Business Correspondence. Jan. 1, 1915 - Feb. 28, 1915

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Title:
Business Correspondence. Jan. 1, 1915 - Feb. 28, 1915
Series Title:
Business Correspondence
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Publication Date:
Physical Location:
Box: 2
Folder: Business Correspondence

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Everglades (Fla.)
Okeechobee, Lake (Fla.)
Okeelanta (Fla.)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00000147:00024

Full Text







Janl, 1915.


My dear Lawrence,

Just across the road fromwhere lam boarding is an old
hermit named Kelley, He is quite an intelligent and interesting
man. I see him occasionally, and get information and seeds from
him* It was he who furnished me the velvet and Lion bean seed.
I have just returned from another call at Mr. Kelley's.
He has a lot of pigeon peas growing rank on his place. He says
they were planted from seed last spring. Now they have att ined
the size of large bushes..,and are beginning Ebear. I obtained from
him the accompanying e+. They mae fine chicken feed* They are
fine, too,for the table,he says@. e advises that they be planted
in your worst end least desirable soils. In your case, this means
the canal bnk* This will help out on your chicken raising.

I have also here some castor bean seed. He says this
bean ealps the condition of the soil immensely. The beans. tim-
selves, falling on the soil, add to it an element of fertilety, he
thinks. In addition, the roots, growing far out into the ground,
loosen it up, and add immmensely to its fertility* He has a fence
row in theasnd along which he planted these beans. They grew to
half the height of the telegraph poles. Then he cut them down. NAiB--
he says the lpnd on which they grew is vastly more fertile than the
adjpining land on which the castor beans were not planted.

There are two varieties of castor bean seed* The red
are represented by theylarge bunches;the white by the xzskaxbxxxx
small one.

I'll get together all of such stuff as I can and send it
up to you to plant. We've plenty of land running to waste. Witlt
me at this end, and you at that, it should be possible for us to
cooperate to excellent advantage. This will help to build up
your pgA3e, and lay the foundations ofthe upbuilding of the Okeelant-
Fruitcrest district.

I see theHerald has my last article on the firs-t page.
I'm writing another article to-day on the Govt. Exp. Station,and
sttii4-g uo the ppl. to work for it. We are in fine shape to get
it this time if we do out part. It would be a good scheme if the ppl
in your neighboehod should petition the Ag. Dept. for an experiment
station.

I had a long visit this morning with the Govt. men here
who are making a soil survey of the Glades. That will be worth an
immense amt. to the region, for it will enable the ppl. to know just
hog their zaitaxx soils are constituted, and what to add to them.
This survey is to be followed by a plant survey- the effect of which
will be to enable the grower to know in advance what plants will greu,-
on his so'l. That cuts out a large part of the gamble. I felt
comr-'limenyed by the statement of Mr. Hearn, leader of the party,
that I was responsiblefar the presence and work of the surveying
party here. I shall do my best to see that we get the Exp. Statn.








Jan.3.


I've found some more things I rant to send you to-mor-
row.They are:

1) The Burmese Papaya. These were obtained in
Burmah by Mrs. Shippey, whose sisters are missionaries there. They
are said to be very fine.

2) Seedling Mangoes. Mr. Shippey gave me these.
He says they are of a good quality, but should be inarched with a
high-grade stock.

3) Grasses:
a) Guinea. Our neighbors, the Barretts,
here have some very fine Guinea grass growing on their sand lot. It
makes an elegant feed for their Jersey cow, which eats it greedily.
One shd.separate the bunch, and set each root out in a hill to itself
in a row. In three months this grass has grown to a height of 6
ft. or more. I 4m much pleased with it here. Plant 4.5 apart.

b) Bermuda. This multiplies by its runner
and takes a firm h6ld on the sand in the Shippey's yard. It makes
the ground firm. The chickens eat it with a relish. Your Uncle
Norve saw some of it growing in Washington, and spoke of it a a famoH4
grass. I hung a sample on mygas jet as a reminder. Plant in a trench,
rith4sheots 6' 'apqrt. f t i
c) St.Augustine. "ample from the Shippey&
yard, I saw a patch at Davie. The owner was much pleased with it.
He said it would kill out any other grass, the Para grass,even, and
the native Glades grasses. It also makes the grt*nd firm. Plant like
Bermd&a gra~.
Of these grasses, I think the appearance of tHi Guin-
ea puts it far ahead. The Ag.Bulletin on "Forage Crops",(No.509),
gives it a good send-off,saying it grows from 6--12 ft.high,rnd at
times may be cut every 10 or 12 days. Frost hurts it, and temps.
of 25 o may kill it.

Bought your pants,oil cloth and romo. pd hard time
finding fit on pants. Waist a little large, as it is. Hope you
won't be too badly out of fashion in the Ukeelanta Pea cpck Alley.


Later: These mangoes grow into immense trees, hence
should be planted with abundant room,35'-- 40'*(ft.)apart,and where one
will want them standing 25 years hence. Trees 12 years old, planted
25' apart now,have their limbs interlocked. The seedling, of an excell-
ent grade. Symmetrical as an umbrella. Fruit with flush like a peach.

m Am gbing to-morrow with Matt. Marshall to the Bright Bros.'
*Olce to see their Para grass and cattle. They are famous. My goods
are atW.P.Beach.












Jan 3.


I'Te folrnd some more rgings I hope to be able to send you to-mor-
row.They re:

1) Box Bermuda Papayas' These are sxxx eat from



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On label, look for name of plant.

One pkg. is for the Garlands. It came to me first.

kamma extends to them her very best wishes,and hopes for their pros-

perity and happiness.

Have you noticed that a R.R.is to come from W.Palm Baach

into your neighborhood? I got it straight,in W.P.B.,from two officers

of the new company,before the news was in the papers. They say they

are fixed, and that it is a sure go. They want all the money and land

they can get from the people wrho will benefit from it. I hope it

will be a surer proposition than the rail roads that have been prom-

ised before, and that fail&dto come.

Hope things are going well with you. Will come up almost

any timeyou think it necessary. Am doing pretty well here now.

Hqve seen Wienand twice recently. He is still anxious
some one shall finance him, but his talk is vague and unbusiness-like.
I have at last made a proposition to him he should jump at, if he has
the necessary judgment. If it goes through, he will get a revolv-
ing drum on to his tractor, and get to work un there soon. I told
him, two or three times, he should by a l means see the Crum cylinder,
at Davie* Last Saturday, he was here to see it. He was to see me
again afterward, but did not. May have tried, and missed me.

So long, till the next time.

Yours, as ever,




Have been sending you bread* At to- ow with
butter. Please report on arrival and quality ,oaves, 10 cents each.
Butter, in small quantities,25 cents;in large 3 4. I should think
you and your neighbors wd.like to get tt right -along. I can arr nge
it-- without commission-- if tney saY so. You must have something to
eat. How about your fireless cooker? Have you ordered one? Do you
want me to help you get it?
T.E.W.













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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
WASHINGTON

January 4, 1915.

My dear Will:

Have both your letters, and glad to know of good start

you have made. Will get in touch with some of the others
and talk about the R.R.. Xamt graft proposition as soon as
possible. Personally, I don't like it, and wouldn't even
talk about it until they have some definite proposition to
make. Railroad grants, either public or private, have
not usually resulted in the building of railroads.
Sorry you couldn't have seen your way to putting
in enough cash to buy the Herald. From what you write, I
think a cash offer of $500 would probably have taken the
plant, and while it isn't worth very much, any established
business is a little better than starting in de novo. To
put in a new plant there,xtS with the machinery to do
work properly, will cost about $5,000, and the manufactur-
ers would want perhaps $1,000 in cash, the balance extended
over two or three years. See if you can work out a plan for
getting a crowd together there to put in a plant of this
kind, on this basis. It is not impossible that Calder may
be glad to turn in the Herald on a deal, and let us run it,
If he is not now, he may be after a few months experience.
An outsider breaking into the newspaper and printing bus-
iness without experience is usually a pitiful proposition,
and doesn't last long. Its the old story of everybody know-
ing how to run a newspaper, with few successful newspapers as
the result.
I hoped, when we talked about the newspaper idea here,
that you would consider it 4 good investment, looking to the
not very far distant future, to put some of the money from
your loan fund into a paper there, and use the paper to get
results and more money.
Have been very busy, and while I have been around
Cat 811 E several times, have met only a few people there,
probably because of the holidays.
Best wishes for a prosperous and happy new year.

Yours

/9^---4L ^ ~~^





H. WILL
DRUGS


PRYOR, OKLA.


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1r.o A. F. Niedo:aonski,
721 i.ook Creek T.oad, 1.W.,
"aBhitngton, D. C.

Dear Fir:-

Shortly before I left 'shington, I sent you
a booklet on 'ruitorest. now, I have my head quarte-.s
here for the winter, where letters will reach me.

I hope you read the booklet, it is recognized by &11
unbiased uritios thtt wve have absolutely the best
Everglatdes proposition ever presented. The re son is
th- t, instead of tr,'ing to make a land company rich,
we are trying to help buerR sucoeed.

If interested, I shell be gld to he: r fri m you*
This is a ',.o;iderA.ul country, with a wonderful future.

Ver. truly ous,


i'I


Jan. 8th, 1915.













Jan. 8th, 1915.


. F. .oo ,
701 A. Street, 7T.E.
W.shin:ton, ,'. C.

Iy dear "r. \'ood:-

I left ashiaigton on the 15th of Too.
I was vei, sorry not to see ou ag in. I a
vond. rin whether you will not ocloe down this winter*
iod..y has been a perfect :.L.iar day. On Chri-L-tj: s
I dreEced as for the Fourth of July. A oorres'ondent
neatr Uhic;. o writes ie t6.e ice there is 1 inches thick.

If you come, be sure tc. let me know th t I .I.
arrange to meet jou. I ,iay be in the laxe district.

Thi..,j< atre moving in this territory, The Ajriit,.tral
Den-rtm:ent is rnnking o, ool survey of the 'ver.-. des;
o:e great problem- th t of bre..kin; uwn "ver"1.. des coile-
has been solved by a tractor and pulverizer, which *oes
next week into ay dietrict4 r. ilro do are coming f-.st;
the 7ast Coast extension fr ifi the north to (Clee ;hobee
is said. to be finished. _ua-thernore, A :71' RAIL RiOPD
P 11 I P ' :7" CH Tr L ,__ .I-C. WI- S '. I. _
1lILE OF FP UI.SU.::.., AlDl IL B iIISI 'D ';:l A T 'i.-.
so C(ener 1 r.anager J.;i;ic; A. ;ocre, assure!. me yesterd-.,.

All this ma.es our unusually ettractive p2orooit:on
still more attractive. Our niitural c,urre would be to
raise our -:rice. Thus: fatr, we have not done so. Tf
however, you. z ant io 'et in on the rese.t fit,:re-, ,.t
would be ell to t kle action prom tly. *n you not
do thief?

Very trul.y yours,




- .1* -~


Jfn. 8th, 1916.



!r. A. *. H*illor,
210 "T. Ir-milt.,n Ct.
adif.-on, Wis.

"c r nir:-

Your letter of Deo. 7th was answered on
Dec. 29th, delay havinA^ been onused by travel. Since
then I halve been expecting to hear from you.

