Business Correspondence. Aug. 5, 1914 - Oct. 30, 1914

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Material Information

Title:
Business Correspondence. Aug. 5, 1914 - Oct. 30, 1914
Series Title:
Business Correspondence
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Publication Date:
Physical Location:
Box: 2
Folder: Business Correspondence

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Everglades (Fla.)
Okeechobee, Lake (Fla.)
Okeelanta (Fla.)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00000147:00022

Full Text




FRUITCREST (FLORIDA) ASSOCIATION
TELEPHONE, THOMAS E. WILL, MANAGER MUTUALISM
VERSUS
MAIN 1555 MARLOW BUILDING, 811 E STREET N. W. COMMERCIALISM

WASHINGTON, D. C.

AuEus t 5,
1914.


Mr. Lawrence E. WIll,
Box 711,
Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

T.1y dear Lrrepnce:

I certainly want to thank you for the very full
and careful'investigation you have given the two tractors,
and the full reports you have sent in. It seems pretty
clear that both the Holt and Buck eye will do our work.
Both are high priced machines, the Buckeye especially. "e
are looking still further among the lower priced, round-
wheeled machines, with prices running as low as three hundred
and thirty-five dollars and upwards.
Wb are also trying hard to make sure of a plow that
will not fail us on a pinch. 'e have not decided yet as
between turning plows and disks. Both are highly commended
and we do not feel quite sure of eith6r type.
I want to strike a combination that will enable me
to break lamd for five dollars per acre and still have a safe
margin of profit. People tell me this should be possible.

I am working on the loan proposition I wrote you of
and believe, from the way it is taking, it will bring the
necessary money. The only criticism made on it thus far is
that I am offering too much to the land owning lender.
I do not want any of the Glades people to think I
am competing with them. If I get things to going as I am
planing them, the results shpild be very helpful to all, es-
pecially to the W7shington colony. I should be glad to break.
up land for any of that Company, and take pay simply in work-
vastly less work, too, than they would spend in breaking their
own land. There are numerous ways in which they and I couIld
cooperate to mutual advantage.
Ray Riley of Jupiter writes me the road is not good -
sandy, and with culverts badly elevated. One auto man reports
a trip over the road knocks fifty dollars out of an auto.
If i break land in 59 I should assume the tillers
would not insist upon three years of free use the same as
though they had broken it. However, I should be glad to have
them cultivate it,gratis,for a yp.r or two. We should have
no difficulty agreeing on a basis.
I am glad we have so.many mechanical men on the land.
Norma and I have been sight-seeing to-day. She 9
leaves Saturday. Your Uncle Norve and wife will come Friday.
Best regards to all the pioneers.
A's ever, Yours, /


rii _II__ i I _II









FRUITCREST LOCATION


ON SECTION 27, (below)


OKEELANTA ADDITION
(Section 35, below) Adjoins Okeelanta and corners with Fruitcrest.
Its 98 tracts are surveyed and staked. A 25-foot canal and road are
being constructed along the south border. The "Okeelanta Pioneers"
are farming on this section.


AT THE HUB


FRUITCREST FACILITIES
AS TO
I. TRANSPORTATION: (1,', and 12) Lauderdale-Okeechobee-Kissimmee Waterway; connecting, by rail, with (2) Sanford-to-Jacksonville Boatline. (3) Florida
East Coast Ry. Extens on, to F. E. C. Main Line. (4) St. Lucie Canal (proposed.) (5) Jupiter-to-Okeechobee Highway. (6) West Palm Beach Canal (begun.) (7) Palm
Beach-Okeelanta-Ft. Myers Highway (begun.) '(7a) Township Line Canal (begun; bordering Okeelanta Addition.) (8) Hillsborough Canal. (9) Miami Canal.
(10) Caloosahatchee River, connecting with the (11) Atlantic Coast Line Ry. tp Jacksonville. (12) North New River Canal, connecting with the (13) Florida East Coast
Ry. and the (14) Inter-Coastal-Miami-to-Jacksonville Waterway. (15) Tampa, Atlantic and Gulf Ry. (surveyed) to connect with ocean steam ship lines on (16) East
Coast, to Nassau and, later, to World Ports; and, on (17) West Coast, to New Orleans, Havana, Key West and New York. (18) Atlantic, Okeechobee and Gulf Ry.
II. COMMUNICATION: (12 and 10) U. S. Mails by boat connecting Ft. Lauderdale, Okeelanta, Rita and Ft. Myers. (19) Lauderdale Okeelanta Ft. Myers
Telephone (partially constructed.)


___~_ I







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(ENKIIAL ( OFK(IC-H:
I.ONG; ll:IDIN(I
KANSAS CITY, MIO.




Tuerglabn Eanb 4alers Tompany


21.1 II I.rPP iS vr
u2;, I TIH CilI1
.Ml.4 I-LA.
'< ..


E. C. IHONV ,
l:GENERAll AGENT FOR TIH
CONIMPANy'VS I..AN


VWABHINGTON, I). C., IIEADQUATMER.:
800 G. STREET, N. NV.
OU11AY DIIILD IING
I'IIONE MAIN 12t60














Ahgust 6,

1914.


Mr B. 0. Flower,

5 Park quaree,

Bos on, '.:asa.chusetts.

Dear Mr. Flower:

I was very glad to receive your

circular and enclose herewith mY order for the

book. I greatly regretted that you found it

necessary to retire from the magazine field

tbou:-.h such retirement, I trust, is only temporary,

and I have wondered through what channels you

were pouring fourth your boundless energies.

hryour book I am sure will stand as a vital

and permanent contribution to the history of

the movement which is ushering in so rapidly

the I-New Time.

I enclose a copy of my Fruitcrest

folder. In this little project of mine is

wrapped up more of the things we have been working

for during all these ye-rs than one would im-

agine from the brief outline furnished. If

I could get a dozen or two of the kind of people

your book treats of the results would be notable.
Cordially yours,


.1






GENERAL OIIFICES: SOLTIirIN O FICfr.
LONG BUILDINGG 2?.r IU2TH -TIr FT
KANSAS CITY, MO. II.I. IE1.A.


Enwrglai iJanb ar'r companyy

E. C. HOWVR, WAmIINCTON, D. C., IIEADQUATRER :
GENERAL AGENT FOR TIIE 800 G. STREET, N. W.
COMPANY'S LAND OURAY BUILDING
PHONE MAIN 42610

Dear 8ir:-

You will be interested to know that the work of reclaiming the
Florida Everglades is advancing by leaps and bounds.

The Furst-Clark Construction Company, a leader in its line, is
handling the work with extraordinary skill and vigor. Six great dredges are
working night and day, and several more are expected soon to begin.

Visitors, constantly coming to us from the 'Glades, are enthusias-
tic over the work and the outlook for the investor and homeseeker. One sub-
stantial business man declared at one of our meetings that the buyer is
"sure to win," and that "the only question is as to how much he will make."
The President of the State University of Florida visited us recently, and
testified to his faith in Everglade lands. Two men who have actually
crossed the 'Glades one, over twenty years ago, and the other, later -
have recently called, and strongly confirmed our statements regarding the
character of the lands and climate. Still others tell us that we understate
the facts, and that "the half has not been told."

Not long since, one caller bought of us ten acres, then twenty,
then another ten, and started for Miami. After seeing the lands, he wrote
us for twenty acres more.

Everglade lands are going fast. Within a year, one tract of
64,000 acres, and another of 180,000 acres were sold; another of 46,000
acres is now almost gone, and thousands of acres from other tracts have also
been sold.

The prices have risen from $24 and $30 to $40 and $50 per acre.
Our fifty-dollar land is now almost gone, and buyers can afford to waste no
time unless willing to purchase at $60 and e80 per acre, at which figures,
also, we have lands to sell.

Our office is now at 809 G Street, N. W., in the Ouray Building,
one of the best office buildings in the city. We are on the ground floor,
and have a fine window with southern exposure, in which are displayed choice
products from the 'Glades. Crowds stop, day and night, to inspect it. Our
lantern lectures, reinforced by new slides, are given Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday nights, and are finely attended.

We shall be glad to welcome all our friends, old and new, to our
new headquarters. To those who have not yet bought we can present THE op-
portunity of a life-time; to those who have, we can outline one plan which
will simplify their task of paying for their lands, and another, for obtain-
ing revenue therefrom.
.."H '"I" ,"";OF OFF'IC OF,
Very truly yours --


L














Ahgust 6,

1914.



Tr. C. T. Ballou,

Boone, Iowa.

Dear Sir:

I have your letter of July 24th. The

land you mentioned is high, dry and very fertile.

Our Washington party has been at work in the

neighborhood nearly a year, and I am planning to

start there soon myself with proper machinery.

Thentown site of Okeelanta has been surveyed at

last. I sold lands on the canal bankrrat seventy.

five dollars per acre, but have since taken of

the unsold tracts.

I enclose copy of Fruitorest folder.
*
'r. Gross's land is quite near.

A vast area of unper 'verglades land

is now dry.

Very truly,yours,






C ENRAL OFFICER SOUTHERN OFFICER
LONG BUILDING 22t, 12TR SREET
KANSAS CITY, MO. MIAMI, FLA.


Enrglahe eanb 'aWles Eompany

E. C. HOWEV", wAHRINGTON, 1). C., IIADQUATLRERR:
GENERAL AOENT FOR THE 800 G. STIPEET, N. W.
COMPANY'S LANDS OURAY BUII.I)INC;
PHONE .'AI1N 4"200
Dear Sir:-

You will be interested to know that the work of reclaiming the
Florida Everglades is advancing by leaps and bounds.

The Furst-Clark Construction Company, a leader-in its line, is
handling the work with extraordinary skill and vigor. Six great dredges are
working night and day, and so.veral more are expected soon to begin.

Visitors, constantly coming to us from the 'Glades, are enthusias-
tic over the work and the outlook for the investor and homeseeker. One sub-
stantial business man declared at one of our meetings that the buyer is
"sure to win," and that "the only question is as to how much he will make."
The President of the State University of Florida visited us recently, and
testified to his faith in Everglade lands. Two men who have actually
crossed the 'Glades one, over twenty years ago, and the other, later -
have recently called, and strongly confirmed our statements regarding the
character of the lands and climate. Still others tell us that we understate
the facts, and that "the half has not been told."

Not long since, one caller bought of us ten acres, then twenty,
then another ten, and started for Miami. After seeing the lands, he wrote
us for twenty acres more.

Everglade lands are going fast. Within a year, one tract of
64,000 acres, and another of 180,000 acres were sold; another of 46,000
acres is now almost gone, and thousands of acres from other tracts have also
been sold.

The prices have risen from $24 aid $30 to $40 and $50 per acre.
Our fifty-dollar land is now almost gone, and buyers can afford to waste no
time unless willing to purchase at $60 and $80 per acre, at which figures,
also, we have lands to sell.

Our office is now at 809 G Street, N. W., in the Ouray Building,
one of the best office buildings in the city. We are on the ground floor,
and have a fine window with southern exposure, in which are displayed choice
products from the 'Glades. Crowds stop, day and night, to inspect it. Our
lantern lectures, reinforced by new slides, are given Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday nights, and are finely attended.

We shall be glad to welcome all our friends, old and new, to our
new headquarters. To those who have not yet bought we can present THE op-
portunity of a life-time; to those who have, we can outline one plan which
will simplify their task of paying for their lands, and another, for obtain-
ing revenue therefrom.

Very truly yours, W ASHIF; 'TC!' O '=T- OF,

OURAY BLD., C .







UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY.


OFFICE OF FARM MANAGEMENT.

(JC /W^^


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August 15,
1914.



Prof.R.; Clothier,
Hesag~ Arizona..
Dear Prof. Glothier:
I have your letter of the 9th and greatly

appreciate your friendly interest. I assure you it was a
great tept.tin to mto e o sct on your Purgestion. However,
I have carried my Florida enterprise sc far and with such
sincesos, and so many people nre virtually dependent upon me
for rozulta from their investrnent.tllht I did not feel free
to change my plans.
I am very Clad your headquarters will be in

Washington. However, I ought to be in Florid. before you
arrive.
You may have heard that our old frief Ca61

Yroor.an has been appointed Assidtant Secretary of Agriculture.
I shall hope to see results from such an appointment.
Sincerely yours,


J






GENERAL OFFICER:
LONG BUILDING
KANSAS CITY, MO.


E. C. HO EV.
GENERAL AGENT FOR TIHE
(OM.PANY'M LAND


WARHINGTON, i. C., IIEADQUATRERM:
800 G. STRICT, N. \V.
OITRAY iUIII1DING
PHONE NIAIN 426(0


Dear Sir:-


You will be interested to know that the work of reclaiming the
Florida Everglades is advancing by leaps and bounds.

The Furst-Clark Construction Company, a leader in its line, is
handling the work with extraordinary skill and vigor. Six great dredges are
working night and day, and several more are expected soon to'begin.

Visitors, constantly coming to us from the 'Glades, are enthusias-
tic over the work and the outlook for the investor and homeseeker. One sub-
stantial business man declared at one of our meetings that 'the buyer is
"sure to win," and that "the only question is as to how much he will make."
S '.. ~The President of the State University of Florida visited us recently, and
o ,testified to his faith in Everglade lands. Two men who have actually
; *- r crossed the 'Glades one, over twenty years ago, and the other, later -
have recently called, and strmrly confirmed our statements regarding the
S-Z\, character of the lands and climate. Still others tell us that we understated
the facts, and that "the half has not been told."

S N Not long since, one caller bought of us ten acres, then twenty,
S then another ten, and started for Miami. After seeing the lands, he wrote
us for twenty acres more.

'" Everglade lands are going fast. Within a year, one tract of
64,000 acres, and another of 180,000 acres were sold; another of 46,000


acres is now almost gone, and thousands of
been sold.


acres from other tracts have also


The prices have risen from $24 and '30 to -10 and $50 per acre.
Our fifty-dollar land is now almost *nr., and buyers can afford to waste no
time unless willing to purchase at $60 and 830 per acre, at which figures,
also, we have lands to sell.

Our office is now at 809 G Street, N. W., in the Ouray Building,
one of.the best office buildings in the city. We are on the ground floor,
and have a fine window with southern exposure, in which are displayed choice
products from the 'Glades. Crowds stop, day and i-lihb, to inspect it. Our
lantern lectures, reinforced by new slides, are given Tu-r3rday, 'Inur13day, and
Saturday nights, and are finely attended.

We shall be glad to welcome all our friends, old and new, to our
new headquarters. To those who have not yet b~'.tht we can present THE op-
portunity of a life-time; to those who have, we can outline one plan which
will simplify their task of paying for their lands, and another, for obtain-
ing revenue therefrom.


Very truly yours, I .1'TON OFFICE OF,

EVERGLADE LAND SALES CO.
OURAY BLDG., 809 G ST. N


4OUTUERN 0 :
MIA I, FLA.i.
MIAMI, FIA.


Erngtlaibr anb atiro (iompatny
















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19 14,

;tate t' iiversi'. ,
0;,?i esvill :' -l7.*,


C- e .i. -.1 ';! n a



o i"' tlh' ,':-.rt.r l,. a'''q ll'utiL .in of yotr' .":.. icul ;u,.t- ,l

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GENERAL O(FFICENS: SOUTHERN OFFICERS
LONG BUILDING 22T, 12TH .STrET
KANSAS CITY, MO. MIAMI, FLA.


