Jewish ledger

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Title:
Jewish ledger
Alternate Title:
Golden Jubilee edition (50th) : Vol. 102, no. 5 (August 3, 1945)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Ledger
Place of Publication:
New Orleans
Publication Date:

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Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 17450217
System ID:
AA00000100:00001

Full Text
GOLDEN JU-RILEE EDITION

S, --*" .- /.." "$,-f S


1945 V 5705























FORi MY RA
AN VS





















VOL. Ci New Orleans, August 3, 1945 (Ab 24, 5705) No. 5
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THE


JEWISH


LEDGER


THE JEWSH CHAPLAIN; SYMBOL OF LIBERATION
By ARTHUR WAYNE


(Editor's Note: The Jewish chaplain has, in
the three years since Pearl Harbor, become an
emissary of the Jewish people .in the farthest
flung corners of the world. More important, he
has brought spiritual and moral solace to tens of
thousands of men, who, in peace time, had little
contact with the synagogue. The following ar-
ticle gives a panoramic view of the high spots
of the chaplains service in Europe, the Middle
East and the Pacific.)
T HE rabbi up for endorsement by CANRA
(Committee on Army and Navy Relig-
ious Activities of the National Jewish Welfare
Board) was a splendid prospect for the chap-
laincy; one thing, however, made the com-
mittee uneasy: would the candidate, a staunch
orthodox rabbi, ride on YOM TOV in fulfill-
ment of his military duties? Two committee
members called him out into the corridor and
in earnest tones asked about it. The rabbi
assured them that, as he saw it, his first ob-
ligation was to the men he was going to
serve, and that would be his guide.
On September 15th, a Friday, the rabbi,
Morris A. Sandhaus, now a chaplain, landed
in France and couldn't find his headquarters,
so he spent the next day the Sabbath -
"bumming a ride" to Paris and, still
unable to locate his outfit, bum-
ming a ride back to the beach.
The next day was Rosh Hashon- ,
ah and he found himself some
work: conducting Holy Day
services for some 300 men. Later
in the day, learning that a di-
vision had landed, he did some
motorized reconnaissance, located
the troops and arranged with
the division chaplain to perform
a second day service. Yom
Kippur was likewise a day de-
voted to travelling from place
to place, conducting services for
groups of worshippers in sep-
arated areas. It was not easy
for this chaplain, with his life-
time background of scrupulous
orthodox observance, thus to
breach the holy days, but his
sense of devotion to the men
Chap
and his profound concern for who
their religious welfare helped hone
pulp
him to overcome the deep dis- bath
quiet he undoubtedly felt. On fore
Jewi
the other hand, he could not Nav)
help being struck by the subtle Boai
but overpowering symbolism of "hundreds
of men stacking their guns and coming in to


Copyright, 1945, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.
services." He was able to describe it as "a
marvelous experience . a heartening sight."
Perhaps nothing so vividly epitomizes the
fullness and depth of the chaplain's service
to men in their hour of greatest need as the
observance of the recent high holy days.
These services were held under conditions
fantastic beyond the wildest imaginings of
the men accustomed to conducting services in
sedate, well-ordered settings. As Chaplain
Harold Goldberg, on the Italian front, put it,
the very act of holding services was in itself
an achievement.
Against a background of, in some cases,
shadow-filled, lifeless rubble, or, more often,
imminent or actual shell-thunder, chaplains
assembled the men and led them in prayers
of immemorial antiquity but imperishable
freshness and meaning. Chaplain Goldberg
held Kol Nidre services at the bottom of a
deep gorge through which a little river flow-
ed. In the stony margin between the river
and the walls of the canyon, he parked his
jeep and used it as the stand for the Aron