Thin,;s are moving in this tcrritjr, where I
'al noav est-.oli-jhedc. The Agrlo'ltural Tepr.rtment
is makiLI n t,1 Survei of the Glades, a tractor and
pulverizer will begin in the l'ruitocrest district next
weekf(0,.arging 3.00 p'r acre), the East Coast
Railroad Exteo.uIon froj:1 thr north to Okeeohobee is
said to be finisheil; furthermore, A R:'." RAILROAD FRaLI
PA*M BEAOH TO LANCET OIQCIOHOBIrE FILL M S ETHIN A
LITTT. OF JfRUITCE.ST, AND BE PFINIT.reD "'ITHUTI A YF-'R- so
I w a posetiely assured yenterd;.y by General Irmnnir r
Jairmes A. Moore.

Those desirin- Fruiturest holdings, especially at
the prices now prevailii;, shc.uld irchOhse same at
ojioe*


Very truly omu s,




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JL.fl. 8th, 19)5.

~- W, F. Bios,
* !I~olei1o, Ohio.
'~r de r ~oiar: (10;- ~rou xa:.y remr ~er the e took, b~'
trin ~v
boat, from ~u.dordz1e to the z2~o, one yoz.r ~o lzxst ebru~ry.
yo~ r~x~-~essed ~n interest in T2verg1j.~e~3 ~ettTh~cnt, vihioh ieeds
~ie to 7rtt0 ~ou v~'An nd sond ~jou a oopy of oiw booklet,
ex'I~ inin~ the ~ruitcr~t rYx'n of st~tt1e:~flt vnd develoIoont.
If you. ~7ill t~Le t1rn6 to ez~mine, kx ~ ~A~tie a~ubt YOU \7111
be inte::~tod~ ~Et ~epre..ente;aore of the thing~ oiu' type of
reo~1G b&lierve in- i~h1n~, irtiaor;~orc, p~t on ~ ;r~: otior 1
~ t;i n 'n~ other ph311, politi.o~1 or oo-oper~ tive, I thLLL,
Vii~ t Ii v'e ~ocn.
If~ it appe~1s to ~r(;U. t ulli. kin&4 Ilet ~ie he: r fz' ~fl ~, OU.


2Z'~ t6In~UJ.LJ ./OUC,













Jan. 8th, 1315.

1'r. He TTeiArc B. Walker,
De-arti:e.it of Tnterior,
"ashiLigton, D. C,

:.- dear '?r. 'Tnler:-

You. of the 4th received. I should
have been delighted to furnish the money neoess ry
for thkinj over the p.-per if I had had it. iovwevcr,
the loan fund w.is s :.El to rtrt with, oaid is already
slipping nwawy.

I am in cloce touoh with mr. marshalll o went to
IMiami yesterday in his auto, and on seven miles to the
Bright Drothers plase(to soo the stock o ,,-d Pira
grasses) I will to over the matter with hi,.L

In M~iami, in the office of Holland i cid tuttervorth,
I miet General ..'anager J.a.mei A. Moore, of the new rail
rood, and hd quite a t.lk with hiui. in consequence,
I sent out a circular letter to our -ruitorest people.
You will geit i.t hrrtly.

"core i rnrer.see e quite favorably. John Hlolland
told me a good deal .bout him. If rernorts re correct,
he mr'y turn out to be the "enm-el" (unc;waren)- .-nigel
of the oapatilist type- that this region h:.s been
waiting for. 7e is s.id to be one o the 1id who
virtually stop at nothing when once commiitted to a
reject. Fe hias bov:;ht the leuiiderson tract, Lrat. I
t ink, wants the rail r. nd largely to pull a few iAllions
cut of that

Hope you will give cuch ti .e as you c'n toward
keeping up your 1'ruito est interest in .r:hirngton. You
r.,.ve y ur other duties, o0 color-eC Our last month
there,, before T left, wts a hot one. I took in over
;.530o.'.00 in less than four weeks. -ioh -e o ald keep
ur that gait.


Cordially ,ours,













Jan. 8th, 1915.




Mr. Geo. P. Friese,

Box 303,

T'hitaker, Pa.

Pc.r Fir:-

Your inquiry of Deo. lOth, was nsnwered un
Deo* 29th, delcy being caused by travel. I have
been ho'.in, since to heo'r frci-i you.

Things are moving in this territory-, where I
am norw established. The Agricultural Depcirtmoit
is r.h:ing a soil survey of the Irl. dua,. a tractor and
pulverizer rill begin work in the Fruitoie.:t
district next week, the Fast Uos-ist railroada d
Exten:ion from the north to Okeeohobee is said to
be finished; furtiherraore, A IRET I AIROAD PF11 i ALM
BEACH TO TLA-'E OKEFCHOBF .';TILL PASS ITHil iA L IE
O F.-Y;ITCKEST, /0 D B7P ITIISHED Ti-:' A YFff- so
I was positively assured yesterday l-Gener;-l an Qer
Jnmes A. ioore.

Thoce desiring Fruitcrest hcr.ldij's especially at
the prices now .revailing, should purh- ese at onoe.

Very truly yours,


oe- "" -





/7


Jan. 8th, 1915.




Hon. D. L. Pletoher, P.
senate Office Bldg',
Washington, D. C,


Dear :ir.:-
Will you kindly request the U. E.
Weather Bureau to put me on their mailing
list, ith above address?
You mvy be interested to know.that I
have been here and in the upper Glades since
feo. 17th, ;ind am giving oareful study to
conditions with a view to ascertaining the
safest and moct profitable lines production
in the rvergl des may take, earecially in view
of the ricks incident to frosts.
Very truly yours,












Jan. 8th, 1915.

Uir.v. L. Niles,
/ ChT.rlottesville, Ind.

..J de: r sir:-

Yours of the 2nd forwarded fro.i tLhinjton
to above address. I am pleac!:od to .eind you copy of our
2 uitorest book t v;hich seako for itself. Our'n; is
the o-.e lnd -i-o-oaiti6n handled wholly in th' interests of
bui-ers father than of some G .id eaouiprny[ Our soil is ten
feet deep -'.nd eoerer, "'"c re onrit:. roof of the 1'ver.-29:des,
*u' ltnd is dry. A tr,.:-.-orttion ownal4'throu ;:h xhich boats
run rorgul- ry is no-.rFk on the e: ot. .not her a n.11 .:1.
dirt hi :c.- are built jst us one mile to the south,
and A IT .".LO..'.D FRO:.I T '.L' BEACH TO) T :-: .'C I. TO
FOLLOW THIS :: IRO,'aD 'ITIIEI A 11:.'i,- so I w:.. soured
yested:y b, officers of the rail road coi,.ny. our -oil
is :icn'a *'lh olicest and be. t decomrosed in the Eve-.jt dss.

:y comiaonr consent of the competent, the u-,.)per l0 des
are "The Cream of the "verga.; des." e ?:re in t':. heart
of that region. It wouldd .: ou to stdwaL E enate '*ocu.ient
89Q .id the Engineers' R'eport on the I'ver:l,..jes- both
obtainable froui Senator D. U. Fletchor. The, c ntain
the "proof" you desire.
The astoundin'j this ut our proposition if; the
price. "7e sell for abodt one third or o.,e fourth of whvAt tlhe
l1 4, corn nies ch-.r;o. If our capitt.l fund is addcd to
the land ~'-;men-ts- which it should not be- v'e arc o.till
far below them, c; ve n our 6enrest tracts.

--op)ing to he::r -' you, E am,

Yours truly,






*
D01NCAN U. FLETCHER. FLA,, CHAIRMAN.
WILL iM E. CHILTON, W. VA.
J0V V, KERN, IND,
S 8$MITH, AIZ.
MILTON LEWIS, ILL.
MOOT, UTAH.
H. GALLINOER, N. H.
MOLL 8, PAGE, VT.
JAMES M. CATHCART, CLERK.


COMMITTEE ON PRIN enceTING
COMMITTEE ON PRINTING.


Jan. 11, 1915.




Dr. Thomas E. Will,

pt. Lauderdale, Fla.



Dear Sir:

Yours of the 8th inst., has been received*

I am asking the Weather B"reay to jolace you on

the mailing list, as requested.

With kIind rAgards,

Yours very truly,

I 't-k tAlt"fCd(9




Rh.


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
WEATHER BUREAU.
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF,
WASHINGTON, D. C.

January 13, 1915.








Hon. D. U. Fletcher,

United States Senate.

My Dear Senator:

I have pleasure in informing you that in harmony with

your recommendation we have placed Mr. Thomas E. Will, Wheeler

Building, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on our mailing list to

receive certain periodical publications of the Weather Bureau.


Very respectfully,






C7 hief of Bureau.







SFRUITCREST (FLORIDA) ASSOCIATION
THOMAS E. WILL, PRESIDENT AND MANAGER
MUTUALISM
WHEELER BUILDING VERSUS
COMMERCIALISM
FORT LAUDERDALE. FLORIDA
Jan. 14,1915,
My deag Lawrence,
Yours ofthe 1.2th.recd. So it's another freeze? Well,
we v'e got to cut out the winter trucking, save as a side issue.
I ordered the lime, Monday, and paid for it. It failed,
somehow, to go. The ppl-- the Ev. Lumber Co-- tell me they will strakt
a point to get up to-morrwwv If your big potatoes were the onrt you
have had to cut down, you probably will not need the limw now.
Have been out to see our lot, It lies finely beside the
Iuiami road* as fine Asutralian pines in front and on road side of it
Is 7 minAtes out by easy bicycle riding* We could easily have a
house there;if the women folks cared for life here---butthey don't.

Will see Austin again to-morrow about the row boat. He
thinks the boat he went to Okeelants in isthe one for me. Liaybe;but
I don't like to put so much money in a boat yet,

Am sending up two more bok+. of Avocado seed-- for the frost.
They hale been on hand pretty long;hope they are still living.

The big bag contained Guinea grass and mulberry cuttings.
Wrote wyyou the mulberries areimply to be stucg into the ground. They
grow into very large, fine trees*o I suggested that they be planted ei.
their on the State's right-of-way,or just on our side of it-- strung
along the canal bank as far as they will go.

The Guinea grass makes a very fine forage grass. I want
a considerable part of it to be planted on burned-over saw grass land-
say along the east end of 59-- 60 I want to find a GOOD forage grass
that can be set inexpensively,without our going to the.expense of plow-
ing the ground. Am not sure there is one,but hope so- Am told
Para gaess will fill the bill; but think Guinea grass is better for
stock. Better plant some of the Guinea grass on broken land wheoxyou
will be willing to have it stay indefinitely. If we get a co r horse
it will come in finely. /

As to your work: Am thinking of wisdom of planting tom-toesa.
perhaps in burned- over saw grass land--and potatoes, both late
enough to miss the frost. In this way, can use land both plowed and
untlowed, and give you all the rork you want. Fight also hire some
help. What do you think of it?

Should think you would find it easier to get bread delivered
from here than from the Searles'1. Whichever suits you will sfit
me. I felt you ought to have. some bread from somewhere.

Havenot closed with Crum yet* If his work is O.K. mpy have
him plow some for us, and some for F.C. If he will take land in F.C.
as Dart pay-- and he thinks favorably of it-- I should like to have









FRUITCREST LOCATION


ON SECTION 27, (below)


OKEELANTA ADDITION
(Section 35, below) Adjoins Okeelanta and corners with Fruitcrest.
Its 98 tracts are surveyed and staked. A 25-foot canal and road are
being constructed along the south border. The "Okeelanta Pioneers"
are farming on this section.