TEnrglabr lan6 alrs companyy

F. C. HONVE, \wAnluNTON. 1). C., lfnJDilATrn u :
C INERAI AGENT FOR THE 0O G. ST(li' T, N. V.
C(ONIPANY'S I.AND4 O(ITAY III.I>I?;
PHONE MAIN 4200

Dear Sir:-

You will be interested to know that the work of reclaiming the
Florida Everglades is advancing by leaps and bounds.

The Furst-Clark Construction Company, a leader in its line, is
handling the work with extraordinary skill and vigor. Six great dredges are
working night and day, and several more are expected soon to begin.

Visitors, constantly c.mii.; to us from the 'Glades, are enthusias-
tic over the work and the outlook for the investor and homeseeker. One sub-
stantial business man declared at one of cur meetings that the buyer is
"sure to win," and that "the only question is as to how much he will make."
The President of the State University of Florida visited us recently, and
testified to his faith in E'.;i-e]rde lands. Two men who have actually
crossed the 'Glades one, over twenty years ago, and the other, later --
have recently called, and strongly confirmed our statements re'.rIin- the
character of the lands and climate. Still others tell us that we understate
the facts, and that "the half has not been told."

Not long since, one caller bought of us ten acres, then twenty,
then another ten, and started for Miami. After seeing the lands, he wrote
us for twenty acres more.

Everglade lands are going fast. Within a year, one tract of
64,000 acres, and another of 180,000 acres were sold; another of 46,000
acres is now almost gone, and thousands of acres from other tracts have also
been sold.

The prices have risen from -24 and $30 to $40 and $50 per acre.
Our fifty-dollar land is now almost gone, and buyers can afford to waste no
time unless willing to purchase at "60 and $80 per acre, at which figures,
also, we have lands to sell.

Our office is now at 809 G Street, N. W., in the Ouray Bilding,
one of the best office buildings in the city. We are on the g-ournd floor,
and have a fine window with southern exposure, in which are displayed choice
products from the 'Glades. Crowds stop, day and night, to inspect it. Our
lantern lectures, reinforced by new slides, are given Tuesda y, ThI~r-: y, and
Saturday nights, and are finely attended.

We shall be glad to welcome all our friends, old and new, to our
new headquarters. To those who have not yet bought we can present THE op-
portunity of a life-time; to those who have, we can outline one plan which
will simplify their task cf paying for their l.r.ds, and arsnther, for obtain-
ing revenue therefrom.
* "*. OF,
Very truly yours - ._. .. 3.. CO
OLU';J-'i BLLG., 809 G ST. N t


^----. ._ ...,.








FRUITCREST (FLORIDA) ASSOCIATION
TEL E, THOMAS E. WILL. MANAGER MUTUALISM
TELEPHONE. VERSUS
MAIN 1555 MARLOW BUILDING. 811 E STREET N. W. COMMERCIALISM

WASHINGTON, D. C.

Aug. 21,1914.

My dear Lawrence, "

It's on me this time againm sure enough. I do
neglectyou sometimes, and it's too bad especially since you're
so faithful in doing everything you possibly can for me. I'll
try to make up tho,

The folks are all vell. Your Uncle Norve and Aunt
Gretchen'paid us a finevisit, tho far too brief. %e also enjoyed
NTorma's visit very much. She is a fineyoung girl. She and Norve
both insisted tn. buying Fruitcrest holdings-- one each. Normna
will ppycash.

Mother sent you one of iy loan proposals. These
ought to bring in plenty of money. It's coming, tho not so fast
as it should. I'm getting out a second .anc still e-sier one for
the hard-up contingent.

One trouble with the Buckeye isi 's high price.
Te HHolt is,2,500. We're much pleased with the Sandusky. It is
soldon approval. We're out only the freight fr6m Sandusky to the
land and bek to Lauderdale if it fails us. Few comp-nies are
willingto do so well. he machine c am be bought for $500 down, and
f1,200 at the end of a year, with good notes and interest. This
is fair.Thcir mnfr. E.W.Price, is ,t Ta'pa, and may visit you.
Our rmahiilst, Mr. Sheldrake of tbhNavy Yard, thinks the Sandusky
the Ist tractor vw he seen. Of course, it means using turning
or disk nlows. Messrs. Helm and 1erner both reassure me as to
the possibility of plowing muck soil They h.-veested it at Davies
I've wondered whether the Buckeye would go thru our
high, dense grass. Couldwe sow the v elvet beans in the chaff
and make them grow?

- Aggin, the results per day rith the Buckeye, and the
cost of operation seem disappointing. I'vehopej we might break
up from 5 to 10 acres per day.

Fra'n what M'r. Helrm and others say as to the Velvet
Bean, it in not probable it will choke out the lily,as well as other
plat life?

Never fe-r about your tract. If I get in there with
a chinn e of my own, as I za planning to; yourtract vill be tkcen
crrc of. So will those of the o-ther Pione-eers, if they s y so*
I should expect to ask thc- no other poy than work.

Wi 11 the settlers have ny money to p-y for their
br eakingvith? Ifso, they certainly st'ould wr nt their land plowed.


0


X --









FRUITCREST LOCATION


ON SECTION 27, (below)


OKEELANTA ADDITION
(Section 35, below) Adjoins Okeelanta and corners with Fruitcrest.
Its 98 tracts are surveyed and staked. A 25-foot canal and road are
being constructed along the south border. The "Okeelanta Pioneers"
are farming on this section.


AT THE HUB


FRUITCREST FACILITIES
AS TO
I. TRANSPORTATION: (1,1, and 12) Lauderdale-Okeechobee-Kissimmee Waterway; connecting, by rail, with (2) Sanford-to-la.ksonville Boathlne. 13) Florida
East Coast Ry. Extension, to F. E. C. Main Line. (4) St. Lucie Canal (proposed.) (5) Jupiter-to-Okeechobee Highway. (6) West Palm Beach Canal I begun.I 1' Palm
Beach-Okeelanta-Ft. Myers Highway (begun.) *(7a) Township Line Canal (begun; bordering Okeelanta Addition.) (8) Hillsbc.rough Canal. 0) Miami Canal.
(10) Caloosahatchee River, connecting with the (11) Atlantic Coast Line Ry. to Jacksonville. (12) North New River Canal, connecting w nh ihe 1 13' Flrid East Coast
Ry. and the (14) Inter-Coastal-Miami-to-Jacksonville Waterway. (15) Tampa, Atlantic and Gulf Ry. (surveyed) to connect with ocean stearr ship lines on I 16l East
Coast, to Nassau and, later, to World Ports; and, on (17) West Coast, to New Orleans, Havana, Key West and New York. (18) Atlantic. Okeech.bee and Gull Ry.
II. COMMUNICATION: (12and 10) U. S. Mails by boat connecting Ft. Lauderdale, Okeelanta, Rita and Ft. Myers. (19) Lauderdale Okeelants Ft. M rers
Telephone (partially constructed.)



iJ






L. E.


r I appreciate Dick's willingness to run the engine,
and yours also. I may need both of you. That's one four weak
spots-- lack of trained engineers. If among you you can handle
the engine, I'll feel greatly relieved. I don't think it will
pay for Dick to go to Fellsmere outhe chance that we may get the
Buckeye.

I'm getting pretty anxious to get started now* Want-
to be on theground long ago. Will try to mke things huTWi.'-" we
do get started. Between us, it's awfully trying too note the apathy
of a lot of. our Florida people. I wonder sometimes whether they
would let one farm their land for them for nothing give them all
the crop andthrow in tchromo besides.

Do your best to keep things harmonious in the col-
ony. When men are so far from home, and living a monotonous life,
and suffering disappointments, they are liable not always to Tbe
ns sweet tempered a'- they might bein better circumstances. So
give and take, and try to forget, and face the future.
I don't understand why you should financethe "twips."
How is this? Idid not suppose they were going to see the tr-ctor,
too; and at other people's expense. I cab not ask the F.C.Assn.
to stand that. If it is to be paid at this end, I shall haveto
donate it.

For purposes of audit, p ease make the expense ac-
count ou't in some such form as enclosed.
I wish Grady,'s sche ~ight be tested outsoon* Is theEL.
iny possibility of h~ing itdne'

Yo u speak of "bre;::i:'; plows followed by strong
r kos." I am mentily inventing a machine like this:
A very heavy rake with teeth say 2 ft.long,and sharps
Hitch behind tractor. Teeth go deep into ground and t~'%hiold
of grass, roots,trash etc* This stuff is hauled till rake is full.
Then rake is tripped. It revolves, and dumps its load in a wind-
. row. Hrere it may b- durned(???).Or left to rot. Ground isnext
grossed witl. a cutaway disk harrow,followed by a toothed harrow.
The velvet beand are now sown upon the harrow,andthus nlt ed. The
ground would be left somew~rhat rough, but perhaps not too rough
for the baans' When the windrows are suffi gently rotted, the ground
under 'N-' would be prepare. in the same wsy as the other ground.
Do you think such a plan wual,. work? Iould _Alndrows be too
close together? \lould the ground be in condition good enough/
for the beans to take hold? AnA. would tney finish up the job? If
so, thii would lgeatly hasten and simplify the clearing job.
If I break the 1-nd upon which any of our party work-
rou and Dick excepted-- I see no# reason for a three- year lease.
*'i-L longtime ease is largely as pay for the brkeing. However, I
shou Id be glAd to havethem use the land ratis for a year;mrybe two.
To havesold $75 -- '100 lnd at 420 just to havesomebody on it last
year would hre been pretty poor business, I suspect.
If theCounty Commsrs. wouldiot 1 t Bolles cut his
n-anl to the eastCoast when he wanted to, he must have wanted high
p:y, or they must havebeer pretty indifferent tothe needs of the upp-
er Glades. Such a canal would have been worth all sorts of money


__ _C_







A E.W.


What "Wright" do you refer to? Is it J.O.'.right?

Has the mosquito situation improved any? aveyou
any of the anopheles"? (Malaria-breeding)

I'M sending you some of my "Development Lean" papers.
I wish you would see how the proposition strike~rour neighbors.

I suppose you have the $50 bythis time. How for
will that carry you? If ppl. comen in on this lonn pl:n right
I should soon hnveplenty of money. As I said, they are slow as
poison, tho. Must bewaiting for some one to hpnd them an improved
farm,and pay for theprivilege of caring for it for their sole bene-
fit, gratis.

How are your avocadoes coming on? Haveyou got
your Bermuda onions yet?

I ordered the bulletins and fertilizer stuff sent
you. Glad it came.

Am writing Copper the tract can bchad for $500 cash
net to me. With the canl coming, that's a sacrifice price. Tho
I don't expectthe man to pay it.

Mr. Hoffman is up to his eyes working up a People's
College at Ft. Scmtt, Kas. So I hardly expect him to g. to Fla.
soon. He was positive he would go this fall. I know onlyindi-
rectly of people who are said to be going to the upper Glades this
fall. The p peas tell of many who may be expected. What the sit-
uation impere$tively needs is for some one to go ahead wit:' m.ehin-
ery, re my plan, andget things ready for the crowd. But if tAe
crowd hasn't enough interest to lend $5 or $10 on such a plan
and on good security, meanwhile enjoying all the comforts of home"
I don't see just how they are going to get a start made and something
coming back from tneir land. Just how much they may deserve it--?
As ever yours, and remember that I
'd-kC.m humping meself'-f grrct' things in slic.p- for genuine, successful
pioneering.


P.S. Carl Vrooman is Asst. Secretary of Agriculture.
He andI are as thick as ever. I am hoping this may lead to somre-
thing good for the Glades.
T.E. W.
PP.S Gld you met t:r. Conkling. I know him,too.
Alwaystake full notes on such conversations, and write them out*
and file them where you can get at them. His son runs the Palm
Beach Post. T.E.W.


j


I I I







FRUITCREST (FLORIDA) ASSOCIATION
THOMAS E. WILL, MANAGER
MARLOW BUILDING. 811 E STREET N. W.
WASHINGTON, D. C.
f ,,/2 --


MUTUALISM
VERSUS
COMMERCIALISM


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TELEPHONE,
MAIN 1555


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FRUITCREST LOCATION


ON SECTION 27, (below)


OKEELANTA ADDITION
(Section 35, below) Adjoins Okeelanta and corners with Fruitcrest.
Its 98 tracts are surveyed and staked. A 25-foot canal and road are
being constructed along the south border. The "Okeelanta Pioneers"
are farming on this section.


AT THE HUB


.''


FRUITCREST FACILITIES
AS TO
I. TRANSPORTATION: (1,1, and 12) Lauderdale-Okeechobee-Kissimmee Waterway; connecting, by rail, with (2) Sanford-to-Jacksonville Boatline. (3) Florida
East Coast Ry. Extens on, to F. E. C. Main Line. (4) St. Lucie Canal (proposed.) (5) Jupiter-to-Okeechobee Highway. (6) West Palm Beach Canal (begun.) (7) Palm
Beach-Okeelanta-Ft. Myers Highway (begun.) ,(7a) Township Line Canal (begun; bordering Okeelanta Addition.) (8) Hillsborough Canal. (9) Miami Canal.
(10) Caloosahatchee River, connecting with the (11) Atlantic Coast Line Ry. to Jacksonville. (12) North New River Canal, connecting with the (13) Florida East Coast
Ry. and the (14) Inter-Coastal-Miami-to-Jacksonville Waterway. (15) Tampa. Atlantic and Gulf Ry. (surveyed) to connect with ocean steam ship lines on (16) East
Coast, to Nassau and, later, to World Ports; and, on (17) West Coast, to New Orleans, Havana, Key West and New York. (18) Atlantic, Okeechobee and Gulf Ry.
II. COMMUNICATION: (12 and 10) U. S. Mails by boat connecting Ft. Lauderdale, Okeelanta. Rita and Ft. Myers. (19) Lauderdale -Okeelanta- Ft. Myers
Telephone (partially constructed.)


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811 r.-'eet 'i. ".,


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tra. Carrie ;. .ent,

Chevy Chase, ..d.

- -y do *..^ 2'!r ileiit;:

j received -u 70il. 1 ti of ti

25th -'n eo:,ecterd you at tie ,iour l-.ed, .nt i e:r

voGl lia'f a)1Ve iLe2e d the "L tC-, Lie tiui;. ex- ueiig,

811 rather than ;i;b.

? have eonie eiehly shleets of t'i', i statici-

i r L wlth a goo]d stock : of' eLverClo;.-s. oE ctut is

at 2211'0 St. y u.

if l ailuidoi olpes: -:. 4 ie iarch my d'aute
shoi.), ; .,e set e0 rly, as a-, l i an i in.; tLO Q) *.-.-;
soon -r5ate not l . *urovefi) ',r".


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807 Woodward Bldg.,
Washington, D. C., 1913.



Dear Friend:-

It's high time we were STARTING SOMETHING in
the Everglades. We've waited three years or more now; and,
unless somebody starts, we'll never get anything done.

We'd like to start on the land we've already
bought, but we can't.

Why not? 1. It's still wet; even if it were
dry, 2. It's too far from transportation and, 3. It's
too far from town or possible neighbors. It may do later,
but not now.

