be sent you direct- by buyer.

II. sU!-F-CAIE 3P- IhG


-:' .


What cane will dc is hlo .:- ':. en.;i:-e. literature. It is the
coming GRE.AT GLi~F: CR'P. >n-.;-ro': ri.: L ,-' SOf Ge., F h fr.:t
year. Tu re t r, i'i co T. 'i C..r t ma rs t i-n j unutt L:ole,
Flant L a sili ~crea:Qr ,- if you c-nr.ot ji.-lnt a larger oiij.


Here are two offers.


Take your choice.


O1) Offer No. ,1:FAR!.I!G YOUR L.AiJ.--We will handle yor land,
plow it, furnish Sand plfnt seed, ki]l weeds, :nd t:..e first urop, only; OR

2) Of-er lHo. 2:--FAR.I~l G OUP LAUD:t---You ill handle. c.r_ land,
plow it, furnish nd pl. nt seed, Ki"l weeds, andr take f'rt.clup, only,

In each case, OWHtR controls E'-.r.rd, and all srb'equent crops.
r (For mode of utili..r. .:r.ae, Se Suar literature above.)

Under Offer-I O.1, your ,land ifiust be in or near Fruitcrest (Sec.27)
or Okeelanta Add.iticr., (sec. 35),t..h in 7, -4, R. o$, Seo lat enclosed),
a.nd nriot ta'ten eny s' 1.Ll ch. Y wIill avance Fif y-F'iv Dollac
($ 55 Cc00') per cre t, co.*r c;ot of y] ee, plntlg, ar:' A7ed-
kil.ai.g, lss ir.y p.rt oft thic whLlit 7; fl:',y heve 91re.dy ad";r-.,u.. You
-tke as security,, nor.-C-.ge, on t.' f:ic t- crop, -.d, out of this crop,
gt back yo',.r 6i -ty -bve Do:lars (i'o. .0C ) per acre, with r
4--


_ -i .. ~. I ..









'> 2. ^ r ^ .j/
y,-^^^--^^---- d,;i--L^A- ^.. ^. ^/. ./^^




A y '/ *


Z^^C^. i ^---^? C;.-- y __ ________/--_Y f^Z^L-P >T


/ p y_ -. ^ / '






4-. / / ---- *_ i

^^''Z^^ !!'^- 4_-..*


/ . ^ .,I,.~" ,Jt

I c --/ ^- r-- ^^ -
IpJ I A~2~iYC~~L AL~I I-tC ..L-LJC p










-* I 7
a-




_Fi---A A J7--i-C 'I 1C-yy-/4^-- V^ ~c
/,~ ~ ;r/ ^J.^,
~~~ ~ ~ LL 7" /y .I- ^^ .-a y^ ,, *




c(---~ 2.> e -r-^- C^-t^-- ^. ff -LI ^C L rt.-^aA <,2>_^-y L-c- <2^^i-3 '- / ^-CS^c A^ ^ "- ^ ^ ^ g^'^- --





^----*------ ^-""^^^Bd
| \<'<^_^1<-^-^--. ^^ ,)o- 7-.-1-' ?Lvi-3-i-e rA>-f L-T7Z4-c^ oj^-:t: l^^ ^^ ^






/J 9/
5 r t. .. .. y-/ ^ ^






_-_ _ / .i H"
2^-<.~~~ .(^-?^ <^ ----^l^-J^- ZrT-^^. ^ ^/Z^^^-sp .iL
















/3 ' ,- ;'7
-- --7
e^e ^ -^y^ f^^r ^---.-- ^- yZ. L "-'-












~P I
s- ^- r 1/ L Z ^ ^ ^ '^ -













( / -,
e^-_L___]^_ ^^^z/.^--- ^^---^rzr


-. $ J-[
y^ -y ^_ ^ jl /y j4 M
b'LP^c yi-r l



fi -^-/^ -3-^ -<_xr __ z << ~ ^


^___ h Li^ ^^-~ f- ^' a?1 > / z.*
_v / - z ^
*<'7 '* ---- ---- ----- <^- -^^^ c~ -- (/
*~~~~~~~ c"__^f / ....- ^

*t.c~C LDV i~ .Z-~-~


.~~~~ /.- "" -^ _


<^~. i_-L^c ,...^^jCCfr4











kC;-
& -;c ~s-c---rb-(-17J/ 9f~A.--~ .2' .5111


cAeA


(t--7L 4f~ (CI*-L




7t
1"'~-.-~---- S ti


--- ---- ---- ------ --- - -- --- -~-~ -- - - --


,,
P-ZL


4--r




C


FI j. AF


y~


1-2-,;~


/l ,#-


- ~~7*t


6 t~~AL ~t~i ~-r41 Zr~ZI-~(~~
C~L~z (7i~tyt


'7~3~3-


c~ ~z~s~Z-




~eun~ ~C- C~rJ~jL~-
z~aP~z~za~


~z~iZ~Z.
CL~hVL)










/1r

~i~ylJQ cz-zr- 4/


13




C~~_f












S' 0 S P -

etF*la,- Ft. auderdale,Fla, June 25,1921.
**o. ,F. M Praz2
W' a..e.Jsed ,ludstatement regardingtaxes in New :Okeelanta' After going over
;r- these mattersin the Ta Golleetor's office reeentlypit was thought bet-
*tr for me to pay all these taxesmlyself,though I do not owe them alland
Bti. L7' the lot-owners of the amount properly to be refunded by them
SYo6t wil note that I assume all the taXesfor 1917,plus cost eost of ad
- .~pertia mplieaviDgyouto pay for' the years after my responsibility
seerasedimely 1918,1919 and 1920. Yon can see thetaz riteelptaby applying
o- to--*jopab to a___I am senLdngthemo Your re-fndis 2.30,
-... --erytmly yours,
Thos. *. Will.

Ft.r auderdale, FlaAg- 17,1921.
MrsAnnmie Jiranz,lDr.
To'ThosB.WilllOr.
For taxeson New Okeelaita lot,No.16oor 1918,1919 andl920,aspr sltatemnat
:ailed on June 25,1921,
S we Dollars andlhirty Cents. (52.30) Please remit,
Received Payment ______
1" 5