AT THE HUB


FRUITCREST FACILITIES
AS TO
I. TRANSPORTATION: (1,1, and 12) Lauderdale-Okeechobee-Kissimmee Waterway; connecting, by rail, with (2) Sanford-to-Jacksonville Boatline. (3) Florida
East Coast Ry. Extension, to P. E. C. Main Line. (4) St. Lucie Canal (proposed.) (5) Jupiter-to-Okeechobee Highway. (6) West Palm Beach Canal (begun.) (7) Palm
Beach-Okeelanta-Ft. Myers Highway (begun.) -(7a) Township Line Canal (begun; bordering Okeelanta Addition.) (8) Hillsborough Canal. (9) Miami Canal.
(10) Caloosahatchee River, connecting with the (11) Atlantic Coast Line Ry. to Jacksonville. (12) North New River Canal, connecting with the (13) Florida East Coast
Ry. and the (14) Inter-Coastal-Miami-to-Jacksonville Waterway. (15) Tampa, Atlantic and Gulf Ry. (surveyed) to connect with ocean steam ship lines on (16) East
Coast, to Nassau and, later, to World Ports; and, on (17) West Coast, to New Orleans, Havana, Key West and New York. (18) Atlantic, Okeechobee and Gulf Ry.
II. COMMUNICATION: (12 and 10) U. S. Mails by boat connecting Ft. Lauderdale. Okeelanta. Rita and Ft. Myers. (19) Lauderdale -Okeelanta- Ft. Myers
Telephone (partially constructed.)












himbrtAk the Central Square( 40 acres% maybe more. If this were not
cropped it could at least be out into a cover crop, which is a fine
thing for the land.

Should be glad to let Searles and Haker put in the store on
canal corner. Don't ,"want to sll this corner. Would let them pse
it on reasonable terms-- gratis,'.fora reasonable time. We all want
a store and shop and other things there. whey would be good men to
handle it, I think.

Grady can buy 5 aQce' of any of my land east of canal;not 74,
though. Why can't he Take 57?-- the canal 5 acres of it. Price,
$75 per acre.Six % off for cash.

Want to find at Davie what is the quickest growing chicken
feed. nate to buy feed Chickens there and here are not laying.
Hone yours will do better.'

Shall probably come up Tuesday, especially if the tractor comes,

Good lucy to all, and KEEP A STIFF UPPER LIPZ The Glades
are ALL RIGHT. We've simply got to learn their curves*
That, by the way, is where the Experiment Station comes in.
Get everybody there to write Sen. D.U.Fletcher to get us an Experimant
Station. It will help. I have got things moving here* The Board
of Trade is pushing it now* Even the sour Lakeworth Herald puts it on
the front page with big ht4@-- taking good care to suppress yours tru-
ly-- a 1a. Strong, the literary swiper. The Govt. men here arelith us
strongly on the Exp. Sta. Think it our chief need, and their chief
duty to say so. Baldwin told me so yesterday. The Station should
do,atpublic expense, all the experimenting you and all of you are doing
ead have bean doing for 3-4 years.

So long; and when you want anything, write before the need
gets too pressing,for cogs may jump here.
Ypurs, as ever,
Dads

7 /. ...









--- 3- --


P.8.The I.I.BEoard are to be here the 2oth. It is possible I
ought to be here and see them* I should like to explain my F.C.
plan to them if opportunity offered* That woald carry me over
till Friday ,1/22.

Ifvo u think well of the tomato planprepare a seed bed.
for seedfenough plants for ,say,4-5 acres, and I will send or ing
up the seed. Mr. Shippey thinks it would be a good venture.
I am not willing to go up against the frost,but, ,by waiting, we
can avoid that;and, they say, prices are likely to be good enough
to justify the venture, especially if the plants areput outin
the inexpensive way mentioned.

We talked in Washington a good deal of the propriety of plar.-
ing Oeb. potatoes'People say the pric,s are likely to be as good
as of those raised subject to the frost danger.

These lines will give you all thework you want, and will
occupy -ll the vacant Itnd you 'ave, and a good deal more.

Mr. Ingraharr writes me the Okeechobee branch has been run-
ning trains since 1/4* Mr. Sherman has just returned from Ok-
eechobee City. He went up on the road some thirtumiles, and out
upon the land some 15 miles* The land is sand,strictly;but he
thinks it better then Lauderdale sand land,

I thought of "king in the Miami show to-day, but decided not
to* I'm not much on shows anyway.

Stores are closed* Guess I'll havethe pleasure of getting
to the boat at 6 in the morning toget this and the other stuff
off to you.

Do you know the new Palm Bpach-- Okeechobee R.R is to run on
the So. border of our Section 35 This should greatly increase
its value* That's another reason why I am not willing o sell that
corner of tract 74.. Despite all our town planning elsewhere, we
may have a town forced upon usjat that very point, tn such case,
your man should be glad he got in on 57.

I've a lot of additional bedding here if you want it. Also
a new folding bed.

I'm installed in my new office,and snug as the proverbial
"bug." Things are very handy, and lookmquite neat, tho I have
no expensive furniture. Hope you can drop in on me here before
long. If I statla live sellingcampaign-- and I may-- this will
come in very handy.

Quite AP.S. But I 've been to supper.


T.E.W*









DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
WASHINGTON
Jan. 15, 1915.

Dear Will:

(Have just had a talk with Bo Sweeney, assistant
secretary of the Interior, who was a neighbor of James A.
Moore in Seattle, knows him well, and knows his record from
A to lizard. -e says Moore will make good on the railroad
or anything else he attempts; that he is a builder and
developer, and has enough money to carry out anything he
promises.) Thought you would like to know this, and that
probably you can use it locally, in the newspapers or
otherwise, in a way that will enable you to stand in well
with Moore.
Yours as usual,

// -^ ^ ^ ^









DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
WASHINGTON

Jan. 15, 1915.
My dear Will:

Enclosed find bill for adv. in special number of Cerman

paper. Am sending copy of paper under separate cover. Find
also receipted bill for freight on your goods. Credit with

with amount. Hope the goods arrived O.K.

While the projected railroad, if built, will undoubtedly
help Bolles sell more land, I cannot see how it will greatly

aid in drainage, irrigation and cultivation, which are the

things we need, and it seems rather doubtful to me if a

railroad will benefit us much, so far as transportation is

concerned, with a navigable canal only a mile away.

What is the outlook for sa.as there?

The jumping prices of foodstuffs make it certain that

prices will be high in the spring, and I hope you will get

ready to put in at least forty acres of potatoes next month,

which will be making a good start. The crop will at least

pay for putting the land in good shape, and should make us a

nice profit. It looks to me more and more as if this was

our safest and surest money crop to start with.

Have you done anything about trying to mow the grass

and plow with horses at Fruitcrest?

Yours truly,

I4-" /3, ft2n













Jan. 15th, 1915.



'r. F. 0. Replogle,
.,"' Arlington, Va.

Dear Sir:-

On the 13th I sent you a iruitorest booklet

andwri ng, Most of ,,oir questions. Our land two dry

and ro-grded by the ongin--ering commission as per-

anently reclaimed.

A boat line runs twice a week front here to the Lake.

The 2ast Cost ixten.ion south to Lake Okeechobee is

running daily trains. A new RAIL, ROAD FRO. PAL TEACH TO

I..A..-: .''C.; '-1 L ".'ITL PAStS WIT,1II. A i ILS OF FRUITCRAST AND

B FINI.SH)D IP A Y3.R, the '..na-emrent declares.

Lake 61kecchobee is now lcar than it should be if the

Glades were finally drained. Our land is as dry.ag we

want it.

'Te have the ON BflYT'S' P OPOSITI'.' IN T' AD3.

Half the section has been sold, 30j for cash. You would do

well to buy soon, while the oDportunity lants.

Sincerely yours,






(; *






LONG BUILDINGS
.KANSAS CITY, MO 1 p








(INCORPORATED)





SC. HOWE, WASHINTON,. DC., OFFICE
I GENlSa AGe. ro t OURAY BUILDING
SC"m es 809 G3 STREET, N. W.
TaEEPHONe MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily ih-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our,'
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. U. Muncaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
;, 2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,

'Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
lace for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
W-,ucing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries ;
d we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some a,
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government













Jan. 15th, 1915.

< 'r. '. 1. Grewell, -
"'et PalP Beach, Fla.

Ty dear sir:-

My old friend, E. ft Richardson, has told me

you o'-mht to be interested in my nlan for saving tlhe

Everledges from the fate they rmay be drifting into. I

hope you may.

Just hrit 1 have in mind -ary be v:rde clearer by two

enclosure: first is the copy of i letter I am rioting g

% man you may know; tie second i. one of my 2verglTdes

booklets.

Both of teese, you ',ill find quite out of the ordinary

run of 'v',r:;lade. stuff. I hope you' ry read them, and

be interested in helping : e save the r'ri.on for some.hinrg

better then.Claus Snreckisisn or 'iiy other kind of economic

slavery. .

I understand your economic views agree with those of

Comrade Richardson and myself. It's because I hold such

views t'it I have worked out this nlan. I have out into it

just as much of our doc~i4t ras is practical for the tine
and place.

I hope I manny hear from you. Jf necessary, I am willing

to run un to W. Palm Beach to see you.

.Sincerely yours,








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Jan. 16,1915.
Mr.H.B.Walkcr,
Office. Secy. of Interiov,
Washington.D.C.
My dearBro. walker ,

nncl sed find following:
1 Deed to first 80 in Fruitorest.
2) Trust Dood to do.
3) Pnd to second 80 in i1ruitcrest
4) Trust d'ed to do.
Am hopirFn they will reach you a fely.
The Crum machine goes to the upper Gl-des
soon. An accident caused a little delta.
Arf d.r: a ferr ales 'rhiln stud 'iri condi4t
tions Another free, with ice, at O!ce(,rnta on
1'ight of Tuesday,Jan.l2. Lawrmice out down his pep-
pers 9nd poti.toes. Voraie graenss and hogs foe me.
"ny try l-t' pot-otoes.
Best reasrds to all. Hope the interest
in Wahington rmy be !cpt up.
Mr. AmoOThomas, (0 I t.,N.V. "ash.,D.C.
called on me to-day. "'as ditecteq to me by some one
answering to your description. aited till too late
to see the Glades save Uaviet Represents a bi7 bunh
of prospective. ,,Offered him 19 % corrmis.sion to sell
to them. Will not be bick till Feb.20. Hope yuin m
*get into touch with him.
Sincerely yours,


. X* *'. . . .


4








_M",


L0 N G B -- Z., D -01, a
SANSAS CITMO. Y, 'M


z V WR,M WIM.. .



v kai)B SA LES COMPANY
. (INCORPORATED)
TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH 1773

SC HICA(- 0

E C HOWE. WASHINETON, D. C., OFFICE
GENErn A.ENt o T. o OURAY BUILDING
Co_.A. h, LAs. D809 G STREET, N. W.
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.
"I
One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought ovdr 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I.. C. 0. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C..

Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
, place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an Income pro-
duoing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
" and we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOT also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government






A


4;


Jan, 17,1915.


Unity C~rreu~ondence School,

91~S Tracy Ave.,

Kansas City,~o.

Dear ~riends~-'..

If you viii kir~dly ~iiQ. me


t:teYwc0a5ary


paper~'a I shall be glnd to enroll ~.n yoii~ Coiarespofldww

e~lce Schoci. I ~reat1y no~recir',te the he1~ I h.~tve

dr~ri7cd,~rit *am ~ti1l derivin'%frOw tne 0tudy of' Unity,

and other 1iter~tui~ rec~Avd ro'ri you, and ~teeire

to t'~.ke up the study of ~ Thought in a wore eye-

tem~tic wr'y.

Anocz'ely yours,

P.S. ]~nc1o~ed find :.~1.OO

T * W.


w






















E


LKANSAS CITYM 0. r CLANI
HENRY G. RALSTO14







S' (INCORPORATED) TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH 1773

SCHICAGO


C. HOWE. WASHINSTN, D. C.. PRICECE
"GrtAALE ASE ENA TH, E OU PAAY BUILOIN
COtaN<, S LA.NL 809 0 STREET, N. W.
TELEpHOE MAIN 420ONE




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with C uffi-
oient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of a6res have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd,(hardheaded Wishington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C..

Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
ducing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries 7
and we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the -.
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government










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Jan. 18th, 1915.


Er. H. '!. 3myser,
1013-1/2 ;ain St.,
Richmend, Ind.


Dear air:-


Your recent favor at hand. I am sorry


I can do nothing for you in the matter of an exchange.


You are one of thou'5nda, and I aim another, whe have


bought spl.enJid lTnd under a b-d Tlan of distribution.


I am devotii rmy time to getting the buyers, in-


Cluding myself, out of the hole by substituting a good


pl.n. Tho enclosed bheklet will explain. Your best


solution is to come in on this. I shall be jlTd to


see you if you care to discuss the matter.

Very tr ly yours,
















"r. Herman 3. Walker,
Department Interier,
'D3e1inoton, D. C.

Dear ?,r. ".lker:-


paper, received.
for driyn.go.


Jan. 18th, 1915.


Yours of the 15th rith bill for -6d, nd
Rnolibsed find check for ',:1.50 in Pqyment


Did the German add britig -iny inquiries', 1 have seen


I 1-w'Ve worked your 'Voore item into ntwmi -riner itotry
gi.ng out tonigrilt. Very 1(,lad~to have it. 'hntch for
my letter in titis v'eek~s Tauderdr~le nn 3ri~- perlinops Others.

ibre(,r-1ly I regard the r~ail read no one QI' th-e greatest
t11ir],-!g that could possibly have come at this tien to tile
Glades.

I ox ~,cje.ctinr, t1-L,? -~3 h.1-. tr,,ctor, ''ith'-u~l'i:

8'-,c~ C 's'9, LO j;7 ill tc* Olr tferr~itory t~liortly. I Iri-ic .,d
sever--l tsl'k- with- 'r'ixn. Ie is in Peraeted J :,'riuitcr"ct1
Rn~d will rrobibly t~r, fl1'iiiid t --~y frr t. in "'cr1:.
TI-i.L will rn,, Cie- lior-. *r)nit 1 ?rfly unritcemleary-.


I nl-n"'rijnr' fe ,I-,;it n.-,t."tos onm ii.nr ceiitr"'1 sqliaifAI.


vb1~Wbi -'a' 1r->41





LONG BUIL-DIPGO, kl 3ll ." O -
KANSAS CITY,MO. pI SF


R M PFiCE


BDvyoSALE1COMR4w

(INCORPORATEDrro)
S -; ,.,TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH 1773
1 -- IA.I T(: 13 IR.DIN (r


C. HOWE, wa0e-.e.on. DC OFFcE
GENiER. AsL r FOR 1E. OURAY BUILDING
COMPANVTS LAID- s o STREET. N W;4,i
TEL, s-0r M... 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
oient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied .
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employee in the Inter-
*' state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good a.
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned ,,
from the I. C. 0. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today, s'
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
1l. + buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men, '
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Sh Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following :

Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
.. 2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,

.... '''"''Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as
t.. place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
uoing point of view. They will be glad to answer yo U1 ri
d we can refer you to numbers of others.

'' y purpose in bringing this sp n
fact that, if you feel like A.414
prospects of getting away fe a





* *


^r. Charles E. Williamson,
Ormn.h1., Neb.


Dear Sir:"


Replying to your ca.rd of the llth I am pleased to
send you copy of Fruitcrest booklet. I am new at Lauderdale.
If our proposal interests you, I trust you may be able to
have a t'lk with me.

I Rm 'nfi of thie *ld Ever~hCdes buyers, who, by the
thliusand, hnve been left in the lurch, having bought lind
4ye -eannet ise. I am trying to get as _-any as neesible, my-
self included, eut of tbe hale. ..."e can enly do this collec*-
ively, hence rmy unparalleled nreaos'il.


Very truly yours,


j.
%L2...........; L~..


. 1y


Jan. 18th, 1915.








1.,: .. ..


....- j '. ts r a i
L__ ON,3 BUILDiNO -w *. dpn 0 n R ron .
SKANSAS CITY.MO 0'.. 1PHILIIB SDELANYV
/ "ENRY 0 RALSTON,

AR.M. PRICE,
WILLIS P, MUNGER.



INCORPORATED)
RANDOLPH 1773
M|A .JESTI r T13UTLDIN (
SCHICAGrO
E C: HOWE. W^MSINTON, D. C., OrFFIC1.
GE.II-L AN.ra 0 .Y E OURAY BUILDING
COMPAN- s L-Ac. 809 @ STREET, N. W.
TELFPHOME MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of aosenoe and Inspected the wonderful Everglades region !
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington. D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Str.eet, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

I Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, am
;p;-place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income .ro- B
gtk;ucing point of view. They will be glad to answer yourpquirla
Zand we can refer you to numbers of others. :-

My purpose in bringing this subject to- oun
fact that, if you feel like I did, TOU also'
prospects of getting awaJ frdi thbdeael dl












Jan. 18th, 1915.


'rs. Sarah TIorris,
f 5311 "'est Clinton Ave.,
Indianola, lewa.

DearTaj4 :- xji.

I gre-tly regret the daj4Win answering your let er
It -ent to -,:.hington, and followed vie 'nere.

I am :3siding one of our beeklets giving information
you desire both by map and text ( na--, 10). This land is
in the upr r Glades, one of the richest tracts en eirth.
Further it in entirely ready for cultivation now. In
fact, a sixty h.p. trecter and oulverizer is shortly to begin
work there. 're ar- near the north New River canal, tbe
townrihLin line -'nn' 1and the -e:*.' l!-' Beach- ,verglades rail
roed, '-hi.'h is to follow the toznsahip line canal.

uve-r ialf of ..ruitcrest tract is airen'dy sold. It is aggr.inst
our 1ilic' to sell a 1...r, acrn~ge to a aiingle Loiy, three
holdin,? bei:.a' the mOtA we have sold one buyer thos far.
I recmrne id that you take say three or four holjings in. ruit-
crst, Iccrmi:.: in this way, a member of t'.f progressive
co-.imun1i iy ',rnd that, nvi!'inr done this, you uy other
lainde in the nei1i`bberhood, at ordinary inar'-et prices.

Now our 'Tr'iitcrest price or ~s20.00 per acre is, of course,
n *-.ost extraordinary opportunity, -offered to mkice possible
tVia building up of a suc'e:-',sful, model community. No other
1-'nds, -:, 't Tlill compare, for a Tmaept, with our propooeition,
sells for ,ny such price. Otier fine cirds outside Yruit-
crest cn.n, however, be bought for from "'60.00 to .,'75/00
per -cre. With the coming to the improvement neow n, these
l1irido .'I'll command still higher prices. I should :dvise
yoir -urchasing prom-atly while the onmortufiity lasts.

Very truly yours,








fr


. A M "-'; ,"'IQ oa I e- f "'t ,r. fS j
off a.. I 'l
AgbMr&Vr I r U





.ONNG BuSlDIAG,
KANSAS CITYMO.


LHIAND SALES MPANY
i _j,,' .,, H, ^^ (INCORPORATED)
~Te LE~ t*.N
^^.^^^^^J^^^ FA'DOLRH 1773 r
--- .%1, J )':r1"( I 'I-LI_)IN( :"


EC. HOWE. wA6.ft.oo D C. OF..Ct ca
GerNEMa Aot v rp I*sE OURAY BUILDING
COMpanv S LAK.s 800 6 STREET N.W.
T"rLE -OnE MAIM 4260



A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in- .{,
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 aores of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employee in the Inter- ...
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned .*
from the I. C. 0, in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today, :',
every Department in the Government service is represented among our ""
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others "
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Waishington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example. I.
Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named '
the following: '

Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher, -
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0., '.'

Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, a
'place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an inoom ro
duringg point of view. They will be glad to answer yoT
. 23,d we can refer you to numbers of others. -.
'-' My purpose in bringing this subjeot .o ur attend
fact that, if you feel like I did, 'UI zt to have *o
prospects of getting away froa the ony of gover


I

r *.c~g~1 J















Jan.19 Ia5.

,Mr. ".F.Taten,
Johnson City,Tenn.

Vy dear Sir:---

Enclosed find contract form ind list

of evail3ble tracts. Orders for holdings

come in by wire. Am just writing the sender

of one such that his tract is sold to another.

If you wnnt a holding, I sug'-est that you

apply a t onceppreferably by wire#designating

trict by number.

The coming railroad from Palm Dench

into our immediate neighborhood is announced

as a certainty, to be av.il 'ble in one year.

This should add greatly to the desirtility

of our already very desirable preposition.

SVery truly yours,















4. ..
*^ : : *- ; ^ . ;. .. .* -* .






LONC- Bul.DIeNG,
KANSAS CITY,MO,
, as z


1WA


I


t ,/ '. ,


I


"& (*INCORPORATED)
TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH 1773
J IIMAJESTTC I3BTILDIN(-
CHIICAG~O
E C. HOWE, WASHINGTON, D. C. OFFICE:
GENEA.. AGEN-- O0 THE OURAY BUILDING
CQOPPAr s LAnDN 809 G STREET. N. W
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government .service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for-leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it. 4

On my return to Washington, my fellow employee in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. G. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our A
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following: '

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss 'di
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,

Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a .'
,'place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro- .
duringg point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
&Iand we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the-r
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of goveXA 'M.







"CLINCHFIELD ROUTE"
CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY
CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY OF SOUTH CAROLINA






Johnson City Tenn January 25 1915 e





Mr. Thos. E. Will,

Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

Dear Sir:-

I have your letter of recent date enclosing application

blank covering your land proposition. I have gone over this

application very carefully and it all seems very good to me with

the exception of that part relating to the deed, which I consider

the most important part. Plot No. 42 has been reserved for me

by Mr. Frank S Lee, of Charlotte, N. C., but before sending in

the applicatin I should be glad to have you write me further about

the deed that is, what guarantee will I have that a deed will be

furnished when I have finished paying for my land? Also, what are

the severa4"S&w~eations made by the Improvement Association?

Please give me some further information on the above

mentioned points, and oblige,

Yours very truly,






J A C WADSWORTHPRE~T.&GEN.M~G~.
* HAS NUCHOLSVCE-PRaT.


ESTABLISHED IN 1869.


FRANK B.SMITHTREAS.
W. L.M9OONALDSE~Y,


SUCCESSORS TO
WEDDINGTON HARDWARE CO.


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June 26,1913.

?ies 1-ncy M.Moseley,
306 C St.,T.SE.,
lnshington.D.C.

Der Comrade:-.
I h-ve not heard from you stinco our correspond-
ence of last December. Thv Ms. youi sent me I h1,nd-d to
the editor of the L'-ud-rydale Sentinel -ith request that
he use it,or at last so touch1f it as h coul d. He in-
dic'ted thai hre -ould use at least P pert o,' it. I m
not sure whether he did.

I "m no- living in the lhe rt of the Tv'r gl-des
( See tract 59 opp.p-ge.)writh ry son,.nd devoting my time
to d ivelopmnit work. Being here mi"ket' it inon.-.ible for
me to do much fpr the ?r1 iter:-est proposition that other-
wise wouldd beimpoqsible. i are h- vin.- fins rnins,and
thins ar- growing wonderfully.