To begin, we must have conditions right. We
must start 1. TOGETHER, AS A COMMUNITY; 2. ON A TRANS-
PORTATION LINE; and 3. ON HIGH LAND.

This we can do in OKEELANTA ADDITION, the
greatest opportunity ever offered in the Glades. It meets
fully all the above conditions. It's by the site of Okee-
lanta. A Washington colony is planning to settle there.
Boats run through it constantly. It's on the Everglades
watershed. In addition, it is one of the richest spots on
earth, and so near the Lake as to enjoy extraordinary pro-
tection against frost.

Finally, THE PRICE IS CUT 33 1/3%. Besides,
YOU MAY TRADE IN YOUR PRESENT WET, INACCESSIBLE, UNAVAIL-
ABLE LAND.

A half section of Okeelanta Addition was of-
fered the Homebuilders one night, and they snapped up a
quarter of it on the spot.

The canal frontage went first. That's what
everybody wants. I now have some more. If you want it,
don't wait. Come in and I'll tell you all about it.

Note 1: THE PLACE: WOODWARD BLDG., 15th and
H Streets, N. W., Room 807, and
2t THE TIME: Between 4:30 and 7:30, P.M.
Come this evening if possible. The sooner the better. At
other times, phone me at Lincoln 3568. Booklet enclosed.
Sincerely yours,


jeb , r^ ^C












bept. 1,1914.


Hon. Duncan U, Fletcher,
enatee Office Building,


L.y-dear .c.ator .loctcher:

I have recently received a letter from my friend,
r. Sauel l:, 'Co'.ppnr, fer:ierly of t.he Govr,:ve-t .rinrtirt Office
but now vorkin on the .verf.lades.

ir Co n:er has been very much interested in the
Ever fladcs for some five rears, About three 1,'ars aero he en*
c6urah-e6 his co,-Finlawf, Ir. Plar ", a y.ur- r 1an ix1 locate health,
to s-in.d a .z!:_Ter in farni:ir on tisc (lades below the "olles Hotel
r. Co *r? hreliev1 s third etieriePie nevrd ;r.s l1r'I life.

"-b:-..t a year ag)o r, Cner led. In the O .jni.n. tion
of our "a-hi.,-i;.'tn Col.y, e nral'ly ion as ".. nta Pioriers
one of tt c'e bri-n- mny son, vino roet to ok:.lan.ta additiio (near Fruit-
creout see .poasie it e.,ie) i;;.ec th:cy P;ave beCLn f'ai.i:'r ever since*

rF r. Coip') r oha 'roi i.ncd that the + ttate of 'r.
flas health -..-s..n de: and. his return to the .l.pes. It is tn-
jra.cticable, no-.;ver, that t'.e two aha.ll b there at the s e tiL'e,
it boi:.r necessary, for one to be earning fuins with which to fi nance
the operations dluirn, ti-e ;ionter a, ... ,. Coppe r tj'5refore
dei.r'es to return to his former ':-ositlo in xin rie o.' :cren Printing
Office and thus enable r. ?F' i:Lg to take .ie ,Jl:-.cc i: the .'asBlnri(ton
Colony-Q4r, CopiX r meanwhile, f'rni iiin. ;r? Fiagg r, ith funds fro,. hi.
own earnings' heie0

-- .itr. Co --r writes t-at hle L a- n.plied for his old po-
S ition but that those in charge beit-- ii r.coni.derable measure a
.new people, his a-o-11cat ion is "h, :iind fire"'

I am very sure that inquiry will elicit the fact that
Mr* copperr has, for years, been a valuable man in t e printing Of.
fice, one rlo~ae retircsent occasi:incd ,much regret. It was not hia
intettion to leave tlie oiJ:ce perananenbly. At the se.,e time, he felt
as tIhave felt, tlht it V'as; ery i, nortant that a few earnest, reso-
lute men, killingg to endure the hardships of pioneering, a' would -o
upon the Clades without further delay and bei., work. if, after
havi:.g suffered this hardship, he should lose both his positions and
his son-in-law-- r. large'ss health beiir reported to be precarious,



S .. q













A B IL L

SProvidinz for the granting of Local Self-Government to the,
..neoele of the district of Colombia and creating the City of
"Washington an independent municipal corporation.



1. Be it -nacted by the Senate and the House of Representatives
. of the United States of America in Congress Assembled, That th-
". City no,. existing and known as the "City of Washington" is
4. hereby created and shall continue to be a body politic and
5. corporra'te under the same name and shall comprise all of the
6. territory within the boundaries of the District of Columbia.

7. 2. The Act of Congress approved June 11, 1878, An Act pro-
S. viding a permanent form of Government for the District of
9. Columbia together with all subsequent acts and amendments
10. relative thereto which do not conflict with the provisions of
1. this act shall constitute the Charter and Laws of the City of
2. Washington; provided the citizens thereof shall at all times
3, have the full power to alter, revise, or amend the same.

14. 3. Within sixty days from the passage of this Act the Commis-
15. sioners of the District of Columbia shall cause to be held an
16. election at which shall be chosen their successors in office
17, who shall have and exercise the full powers of local legisl't-
18. tion until otherwise provided.

19. 4. The Copmiissioners of the District of Columbia shall have
20. full authority and are hereby directed to prepare such rule:
21. and regulations as are necessary to protect the rights and
22. determine the qualifications of the voters and to sbnunre the
27. safe and orderly conduct of the said election,

24. 5. Proposals for charter conventions or charter amoencnments
25. shall be submitted by the Commissioners at a regular -'r special
26. election, upon petition of five per cent of the qualifiAe
27. voters.

28. e. The sum of Twenty-five thousand dollars is hereby appro-
29, printed, one half out of the revenues of the District of
30, Columbia and one half out of the Treasury of the United States,
31. or as much thereof as may be necessary to put into operation
32. the provisions of this Act.


Air









the pe.,alty thus i.',oosed ir-'on h l for service t:e co .. .".od o .ld
seeia excessive.

I oh:all .rpp::cia't it er eciall if a et
pro-.;:)t rei;:-t.te- erit. t so ." ." I believe '.ou -:ill rnt onl. aid
t. e e .,
two wo,:)rth, ..eia, .^-mf he. L olic ,,r iee, en J" e ", .... ..e "nn
of 79one eri. ,r: i;. t.,^; ,reat ve(,l, -'"- o,(' lo,.i- '. .




7',. 1 've j;.,t !ea ,rned t-:o i.woo rtSri t, -*. 'rtin nt f7 ctI :
1) Ir.' Coprner's 1,, .ce }-. .iVi'r w been fil'c : ;
2 ) tr. C. ~ol 'eiter, n electo-t- r fit'i:. r,ito.ii-
I- a i- cc .il. I -r to t.i 'it y .r. oo;-r, Ir 1
i is T e; 1-i U i. o i a G0 0 L ", rn filled
: .


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A BI LL


Providing for the granting of Local Self-Government to the
people of the district of Bolombia and creating the City of
Washington an independent municipal corporation.



1. Be it enacted by the Senate and the House of Representatives
2. of the United States of America in Congress Assembled, That th,
3. City now existing and known as the "City of Washington" is
4. hereby created and shall continue to be a body politic and
5. corporate under the same name and shall comprise all of the
6. territory within the boundaries of the District of Columbia,

7. 2. The Act of Congress approved June 11, 1878, An Act pro-
S. viding a permanent form of Government for the District of
9. Columbia together with all subsequent acts and amendments
10. relative thereto which do not conflict with the provisions of
11. this act shall constitute the Charter and Laws of the City of
12, '7-,. hington; provided the citizens thereof shall at all times
13. have the full power to alter, revise, or amend the same.

14, 3. Within sixty days from the passage of this Act the Commis-
15. sioners of the District of Columbia shall cause to be held an
16. election at which shall be chosen their successors in office
17. who shall have and exercise the full powers of local l.- tlsa-
18. tion until otherwise provided,

19. '4. The Cornni si n:r,- .-.f the Di...trit .-,f C l iji:, ,. .l-.ll h-.:-
20. full authority and - .:-,' Jir :.. pr rul-
21.. .nd regulations a r c_ t:. t t ti r : t an
22. determine the qu .lifi.:- t .:. .. t t,-L t : n tun-e tt :--
23. safe and orderly : :,'uct :f th-- -id. -1 *:: i:.

24. 5. Proposals for .h rt.-r c.:. nv.rt s : :.r ch ri cn 1: ni nt
25. shall be submitt:.-1 bT, t -.--- :..mmi ~s :n--ir. -.t r --1- i : .1 1 ,1
26. electi: n, upon poe tii .n ..f t '-', ,:-r .. It ;. lif -
27. voters.

28. e. The sum of T .- ---f i- thi..u -, d. 11-- i :-- ; ..r -
29. printed, one half .- t th -- u-- -. f th.- -
30. Columbia and one I ;. t i. '" .' :. t: i l' 1 -
31. or as much thereoi -r '-- --- --. ; t r..i i t [. :- i .
32. the provisions of ti-. A.:t.


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SFRUITCREST (FLORIDA) ASSOCIATION
TELEPHONE, THOMAS E. WILL. MANAGER MUTUALISM
VERSUS
MAIN 1555 MARLOW BUILDING, 811 E STREET N. W. COMMERCIALISM
S., r WASHINGTON, D. C.
September 5,1914.





Mr. Lawrence E. Will,
Box 711,
Fort Lauderdale,Fla.

My dear Lawrence:

SI have been neglecting you again, but have studied
your letters with much interest.

Mr. Copper has written me to help him get back into
the GP.O. that his son-in-law, Mr. Flagg, in poor health, may take
his place. I am doing my best, with hope of success.

I am also making a big effort to induce the De4part-
ment of Agriculture to establish an Experiment Station on the Glades.
Have written a lot of letters to a lot of prominent people from
the Governor of Florida, Senator Fletcher and the Secretary and
Asst. Sec. of Agriculture, down, and am working, in person, on
the Senator and the Asst. Secretary. I have hopes of success.

The loan is coming along though much more slowly
than it should. I think I see about $1800. safe now, but want to
pull it up to as much as $3000. anyway. Am pushing the thing hard.

One of my buyers, Mr. Price, of Jaqua, Kansas, will
move to Florida this fall with his family and take five horses,
16-inch plow, hay rake, harrow, and various other things. He asks
me whether to leave any of these behind. I advised him to bring
them all. I understand horses are very high in Florida What do
you know about that? He assumes he cannot go upon the Glade land
this fall and .that,therefore, he had better stop at Lakeworth for
Se the winter. Is it safe now to take horses upon your land if
provided with muck shoes? I told him I would ask you.

I am enclosing some valuable notes I made regarding
forage crops. I hope foi e able to use them.

As to the need for putting $15.00 to $25.00 worth
of wood ashes on the land I am planning to break up on the loan
plan. If this were necessary, it would block the whole proceedingA.
It is hard enough to get these people to put up the $2.40 per acre
represented by the interest on their $20.00 per acre of loan, at
4% for three years. To ask them to pay the other in addition would
scare tam to death. At the same time, it would also break me.

I do not bind myself to the velvet bean. At the
same time, it is very cheap; that is the seed; and I am assured









FRUITCREST LOCATION


ON SECTION 27, (below)


AT THE HUB


OKEELANTA ADDITION
(Section 35, below) Adjoins Okeelanta and corners with Fruitcrest.
Its 98 tracts are surveyed and staked. A 25-foot canal and road are
being constructed along the south border. The "Okeelanta Pioneers"
are farming on this section.


FRUITCREST FACILITIES
AS TO
I. TRANSPORTATION: (1,1, and 12) Lauderdale-Okeechobee-Kissimmee Waterway; connecting, by rail, with (2) Sanford-to-Jacksonville Boatline. (3) Florida
East Coast Ry. Extension, to F. E. C. Main Line. (4) St. Lucie Canal (proposed.) (5) Jupiter-to-Okeechobee Highway. (6) West Palm Beach Canal (begun.) (7) Palm
Beach-Okeelanta-Ft. Myers Highway (begun.) *(7a) Township Line Canal (begun; bordering Okeelanta Addition.) (8) Hillsborough Canal. (9) Miami Canal.
(10) Caloosahatchee River, connecting with the (11) Atlantic Coast Line Ry. to Jacksonville. (12) North New River Canal, connecting with the (13) Florida East Coast
Ry. and the (14) Inter-Coastal-Miami-to-Jacksonville Waterway. (15) Tampa. Atlantic and Gulf Ry. (surveyed) to connect with ocean steam ship lines on (16) East
Coast, to Nassau and, later, to World Ports; and, on (17) West Coast, to New Orleans, Havana, Key West and New York. (18) Atlantic, Okeechobee and Gulf Ry.
II. COMMUNICATION: (12 and 10) U. S. Mails by boat connecting Ft. Lauderdale, Okeelanta. Rita and Ft. Myers. (19) Lauderdale Okeelanta Ft. Myers
Telephone (partially constructed.)


I --- I I I I 1, 7--- I 11.""'WWW -I x v r










it is an extremely vigoroushardy Jlant requiring nothing but
a moderately good seed bed. I wrote Callahan yesterday asking
whether he had planted it, and whether it required the wood ahhes.
I wish you would ma further inquiry on this point.

I am much pleased with the Spalding Deep Tillage Plow
which Prof. Cottell called my attention to. It consists of frame,
wheels,and pairs of disks. One disk runs directly in front of the
other. The depths can be adjusted. The first disk cuts off a
layer 6 or 8 inches deep and throws it into a furrow, say 18 to
20 inches deep. The second disk follows in the furrow made by
the first, taking off another slice 8 or 10 more inches in depth,
reaching down to the true, fine, pulverized soil, and throwing
this right upon the top of the dirt thrown out by the first disk.
Pictures and testimoniesyshow that this plow burfies dense vegeta-
tion as high and even twice as high as aslhorsel's back and leaves
the ground in the most elegant tilth, with a surface so clear that
one would hardly imagine anything had ever grown on it. Further,
it mixes and pulverizes the soil to a wonderful degree. We can
get a plow with three pairs of disks, and have these pulled by 4A
tractor. We can cut from 16 to 20 inches in depth, if we like.
The inventor thinks 16 inches will fully meet our needs. Now
what do you think of a plow like this? To me, though we have not
tried it on the Glades, it looks like the solution. Further,
Prof. Cottrell's recommendation goes a long way with me. I may
have a chance to see it work before trying it#there.

How long did the mosquitos trouble you?

Your suggestion regarding returning money instead of
giving land might go in as an alternatige,proposition.

In burning piles or rows of saw grass have you found
the land to be damaged? It was, at Davie. I saw the effects.

I wonder that Mr. Kerr has not spoken to me here
about the use of our land. I think your suggestion regarding let-
ting him and rockett have it at least two years is al'tight. Of
course, they will be improving it. If I break up the i.and with th
Spalding Plow, I imagine I could easily get t tenants who would
pay rent.
I am afraid Grady's scheme will not get tested out,
unless he wants to try it himself.

I hope you may be able to learn just what is being
done with tractors and plows at Gladecrest.

I am mighty glad you have the banner place in your
neighborhood. That's encouraging after all your hard work.

Let me know a little in advance when you know you
must have more money. I have not collected any yet on the loan,
waiting to see what the total might be. With that money in I


I I I I I r II I









ought to help you easily.