FHEIR SACRIFICE TO BE MEMORIALIZE


lains"- 1uis Werfel, Alexaneer Goode, and Irving Tepper,
m have paid the supreme price in the fight for freedom, *
ored tomorrow, the Sabbath of Chanukah, in temple and syna
its throughout America on the occasion of Jewish Chaplain
. The rabbinate of America has given 280 rabbis to the
es, and sermons tomorrow will pay tribute to their role in th
sl Chaplains Sabbath is sponsored by the Committee on Arm
Religious Activities (CANRA) of the National Jewish W
rd.
Kodesh. At the side he set up his little field
organ. "The men all had talesim and the


twilight made these colorful prayer shawls
stand out against the somber uniforms and
helmets of the men. We were a little island
of praying men in an ocean of military ac-
tivity."
Chaplain Israel J. Kazis held Rosh Has-
honah and Yom Kippur services "as close as
possible to the front lines to enable our in-
fantrymen, who were fighting, to attend."
The area was under enemy observation, and
the chaplain noted the symbolism of "Jewish
soldiers proclaiming their faith in God in the
face of the enemies of God." Several hun-
dred yards to the rear, American guns were
shelling enemy positions on the mountain
ahead. The shelling went on constantly "and
when all the guns joined in a barrage I'd have
to stop chanting or preaching until the noise
subsided. To offset the noise of ordinary
shelling, my choir of six men and I sang at
the top of our voices.
In the far reaches of the Pacific, Chaplain
Eugene J. Sack sought to combat "the usual
primitive jungle condition" with "as home-
like a service as possible."
Chaplain Sack found an
D assistant (the first J e wish
assistant he'd had), Pvt. Jack
Rubin of the Bronx, an infan-
tryman who had spent the pre-
ceding three months in the hot-
test corner of one of the most
active New Guinea fronts."
Particularly attractive about
Pvt. Rubin was the fact that he
had personally shot a six-foot
Jap machinegun sergeant right
between the eyes" Chaplain
Sack felt he needed the luxury
of the capable protection Rubin
afforded. Not unimportant, how-
ever, was Rubin's civilian back-
ground: in New York he had
been a cantor in training and
had an excellent voice.
al of
vill be The day before services Chap-
gogue lain Sack and Pvt. Rubin waded
s Sab.
armed through hip-deep swamps, cut-
e war. ing beautiful swamp and fern
ty and
welfaree palms. With the aid of the
carpenter shop, which fashion-
ed huge candelabra, and some hospital sheets,
(Please turn to page 3)





THE JEWISH LEDGER


The JEWISH LEDGER
Established January 4, 1895
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY BY
THE JEWISH LEDGER, INC.
608 Dryades St., New Orleans, La. Telephone MAgnolia 2253

EDITORIAL BOARD
Rabbinical Council of New Orleans, La.
Member: Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.
Official Organ: Temple Sisterhoods

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: 1 Year, $2.50; Six Months, $1.75; Three Months $1.00
No subscription accepted for less than three months
Advertising Rates on Request

.. Entered as Second-Class Mail Matter at the Post Office, New Orleans, La.

NEW ORLEANS, LA., AUGUST 3, 1945 (AB 24, 5705)

JUBILEE
By RABBI JEROME MARK
THE Golden Jubilee of an Anglo-Jewish paper marks an epoch in
the historic development of the community where it is published.
It is with sincere gratification that we note the celebration of the
50th anniversary of the JEWISH LEDGER. The subtitle of the LEDGER
is "a weekly journal for Jewish families." This tells the entire story of
the aims and purposes of a local paper of its type.
We may or may not have Jewish magazines in the United States or
in England devoted to serious studies of the present scene in Jewish
life or to scientific investigations into the history, the social articulation,
religion, philosophic, intellectual and esthetic lore of our people. Such
magazines may be of high literary quality, they may reflect and even
embody our present-day literature and culture, art and drama, poetry
and science. This should not be the purposes of a community organ
such as the LEDGER. The motto of the LEDGER is "For my brethren
and friends I would fain speak," a motto which this paper has followed
for 50 years with love for the Jewish people, with devotion to all Israel,
but centered in and emanating out of New Orleans.
In an editorial, this writer is uncertain as to whether he is entitled
to stand off in order to congratulate the LEDGER or whether it is his
business to lose his identity with the paper and, editorially speaking,
stand in the receiving line to accept congratulations. Whichever it is,-
we cannot refrain from taking this opportunity of saying to the pub-
lishers and to the former editors of the LEDGER that we thank you for
your past achievements, we are grateful for the fine standing of New
Orleans Jewish communal life which you have always fostered and
reflected and, finally, that we wish you fullest success for a bright
future.