In your lott.-r of C(hrii.tTn'. Dity yor indicate;.
that you werethinkinr seriously of gettin'- into the Fruits
crest proposition,%nd interetin: your friends to do so.
As the enclosed ilip indieptes, ne hrve not mu'oi left
to sell. Practically il"l of thit re ha.vn prid for,a
and are, th before, able to give deeds for. The big miohin
that is expected to break our land-- or 1 p--rt of it,at
le'st-- is popping -w:.y in th- cinal right no"- Just out-
side our door. It does fine --orc. 'e only need more
of such mT'chines to c-tcl, un vith th', demand for their
services.

Should you still b', interest d in Fruitcrnst
you would do well to m'rke selections as -oon as possible.
Theclpss V tracts are no-w prnctic:-l.y all. gon,.

The mTrrgjin of this letter gives th-^hbest short
st-tement of our"Plin."
Fratern'lly yours,


*













January 28th, 1915.


Mr. w. F. Eaton,
Johnson City, Tenn.
Dear Sir: "
Yours of the 25th received. closedsd is transcript
from one of the st.te's deeds specifying its severall reservR-
t i o n s .. ... .......... .. ...... ..
.. As to the deed, the proposition is this: I contracted
withh the 9tate I.I.Boird for this lind before the ,ruitorest
Association was organized, and bought th, land fr:im the gtate
Son a contract, which our central rnan.ge9 at Tashiiigton is fa- /'y,,
Smiliar with. This contract provides for time pay-entpfor the
Island. These are being made in fact, we are well nhend of tine
with the Dnyments. The next is due ."irch 18th, but has been
met, and no other is due until Juns-l8th. For this, we now
have the money in bank. "'e pay for eighty acres at each pay-
m rent. 'e have now paid for tio of these eighties, as shown
by enclo'ed~ rup.


The state Imkes dend to me. I suo-nsted to our
central j,"4,ge that I should nra''oe deed to a bo'.rd of trustees
selected from aheir o'n numb r, and thit the duties and powers
Sof these trustees should be stipulmted in a carefully frramed
truse.deed. Our board, with t"'o lawyers on it, unanimously
ap~:-oved this au.r;-ostion. The trust deods, one for each of
the two eighties, were very carefully worked out by a competent
lasliington C. attorney, and a:reed to by our (o'rd, whichh se-
lected two of its leading members as trustees. I thereupon
made the two eighty acre tracts over to these two trustees
under the terms of the trust deeds. The four documents, de'eds
and trust dreds, were recorded with the 0lrk of the circuit
u court of Palm Beach County, "-. George O. Butler, '"est Palm
Beach, and entrusted to the trustees.
S In future, as eighty acre tracts rre paid for, the
above plrn i-ill be follo-ed. The trustees thus hold the lands
in trust for the buyers until the sectbn has ben paid for,
following which the trustees will give deeds to the individual
Buyers.


This plan, I think you will agree,would be hard to


1~qr~eAi?






KG ANSAS CITYMO. PHlI lk 'i.'boII
IENRY G3 RALSTON
*. p ; -





(INAORPORATED)
RANDOLFPH 1773
tALJESTIC E UTIL) IN(Gr
\CHICAG(O

1 E C HOWE. WASHINITON., C., OFFICE
3G ..s... .nAG -o. OURAY BUILDING
Co s L. L D 809 G STREET, N. W.
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
P. wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied ,
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of aores have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
[1j practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Oompher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

"''Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
4-", '^.0'lace for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
Jo2!i" 4uoing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries;
-';d we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government

















w. F. E. # 2.



Improve upon. It resembles that employed by some of the largest
l.-nd companies that have operated in 4the Everglades.

If this tract were leing handled as a purely individual,
rrofit-,,,q':ing, business venture, I r.'iihrt be expected to pay
for it in full myself before makin-g any sales. However, it is
not su1h -n affair in any sense. NIo one makes any profit
out df it. I receive a little aalnry for the work I P.m doing.
The 'r-l.? orooositi'on is bein., h lndled as a co-operative effort. ,
Associ-tion i.ember8, who like your friend "'r. Lee, are aiding 'r
in nutting these sales t rol-i'h, r provin, tmn.emTesives to be i
genuine co-onerators.1.'V ,more like him will aid in complete? W'('.
I te :3.le of the entire tract, rq'e c?.n thereupon at a vlry e'rly
i dny, g-ive irA.ividu.l deeds to ll the buyers.

I I ai,-,y add that some v ery Ilerge land operators in
I1 .'o. v..'. sold large numbers of t'ract3 for which they
I tLe,.selves held no dedd at the tirne, but were purchasing, on
y, ... -., from the state or others. I have heard, however,
i no abuses or irregularities in connection with this work.

CO Ll'e lth, I wrote Tr. Lee that tract 42 hsd been
1-old, .j: -, ested to him, as I did again on the 21st,
not L-I ,-,roun of tracts vhich I thought -i;-ht satisfy
ii.:eli 'ii his friends. I have not henrd what he thinks
of it. I[ -E however, ndw writiiig the buyer of tract 42,
- ki ,iiht.r he will take another tract I hlve named.
So tiere ,'re two chances you dan be satisfied with A,
location. It all shows the importance of applying
Drornntly.

Very truly'yours,


-~A





L ONG L-DPIoCG
KANSAS CiTY MO PHIL




H TELEPHONE
AMID MX.:-SALESJ9w MXAiyr-

RANDOLPH 1773
L ISTIC BUI-LDIN (
I, '[t-: CCHICAGO
E C HOWE. wls-. ,GoQ o C.O,-.c.
GEN [L ACGET FCA T E OURAY BuILDING
COMa. m L.a- BO3 0 STREET N W
TEcE.t-o0..s MA.- 4260


A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
,i he could leave the government service for something better. I
(.1 wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
oient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in- ,
'.4 creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied *
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region j..
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employee in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good 'r
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our 4.'
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others ,,j.
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
iA 'are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

*'-' -""- t Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named:
the following:

II"T Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. 0., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0., .

~',% Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a *-. .
... place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
-* '' k '^ duringg point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries *
-''and we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attentiap is the.
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also,want to have *om
prospects of getting away fro khe deal monotony of .goi

.*' 4
V V*r 4















re. J. Trotter,
SllTere, Calif.

My deer Vpbel:-

Norma Bell has just written me, sending payment

on her Fruitcrest holding, and asking rme to send literature

to Vr. Trotter.

'ormra wwas with us last su,,w.-r in "ashinqton. ~e had a

fine visit. '3he told us of your pleasant home.

Your aunt ?May and the girls are in 'aslhington. Lawrence

and I are in Flerida. ,His came is shown on bnck of letter

head. I have an office here, but spend some time with him

there. "ill send you a Lauderdale -r.per contnininjg partial

account 6f my last trip there.

The "verglades are as l-rge as Rhode Islan) and Deleware

combined. They represent a. ;ntiificent empire wiith ''.arvelaus

possibilities. The low land is wet, but ours is dry. I

am doing mr-y best to make the country habitable, and the land

"Tihe bent poor man's propo0-ition" in sight.

If -.-on and I r. Trotter would be interested, I should be

,ve-ry rl1..'d to have you in our association. You will note

'ht. vp ire handling matters so that the buyers may come

or 91-, --pay, just as they like.

Sincerely yours,
i


.. .


Jan. 28th., 1915.




'-w' w' w'W


rd4JMl


P41LIP 9 D ELANy
-FA G. RALS4.1
V. W. HLM,
R. M. PRICE,
GCLOY.^ ATflCSUflL
WI LLIS P. MUNGER.


Ah4IA&SALES COMPANY
(INCORPORATED) TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH 1773
rACJESTIC V1XDIN 0
CHICAGO0


WASHINGTON. 0. C., OFFICE
OURAY BUILOINO
809 0 STREET, N. W.
TaLEPHONE MAIN 4260


A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy,, equable climate, with suffi-
oient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the.Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida., I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it. j

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good U
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
- I B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher
.- 2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

Ar'.Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as
,',place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an Income pro-
ducing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries *l
d we can refer you to numbers of others. S' I

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is t
fact that. if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government


El


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Jan. 28th, 1915.


yr F.. C. 'uagrave,
2130 Drak Part Ave.,
Des Foinea, lewa..

Dear S'ir:-

Your letter of the 19th to CverF qades Land Ceon-ny,
Palm each, Y1eridp went to the -verrgldes 'oi,.r & Land
Co., P.nd 'waq referred by therm to me.

I enclose literature r '"dirr.- my VFruitcrest arooesition
one half mile west of Okeelanta townsite. As -e-'Frids
Ilhepness" you will find my o-rices extr-ordinaly, since
I ?rm selling : this lnnd rat tIvh state's -nrice .-f "20.00
as scre. Belles land adJoinint'. this on four sides is 'd-
vertised at ;:60.00 an r cre. Vy object is to establish
a successful u.~o r v7er;lides community -on a plan that
should srBead all over the Gl~des, thus enabling buyers,
as the immense -ajority heretofore have not, to realize
on their investments.

The enclosed sli' shows available tracts. I cpn
sllow you 10, comrrission. Honing to hear ir.'f you,
,I a :,











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j,., ,.,







PHILlI


h#AS~i~EGCOMPANB
INCORPORATEDE) LPoN
'TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH 1773
ITA.JTGSTI-C TnLDINI
CHlICA.GO


|'I '! V"T
SC. HOWE.
GrOMPa AG.E ro0 L..
Comp..N a LAwNCl


WAsMINTONr. D. C., OFFICE.
OURAY BUILDING
809 O STREET, N. W.
TaL.PHONE MAIN 4260


A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
fI ^ ^ _- __


liiiBl
'IS



I 5,lf
t :




[ .






.^a


B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher, T
.- 2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

-Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a..
"flace for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
doing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries:
and we can refer you to numbers of others. .

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the .
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of goyadlt


LONG BLUILDIO,
KANSAS CITY,MO.


0o lowing:

Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Roohambeau, Washington. D. 0.. Miss


the













January 28th, 1915. '




Mr. Oscar Kl-nn,

S 1129 Hadley St.,

yilwaukee, myis,

Vy dear air:

At the request of Mr. T'. J. 'Yandrey, of i!adison, I am

sending you herevith literature on Pruiturst, Fla. I have been

familiar with Florida Evexglades matters for the last five years

and especially with the methods whereby the lands have been sold *
Th*. practically universal pln employed has been that of the land

companies, which have sold for private profit and, as a rule, left

their buyers to work out their own salvation. This method, it is
now perfectly evident, is proving a disastrous failure, notably

for the buyers, but in a measure, even for the sellers themselves,

to say nothing of the public and the reputation of the 2v'rylides.

I. have determined to establish one community on a basin

whereby success for the buyers should be practically insured, and

bought at thr lowest price, not only of land, but of development

and experience. This plan is set forth in the Fruitcrest booklet.

Competent critics regard it as entirely outside the class of ordin-

ary land propositions.

If this were good simply for the buyer, it would be

worth y'hile. Its good effects, however, only begin with him.
Such a community, succeeding at one point, should be repeated










O.K. -2-







UNTIL IT HAS SPREAD ALL 07 "P TH7 GLADES AND MADE AVAILABLE AND

HABITABLE Ti;" T'T-S OF THOUSANDS OF ACRES NO' .RT',',DERRD UNAVAIL'

ABLE AND UNINHABITABLE B'CAT'USE OF THE LAND COMPANY PLAN OF SALE.

It is this which magnifies its significance, especially to, the

old buyers.:

Hoping it may interest you, I remain,

Very truly yours,


q-,.
,


a:* ;" emoa evJ.; O : V. I o Dl Oi' ,o
" *V vo3 .: -:.1f onou Cfaeb ..J ,














January 28, 1915.