I hope you will do all you can toward maintaining har-
monious relations among the Colonists. Copper spoke very kindly
of you. I judge he has given up his hog proposition, for la:k
of responses from this end.

Your letter of the 1st, to your Mother, has come. We
are glad you are still at it and keeping up your spirits.

If I dend you a form of letter for the Secretary of
Agriculture urging the establishment of an Experiment Station,
in the Upper Glades, I hope it may be possilbe for you to get a
good lot of signatures.


others,


As ever yours, and with best regards, to Dick and the





(>%^ A/1C


P.S. I don't understand the case of the Fullersb You certainly
are not expected to pay their billsright along. You better have
an understanding right away with the proper persons about this. ,





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''n, rllh a eae,1 a., -e-t. 7 1914.

T. rlnl. R.Cop-er,
t. L.-uderdAle,YF;a.

Je-r SirS-
Yeur letter ,f Agu. 215.to the Trustees of the Internl1 fxx
I':.nrv wnrnt 'und pr .--ining to certain questions relative to rights
'lon;i: t.te o',nr-1. h1's bI.een rferrFed .t me for attention.

'ihe rii:lht-ef-way of the c'rn:ls *-.; rises a strip 1 0 ft.
S' Lh i r h ~ id7e of the o-nter line of the c.'~nal; this ritrip is
considered as part --nd -ro-C 1 the cl-n'l itself; a ;-Aceqs'ry
idjunict. the "--e to b o retained for cii9-'l i.s--e 'nd protection.
'Te atriv of 1,',1 r-emri-ing the right of wwny p rt-'Vee of the
nature of I t. blic re-d,in .?ilich ;All perserls 1have nn equa _right
I a' tfo i ts '1T:'lic :.19 -r 'E n'r Jeo *ec'n e"'uir,' 1aosse.B-ion of iny
nertion of t.l right of v-ry. ,Any structure buLit thereon is sub-
jecto t;oe riteS- .nd regul-tiens of toe T'ru"te~-a of the I.I.Fu d
rol-t-ivc to t.-, right of way. It -y not ,e 'i srl for priJ. t
urEisrc sIa,) the t l ex lJlrofn ao' anoi th 9 r-' n. Te oceu ta1n.y I ff
-..' iny nort.i' i .,f t.h r, i; t O ';ny for -. legth ou tire -ill not,
urepr -ny con'i.tion!-, eatrbli'll on.rabir ": x.iv-ersea puosseas-in.
A.y -tru-.3: ore desired to be i.ilt on -' ri't'it e' Oax,, or -yilock
or rtt-inin(- w"11,1- n.Uin: ,;- ditch "'"- cn-t ,t' t.".:d Orn' r per-
r -ia-- n ,'s-! t.-1 ',y t]-e 'i 'fltP (.f t'- I.I.m.ind. .......****
Rae.l-tiTve te te rl- :t-l_ o rf t'-,e mnd hrubt ery, I sug-e-at
th-t yo!" confine -o'D, o-r:-tionr '!. your, Qn trect,-.nd n&t nciroch
uvon tVi ;'--nl right of *rrny.
Your" v-ry trnly ,
*F.C.i1aiit,C if r-in -ce



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LONrG Bu-i.D-r "Nil ID e loRn :
'4KANSAS CITY, MO. PHILIP S.DELANY, ..


R M. PRICE,
..- N~m'~el o'vO rnCARunc.
J,. WILLIS P MUNOER.


hA" NINS4LESO M/IPANY
INCORPORATED)
,.. .TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH 1773
,,T. MAJiESTIC I BUILDING


S C HOWE. -.... c o.'
G a. A. C,. *-. COURAY BeLILNONG
Ccm-Am C LA 0 8BO STREET N v'
T--ro- Mp-a 4260


a J
A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
oient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in- .
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 aores of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 aores on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of aores have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
S- B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
-, 2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,

. Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
/fduoing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquire
,and we can refer you to numbers of others.

C- My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention i 4p
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have ay
pr otes of getting away from the deadly monotony of go

S**















ant 8,



De r ,r. Cor nr,

Your of the 3d. ot ht 'nd. Ye ,, pf yo- ten per cent
commni iqOiur rOn o' .;c'

YOu, onck o"' -n '" tin ; 0 cr '* 'utSidet of
iruit'-r t, I h**v no t.-nl J c.re to s .:1 no-w, :r-,t
the 3.Oi. 40 in Sec.354 9,q),905,9r,97,' kno':, the

"'ltue ,1'R. n.t.. -o proitt thi tr t l thin:

Tr-cts 53 nd i old t 75 per ol de nI 7c
o'40 I oo 'i.o r nn 1 r:or'i2-, in* rtl.? 1 c'11.
t-iidf0 for "30O0 o2.,l, PnL mu un 9 urily to ro 0t vorth
'i t-' ;e r 000* in I~ r it: i no1t '- rtl h 0 th- .
bunotein-: i t b'rl to t7.,e tei '',Iifnrr c, o of th n i ieo t
Thi. 'com is firo t f' k hi -. 4t rQu> thl i burd-ri of
rcin! od" ofi 0" ^ t t n .0 ;.'O th-'e t: o f

tY h.th t 4. in S o ., ,." i ,-.,!i. .ty can



notrijf5 to hi YuAe od -t-, '7er "cr i u 1 je i
conr0 tcrrble. t rt: oo bito ti oL fh :1c
'i '-It! Pruitc t 't.ti -.- -td j7my t e t .*onoFim
incr ti-'.t o i .0 Xofn r 4 i n 'or. Lu r *"ruc 1"

Yos 'i I it- f. 2 *Krlication Ir c anf
do "ly *thin more, I Ih3 i; rI b .i-. to 1 o i ti t


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*


A B I L

Providing for the granting of Local Self-Government to th.
people of the district of Colombia and creating the City of
Washington an independent municipal corporation.


1.
2.
5.
4.
5.
6.

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

14.
15.
16.
lo.
17.
;8.

19.
'20,
21.

'3.


'5.
FC.
*^7.

B. 3

0.
1.
7 .


Be it enacted by the Senate and the House of Representative:
of the United States of America in Congress Assembled, That. thi.
City now existing and known as the "City of.Washington" in
hereby created and shall continue to be a body politic and
corporate under the same name and shall comprise all of the
territory within the boundaries of the District of Columbia.

2. The Act of Congress approved June 11, 1878, An Act pro-
viding a permanent form of Government for the District of
Columbia together with all subsequent acts and amendments
relative thereto which do not conflict with the provisions of
this act shall constitute the Charter anA Laws of the City of
Washington; provided the citizens thereof shall at all times
have the full power to alter, revise, or amend the same.

3. Within sixty days from the passage of this Act the Commis-
sioners of the District of Columbia shall cause to be held an
election at which shall be chosen their successors in office
uwho shall have and exercise the full powers of local legislJ-
tion until otherwise provided.

4. The Commissioners of the District of Columbia shall have
full authority and are hereby directed to prepare such rules
and regulations as are necessary to protect the rights and
determine the qualifications of the voters and to sounrre the
safe and orderly conduct of the said election,

5. Proposals for charter conventions or charter amendments
shall be submitted by the Commissioners at n regular *r scial
electi:nn, upon petition of five per cent of the aualifi-i
voters.

6. hr- sum of Twenty-five thousand dollars is hereby appro-
priated, one half out of the revenues of the District of
Columbia and one half out, of the Treasury of the Uinit.,: Stotes,
or rs much thereof as may be necessary to put into operation
the provisions of this Act.












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TO BUYERS IN THE UPPER EVERGLADES:
Dear Friends:
Do you know that, owing to the war, the Governor of Florida, by special
proclamation, urges upon the owners of Florida land "the cultivation of as
extensive fall food crops as the circumstances will permit," utilizing the
"vast undeveloped advantages and resources" of the State "in the pro-
duction of enormous staple crops, and in furnishing a very large portion
of the nation's meat supply"?
We should begin at once the cultivation of our Glades lands. Our suc-
cess, however, is absolutely dependent upon our co-operation. To forget
this fact is to ignore experience, defy fate, and court failure.
Here is a simple, fair, and inexpensive way in which you can help.
The accompanying statement has been prepared for use in working
up a series of meetings with the object of placing an additional portion
of the Fruitcrest tract, increasing the Development Fund, and so ensuring a
successful beginning, this fall, in breaking, planting and general develop-
ment work in the Okeelanta-Fruitcrest district with modern machinery and
appliances.
To increase its effectiveness, the paper is to be signed by a number
of Everglades buyers, printed on a postal card, and distributed by hand or
mail. It is so drawn that almost any informed Everglades buyer should
be able to sign it. That he may not have re-bought in the Fruitcrest tract
makes no difference. Settlement and development are vital to him, never-
theless, and this is the way to start
Remember that Fruitcrest (Sec. 27, one-half mile west of Okeelanta) is
being re-sold at the-State's price, $20 per acre, at a profit to no one on
earth. This fact should effectually disarm criticism, and enlist the co-
operation of every buyer in the Upper Everglades.
If operations were confined to Fruitcrest solely, success, there, would,
nevertheless, benefit buyers for miles around, and especially those in
Okeelanta Addition. But the operations will not be thus confined. Should .
you so desire, they may be extended directly to your own tracts. In help-
ing, therefore, you are grinding no one's private ax, but are directly help-
ing yourself, and your neighbors as well.
Will you kindly return the statement promptly with your signature,
and indicate the number of cards you can distribute?
Sincerely yours,
THOSE. E. WILL.









Dear Friend:
You have heard of the Florida Everglades, and may regard that region as one to avoid.
"History repeats itself." Years ago, the nation was warned against the purchase, for a trifle, of Louisiana;
"Texas meant Taxes," and Alaska, our Golconda, was "Seward's Folly."
During earlier ages, the sea that separated America from Europe was "the bourne from which no traveler
might return," and Canaan, flowing with milk and honey, was infested with "giants,"-"a land that eateth up the
inhabitants thereof."
So the custom of frightening people away from a land of opportunity is not a new one.
Many of the undersigned have personally inspected the Florida Everglades. In consequence, we believe
that no region of equal merit was ever equally maligned.
Its area exceeds that of Rhode Island and Delaware combined. The quality of its soil and climate can hardly
be exaggerated. Lands in the Lake region are high; and, for more than a year, have been dry and cultivable.
In fact, pioneers have been working there for nearly five years: and a Washington, D. C., colony has been there
since October, 1913.
An imperative need of the region has been a PRACTICAL PLAN OF SETTLEMENT AND DEVELOP-
MENT. This has now been devised, and is being effected through the Fruitcrest Village Community.
This plan we regard as wise, practical, free from the visionary and fantastic, and meriting your careful at-
tention.
At a meeting to be held at the place and date named below, this plan will be explained by its author, Dr.
Thomas E. Will. Everglades investors will be present, and will be glad to answer questions.
You are cordially invited to attend.
PLACE: 811 E St., N. W., Washington, D. C. DATE: 8 o'clock p. m., Saturday, September 12.
SIGNERS:








NOTES:
1. Has visited the Florida Everglades.
2. Has purchased in Fruitcrest.
3. Has purchased near Fruitcrest.
4. Is a member of the Central Management of the Fruitcrest Association.
" 5. Is a member of the Auditing Committee of the Fruitcrest Association
6. Is a member of the Florida Everglades Home Builders' Association.


I








4 FRUITCREST (FLORIDA) ASSOCIATION
MUTUALISM
THOMAS E. WILL. MANAGER VERSUS
TELEPHONE,
MAIN 1555 MARLOW BUILDING, 811 E STREET N. W. COMMERCIALISM
WASHINGTON, D. C.


Sept.10,

1914.
My Dear Lawrence,
The last Sentinal says that Mr. Price, of the
Dauch Mfg. Co.,h-.sa gon e up the canal to Fruitcrest,
"to operate the Sandusky tradion engine." I am tremen-
dously interested in this. I have been corresponding
with Mr. Price and his home office. They are of the
very few traction ppl. who seem genuinely interested in
trying out the possibilities of their tractors on the Glades.
And now, if it is true that he has artuallygone up there
to operate"the engineit certainly looks as tho he means
business.

I certainly hope ypu are in touch with him; end
that all of you will give his tractor the most careful
examination and test. It is a good deal cheaper than
the Holt-- $.,600---.1,700 as against $2,500.

I should want to know whether he has actually
taken the tractor there, or simply gone inperson to see
the soil. Also, what plow, if any, he is using. I
feel pretty confident the Spalding deep tiller will
prove a big success, tho it has not been tried on our land
yet.

Money is dropping in slowly lam pushing things
here night and day, and want to start Just as soon as
there is money enough in sight to make it safe and wise.

fe are having fine,cool weather now--- a genuine
touch of fall.

All well. Hope ypuare all well,and making head-
way.
Always glad to get your letters.

As ever yours,




(/









FRUITCREST LOCATION


ON SECTION 27, (below)


AT THE HUB


FRUITCREST FACILITIES
AS TO
I. TRANSPORTATION: (1.1, and 12) Lauderdale-Okeechobee-Kissimmee Waterway; connecting, by rail. with (2) Sanford-to-Jacksonvllle Boatline. (3) Florida
S East Coast Ry. Extens on, to F. E. C. Main Line. (4) St. Lucie Canal (proposed.) (5) Jupiter-to-OLeechobee Highway. (6) West Palm Beach Canal (begun.) (7) Palm
Beach-Okeelanta-Ft. Myers Highway (begun.) *(7a) Township Line Canal (begun; bordering Okeelanta Addition.) (8) Hillsborough Canal. (9) Miami Canal.
(10) Caloosahatchee River, connecting with the (11) Atlantic Coast Line Ry. to Jacksonville. (12) North New River Canal, connecting with the (13) Florida East Coast
Ry. and the (14) Inter-Coastal-Miami-to-Jacksonville Waterway. (15) Tampa, Atlantic and Gulf Ry. (surveyed) to connect with ocean steam ship lines on (16) East
Coast, to Nassau and, later, to World Ports; and, on (17) West Coast, to New Orleans, Havana. Key West and New York. (18) Atlantic, Okeechobee and Gulf Ry.
II. COMMUNICATION: (12 and 10) U.S. Mails by boat connecting Ft. Lauderdale, Okeelanta, Rita and Ft. Myers. (19) Lauderdale Okeelanta Ft. Myers
Telephone (partially constructed.)







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THOSE. E. WILL. FEDERAL CONTROL FEDERAL
EXECUTIVE AFFAIRS ;
SECRETARY DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SUFFRAGE LEAGUE DISTRICT CONTROL or DISTRICT
OURAY BUILDING, AFFAIRS.
TELEPHONES:
MAIN. 4260 809 G STREET, NORTHWEST, LET THE PEOPLE
LINCOLN. 3568 RULE.
MITeastington, B. (i1. UL






Dear Sirt-

Permit me to call. your attention to a valuable docu-
ment recently issued by the United States Senate and mailed
you herewith. This document (#1138) contains important data
regarding the government of the District of Columbia, and an
appeal for municipal suffrage and self-government. It should
be scattered broadcast, not simply in the District, but
throughout the United States; for absolutism in the Nation's
Capital is a National concern. To this end, at least 10,000
copies should be printed at once, and followed by others.