In a scattered sort of way, we have here indicated what a journal
such as the LEDGER should be. It should be devoted to serve its imme-
diate circle, but should also go into Jewish homes for the purpose of
integrating the entire community into'a homogeneous group held to.-
gether by the spirit of warm friendship and mutual loyalty. This pur-
pose was carried out so capably for many years by its brilliant editor.
Dr. Mendel Silber. It is the trust of this writer that the present rab-
binical editorial board will further the purpose of Jewish inter-cultural
and inter-communal understanding and harmony. It is well for the
LEDGER to reflect and to expound every phase of Jewish life (except,
perhaps, apologizing for the burning of Jewish books!), which is being
done so capably by the present editorial board.

There is one more ideal for Anglo-Jewish publications which I would
indicate as an aim for the LEDGER in its next 50 years of progressive
journalism. This aim can best be experimented with in New Orleans,


NEW ORLEANS, JANUARY 4, 1895
OUR SALUTATION
SWith this issue the Jewish Led-
ger salutes its friends and patrons
and modestly enters the arena of
journalism. The assurances which
we have received from those inter-
ested in, and closely identified
with Judaism, combined with the


to apply all the energy they pos-
sess and use every honorable
method known to them to crown
the undertaking with success.
We feel convinced that the best
and most worthy course to pursue,
in order to win popular favor, is to
show that we are at least deserv-
ing of it. If by well directed zeal


AARON STEEG


Founder of the Jewish Ledger, published weekly since January 4, 1895


good wishes, and encouragement
of our numerous friends, enable
us to say, that our enterprise is
:launched under brilliant auspices.
Indeed, if perseverance can accom-
plish anything, then those who
stand at the helm are determined


we should happily consummate so
fortunate a result, then we are sat-
isfied that the public will not with-
hold from us that reward to which
merit is always entitled. Our col-
umns shall be devoted to Judaism,
(Continued on page 75)


..herTe we live on friendly terms of mutual respect and understanding
with our non-Jewish neighbors. It might be interesting to try the expe-
rimen .of inter-journalistic communion with our neighbors. Why not
iite .soie Christian denominational writer or some non-sectarian but
ifoa-Jewish community leader to write occasional editorials for the
LEDGER? Reciprocally, the journals with which we enter into such
relationships should invite our editors to write, or should reprint from
the LEDGER, worth while articles which would serve to interpret Jew-
ish communal life in New Orleans to our neighbors.
This may be a big order. It may take years to develop. However,
a journal which now celebrates its 50th anniversary can well extend
into the future a long-term program of achievement. Meanwhile, best
of luck to the JEWISH LEDGER on the celebration of its 50th anni-
versary.





NEW ORLEANS, LA.


THE JEWISH CHAPLAIN
(Continued from page 1)
they decked out a green-and-white
altar and succeeded in giving a
yomtovdig air to the crude, grim
jungle chapel. "It would have
done your heart good," Chaplain
Sack said, "to see the boys' faces
when they heard the first notes
of the old chants."
At Chaplain Albert A. Gordon's
Yom Noraim services, many Aus-
tralian Jewish lads were present
and he reports that the Americans
enjoyed dahvening with them and
listening to their peculiar accents,
the consensus being that they
sound like Galicianers. Chaplain
Gordon's services, conducted with
beauty and dignity, were complete
in every detail and "were it not
for the native type chapel and the
tropical breezes, I could have
imagined myself in a synagogue
back home." The Ark was draped
with the traditional white paro-
ches, prepared by one of the men,
and "our shofar blower distin-
guished himself with clear, pene-
trating blasts." From the express-
ion on the faces of the worship-
pers, Chaplain Gordon recalls, it
was plain that they were proud of
their religious heritage.
The holy day services, whether
in liberated France or the jungles
of the Pacific, in the icy waters of
the northern climes or the enerva-
ting heat of the Middle. East, left
a trail of ecstatic appreciation and
it is a toss-up whether the men
and women for whom the services
were arranged or the chaplains
who did the arranging benefited
more by them. "They were a
thrill that comes once in a life-
time," Chaplain Isaac Klein re-
ports from France. "The high holy
day services were an experience I
shall never forget." Chaplain
Klein had to perform the functions
of all offices: he was not only
rabbi, but cantor and and most
arduous of all shammas. When
it was all over, Chaplain Klein
was "weary and exhausted, but the
happiest man alive!" At his ser-
vices every branch of the military
was represented: the Air Corps,
Infantry, AAA, Quartermaster,
Ordance, Engineers, Wac, and so
on.
In the historic city of Verdun,
where Chaplain David Max Eich-