,r. Herman B. "'alker,
Office Secretary of Interior,
'irslijington, D.C.

Dear Mr. ivalker:

I have not heard whether you received the deeds

and trust deed I sent you( I hope they have arrived in

safety.

I have just returned from the Lake. My story in
this week's Lauderdale papers will epitomize matters there.

The frost and freeze situation compels a complete ch-nce of /

line of work. The farmers are accepting the situation

philosophically and without loss of faith in the country,

are going ahead.
p
Thr Crum pulverizer was delayed, but is expected
to start up next Saturday. The farmers are eagerly awaiting

y its arrival. r. Crumr was in this morning. His concern,

when such changes as comin- experience may dictate, have been
made, is prepared to turn these machines out ranidly. The

results should be a revolution in glades farr.ming.
In the Florida grower for January 23rd, page 11,

will be found adv. of the Universal Motor Cultivator. Fr.

e ": waters, one of our leading Upper Glades fam'ers, has seen it

.. and is convinced it is just what we need. I have just written

the Fellsmere people, who are said to have one, to learn how
*i 'l.-76 ,@ |f*;^ ''










H.B."'. -2-





it "orkr. If satisfactory, it should supersede horses.

The acreage the Upper Glades farmers will plant in

late potatoes will depend upon the success of the Crum

machine, and, possibly, upon the introduction of the above

cultivator.
'.'e are -having an excess of rain both here and in the

Lake region, which is making' much trouble.....

1. At the convention here on the 20th, when the I.I. Board *

ere in town, a nation wide Evergladeq organization was

h lnched. Some pretty careful heqds are now at r'ork formu-

lating its m-ech-nism. I am in touch with them, and am hope-

ful it will prove the organization n.-eded for solving Glades

or obl ems.

I am still '-aking some sales, though am compelled to

divide my attention .' 'I -hole things csrn be kept' ;'ng at the

'aslhington end. O1nleas there i., a considerable demand for

S. our'new 'booklet I shall be gl-d to reoe.ve as many copies as

can be spared.

SCordially yours,






l i




t. C

i' -sH .*j













January 28, 1915


^Sr. E. K. McGoe.,
0s' c/o Smith- "'rdsworth Hardwrar Co.,
29 !. Trade St.,
Charlotte 7.C.

Deir Sir:

Yours of the 25th at hand.. I am enclosing copy of list
of available Fruitorest '"aots. 3?rioes of holdings, per clans,
are found on rage 15 of booklet. By noting the numbers (Arabic
and 1Ro.an) of a tract you can determine the price.

I have just returned from the Fruitcrest district.
There ia much activity vaoni; thUe settlers.in that vicinity.
They are agreed that they have the richest l'-nd and finest climate
of which they have xny knowledge; and, wliile most of them bought
on the Ipnd company plan, they are paying tribute to the Vruit-
crest land now by o:ginizing, nd arranging to work together
for common ends. Gur Fruitorest buyers are, from the beginning,
organized, and far more effectively than land company buyers
can possibly be.
whilee our tract holds out you can still buy at :0.00
an acre, th ugh land company land adjoining it on four side
is advertised at 060.00 an p.cre.


Sincerely yours,






Si.ANSAS CITY, MO. PHILIP S.DELANY.
HENRY G. RALSTON,
MR PRICE

S., WILLIS p MUNOER.

-a.. SALE "fM.PANY
,mo.PRAT" TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH 1773











CommWrce Commission,.the writer was looking forward to the time when
IE I.m. at AsgI. E, Q. OUFRAY BUILDING
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission,.the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
,'/A creasing income as the years rolled by.

r One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
q who are living upon this land and working it .told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
:from the I. 0. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
Buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

"' ^^.Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named f
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
... ..,.~. 2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C..
'* .-.. i' ,^ 1 ,. ,
: '''Ask them wnat they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
Solace for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
'-""ucing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries;
'':'" d we can refer you to numbers of others.
-* .A-. :t... I .... .
My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government

t






94





January 28th, 1915.




j|$. M. Moore,
/"Dunedin, Fla.
^ My dear sir:

Yours of the 25th received. I am glad to -end you
literature on Fruitcrest. The map shows its location. It is
not on the lake shore; however, its organization and other fea-
tures place it entirely outside the class of other land company
propositions here, lake or no lake.

I have just returned from the lnke, and have been told
that some of the farmers on the lake shore have been planting
to move down into the interior because the lands at the lake
shore have been so dry. Those lands are high, and rains are
reported to be more r.re in the lake region thin in the interior

Practically all the !.verglades lands are haIdle@ on the
Robinson-Crusoe, go-it-alone, psyyll-the-inma'ket-will-bear plan.
The Pruitcrest plan represents n. complete revolution. It is
the one plan formulated in the interest, pure and simple, of
buyers, and not of some l.nd company. It is designed to insure
success for the buyers.

Over half this land is sold, 30 per cent of it for
: cash. While it lnsts, you can get it'for 20.00 pr acre. It
is surrounded by land advertised at $60.00 per acre.

Sincerely yours,






_H-^ KANSAS CITY,MO. PHILIP'S.DELAN'





"- J+AOk SALES 1fMWAiV
,, -'f!INCORPORATED)
RANDOLPH O 773
-- N1A.JESTIC I; TrILDIN(r
, ~CHI CAGO}

G E C. HOWE, WASHINTON. D. C., OFFICE
Gera nMa. AoIN' ros ,s OURAY BUILDING
+ '. Cona,." s La e 809 0 STREET, N. W.
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260



g A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
She could leave the government service for something better. I
j wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
coient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.
One day, a piece 'of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
i for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
i who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 aores of it.

.- On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
.- state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
,, judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
From the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today, I
S.every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of aores have been sold in Washington, and others
'' are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
.r practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
...... example.

i",,,,'..... Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
J,^, ~ the following:
~l',.^ ,Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. 0., Miss
"!' B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., 8. P. Compher,
'2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

--"i" ., t'1 ,.Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
., ,lace for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
..+, ,.mJ^^^^uoing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries ,
,. I ^ ~n ,d we can refer you to numbers of others.
.**"...t .^ My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did. YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government F










I 'U


Jan. 28th, 1915.



Mts. Sarah Korris,
311 "Vest Clinton Ave.,
Indianola, Iowa.

Dear "adam:-

Yours of the 18th received just 1.s I was called away
to the lake region; hence the delay in replying. Your letter
of Jan. 1st I answered on Jan. 18th, sending booklet and saying
"This land is in the upper Glades, one of the richest tracts on
earth. Further it is entirely refdy for cultivation now.
In fact, a sixty h.p. tractor and pulverizer is shortly to begin
work 'there. 'e are near the north JNew River c-nal, the town-
shin line canalmand the new Pal'r, Beach-Mverglades rail road,
which is to follow the township line canal.

Over half of .Fru.tcrest tract is already sold. It is against
our policy to sell a large acreage to a "ingle body, three holding
being the most -re have sold one buyer thus far. I recommend
t,hst you tnke say three or four holdingsi in :;?ruitcrest,
becoming, in this way, a member of this progre:3 ve
community, end that, having lone this, you buy other lrnds
in the neighborhood, at ordinary market prices.

Nlow our Fruitcrest price of $20.00 per cre is, of course,
a mott extraordinary opportunity, offered to make -,ossible the
building u- of a successful, model community.. No other
lands, which will comnare for f moment, -ith our n- onosition,
salls for mny such price. Other fine lands outside Fruit-
crest can, however, be bought for from X 60.00 to ,75.00 per
acre. ?7ith the coming to the im-Drovement no-w on, these
1 `7 lands will command tilll highc'r prices. I should advise your
purchasing promn-tly while the on-ortunity lasts."

.It may be that you have alre-dy received the a ove.
In any event, I should be glad to hear from you.

I have just returned from the Okeelanta-Fruitcrest district.
A fine little settlement is ,-ro'-ing up there. The people
are active, earnest and progressive. They are organizing,
petitioning for roads ond a government experiment station,
arranging to have their lands broken by a 60 hxp. tractor and
S pglverizer, c.Rlling for a store and post office, mnd otherwise
Sp'iphing to the front.

The coming rail ro"d ( see enclosures) meanns much to this
:.recion. ,I have a consider-ble iec--'r.-e lying on the line this
... railroad, so I ;" a, R red by its directors, will follow.
ii' y own lend, I b- s',elinf at ordinary cornmerciel prices.-

I

















Thit is -'~ht makes the F]ruitcrest land such a marvelous bargain. .

?.y land in section 35, corners -ith Fruitcrest (see trap
on opposite nage of letter.

Considering the size of your proposed purchase, should
ou not cone down .nd actually insect the land? I should
be very glad to go with you into the Fruitcrest district, Pnd
show you over the entire proposition.

Regretting that our correenondence has been broken into,
and trusting you may receive this promptly and reply soon,
I remain,


Sincerely yours,





r ~




EE~j~


'


I... ~


-ONG Bu,'lDNO, D3S.ImHORtM8
--' KANSAS CITY, MO. PHILIP S. OELANY.
S, I HENRY 0. RALSTON,
V W. HELM,


l1 -& ^ t Jmlddddl A* l m ,.' t .": V^I-M ,P., ..-- ";



(INCORPORATED) TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH /773
MAJ-I AJTESTIC T-aUILDIN,-
CHICAGO

E C. HOWE., WASHINrTONm. D. C., OFFICK
GEaNERAL AaiP' FOBRn 'e OURAY BUILDING
COMBAT S L apc 809g G STREET, N. W.
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
oient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region ,
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people :
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it. .,

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following: "

Dr. 0. u. Muncaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss'
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. 6., S. P. Compher, "
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
,place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
uoing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
pnd we can refer you to numbers of others. '

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some ..
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government A

niHS












Th.30thj, 1915.



'323 B3u zzlton Ave.,
4000000 lkensburg, Pa.

De'Rr T r. L eift;

Our fr'ien~d, Yr. 71. ollingger, of Pittsb-iir1.
~u re ts h" I sendl you li terature rej-rdin Fru~itcrest.
This I tlikfer:'. pleasure in Iocing. Th'e boolcet -rd contract
are slf exp,)lnatory.- 3hioald polnts aris~e, Ishall be j,1nd
to have IOU '.-kqetos

11leafne noL-0 Uivlt this is A J"ri .3 T13 I %CT :t ST LY.
Thne only, cte of, its 'kind, to kn 1rowledire in tine ::IverrrlThdea.
rracticpily all of t 'e 'others. are- linid'le4 by lnrc,.e >r~nd
conp~qnieg which do busineqs stri~tl1;, in their ownr in~terest.,,/
charpiing i.ll the ~inmket 'i.h'vr ari(3 Ter'ini~r tn' h'.qr
to, vorkc out their oT-ni sa-lv,3tion.

1ro.~ ha }i1f he:i'jtores-t tr-rt h*rs been .9old, tlijirty
i-er c(:mt of it for --tcash. `1i`en tiv- vO.Ps hxr,,e b-,?n carried
n little farther w-e lio-v to ~jlki rprgresjve viork in develop-
in Mie land. usi-ig, 'a tlie begj~it'i-j irx h.u.tjto
ff nine end nulver izing rncai~e.

A main canal. is about thrree q %-rte!*Q of PA mile east of
us; a secondary c--naj. and 7c-od ro-'d one tnile so.,l~i of us.
This is, to 'be coaTipleted to Palin- ]3e,4ch, f.)rt,~ -,ileo dietn-nit.
It, ii~ to be pzarnileled by a r:!ilr~ond, connecting us with 'Palm,
Beach'11, arid, so the General Tat.-,.,er assures nie In personn,' to
1:e wt~erpti'lp: trains withnir R "Pnre
The ~coipnying L-iuderdal~e onprnes cortain an articl.p of
mine sborwing the activities nrmong the, rp.)rjle nor in our
diriot. W-Athin P year great Rurnbpa- 1,n v-i&-Jectedi to
~e th~ere.