While postage on this booklet is free, the cost of pub-
lication, (about .7# per copy), and labor, must be met pri-
vately. Can you help us raise the funds with which to circu-
late this document? A check for any sum, from one dollar
upward, will be acceptable, and will be applied exclusively
to this purpose.

In the fight thus far made for District suffrage a few
people of moderate means have borne almost the entire burden
both of labor and expense. In the special work of distrib-
uting this memorial, illuminating and broadly educational as
it is, it is believed you will be willing to lend a hand.

The time is opportune. Today, as never before, the peo-
ple of America are reaching for the reins of power, resolved
that government of-, by and for the people shall, at last, be
realized. In city, state and nation, the boss is falling, and
the political machine is passing to the scrap heap. In the
Capital of the Republic, alone, where our civic and political
ideals should be most fully realized, we have a government
which has been truthfully characterized on the floor of the
U,S. Senate as "an absolute despotism", "a corroding canker
at the heart of the institutions of the United States", the
people constituting a "vast community of political slaves".

Let the American people once learn the facts--for which
they, unwittingly, are responsible--and this monstrous anom-
aly will not survive a single session of Congress. Help.us
to inform and arouse them.

Yours for the cause,


Executive Secretary.


1







FRUITCREST (FLORIDA) ASSOCIATION
TELEPHONE, THOMAS E. WILL. MANAGER MUTUALISM
MAIN 1555 VERSUS
MARLOW BUILDING, 811 E STREET N. W. COMMERCIALISM
WASHINGTON, D. C.


Sept.14,1914.

My dear Lawrence,
I thank you for your letter of the 7th.,but am very
sorry the Dauch machine seems unsuited to our work. The
price is reasonable,and the credit plan they offer would
make me practically safe even with the money now in sight.
On the other hand, the $3,500 required for the Buckewp-
looks formidable. Am still getting pledges, tho slow-
ly.So many of the old Everglades buyers are so willing
to let George do it", while they lie back on their
salaries. I had an hour's talk with one og that kind
this very day.

Now how does this look First, burn off the
grass as fully as possible; then put on the big rake
I wrote you of, tearing out and heaping up,in windows7
as much of the remaining grass and rubbish as possible;
either burning it, or leaving it indefinitely to rot,
on the principle that l nd is plenty. Then putting in
the Spalding deep tiller and tearing things up and turn-
ing them over, going down 16--20 ". Finally, putting
on the cover crop, to civilize" the soil, save on
a small area reserved for trucking, which would be treat-
ed,if necessary, more thoroughly.

This would save some $700 -- $800 on the machine,
and give us a Spalding which appears to be a wonder in
turning up the real soil.

One question is, to what extent can the g rass
be burned? If we could get a surfaclanywhere near so
good as that produced by Mallard's flat hoeing, I feel
confident we could handle the soil with the Spalding.

Again, have you any doubt the Holt would go over
our soil, and pull hard enough?

I shrink from the Buckeye on account of 1) :.The
high first cost, 2) The high cost of operation,3) Tht- '
small day's work resulting. The big acreage I am like-
ly to handle under the loan plan neessitates a plan
by which I can get the land into beans faster than 1-3 a
acres per day, That in one reason I hope the rake etc.
plan( above) may work.

Aggin, can one get any business on the ground
for the machine? Have the people there any money?
If all are in the condition of our Wash. ppl.I fear
there would not be much cash in that.


Watkins did finely with chickens* If you could









FRUITCREST LOCATION


ON SECTION 27, (below)


OKEELANTA ADDITION
(Section 35, below) Adjoins Okeelanta and corners with Fruitcrest.
Its 98 tracts are surveyed and staked. A 25-foot canal and road are
being constructed along the south border. The "Okeelanta Pioneers"
are farming on this section.


AT THE HUB


FRUITCREST FACILITIES
AS TO
I. TRANSPORTATION: (1.1, and 12) Lauderdale-Okeechobee-Kissimmee Waterway; connecting, by rail, with (2) Sanford-to-Jacksonville Boatline. (3) Florida
East Coast Ry. Extension, to F. E. C. Main Line. (4) St, Lucie Canal (proposed.) (5) Jupiter-to-Okeechobee Highway. (6) West Palm Beach Canal (begun.) (7) Palm
Beach-Okeelanta-Ft. Myers Highway,(begun.) ,(7a) Township Line Canal (begun; bordering Okeelanta Addition.) (8) Hillsborough Canal. (9) Miami Canal.
(10) Caloosahatchee River, connecting with the (11) Atlantic Coast Line Ry. to Jacksonville. (12) North New River Canal, connecting with the (13) Florida East Coast
Ry. and the (14) Inter-Coastal-Miami-to-Jacksonville Waterway, (15) Tampa, Atlantic and Gulf Ry. (surveyed) to connect with ocean steam ship lines on (16) East
Coast, to Nassau and, later, to World Ports; and, on (17) West Coast, to New Orleans. Havana, Key West and New York. (18) Atlantic, Okeechobee and Gulf Ry.
II. COMMUNICATION: (12 and 10) U. S. Mails by boat connecting Ft. Lauderdale. Okeelanta, Rita and Ft. Myers. (19) Lauderdale -Okeelanta- Ft. Myers
Telephone (partially constructed.)











do as well, it would be fine.

I think you will do well to organize with the
F.' Society of Equity. I have heard favorably of their
work for several years. Organization is absolutely
essential* The better the organization, the better
for all .

How hard will the hirb nrice of fertilizer hit
you? How long will your little money last? I am
low here till I decide to collect on the loan, and I
don't want to do that till I see enough pledged to make
it safe.

Can you gibe me little list of the things you
are doing for the benefit of anxious inquirers? (-*lt*,n

I have not referred in my letters to Copper to
any friction. Do your best to keep things running smootk-
lys Copper and I have always been the best of friends,
tho he failed to get along with Bowen and Str6*p.

I hope you won't get in too deeply with the "twins"

We wondered why you chose the night to mak e your
trip to Lauderdale.
Rehm, my Chicago agent, writes," Myself and
a number of others are expecting to put our land under
cultivation some time this winter... Several of my Vaper-
ville people are going south on Tuegay,next with a
view of settling somewhere near Okeelanta. Two of
the parties going own land in the W. half of 26. They
expect to go to farming at once. I am trying to close
a deal with one of the fellows for lot 32 at $50 per
acre. He, however, insists on seeing the land first."
Then he asks me to tell you this so-there may be no
confusion as to prices "~ Lot 32 4Wt.'Told tf'Eisenbelsa,
but he wants it sold
As ever yours, .-


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Sept. 19,1914.







Mre. Laura V. MoCullc.lh,

Lakeworth, Fla.

Dear l'res. cCullough:-

Ycurx of the 14th, with signature

received, I thank you. Enclosed find the two papers

you should have had,

T appreciate greatly your ooop.ration,

especially in getting tVie ~tory into the paper. Ofcourse,

the cutting out of my name this time was utterly without

excuse *-no land proposition beii!G involved --out I consider

the source,

Am hoping you will get the resolutions

though the Cha.u'ber of Cor_..eroe and to the Department of

Agriculture soon. 'e have an excellent friend nov; in tV..

Department in the person cf Er. Carl Vrooblan, Asat. Secretary,

a warm friend of mine of 20 year' standing,

Of course, I don't expect,you to send

any money now on land. If, however, you can help by interest-

ing people in getting in on the developei.nti loQan lan, that

w-vill help all of as. WAE KN-OW now that, to make a real sue-

oese in the Glades, we must have CAPITAL; and my plan seems

dt to be the simplest, fairest and most prac:tioal,as yet de-

S' vised.

d







KANSAS CITY.MO.


LAND SALES COMP
Jy f IINCORPORATED) TE

SNIA, II;ESI(: I I'L LIN0


E C HOWE. WASHINOTON, D. C.. OFFICE
G0 E-fa A..e.. C rc. OURAY BUILDING
CC s LSAD' 809 G STREET, N. W.
TeLEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
irom the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd; hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following: -4

Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C..

Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
'place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
;. during point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
" and we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government


I I










-id
2--LcCullob W .a



By a few well directed letters you Iay be able to i st

':. several people, and thereby turn the scales. Lr. Callahan

h1.s just [fpvenr me the name of a 50, acre -ain near section

35, whom I shall write.


Cordially yours,


j>


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LONC Bu IL.DiWN ,
KANSAS CITY, MO.


.~ DI


PHILIP S.DELANY,
HENRY G RALSTON,
V.W. HELM,
-s Vic. P.~.D.n.T.
R. M. PRICE,
80EC L n T- BUNR.,
WILLIS P. r uNOER..
WILLIS P. MUNOER.


LA--NAN.D .SALL!su'Pf
fiNCORPORATED)
TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH 1773
NA.JESTIC BiAITIDIN
CHICAGO


C. HOWE.
C5M PNANV s ,.Le. L
COMPANy S LANacEs


WASHINOTON. D. C.. OFFICE
OURAY BUILDING
80o9 STREET, N. W.
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260


A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with auffi-
oient fertile,acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in- '
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it. ,

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good "'
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be name ,'
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,

,'nk them wnat they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as
'e for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an-,no a pro-
^ .:..'nig point of view. They will be glad to answer y
I. we can refer you to numbers of others. .' I

'y purpose in bringing t i subj t yo
fact tuat. if you feel like I.aid, r0
prospects of getting away from-the dead


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THOSE. E. WILL. FEDERAL CONTROL O E
EXECUTIVE AFFAIRS ;
SECRETARY DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SUFFRAGE LEAGUE DISTRICT CONTROL of D
OURAY BUILDING, AFFAIRS.
TELEPHONES:
MAIN, 4260 809 G STREET, NORTHWEST. LET THE PEOPLE
LINCOLN, 3568 RULE
o sashtington., B. RULE






Dear Sirt-

Permit me to call your attention to a valuable docu-
ment recently issued by the United States Senate and mailed
you herewith. This document (#1138) contains important data
regarding the government of the District of Columbia, and an
appeal for municipal suffrage and self-government. It should
be scattered broadcast, not simply in the District, but
throughout the United States; for absolutism in the Nation's
Capital is a National concern. To this end, at least 10,000
copies should be printed at once, and followed by others.

While postage on this booklet is free, the cost of pub-
lication, (about .7# per copy), and labor, must be met pri-
vately. Can you help us raise the funds with which to circu-
late this document? A check for any sum, from one dollar
upward, will be acceptable, and will be applied exclusively
to this purpose.

In the fight thus far made for District suffrage a few
people of moderate means have borne almost the entire burden
both of labor and expense. In.the special work of distrib-
uting this memorial, illuminating and broadly educational as
it is, it is believed you will be willing to lend a hand.

The time is opportune. Today, as never before, the peo-
ple of America are reaching for the reins of power, resolved
that government of, by and for the people shall, at last, be
realized. In city, state and nation, the boss is falling and
the political machine is passing to the scrap heap. In the
Capital of the Republic, alone, where our civic and political
ideals should be most fully realized, we have a government
which has been truthfully characterized on the floor of the
U.S. Senate as "an absolute despotism", "a corroding canker
at the heart of the institutions of the United States", the
people constituting a "vast community of political slaves".

Let the American people once learn the facts--for which
they, unwittingly, are responsible--and tnis monstrous anom-
aly will not survive a single session of Congress. Help us
to inform and arouse them.

Yours for the cause,


Executive Secretary.





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a.NSAS CITY, MO. PHILIP S.DELANY.
/ HENRY 0. RALSTON.
WI LLIC e r Psi MNT. OE
V.W. HELM,




.LAND SALEs COMPANY

f INCORPORATED)
TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH 1773
LlAJES'rlIC T-OI1LDIN(i
CHII (3A(; 0O

C. HOWE. WASHIsn TON. D. C., O ,FICE
GENhLRA A.EN FOrc THE OURAY BUILDING
Coman- S LAP~kD 809 STREET. N. W.
TE.EPHONIE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing Income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C..
p.
Ask.them wnat they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a "_
place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro- ,'
during point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries ;
and we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that. if you feel like Tdid, YOU also want to have some .
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government

^..










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c NSAS CTY.MO.DELANY
HENRY 0 RALSTON
V W. HELM,
SRM.PRiCE.



-" LAN SALES COMPANY
(INCORPORATED)
RANDOLPH 1773
%TIr lJI' %I(; T TL.,DINA G
CHI(AGO

E C. HOWE. WisHNoroN. D. C.. Or~e
G' II Ana Fn o r OURAY BUILDING
.CO s I.pD SLhOS 809 STREET, N. W.
/h TELEPHObK MAIN 4260



A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
i wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by..

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C, in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today, I
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of aores have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

,i'1ii ~I, Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

"- .....Dr. 0. M. Mun'aster, The Rochambaau, Washington, D. C., Miss
S"i. B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
." .-. 2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C..

l :';'r:"1^ Ask them wnat they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
Place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro- .
'', j "'^ '' .." duringg point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
'":. *' and we can refer you to numbers of others.
" My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is theft
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government








SFRUITCREST (FLORIDA) ASSOCIATION
THOMAS E. WILL. MANAGER MUTUALISM
TELEPHONE. VERSUS
MAIN 1555 MARLOW BUILDING, 811 E STREET N. W. COMMERCIALISM
WASHINGTON, D. C. 2,1914.
Sept. 21,1914.




Mr. Lawrence E. Will,
Box 711,
Ft.Lauderdale, Fla.

My dear Lawrence:-

Yours of the 15th to hand. Enclosed find
check for $25.00 which I hope will1elp some. I shall writd Mr.
Copper today, explaining that I may be able to sell the piece
of hts land east of the Canal, if he desires, thus making him
a little money; and hoping he will not carry his selling operations
so far as to embarrass those of your who are still trying to keep
the flag flying.

I wrote Mr. Kerr saying I should be glad to see
him before the sale took place. If the stove were sold, you would
be without the necessary cooking appliance, I assume; and that of
course would not do.

We will see that you get the shoes in good time.

.I sent you another box of avocado seed Saturday.
The last weekly Metropolis has a good avocado story, but says
the -Tree will not do well outside of Dade County. I think your
climate however is as good as theirs.

I returned a verbatim copy of te expens~g account
for your signature and return to me. Yes, I asK-to have the
gas engine booklet sent you to be studied by you and Dick. I shall
probably need all the help I can get from both of you in handling
an engine.

I enclose copy of Callahan's answer regarding
frost and ashes on velvet beans. Walker mentioned danger of their
leing killed by frost.

I have just written a St. Louis man (an Ever-
glades buyer in section 36--a Civil Engineer) who has been working
to invent a plow, and road and ditching machinery tor use on the
Upper Gladew. He is enthusiastic over his machines, and believes
his plow will plow 15 to 20 acres a day. That looks pretty big
especially if, as the last Lakewath Herald says, the Grass and pig-
weed are 14 to 15 feet high. He thinks of using a Holt Baby
Caterpillar, which he has examined, or a Strait. If he can make th6
thing go it may pay me better to hire him to do the work. I am
asking him about this now. received a good ofter from him some
time ago but the completion 6f his machine seemed to be too far
in the future.


y 07,L se, /r,









FRUITCREST LOCATION


ON SECTION 27, (below) AT THE HUB


ICREAMER


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OKeLRNTAM
ADDITION

nonoreT
* OeStLL woZt.
WAOPIAOD
Mw HD~T.
CULTVATORJ.
I.WATHIn
e. CALLA/AN
3.tALL.


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OKEELANTA ADDITION
(Section 35, below) Adjoins Okeelanta and covers with Fruitcrest.
Its 98 tracts are surveyed and staked. A 25-foot canal and road are
being constructed along the south border. The "Okeelanta Pioneers"
are farming on this section.


.FRUITCREST FACILITIES
AS TO

I. TRANSPORTATION: (1,1. and 12) Lauderdale-Okeechobee-Kissimmee Waterway; connecting, by rail, with (2) Sanford-to-Jacksonville Boall;ne. (31 Florida
East Coast Ry. Extension, to F. E. C. Main Line. (4) St. Lucie Canal (proposed.) (5) Jupiter-to-Okeechobee Highway. (6) West Palm Beach Canal (begun.) Palm
Beach-Okeelanta-Ft. Myers Highway (begun.) .(7a) Township Line Canal (begun; bordering Okeelanta Addition.) (8) Hillsborough Canal. (91 Miami Canal.
(10) Caloosahatchee River, connecting with the (11) Atlantic Coast Line Ry. to Jacksonville. (12) North New River Canal, connecting with the 13) Florida East Co
Ry. and the (14) Inter-Coastal-Miami-to-Jacksonville Waterway. (15) Tampa, Atlantic and Gulf Ry. (surveyed) to connect with ocean steam ship lines on (1)Gf ast
Coast, to Nassau and, later, to World Ports; and, on (17) West Coast, to New Orleans, Havana, Key West and New York. (18) Atlantic, Okeechobee and Gulf Ry.
II. COMMUNICATION: (12 and 10) U. S. Malls by boat connecting Ft. Lauderdale, Okeelanta, Rita and Ft. Myers. (19) Lauderdale -Okeelanta Ft. Myers
Telephone (partially constructed.)


;-2*1~-4"-:1 ;~';'" - r











Like you, I realize the risk that must be run, and am
quite willing somebody else should take it if he will without
making us wait too long. From all I have learned, I feel pretty
confident that if the land were wnce decently broken up, the vel-
vet beans would grow alright. My plan is to turn hogs in on
these, finishing tiem off, say, with peanuts, and then ship them
down to Lauderdale or Miami, and sell them on the hoof. That
strikes me as a pretty safe proposition --away ahead of trucking,
with its frost, bugs, commission men, etc. etc., to struggle
with.

By the way there is a good deal of talk about Prof.
Potter's recent article in the Country Gentleman. I wonder if
you have seen it. I judge its tone is a little blue. Is it
tru4 that he first lost his secretaryship of the Association,
ad was therefore in a measure embarrassed?

We are studying another tractor, the Leader, two thousand
pounds lighter than the Sandusky, and costing, with extension
rims, $1400.00. This can be gotten on approval and, if accepted ,
the Company will wait for most of its pay, taking land as security.
That makes the proposition fairly safe.

No, I have not gone too far on the Loan Porposition. I
am simply receiving offers but accepting no money until the list
of names is l6ng enough.

I think your mother is writing you today, hence I will
cut this off here.

With best regards to Dick and the others, and with many
thanks for your frequent and newsy letters, I remain as ever,

Sincerely yours,
,^ --


__ _I__


I
















"You ask about frost killing velvet beant.
That sounds funny. They stand lots of
cold, and if tops are killed, roots will
sprout again.

How did Lawrence get it in hin head (he)
would have to use ashed to get a stand?
Thats' new to me He probably planted
too near middle of summer, and theysun-
bQrned just as coming through ground
Other peas will do that."


(Sighed) A.V. Callahan
To Thos. E. Will,
Sept. 15,1914.


K;


r .'s-~-c~ "i^:~~;i~
















epte.iber 1-5,1914.


lion. Joe P. Johnston,

chieff Post Office Insi)ector,

6ashinFaton,D.C.

Dear sir:

It is desired to brinr- to your attention what seems

to be the use of the United States ails for fraudulent L.rooses.

'With` this in view, there are enclosed circulars of the Okeelanta

Corporation, the Treasurer of the Okeeln.rnta Association, and

of two of the three Trustees of certain lands -iven by the Flor- /

ida 7ver1lades Land 'omnany to purchasers of land from said -J

Coj..paan, at an auction held at West Palm Beach in April, 1912; and

also :ertain "definitions".

The said donated or "Gift Lands" consisted of some

seventeen hundred acres, more or less, and were deeded to three

trustees for distribution, as set forth in the deed of trust

(copy herewith). It will be noted that each interest in the

Gift Lands was to be represented by a share of stock, which shares

wei-e to be distributed, by the trustees, to the owners thereof,

without cost to tiem.

The trustees were left -ithout fu;n.s with which to

carry out their trust. In couseq-e!nce, The CGkel-Lnta Association,

a voluntary dues-payi :g association of the contract holders, was

organized; and this association has financed the trustees up

to the point where the stock is to be distributed. As shown by

;














;tn report of i -. rcr, -COW-itn, ts c n :O ad


S t t. e tc a ircla fiient





C.ii i, o .A


YVARU, 0'4-y r, 051.y "..r t JA




f '*. pW I jz 1 1 o pat: '10 C.: w n N 0 : V Wk "01 cW


''c .;. i.". i: *.


11 .' :i
















I ,


I *0


,L r an- .'I' *' i o1





owners are ordered-tjggj"__


V C A


iA A'


,stock 6(0 L .





o 0 '4 s


Wu a L1


i: t


IV na a- F I W MC L t, 1
:'' I. C 1'.** 3 .'





nA 3" tf **' t, a !, v





;u i^ v* *i r* '. S


I' ht


;,ci. I t L.A


(2\ u.i


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-. of

,too]


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t,


'Y es ( ;ii


., . . .11.ti,








stock and, therefore, unlawful. Furthennore to try to force

a surrender of the stock unless ,2.u0 per share is sent the Cor-

poration, is felt to be a crime against a -rpat number of unin-

formed and defenceless people,

It is believed that the use of the United States

Mails for such a purpose is fraudulent, and that its effect is

to obtain money under false pretense and representations.

Should you so find, it is requested that action

be taken, under the law, to compel the return, to the owners,

of all stock assiarned to the said Okeelanta Corporation; and, like-

wise, the return of such moneys as may have been collected from

the poorly informed and unprotected people of whom the Okeelanta

Corporation and the two trustees anrear to be endeavoring to

take advantage.
Very reaDectfully su'cmitted,



Trustee.



S .,ember,Bxeclitive Cormnittee
of Okeelanta Association.


-- ~ "


I









(1)

3,0-0 St., :J ae., '9''an.iia.:4ic, t Z

Sp t.23, 1i)14.

Deaf- nwde:-

l i., - ''
A ,;"-'..: .L.:.. V.., La in v ,t, in n.-rd t., Our ibeQio-coml .

att,,5aD5t v .~P "... o.r- .1.- i i. .t go 9 rSri,'t.. It i v h. ,;.. ... ... % '.he
/ sul.l- bd.' -"' .2otAI on e'A rtilculos that v t '.hi-' mixad .and

it ( G;t ,so si:.;:.n ,, th i "- '9 .- rI. Ln* leb -i-ndt PROW.': t''OR 'W ILT

Waettita ha :l9ts tlcQ*ooed. '4e ,Ad that .i .;-:: vry .-iI' r bu.ili..t ad

by r s iL i : .., ;,~. ;'a *e h r 9.l,.]rfo.i ,'.in at rr.1 1 .. .

l.. i .1. "-to : r frorsar.s tichrr3: Ci. 4ecation ii oTf a

hirjh o t:r i .; .: .1-.., '- ac c.! i v ?.r r n ul % -'*. l hlrs :..inft to

Bee ~ -'ruv 'i .L:. ea .ll >Y": :-"r -'.- ,tr .*:. o.1- t r-.r t 0- :ink off i .li: o1~put

onsci;ui cojLOcei a ; 't- :--r : .m'utt"o iar.. An.'.rohiwnl 'uThy

ha *l ot 1-..eid 1.,.* t 3al :n:i r -- .''. ".t.l.- "oin- 01,' *r.<* rfo ':.ui.i- ..'I" dst

vr S nit Aut nd-1OWticn '.. .: -'. an 's leoif *.:
A
coC isLL nrU.. *,.: ,' -ai tira -.b- r .had Iiob rt T, ..i ; .'i. tha

lsd *a l.- : -m ti. . A "',ci-. .t .". i-.l.t.r; d.i. hin cs.ini"n.

A a 1i :3f iA' aor r.- -,'n..d .a ~t.:ab t a ..A.idnftt d ,r, j.:i- .L l ,inld

anti a luogica ucntiint -'rtly a '*2freasor %an a ..tudin'. of nocitld

c1oris *.iat ...v; h. ,'- tl T1-t. ot .oenc-., Autereo.n ftr-bertoP- P7- l.

Pr. .~. ;:: :. .. s.r, i-.. .*'.t. Ane S ', J' T a i h
Arlt.'r z, A .. t mi. .r.vi.z4 c* Caar.a TrOSI~e ar A i V1. s edi bat VrO
rritI.;ca:B'-'' fa." ct.lsT e a. -r- r counx-auLa 'royaliuadL (..'r-'it'.<*.1 rt' t, i'ro!uriLtin'

1 al. A.i1 (*I'' iof the finest b~r.-.s c;-" o: ,ri.en. It 4. l not his

?'.-. An < ri It'h 'Aj that l.?; Prorf fo:O2r O 'i;jh ectaIa to bil a.. i* '.;.. '"i



*- -
r. IY ..nd .- & if ,JC c .... e.e.a niitt aOr. In.:, J, .,J' ,3o n .s 1,,







,ow i,, sw e oa" viol.:-,', -' no t :m rcn- hiea it is '..'n- 10,* bou-r-. oli
:,.i-. t '. ,t'.;. ice ore ur h.2 ith i tJ.ti trcvutlo .'i-h.
,' t ..'"*'. .' /1-''n-"-'1 iA^J* .fE;-h. ..&.' fl4\tSJfJW fiJ l-ti^ tSifl IL ,V^N to*- lifc -





*i G

Ihw 41". 01'-. o11 0 01 1A't i.' not :i'tlrnYa.f t, it is %t lo. ou oi



Th@ X "** awnd ita leaadora arm ntiogt4r 4l..ra'chiti& or .jwLr-

chiutio but cOldai-oonscious ex-enntas tf .he working class initerrest ce

thR Ak, i. of L. la of raft interest.




p 1


Irr.s_ atcirv of tAii. roef inments or -orOl tone tf fl1 F.cnword, it

d Ia nUot advna*e iti or'lei of sooi.AlirI to :;rseuoite or adbtEt 'i"- r to

pull aoft
Thue &trike of th" !yluded *.: .6..11 ttr '.t raa in4 yIn 'ket,

is th. .-aetbod of thae 1. '. A2salitir.., murterlr.; ,rabShrlotinc

aCa .tastruOt.ian cS proP.rty a s.ts th erath.o" of craftt t.Lilr.i.7 for

three hundr') d ytar't. Th* lko J:.N.r. worrr nrt only ..ie r' tn-

by tle yellow saciklistsI t thai,, ic,)n:-.e ut It it r. rally known

by inEidlirs tlit. they cret aided. =n' siUbott.ed in t'eicvr 4ob 1b- a rn'brl r
o0 yellows tuu well ar. .io0rrt c cflcifalI f T+he .* ". f 1. T'he XI. .

W/ npeithl i-l.rer-ohel or i.rsatices rin.l'nr'r, iftI i i''",ndi;.t- violence1
t i' aj. ti04- ,Te in '.:..."r tvo ..',err. -.ho .ti'.irit for 'hp' Eo-

citl ,evolit.lio, n: tAlhn to t*.. pc-;:c'l2Stl, or fo-c&b3- ftu.l roc.-;e1sin
of' -the Ind ,n: m.'-,"ua ,,
of the l..nd .l mr..ohb'er:y. ?.. .'-.. P::'Tffscr w.a glI.Ad ,d *'e Na-

tional S'ooi-a.art .ditut v/h& Isivln';.:at .2 .t "'iztP. h7a-:r0lf mbr, *flfl8

responnibl.e for +*.he ..Ord':r o:' 4- .nb:lr.:. "" 1.r t.-u: not true jand ths1y

knew it an' the,- alBRo kunsv tth.'. th-i. t r:v- Ucrie'- s *. ? ruilt:- one.

Coamri Will wat 1.JSo dcor4.l/ ~- '.,..1.'.. ,4 1"-t~ ., ..c* to-z of }:.-rnes

an(. rcthbir rn.a 'hn white's.h by :}.**- -.:t others, bcut *,,- not

aoneoiuten; enouh to voFa for hea recall ,c'4in.v .rT !.7.1':nitt yet

the pullEd ofTf 4 atun in tr'lroting ,' i:-.!.-'. ~ r-c.rt.ary of the .f. a.

Cltiairs -*esoiifii.Ln .nd Piaroo ra~.th}'r cryly rw.trk-:"':'You had b't+.or

nor +.k about dirnoo acticn.* W.'. w'h Proif.n
b ~and Iw wH 4e Ii vmbr< lilke like his b4t : w the valun. n.n the nnlro-cwmic(

Thi L.InaIJ c.Omiad.n .ho -t.).adwi ok T'.i" tmA iitririry; |
S take hi' too -Qricual2, an L. -o-Lrgn is :,'-fori- a~vr a a -ovntlutionist

he in a j.kei, In tho ntate of W:'-,l.i-ton h0 would be expelled? now .

I do. not belitvY in ?.',-'asey hun1.-in frr m eih r ntaItndl'rot1t Mfl.etehzr by

th r 'da Ih th-. Stats If Walhin-toa 0f tha .. S-lows oUn Pinrni-ylvxanin..

Dioi nisurie of tha te:nvi Amardhirm b: tb h <.-.k tmn file or even

leaders li:.c Tolloak ;.n,1 :lichmntui la .Uite nAt..ral arn exctu; -)lena the

of FToyl. id, ftr '', hilfu.ty:tt .oI S, it it a crire bnt on thcf r-..rt o

kxtkazxra r-Proffasor Will it ie t jor.-'. H'T it; 1tuinj' and a8 irgt we @

all bpt tf he oculd eat up to thi Ahalzni r eftingn on a Wednasdasy avning

















at 9th a&n '2 Stb., N. hE would thort get a oerrect iu:ossiop2 i0i

AaJmrohism of Tolztoi r.nd the Baha, and 1# he taok a tri' '.e C"'eA Y:ork

to Wall St. he qroulid ret a correct idea of the Ancrflsr.. j' T.-:V rt

Speoner.

VIth lhopes tfor he early reformation otf ouu-.. Pro'vasur, I Ln,

YToere somrately,


t !*


~]sl~-







FRUITCREST (FLORIDA) ASSOCIATION
TELEPHONE, THOMAS E. WILL, MANAGER MUTUALISM
VERSUS
MAIN 1555 MARLOW BUILDING, 811 E STREET N. W. COMMERCIALISM

WASHINGTON, D. C.

Sept.39,1914.
Mr L.E.Will,
# 711 Ft.Lauderdale,Fla.