Lanid comri-ny l)nd adjoiriimr. ours on e,,4t, wVeit, ricrtur- !,d
sopthr seller at kd-(350O -) -icre; oure sells at .2~l.r w~l
of wh~at co-oner-tion can do at the ouitoet. Je pbr to-mnply
the s~enrinciple. in cv~tivation, tr~n,4nortatidn, operation
of public utilities arnd so forth. If this kind of thing
interests yiou I would be ple*,fed to kxePr from youi.


Very rrespctfully yours,





LONG BUILDING,
oN KANSAS CITYMO. TIMCroRaW"
ANSAS CIT Y,'MO. PHILIP S.DELANY, m
HENRY 0. RALSTON, W
S9 L. VW. E*M VSIEMT.
R. M. PRICE,
'. ^ S" t --. .GWIL P HUNGER.




(INCORPORATED)
RANDOLPH 1773
- MAjESTIC BITILDING .



E C. HOWE, WASHINGTON, D. C. OFFICE,
GcrNeRA. AC.-1T F-C THE OURAY BUILDING
Comp. N S LAN0 9o g STREET, N. W
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer'was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in-the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 aores of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. 0. 0. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying.. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils .-- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,

Ask them wnat they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-,
duoing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries;
Sknd we can refer you to numbers of others.'

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that; if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government














Jan. 30th, 1915.


Dr. Geo. B.. Klein,

New Tartinaville, V'. Va.

Dear Sir:-


Enclosed find copy of letter to Vr. seeker.

I thank 'on for joir interest. "Tould you not like to

become a member yo'-' :lf? Thiq is a unique

cpn-ortunity to Pid v7bat nay -iro-ve rn opoch r~ikin--

ly0ove'nent.

Verj truly yours,































! p|1A


I






















I 'E'
" RR


LONG aUi.OING, J.o:
4 HENRY 0. RALSTON,
V W. HELM
R.M PRICE



AAND SALES COMPANY
INCORPORATED)
TELEPHONE
SRANDOLPH /773
Nj [ALIE K IC; 03TTLDI
CHI(AG O

C HOWE. WASHINSTON. D. C., OFFICE
GE,'.Er AL. AE' *O "HE OURAY BUILDING
09 La s BOB STREET, N. W.
TELEPHoNE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Roohambsau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington. D. C., S. P. Compher, '
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C..

Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an Income pro-
ducing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
and we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention il the'
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government -













Jan. 30th, 1915.


Kr. B.B. B.eeker,
''est ,nh Beach, Fla.

Dear Sir:-

Dr. Geo. D. Klein su-,restso my writing you
-ro.rding Fruitcrest. This I do rith ole'Jsure.

Plense note that this is a 3I. ,3S' PROPOSITICO., S.'PICTLY-
the only one in the Glades.


-17
-4,.


ore th'.n f half- the tract hd been sold, thirty holdings I
for 'elh. Development '-or.- rith a 60 )i.'. tractor nind
nulverizer is expected to b'gin there soon.


S Te Pal'j Bea-ch-Nvor'l',des railroad, its directors tell
me, 7vill follow the tornahip line ca'nal, one mile 9outh
of Fruitcrest, ri.nd- r nrnini'r trains in- yr"'r.

Fruiterest is sur' niod by lrind selling ant ,65.00 -er
' cre. Ours sells at -20.0-0 sny-amle of wh!,t co-on ration
cn' c do. "/e nl n to. bOply this principle not only to
selling 1ind, but to cultivation, tr-nsnortation, retailing
S--oodq, the onerition of -ublic utilities' ind so forth.
If this kind of thin interests you I .should 1e lo'd to
" hear "from you.

S. ry truly yours,


I. .' ^- -

it .


W" :






lLA ONG BuILDINO, 3iJVE Iroa :
SjILIP 9 DELAUN
.1E Y 0 Lo roN.





I4o W SALES COMPANY-
/, -. (INCORPORATED)
TEL EP C.


C HI N6(-; 0

S E C. HOWE. A*s- r. moV 0 C. Or-.Cl
GeranAl. AGXV FOs T-- OURAY BUILoDING
i COMPANY S LAmD 809 G STREET N W
\TBI-C OPCM -si 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employee in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. 0. 0. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named '
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss 4
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington. D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,

1v, Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
. i''place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
duoing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
-,and we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government

. -"*


." -_, *"I ,












February 1, 1915.








Mr. Henry Randall,

David City, Neb.

Dear Sir:

At the request of Mr. D. T. Firor, I am sending you

literature regarding Fruitorest. He hns given the proposi-

tion careful study, and i.s i-muh ila ised with it. It is the

only land rrooosition in Florida, so far as I know, that is

handled from the standpoint and for the ex clisive benefit of

buyers rather than of some seller. The land and climate are

exceptionally fine. In addition the fact that this land is

sold at cost at about 1/3 or 1/4 of the pi'ice of competing

lands, and that a co-ooerative proposition, worth more than

the land, is thrown in, makes this a most extraordinary

opportunity. If interested I shall be glad to hear from you.

Very truly yours,






s ^^. LON G BuH-DING, D)1WW 10.'IO ] __
.KANSAS CITY. MO. PHIIP S.OELANY,
HENRYC RALSTON,.
Wi ~V.W. HELM,




4 C ..,. ,., a n ,t.
BLESALS fOMPANA
(INCORPORATED)
S r .-RANDOLPH 1773


I CHICA3,GO

"E C. HOWE, WASHNWSTON, D. C., OFFICE
G'E Anne Acmape r ,; ,HE OURAY BUILDING
,CCone s- Lan-,8 809 G STREET, N. W.
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
Sturned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
*. who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
,- comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 aores of it.

r'P -, On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
-,, judgment that tney bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
...$. 'i from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
iJ'4l every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Wishington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
w'ii example.

I's";.OC Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
"pI, the following:

Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
S[ B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
'" 2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C..

. ii',, ,--, Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a .
-. ,. place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro- ,
during point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
-, and we can refer you to numbers of others.

,-.-...'.* My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is t
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some ,
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government







FRUITCREST (FLORIDA) ASSOCIATION
THOMAS E. WILL, PRESIDENT AND MANAGER
MUTUALISM
WHEELER BUILDING VERSUS
COMMERCIALISM
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA

February 1, 1915.



Mr. L. E. Will,

De'r Lawrence:

I am sending your raincoat herewith. Hope you will like
it. Enclosed find your bank book, with additional $25.00 de-
posited. These little items may be credited to birthday if you
like. Your mother is sending you a cake. I should like to
help you consume it, but shall probably arrive too late. Don't
1-1-et it spoil.

Have just had a talk with Mr. Crum. lie starts for
your country early tomorrow. I may come up again next week
to see his machine and arrange for our work. I think of
having our plowing begun on tract 74. Later, I may have
him break up the central Square of Fruitcrest. You are at
liberty to order seed for five acres of potatoes with the
crowd.

If you need help, I can employ a Mr. Jackman who
is here from Ohio, owns a Bolles tract on Cross Canal in 34,
and wants work. He may work for Callahan; wages, $1.00 per
day and board. I think he would rather stay with you at the
same figure, though I have not said much until I could con-
sult you. Will you need help ? How soon, and for how long ?

I don't want to offend Copper in this matter. He
also would like work, though he ought to have more pay than
that considering his past. Mr. Jackman impresses me as a
fine:man, and seems to be a skilled horticulturist. His
daughter may b'uy A.Fruitcrest tract and interest others to
do the same.

I have talked with Mr. Cr,.m about moving the asking
house and your house to the Cross Roads. I think we can do
this a little later. You might talk with Mr. Copper about
his letting me have his four-fifths of the packing house,
and find what he wants for it. The natural thing to do
would be to put this against a part of what he owes me. If,
however, he feels that this will be hard in view of his fin-
ancial need I might pay him a little money either on account
of the packing house or the little you owe him. Of course,
the balance is heavily in my favor, even if I take the pack-
ing house and pay him nothing on any of the accounts. Still,
I realize his extremity, and should like to help him if I can.

I suppose 1'r! Hetherington will be down shortly
with his money. Cordially yours, .









L.E.-'. -2-




P.S. My Chicag; agent was in last Friday with a crowd from
near.Chicago. He will resume selling for me. Please find
whether Mr. Garland still wants to sell tracts 1, 2, and 7a;
and, if so, at what price, and at what discount for cash.
I may be able to handle it for him.

Mr. Grady was in today. He seemed to be badly out
of sorts, though stated no reason.

T.E.w.





e-







February 1, 1915.



,Mr. J? "'. Ricketta,

Perkins, Okla.

Vy dear air:

Yours of the 27th ult. received. I am pleased to
send you a cony of oar Fruitcrest booklet, which el-rAins
things fully.

This, you will find, is a buyer's proposition -
the only one I know of. Furthermore, as an old .verglade 4
buyer, you should be interested in this feature ; with
this plan once in operation, ai.il-'r comn:.unities should
pirrini, up all veor the Iverglndes. These will prove the
salvation of the people vho have bought fr n the land com-
panies and find it imnossible to use their land, even thcui;
it is dry -nd aurveed. A Fruitcreo4 settlement within a
mile or two of such a tract will make it available rtd add
immensely to its value.

Over half our holdings have been sold, thirty per
cent of them for cash. Should you want one,, you would
do well to order it soon.






,OAN SA. BL S N CITY, MO. rna1F rob na nM
,, PHILIP S. DELANY
V i HENRY 0. RALSTON

-AA. -R.M. PRICE,
.F WILLIS P. MUNGER.


If JA SA LES CMPAAWY'^
(INCORPORATED)
TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH 1773
N rllOc-, SII tT II(TILDING(
(CHI (zCA O

SC. HOWE, WASH56roN, D. C., O F ,c
.E .L .w .n ..SL OURAY BUILDING
CompAh. s La.o 809 G STREET, N. W.
STaS.EPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
', turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I.saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
Vfrom the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
Siexample.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Hiss
.B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
,' ',' 2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

,, Ask them what they think of Everglades hands as an investment, as a
place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
'.'. during point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries;
V'.::. *. ,and we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the k
. fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some ,
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government'

ii._ -- i F' I I I im lr I f"





JIM PRINCE, ASSISTANT MGR.


YADKIN HOTEL
100 ROOMS, 70 ROOMS WITH PRIVATE BATH
EUROPEAN CAFE IN CONNECTION


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FRUITCREST (FLORIDA) ASSOCIATION
THOMAS E. WILL. PRESIDENT AND MANAGER
MUTUALISM
WHEELER BUILDING VERSUS
COMMERCIALISM
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA

February 4, 1915.




My dear Lawrence:

Yours of the 2nd received. I have bought all the
things you wanted, save the motor, and am sending them by h
the Forbes Boat.

The express on potatoes to "'ashington is ."2.25
per hundred lbs. The express office assumes a hamper to
weigh fifty lbs. The charge, therefore, on a single
hamper is put at $1.20.

I have talked with Austin, who has, he says, a. nice
little motor suited to a row boat, his charge for which is
$35.00. I have just seen him again, hoping it milrlt .be
ready to talk business about, but it is riot quite. He
will get it ready soon. **

I am gl d your potatoes are doing better than ex-
pected; likewise your hens.

I shall probably be up, say next Tuesday; and can
trA with you about tract to plow. I think it should be 74.
Am glad Crum has met our people.