My dear Lawrence,
Yours of the 21st was recdoand carefully studied. I haven't
time to write fully this time. However, I want you to have the
bal. of $16.65 by this boataso enclose check for same,

$300 moew came in yesterday on the loan, making about $2,000
on which I can count. A little more is tentatively promised.
Have had to turn down several hundred because the land was too
far ways Great Grief .-.
I rec&. a fine letter yesterday from Pres. Fels oa the
Fellemere Co. re the Buckeye. He thinks its the thing. Again,
the last Everglades Magazine has a fine story re it. ; So we've
about settled down on that, and decided to look no farther*

There remains one morelquestion. The Lakeworth Herald re-
cently told of the experiences of the surveyors in the Upper
Glades. It said they were working in grass and careless weeds
14 and 15 feet high. You said the Buckeye would work in grass
3 and 4 feet/high. Now what is our chance toget through this
f6iest of grass and weeds?

The price I have been setting for the breaking seems far
too low in thelight of the Fellsmere experience. I don't think
it wise to attempt to change it,thofor those already in on the
loan.


Right here Mamma phoned me and read me your letter acknldg.
recpt of last remittance/etc. Thatis interesting news about
the prospectiVe Buckeye. Will write Bolles. "an t say whether
his secretary will permit me to have an answer. That's her
style, p en tly,.

arland is to be married to-day, they say,to Miss Brunner.
They are to go to the Glades next week. I presume you will have
them for neighbors.

Tract 58 is sold to an Ia.man. Everything else in the
s'e. 80 ,however, is unsold,as are 81-2. I'd have to give a
well- secured contract for a deed, as I haveot paid the State
for this land. Everything in 51-4 and 59-66 except 53 is un-
sold, and paid for. an give deeds for any of it. Price of all,
$75 cash;-80 on paymentsof 20 per tract per month.
Should like a census of the neighborhood for the Fla papers ,
Do any of youfppl. feel like going in onthe Development
Loan plan?
It is not very likely Mr. HIoffman will come this fall.
Had a nice visit from Mr. and Mrs. Titlow recently.
Don't hesitate to give suggestions. They are valued.
Cordially,and as ever,
_____Z Z. ^^c^ ^^^









FRUITCREST LOCATION


ON SECTION 27, (below)


AT THE HUB


SFRUITCREST FACILITIES'
AS TO
I. TRANSPORTATION: (1,1, and 12) Lauderdale-Okeechobee-Kissimmee Waterway; connecting, by rail, with (2) Sanford-to-Jacksonville Boatline. (3) Florida
East Coast Ry. Extension, to F. E. C. Main Line. (4) St. Lucie Canal (proposed.) (5) Jupiter-to-Okeechobee Highway. (6) West Palm Beach Canal (begun.) (7) Palm
Beach-Okeelanta-Ft. Myers Highway (begun.) 0(7a) Township Line Canal (begun; bordering Okeelanta Addition.) (8) Hillsborough Canal. (9) Miami Canal.
(10) Caloosahatchee River, connecting with the (11) Atlantic Coast Line Ry. to Jacksonville. (12) North New River Canal, connecting with the (13) Florida East Coast
Ry. and the (14) Inter-Coastal-Miami-to-Jacksonville Waterway. (15) Tampa, Atlantic and Gulf Ry. (surveyed) to connect with ocean steam ship lines on (16) East
Coast, to Nassau and, later, to World Plrts; and, on (17) West Coast. to New Orleans, Havana. Key West and New York. (18) Atlantic. Okeechobee and Gulf Ry.
II. COMMUNICATION: (1. and 10) U. S. Mails by boat connecting Ft. Lauderdale, Okeelanta, Rita and Ft. Myers. (19) Lauderdale Okeelanta Ft. Myers
Telephone (partially constructed.)
1-


r -- ~u~--- -- ~~ ~-- --~-:;~" 7T- P7 I--


~rS


, '.f











11--E ;t. N.'::.,

Mashington, D,C. September 3G,1914.



Yr. Ceo, '.. haiffer,

17--Que it. ?;. *,

City.

..j dear :r. Lchiaffer:-

I understood ,ou Lome months tince to

say that you i-'-E received circulars from: the I;oard of Direct-

or~ of thc OkeclR:.itt Cor;' w'ration ucll2n io you for ,;2.00--

less any d''s .*.r .:i i t have .nt'r-d the ,1:Cela.ntat Asoociation--

for c.share o-f ,toc'.. due .ru oa account rf your rights in

the "Gift iLand" prca ;ted by the .'l ida .ve--;lJalo LadLI1 Co.

to iirc'ha..ers of its l.Wida. I furtl;er rnrlerstood you to say

that you res ___O.c to the call, *..c,i,:.-c to the treasurer of

the Olkeelanta Cor ovationn, Doctor A. J'arr, 32*-liorth l.tate

St., Chicago, Ill., the sum of .u2,C. RA this cur ct?

er tru yours,














T- IV Vt.'* *
.'J'







I.OrG EuL.D.rG,% 1D "'17
SA NSAS CITY.MO. p T
P. MPH LIP S.DE
HENRY o. RALSTON,
V.W, HELM,
...- R.M. PRICE,
WILLIS P. MUNOER.


,' s, ;I.D SALES COMPANY
( INCORPORATED)
TELEPHON&
RANDOLPH 1773
LA.JEESTIC; 1T3'ILDIN(,
S. CHIC;AGO -

E C HOWE. WASRINOTON. D. C., OFFrri
G NE AL AGEN..... o E OURAY BUILDING
Co 5s LAND 809s G STREET, N. W.
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
oient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
.for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Wishington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be nauad
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. 0., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

Ask them wnat they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
: during point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
Sand we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government









w ekf


.t. ~-I,. 'A


LOi O ~'


'1 .i I "~~ CC l~r
. i


)' .~-C


4,~ ~c I "':. e lfi7


1.^~iI


e;~l: ~ I i;:


:)t. Sr;,1814.







S.KANSAS CITY.MO. PHILIP sDELAN
ON HENRY G.RALSTON,

11' a A~ V.P W. HELM ,
IN lW L rr c A jorrr
WILLIS PFMUNOER.

LAND SALES COMPANY
/INCORPORATED)
__TELEPHONE
RANDOLPH /773
NIAJI(E 131 ILDLIG(,
CHICAG4kiO

E C. HOWE. WA.S erATON, D. C., OFFICE
SC.G rHOW. G .. A., Fern Hs OURAY BUILOINO
S I CoMa., .S LAo.D 809 0 STREET, N. W.
T9LSPIHONCI MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
-. state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
1 from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service ig represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd,'hardkfbsat*Wiqhingtoh business men,
i3i practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soiles--.l-avi bought.and
are constantly buying it. YOU cann'dt et-ter thirffollow Their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be namai
"the following:

;-,, Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. 0., Miss
"' "Il. B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
.. '.. 2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,

S Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
. place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
'' during point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries;
... and we can refer you to numbers of others.

S' My purpose in bringing this subject to your attention is the
fact that, if you feel like I did, YOU also want to have some
prospects of getting away from the deadly monotony of government







7 FRUITCREST (FLORIDA) ASSOCIATION
TELEPHONE, THOMAS E. WILL. MANAGER MUTUALISM
MAIN 1555 VERSUS
MARLOW BUILDING, 811 E STREET N. W. COMMERCIALISM
WASHINGTON, D. C.
October 3,1914C



Mr. Lawrence E. Will,
Box 711,
Ft. Lauderdale,Fla.

My dear Lawrence:--

Continuing my letter of the 29th--your mother will
get you the leggings and cap soon. I wrote Botles to learn the name of
the prospective Buckeye buyer. No reply yet. Shall be glad to learn
of progress of sales. I hate to sell any in 5, but might do so to in-
crease the funds.

If I can get a fairly accurate idea of the umber and
location of settlers Jn our District I shall be glad to send Arei into
the Florida papers. You might mark locations on one of our maps.

Glad that you got the check. "ince Copper's sale
was to wait on what Kerr might say, I wanted to go over the matter with
Kerr, lest the sale might embarrass you, and hoping I could help fix
things. I have written Kerr a second time, the last time politely men-
tioning the suit case, but have no reply yet.

Walker and I have been talking over the possibility
of being able to use teams and plows where you are; hence enclosed
letters, to see whether the thing could be tested out. Meanwhile shall
be glad to get your idea as to whether such a test, at this time, would
be feasible and worth while. If so, and we can scare up the outfit at *
a reasonable figure, I may want you to go down and get it and give it
a test.

S. 'Loan fund now amounts to about $2000. $50.00
cam an unexpected source. The Home Builders#
and g~ r g the plan a strong endorsement. This will
go out, and should easily double the present fund. If, in addition,
some body els6 will bring in the right machine, and I can hire the pul-
verizing done at a reasonable figure per acre, that will greatly simplify
the whole situation. Two or three have written me they are preparing
machines to use on Upper Glades lands.

I don't want to come until I am properly prepared.
I may be able to do more at this end. Still, the delays are trying.

Never fear but that your tract will get the full
benefit of anything I am able to do in that region. I realize fully
your desire that everything you do shall be for the benefit of the fami.*





--


FRUITCREST LOCATION


ON SECTION 27, (below)


OKEELANTA ADDITION
(Section 35, below) Adjoins Okeelanta and corners with Fruitcrest.
Its 98 tracts are surveyed and staked. A 25-foot canal and road are
being constructed along the south border. The "Okeelanta Pioneers"
are farming on this section.


AT THE HUB


FRUITCREST FACILITIES
AS TO
I. TRANSPORTATION: (1,1. and 12) Lauderdale-Okeechobee-Kissimmee Waterway; connecting, by rail, with (2) Sanford-to-Jacksonville Boatline. (3) Florida
East Coast Ry. Extension, to F. E. C. Main Line. (4) St. Lucie Canal (proposed.) (5) Jupiter-to-Okeechobee Highway. (6) West Palm Beach Canal (begun.) (7) Palm
Beach-Okeelanta-Ft. Myers Highway (begun.) ,(7a) Township Line Canal (begun; bordering Okeelanta Addition.) (8) Hillsborough Canal. (9) Miami Canal.
(10) Caloosahatchee River, connecting with the (11) Atlantic Coast Line Ry. to Jacksonville. (12) North New River Canal, connecting with the (13) Florida East Coast
Ry. and the (14) Inter-Coastal-Miami-to-Jacksonville Waterway. (15) Tampa, Atlantic and Gulf Ry. (surveyed) to connect with ocean steam ship lines on (16) East
Coast, to Nassau and, later, to World Ports; and, on (17) West Coast, to New Orleans, Havana, Key West and New York. (18) Atlantic, Okeechobee and Gulf Ry.
II. COMMUNICATION: (12 and 10) U. S. Mails by boat connecting Ft. Lauderdale, Okeelanta. Rita and Ft. Myers. (19) Lauderdale Okeelanta Ft. Myers
Telephone (partially constructed.)


i~-~











At the same time, to make things go right we must have capital, and
that necessitates interesting a larger number. Furthermore, I must keep
pushing on the Fruitcrest proposition for that means much from many
points of view.

Don't hesitate to make any suggestions or recommendations
that look good to you, for your ideas are very carefully weighed at this
end.

All are well here. We are having magnificent weather.
School has recently opened up.

I suppose, with new neighbors coming in, things will
liven up in your neighborhood.

Sincerely yours,





PiS. Mr. Rehm writes me that five men from Naperville have

gone to the Lake expecting to farm near Okeelanta. Several

others from Naperville, Illinios, will go a little later.

I hope you will meet these men, and see that they understand,

without needless delay, the importance of using modern methods

in starting framing on the Glades. Mr. Rehm writes me he has

been trying to interest my Chicago buyers in my Development

SLoan Plar;'"cVt wiftout success. Maybe these men now actually

M 2.--.o r*t"--^Irvne 'at a keener appreciation of the importance

of this plan than they had while riding on street cars in Chica-

go. The thing for them to do then is to get behind the plan

and boost. The most effective way to do this is to get in them-

selves if they can--by clubbing together if in no other way,.and

by writing their Illinois friends to help with alltheir might.

T. E.W.


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LONG SuL..DING "DVIECTOR01t"
KANISAS CITYMO. PHILIP S.DELANY.
HENRY RALSTON






S(INCORPORATED)
RANDOLPH 1773
NxA.JESTrTIC T4LILDIN(i
CH1I(I;ACAO

SC MOWE. WASHINOTON. C., OFrcFC
GE. A.B.' OURAY BUILDING
809 0 STREET. N. W.
STLI.PHO. E MAIN 4260



A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when I
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
oient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
oreasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So Impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employee in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded IWshington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Rochambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher, ;
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. 0.,

.Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a .
.-01ace for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
ing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries i
d we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to your a" tba.
fact that, if you feel like I do; g .w
prospects of getting away from .1ie.

A ...




- w -


October 3,1914.





rP. C.G. Fiodev,

St. t aue rdal, ";aa

j. y de.'.1 "r. ',-h noes:-

"8 ':re- wwondelrin -1hether soil conditions

in the Ckeelanta District would not now ipermt the use of horses,

with iuc1 shoes, and plo ra. If I could l .r;i of a tem, .*.o'er,

and plow that could be taken up into thl.t region, for a reasona..be

charge, and tested out there, e "ii t a:r.;--e to L:.ve it done.

I wonder whether you hafe such an o tfit, or can put me in touch

with so.i..one w'.ho has.


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,C~ ~a~FQ ,3fZ

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Of course, development -York in the Lake

Pt.: La.uCde:dalec

S iii~ yuu for pat cb'rteaies, I a.i


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_.ji ::ty .'/ore*b,~l ^


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U ,BE "


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S LONG Bu-LC.-11C 3)D IlIJFl- JL ,FI R *4 N
1 KANSAS CITY, MO. PHILIP S.DELANY,
I HENRY 0 'RALSTON,
SV.W, HELM, T
IR. M. PRICE, T
_" WILLIS p, MUNGER.



(f NCORPORATrED)
RANDOLPH /773
T MA.JESTrO IRTILDIN&G
,'"' \J"rl CHICAGO

E C. HOWE, WASHINOTON, D. C.. OerICL
GENERA.. AIREN F1, 1-1 OURAY BUILDING
COMPANY. s LAN, 809 0 STREET, N. W.
TELEPHONE MAIN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employes in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good '
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
praotioal, hardfisted farmers -- who ,O'1 89si. --h bge..tpgh nd
are oonatantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example. .",,.q

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Muncaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,

A;iAsk them wnat they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
-'laoe for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
ucing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiLes ;
d we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing this subject to you a t
fact that, if you feel like I 44d, YOU also w
prospects of getting away from.the dea~

k . :
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IONG Su -DiNO D liXIO C"r O 3 :
KANSAS CITY, MO. PHILIP S.DELANY,
HENRY RALSTON,
V.W. HELM,
.R. M. PRICE,
WILLIS P. MUNOER.


SISAVaSALE COMPANY
.- (INCORPORATED)
RANDOLPH 1773
NIAXJESTICs r CITLAU i
CHICAG O

E C. HOWE, WAHINA TON, D. C., OrFFICKa
'[ rIl... AGir FCR 1 -E OURAY BUILDING ".
CoPam S LA-s 89O STREET, N. W. -
TELEPHONE 'MAIN "4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy., equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employee in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1600 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. 0. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soile -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:
'C1
?. Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,

t.4,sk them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
lace for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
cing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
:ld we can refer you to numbers of others.

S' My purpose in bringing this subject to your a n. the
fact that, if you feel like I dte, YOU .
prospects of getting away from tihe. ad
3 Fyg ~~:Eb.














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a3' J : )

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'^ _.G iCNG BEu',.DPNG XDI-l I'3 CI *I ,M,
KANSAPS CITY, MO. PHILIP S.DELANY.
HENRY G.RALSTON.
V W. HELM,
R.M PRICE,
WILLIS P. MUNGER


SyND- SALES SOMPANY
INCORPORATED) T
PANDOLPH *73

p C-'IH II (' 1/%( E


HC HOWE. A. -..r.;c. D C gOr CE
SGERIA. P.E." 'C- OURAv BUILDING
COmF.PA LANCB BOB G STREET N W
T e.. -0'B. rAA.. 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, thu writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
cient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 acres of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employee in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1500 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Evergladas may be named
the following:

S Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
'V 2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,

'i..Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a
i4place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from a de pro- .,
rdauoing point of view. They will be glad to answer uiriese
d we can refer you to numbers of others. .

My purpose in bringing .ftih lbjLo, :;ib'
fact that, if you feel like '4 t aYOl aLlo
Prospects of getting away fro the a
., ll +~. .,:.-







DEMOCRACY CAN NOT BECOME A SOCIAL FORCE UNTIL TE CITIZENS BECOME THINYIERS'AND
CRITICS OF SOCIAL ARRANGEMENTS.-PRoi. J. ALLEN SMITH IN "THE SPIRIT or AMERICAN Goy rH NMENT"

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES The Study Club In Eco
THOMAS C. WILL. District Suffrage partisan organization for t
JULIAN PIERCE. Munlci.al Ownership cussion of socialand eeono
D. C. SHERMAN Direct Legislation ahn local and national imrort
JULIA M. BtiRKE Woman Suffrage
HERMAN B. WALKER, City Government its information by public m
GRACE E. VAIL, Eight-Hour Law JULIAN PIERCE, EXECUTIVE SECRETARY tiles, correspondence and
J. W. RICHMAN, Finance The expenses of the
J: H. REESE, Union Label m- h..nt


2yA .
.4Q41


nomics is a nur,.
be study and rlj.
milc iuesltons o
*It dimsemrlnates
meetings Iress nr
printed matter.
Study. Club ire
itions.


October 7, 1914.


Mr. Thomas E. Will,
811 E Street, N.W.,
"ashin on, D.".

Dear Comrade:

The undersigned has been instructed by the Distriot Central Com-

mittee to at--oint a coj,1itte' to have charge of educational and prop-

aganda meetiiugs to be given under the auspices of the D. 0, C. -every

Sunday evening during the fall and winter. The work of the committee

will consist of--

1. Determin4in the subjects to be discussed.

2. Securing the lecturers.

3. .anaging the meetings--publicity, literature, etc.

By subdividing the work, it need not fall heavily upon any one

member of the oommitttee.

7ould you be willing to serve on the committee in case your

services were "drafted"?

Kindly answr at once.
Fr eternally, yours, '


811 E Stre-t, .W.
? 811 E Strent, a.W.


a U


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jt

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FRUITCREST (FLORIDA) ASSOCIATION
TELEPHONE, THOMAS E. WILL. MANAGER MUTUALISM
MAIN 1555 VERSUS
MARLOW BUILDING, 811 E STREET N. W. COMMERCIALISM
WASHINGTON, D. C.

Oct. 13,1914.
'My dear Lawwrnce,
We have your letter re the shipwreck, and the one
following-- The latter Mamma read to me over the phone *, .
: You have certainly had an experience. clad all
escaped so well.
I will withhold 61 from sale for you* However,I
have already assigned it as security on the loan. I
don't think that should worry you the. Go ahead with it
just the same. If, by any accident, I should find I had
to let any landgoon foreclosure, I should make special
eff ort to save that piece.
I am getting out a second loan folder. It should
be in the mail ThursdaY. Will send you a copy. I believe
it will bring the amount sought up to the necessary pint.
Mr. Connah stopped with me here recently. Had
a good talk with him. He advises me to see what Mr. Helm
does in the way of getting a plow. He is expected to try
out a ewells wanders disc.
Have heard from Rodgs only re the team etc* e
thinks the idea excellent, ays he is to put out 150 acres.
Thinks tho one could not even BUY in- auderdal ethe outfit
I wanted to hire and try out. Thinks one might in Miami.
Have expected re plies from others.
Congressman Smith of Idaho told me of a device
they used very effectively in Idaho to conquer the sage brush.
It is a big tractor,to which they attach a heavy knife 10 ft.
long held down by the weight of the tractor* The knife
runs under ground several inches' One end runs ahead of the
other that the knife may cut in the same fashion as arazor.
It is much like a very long plow share with out a mould
beard. This knife cut off all theroots of the sage brush
and loosened u p the ground. The brush was then burned off,
and the ground left in fine shape for tillage.
It looks to me as tho this plan would meet our
case.It would cost little to try it on Helm's tractor.(Holt)
If it succeeded, it would enable one to do a real day's
work-- which 2 or 3 acres with a $3,250-machine hardly is.
One could plant babanas right in the down grass,I thing.
The rubbish should save the moisture and restrain the weeds.
Where a fine seed bed is needed, one might use fire, the
rake, and the disc harrow. How does it look to you?
a to bnnnaas, Mr. Crime writes me he"thinks 5,000
acres could be disposed of along the East Coast of Fla.
alone." ....., 6 o'clock. Must mail this and go.

Best regards to all,and ever your,


-. 0,vxe


i;-









FRUITCREST LOCATION


ON SECTION 27, (below)


OKEELANTA ADDITION
(Section 35. below) Adjoins Okeelanta and corners with Fruitcrest.
Its 98 tracts are surveyed and staked. A 25-foot canal and road are
being constructed along the south border. The "Okeelanta Pioneers"
are farming on this section.

43 e
81 27322 9 8 2I
38573635. 1 + -H
45 e -10
2-4 3




59 : 53 5




Z93 76


95 79 55
96 80 69 56
5 90 898887 0 5
97 81 57
98 82 58


AT THE HUB


FRUITCREST FACILITIES
AS TO
I. TRANSPORTATION: (1, 1, and 12) Lauderdale-Okeechobee-Kissimmee Waterway; connecting, by rail, with (2) Sanford-to-Jacksonville Boatline. (3) Florida
East Coast Ry. Extension, to F. E. C. Main Line. (4) St. Lucie Canal (proposed.) (5) Jupiter-to-Okeechobee Highway. (6) West Palm Beach Canal (begun.) (7) Palm
Beach-Okeelanta-Ft. Myers Highway (begun.) .(7a) Township Line Canal (begun; bordering Okeelanta Addition.) (8) Hillsborough Canal. (9) Miami Canal.
(10) Caloosahatchee River, connecting with the (11) Atlantic Coast Line Ry. to Jacksonville. (12) North New River Canal, connecting with the (13) Florida East Coast
Ry. and the (14) Inter-Coastal-Miami-to-Jacksonville Waterway. (15) Tampa, Atlantic and Gulf Ry. (surveyed) to connect with ocean steam ship lines on (16) East
Coast, to Nassau and, later, to World Ports; and, on (17) West Coast, to New Orleans. Havana, Key West and New York. (18) Atlantic. Okeechobee and Gulf Ry.
II. COMMUNICATION: (12 and 10) U. S. Malls by boat connecting Ft. Lauderdale. Okeelanta. Rita and Ft. Myers. (19) Lauderdale Okeelanta Ft. Myers
Telephone (partially constructed.)


._ 1

















id. Ave. and C Ot.
-------------------------



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T. ;. ~1.l.o,



de".r : r. 'olles.:-


1 poe- .. r tile 31. I
.is Io.erg ;:"<3 t in iu o u
frOu La-:it;na to *'t, -, y' T Oli
aSnir"s 44 i,-,nd 45. If no' tou
tU 'A':, o 'o siB nt e, f a


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ao 'n.. t ; .. ic


trict, i'. crn e t no re. 2:ie . '.i l .,, o Le .
'pu 'i '.Ci ; uject'' I .f u, "* o, ; .. '' 'i U '
Is ;.. i7 s;-)^ci il i o *jeO : t sti l+...., ':drequired I. .t ,< I co .
.ore. uch an f or, t. :, -i ra deal.
.Q.V _.9 1 -i)I e


:~ICerL A.


L.










THE PEOPLE'S CHURCH
FOUNDED OCTOBER 4. 1891


STUDIO HALL,

1219 CONNECTICUT AVENUE, NORTHWEST,


WASHINGTON, D. C.


r,
SERVICES AT 11. A. M. SUNDAYS


OBJECT:
THE SERVICE OF HUMANITY.


&P~~~


REV. ALEXANDER KENT
FOUNDER


)_









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: - * qrg- 100 "J o s i,


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dNG SU ING *J I1 O e 'e*B:
N KSA S CITV.MO p,- s'D
-ENP RALr N





SA LAN SALES COMPANY
-cLTELE HONE
^ ^, ,_ .js (INCORPORATED)
PANDOLPH 1773
NI%.I T : TI .'I. IN<(
|,P \ CHIC A O IC
E C HOWE. w*-,no D C .O .ca
GOINRAL. AGE,. FO 0. v OURAY BUILDING
CoPAP v a LA. DI 00g STREET, N W.
TcLE-oM C M ..aN 4260




A year ago last August, while employed in the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the writer was looking forward to the time when
he could leave the government service for something better. I
wanted to own my own home, in a balmy, equable climate, with suffi-
oient fertile acreage surrounding it to insure me a steadily in-
creasing income as the years rolled by.

One day, a piece of literature similar to the enclosed was
handed me by a friend in the Treasury Department, who had just re-
turned from the Everglades of Florida. I read it carefully, applied
for leave of absence and inspected the wonderful Everglades region
for myself. So impressed was I with what I saw, and with what people
who are living upon this land and working it told me of their in-
comes from it, that I straightway bought 100 aores of it.

On my return to Washington, my fellow employee in the Inter-
state Commerce Commission had such confidence in my honesty and good
judgment that they bought over 1600 acres on my report. I resigned
from the I. C. C. in December last to sell Everglades lands. Today,
every Department in the Government service is represented among our
buyers. Hundreds of acres have been sold in Washington, and others
are constantly buying. Shrewd, hardheaded Washington business men,
practical, hardfisted farmers -- who KNOW soils -- have bought and
are constantly buying it. YOU cannot do better than follow their
example.

Among those who have actually seen the Everglades may be named
the following:

Dr. 0. M. Munoaster, The Roohambeau, Washington, D. C., Miss
B. E. Adams, Forest Service, Washington, D. C., S. P. Compher,
2142 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.,
V ;t
Ask them what they think of Everglades lands as an investment, as a n
P-;place for a home, from a climatic standpoint, from an income pro-
4duoing point of view. They will be glad to answer your inquiries
"4.'and we can refer you to numbers of others.

My purpose in bringing thi, subject to youA^ tAi
fact that, if you feel li alap wkp?
prospects of getting aI ti ady ubf'.
3j r;^"i'"." ,-

*^ .^ ... -;l


a








k FRUITCREST (FLORIDA) ASSOCIATION
TELEPHONE, THOMAS E. WILL, MANAGER MUTUALISM
E ONVERSUS
MAIN 1555 MARLOW BUILDING, 811 E STREET N. W. COMMERCIALISM

WASHINGTON, D. C.
October 15,1914.

L'. Lavwrence ':. will,
Rlox 711--t. Lauderdaie, i'la.

-)ear iawvr ence:-

Your two letters of the 4th and 10th were
very interesting indeed. Your experience 'ith the boat, while
trying, was valuable, and So:',.,-.d ,hat you car do. I am vrondering
-,ether a horse and especially a trnctorc ould be t'ken up
to your district without seriously inj-'"'.tg or shipwireck. mould
they be hauled on a bar-'ge drawing considerably less water than
the boat?

MO. Bolles wrote me, "there was no one in
my party who had any connection with a lr-ctbrCoo..~ .i that I
know of." I said nothing about a '-r-:-tor Comipany. He continuese-
"I have been investigating the question of cutting up the saw -r-.'as
roots ..self, and as soon as I have reached a decision, and if
the step is taken to put a m-achine of that kind in commission, I
will promptly inform you."

I wonder whether you have ever heard of a tractor
going up into the Hillsooro District.

As to :Z'..-,' cane, you vill find the following
figures, a-d more, in L--'rs and Roebuck's big catalog (pa ;e 1508).'

1. Keinood Horse Borer Cane Mills for /
Sorchu-L 'and Sugar Cane, -17.25-60. 15

2. Cook's Eva--3 oration Pan
(for samie.) 4.20-25.25
Totals--------21.45-85.40

So you see your information was corr '".' 'I
Think you ,wo"ld do well to pl-mt such cane as you can. ".ith
kills at the above price it ought to be possible to make r.-,yI
and the demand seems to be good.

I think Ir. and >Lre. Titlow p~laned to leave
for Florida shortly after, Th'- kagriving.

I anm grld to rit your map of settlers. I sup-
poose Garland io going upon .'-ct 5 which he 'ousLht of Johnson.
Garland's wife is a very fine young woman.

I o_ sending you some of my now folders, going
out todly. I hope they "ill round up t:e balance of the loan.
Please distributethe two-p-. folders from time to til. V here t Y.

,, """ v i


I I I I I










FRUITCREST LOCATION


ON SECTION 27, (below)


OKEELANTA ADDITION
(Section 35, below) Adjoins Okeelanta and corners with Fruitcrest.
Its 98 tracts are surveyed and staked. A 25-foot canal and road are
being constructed along the south border. The "Okeelanta Pioneers"
are farming on this section.


AT THE HUB


FRUITCREST FACILITIES
AS TO
I. TRANSPORTATION: (1, 1. and 12) Lauderdale-Okeechobee-Kissimmee Waterway; connecting, by rail. with (2) Sanford-to-Jacksonville Boatline. (3) Florida
East Coast Ry. Extension, to F. E. C. Main Line. (4) St. Lucie Canal (proposed.) (5) Jupiter-to-Okeechobee Highway. (6) West Palm Beach Canal (begun.) (7) Palm
Beach-Okeelanta-Ft. Myers Highway (begun.) .(7a) Township Line Canal (begun; bordering Okeelanta Addition.) (8) Hillsborough Canal. (9) Miami Canal.
(10) Caloosahatchee River, connecting with the (11) Atlantic Coast Line Ry. to Jacksonville. (12) North New River Canal, connecting with the (13) Florida East Coast
Ry. and the (14) Inter-Coastal-Miami-to-Jacksonville Waterway. (15) Tampa. Atlantic and Gulf Ry. (surveyed) to connect with ocean steam ship lines on (16) East
Coast, to Nassau and, later, to World Ports; and, on (17) West Coast, to New Orleans. Havana. Key West and New York. (18) Atlantic, Okeechobee and Gulf Ry.
II. COMMUNICATION: (12 and 10) U. S. Mails by boat connecting Ft. Lauderdale, Okeelanta, Rita and Ft. Myers. (19) Lauderdale Okeelanta Ft. Myers
Telephone (partially constructed.)


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