Dr. Cole writes me today about wet-land in his vic-
inity. Spitzer told me as I came down about his land being
wet. I want to go out anin upon 27 to e::rLinie its condition.

I have just sold #12 in 27 to Walter Brillin7er, of
Pittsburgh. He thinks he can make sales for me. If you have
a chance to sell any of my land in the southwest quarter of
35 at .,75.00 an acre, go ahead.

UTr. Hetherington expected to be down with his nayrrient
about the first. I assume his money has been delayed.

I hope you will find your slicker all right. If you
want anything else let me know in time to brinr or send it on
theTuesday boat. I hope to have an engine to bring up. Then
we can do some running around.


Cordially yours,


'y









FRUITCREST LOCATION


ON SECTION 27, (below)


OKEELANTA ADDITION
(Section 35, below) Adjoins Okeelanta and corners with Fruitcrest.
Its 98 tracts are surveyed and staked. A 25-foot canal and road are
being wrnstructed along the south border. The "Okeelanta Pioneers"
are farming on this section.


AT THE HUB


FRUITCREST FACILITIES
AS TO
I. TRANSPORTATION: (1.1,. and 12) Lauderdale-Okeechobee-Kissimmee Waterway; connecting, by rail, with (2) Sanford-to-Jacksonville Boatline. (3) Florida
East Coast Ry. Extension, to F. E. C. Main Line. (4) St. Lucie Canal (proposed.) (5) Jupiter-to-Okeechobee Highway. (6) West Palm Beach Canal (begun.) (7) Palm
Beach-Okeelanta-Ft. Myers Highway (begun.) '(7a) Township Line Canal (begun; bordering Okeelanta Addition.) (8) Hillsborough Canal. (9) Miami Canal.
(10) Caloosahatchee River, connecting with the (11) Atlantic Coast Line Ry. to Jacksonville. (12) North New River Canal, connecting with the (13) Florida East Coast
Ry. and the (14) Inter-Coastal-Miami-to-Jacksonville Waterway. (15) Tampa, Atlantic and Gulf Ry. (surveyed) to connect with ocean steam ship lines on (16) East
Coast, to Nassau and, later, to World Ports; and, on (17) West Coast, to New Orleans, Havana, Key West and New York. (18) Atlantic, Okeechobee and Gulf Ry.
H. COMMUNICATION: (12 and 10) U. S. Mails by boat connecting Ft. Lauderdale, Okeelanta, Rita and Ft. Myers. (19) Lauderdale Okeelanta Ft. Myers
Telephone (partially constructed.)





O/
W *





February 4, 1915.




Mr. "7. F. Eaton,
Jphnson City, Tenn.
My dear air:
In response to your inquiry I wrote you
quite fully about our deeds and various safeguards
to the buyers. I have been hoping to hear from you.
Our proposition has absolutely no rival be-

cause it is handled in the interest of the buyers
rather than of the seller. Our tract is surrounded

by ;65.00 land. I have land adjoining which I sell
at ?75.00. You get Vruitcrest land at 20.00 only
because it is a co-onerative proposition. "lith the
railroad and other improvements what are going in this
land ought easily to be worth many times its present
price in a few years. "ihen this tract is gone I
know of no opportunity one will have to buy again
at such figures.

Very truly yours,










%a ..ws" ,.






LON EO UIL.D-PO DAOF.O *
K A N S A S C I T Y M O P H I L 1= 3 s

V.W. HELM,
R. M PRICE,
Vp WILLIS P MUNGER.



INCORPORATED)
RANDOLPH /773


CHI (CAGO 0
E C H*OWE. WASHIN TON, D. C. OFFICE:
ted fA.o h Eo O E URAY BUILDING
C'AO. B1. S o STREET, N. W
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
oient fertile acreage surrounding it ,to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
c--- homes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Wishington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their r
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
IB. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
A0 2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. a..

''y ,' Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as
I' i"'.."place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
K-duoing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
-and we can refer you tf numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is t
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have mome
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of goverai









DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

WASHINGTON
ADDRESS ONLY
THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR
Feb. 4, 1915.

My dear Doctor:

The deed came through all right, and is in the safe. I 4

thought I had acknowledged it. Have been much interested in your

newspaper articles and letters. I have seen the Universal Tractor

adv. and it looks good, if it is made right. I have been very busy

and out of town part of the time, and have somewhat neglected

matters here, but get around occasionally and try to keep in

touch. There are two or three nibbling, but have not made any

sales.

Have a hard fight on my hands just now to land an appoint-

ment for a friend on the Trade Commission, and incidentally to

get a good job for myself on this board. Looks as though I would

win. Will write you fully a little later.

Very truly yours,





Have you had a chance to look over my place on the river? Would

like to know what there is left there.











FebriAry 4, 1915.






Mr. J. 0. Levis,
Johnson City, Tenn.
Dear Sir;
You know 1r. F. 3. Lee. He believes
in Fruitcrest. If you knew an much about the
-verglades as he doei,I believe you would too.
Enclosed is a circular letter I am sending his
list. May I not hear fror, you ?
Very truly yours,


IL *'*' "1 'L ,'-


M


e *0


'6







KANSAS CITYMO. PHILP ELANY,
HENRY G. RALSTO N
V" % V W. HELM,






TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH 1773



CC W .. WAS.HINTO., 0. C..Olrrc

C SaL. ... Soo 80 ST IEET. N. W.
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
I1 he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
: handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence.and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 aores of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of aores have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded WAshington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0..

SAsk them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
lace for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
ducing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
^- d we can refer you to numbers of others. *

V. i. My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is
SOfact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some

prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of govesty h






eg *
S. 0





'February 4, 1915.








Mr. Don Parsons,

Johnson City, Tenn.

Dear Sir:

You, know ?r. F. 3. Lee. H!e belie'?ves

in Fruitcreat. If you knew as nuch about the

Evergl-.deo as he does,I believe you would, too.

:;nclosed is a circular letter I am

sending his list. tay I not hear from you ?

IYours very truly,
















i

I-
.* g~
+ :






AN'SA '. NSAS CITY MO PHILIP E LANY l n

HENRY 0. RALS70O







l ^ ^ f c IE O Y 1 RANDOL 17
V W. HELM i
en f i ae~g uR M. PR tdi CE
.WILLIS P. MUNGER.



(INCoRpoRA TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH /773




E CtrHOWE. wf .t.r.lT. 0. C.. OF..C.
*C L.-E,6 809 0 STREET, N. W.
TZLEPHOME MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absenoe.and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 aores of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
', i every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of aores have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men, -
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,

Ask them what they think. of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
"'; '--M ^ place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
oing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
-' nd we can refer you to numbers of others.

.*.. My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of gove""hlli






eg *




February 4, 1915.







Mr. J. I. Templeton,
Knoxville, Tenn.
Dear Sir:
You know. Ur. P. 3. Lee. HTe believes in
Fruitcrest. If you knew as much about the
Everglades as he does,I believe you yould, too.
Enclosed is a circular letter I am send-
ing his list. May I not hear from youL?

|; ery truly yours,






1
,I
.. ', '


Q".




f ''


6






KANSAS CITYMO. PHIL LY,

HENRY 0. RALSO
V W. HELM,
R. M .PRICE,
Sa dWI LLIS P. MUNOER,



(INCORPORATED)
RANDOLPH 1773
NA3.JESTIC 3l TILDIN
t CHICAGO


S C. HOWE. WASHINmTON. D. C., OFFICl
.e ..... of be OURAY BUILDINO
Co Poe s LAfr os 809 0 STREET, N. W.
TELEPHONE MAI. 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own.home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
banded me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of aores have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

the .Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
..- the following:

.. Dr. 0. MI. Muncaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
S,. 2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

i. 'T-Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a .
lac for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
uoing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
-d we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of gove ',


4
hA












February 4, 1915.


6


!Y!r. C2. if. A. Otto,

Bloomf~tield, Neb.

Dear .3ir:


You'know Mr. F. S. Lee. He believes

in Fruitcreet. If you knew as rmuch about

the Evergl'des as he does, I believe you would, too.
I am enclosing a circular which I am send-

ing his list. May I not hear from you ?
Very truly yours,


I,
-


940





I /-LONO Bul ,D-NO P ,,:OH
KANSAS CITY,MO. PHILIP E LANY,





,INCORPORATED)





CoP. 1, L..06D 809 0 STREET, N. W.
'n 'ETzLIapHOnH MAIN 4260



A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
1cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
Sk, creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend i'n the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
S3 for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
,l-'^1 who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in- ,
...,', 'comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it. ..
l On my return to Washington, my fellow employee in the Inter-
-',,- state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good .
^-F judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned '^
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
*every Department in the Government service is represented among our
Sbyers. Hundreds of aares have been sold in Washington, and others
Comme are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men, when
*'*,' +, practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their

re Among those as the actually seen the Everglads may be namedby.
the flOne day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was









for mysDrelf. Mupresaster, The Rochambau, Washington, D. ., iswith what people
B.who are living Adamsupon thi Service, Washington, D. me, S. P. ompher, in-
On 2142 P Streturn toW. Washington, D.my fellow employee in the Inter-C.

state Cfor a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro- oo!.
from the I. C. uin point of view. They will be glad to anserglades your inquiriesds. Today,
b d we can refer you to numbers of others. ashington, and other

are constantlyMy purpose in bringing this subject to your attention follow their
" "fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony ofgoay be named
the following:
2142 P Street, N. V., Washington, D. C..


I






















T!'r. John AX. Link,

(Tharlotteo, U. C1,

Dear Sir:


You know -r. 2?. 3. Lee. He believes in

Fruitcrest. If you knew as ranch about the

ETverglades an lie does, I believe you iould, too.

Enclosed is a circular letter I am send-

ing his list.- Fy I not hear from you ?

Very truly your,


S. V


J

~AI


FYo"r.,-1.m:cY 4, 1915.


940 0






10NOW 0 Ou ILDit a, "X0,C- ORI s
- AN SAS CITY,MO. PHILI LANY,
'.,/< 4" +HENRY 0.O RALSTON,

,-R.M. PRICE,



SA E e.Di TELEPHONE
ASl year ao lt Ahile e(INCORPORATED)
"" " lRANOOLPH 1773


k:1 'CnHICAGrO
E C. HOWE, WASHINGTON, D. C. OFFICE:
GENIEIA AEI'.T PC THEo OURAY BUILDING
Cc-P.', I L^a 809 0 STREET, N W
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida., I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,

.Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as
'place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
.tducing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
-and we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is t
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of goven I








3 00o


February 4, 1915.






Tr. 3dw. v!. Lee,
Lynchburg, Va.
Dear Sir;
You know Mr. F. S. Lee. Hie believes
in Fruiterest. If you knew aa much about the
Everglades as he does, I believe you would, too.
Enclosed is a circular letter I no sending his
list. M!y I not hear from you ?
Very truly yours,


~&~4 A,~*


go *







PHILIP S. ELANY,
HENRY 0. RALSTON ,
V W. HELM,
i v Vice PR c sOaeT.
R.M. PRICE,
WILLIS P. MUNOER.


LAjV.:SALE~1WA~V4W
(INCORPORATED)
TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH 1773


WASHINSTON, D. C. OFFICE
OURAY BUILDING
80s G STREET, N. W
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260


A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstat
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time whe
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
oient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applie
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
'- state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and goo
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. 0. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today
1 every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be name
.. :'!' the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. 0., Miss
S B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

,*,,; 111m Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as 4
4y.* *-^-lace for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro- j
." 4.duoing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
7and we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is t
fact that. if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of governama


e
n


d

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d










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