horn conducted holy day rites, the
congregation of 600 soldiers heard
an Army bugler blow the tradi-
tional blasts on a "good old GI
bugle," for there was no shofar to
be had. Nor was there a Sefer
Torah the Nazis, lately depart-
ed, had gutted the synagogue,
stripped it bare of all its religious
appurtenances but, using a He-
brew bible, "we opened the Ark
and went through the entire Torah
service as though the Torah was
actually there."

Cleaning up the synagogue after
the Nazi Augean-stable profana-
tion was a formidable task and
threatened delay and complica-
tions. The chaplain found a short-
cut. He approached the command-
er of a nearby prisoner-of-war
camp, secured the services of ten
Nazi captives and turned them
loose on the mess their people had
created. "These erstwhile 'super-
men' did a super-job," Chaplain
Eichhorn relates. "They cleaned
out the synagogue in a jiffy,
scrubbed the floors and the walls
and turned the desecrated sanctu-
ary into a fit place of worship with
a speed that was amazing."

Chaplain Norman Siegel not long
ago traversed some eight thous-


and miles in the Central Pacific
area in plane, jeep and LCVP,
conducting worship service and
memorial rites, conferring with
unit chaplains and commanding
officers, chatting with as many
Jewish servicemen as he could -
seeking, overall, to learn how he
could be of greater service to the
men in uniform.

One memorial service stands out
particularly in Chaplain Siegel's
recollection. "We were gathered to
honor the memory of our deceased
buddies, Jewish and Christian and
some whose faith was. unknown.
Fronded palms swayed gently in
the air and soothing waves played
softly upon the shore nearby. Rows
of white crosses, Stars of David
and V-markers stood together,
silent before us. Catholic and Pro-
testant chaplains joined me in the
conduct of this service. After the
opening prayer 120 Marshallese
men chanted in their native tongue
a solemn hymn in memory of their
own deceased, who lay there too.
When the service was completed
a rifle squad fired the military
salute and two buglers sounded
taps. All of us who stood then on
that hallowed ground shall long
remember it."


Graphic testimony from the
areas in Europe which have been
cleansed of the Nazi filth, points
to the fact that Jewish chaplains
have become the symbols of liber-
ation to the distressed Jews of
Europe. The first to bring light
to the misery-ridden blacked-out
communities of that stricken con-
tinent, Jewish chaplains have re-
established a life-giving link be-
tween American Jewry and their
suffering, decimated co-religion-
ists. They have entered far in ad-
vance of any American relief or-
ganizations, of any military gov-
ernment, and in so doing have
dramatized, by their very presence,
but more, by their valor and by
their splendid helpfulness, the sig-
nificance and telling role of the
Jew in this war.

The reaction of the Jews in one
French town is typical. When they
realized that they were in the pres-
ence of their liberators, they were
stunned; completely speechless.
Then they broke into tears and
wept bitterly. The American sol-
diers stood around and watched
spellbound. Gradually the French
Jews stopped sobbing. Here and
there one of them smiled through
(Please turn the page)


--- -


I IlBD'S ET VIEW OF EIDFOB WASHIli.8,fN FORFE.T, at Ifar Ba-Cnorean.
'Ia I ee. The rirr.st *lra.r In trl .ute to mte firar Preellert
of th' (Urlr-a St"',le van tiaa' -Sr.t b A.i-rlt n Jre.* In IQAi Qann
r,e AmArlena p-ople celebrat-d the ,1:7r.a-nlal anrvil-rs&ry or the
Father of our Cooutry. lanoe to tr e left er to. Rebreo dedica-
tLon plaque and the forret ase L app ared In the bedlrMil of tre
plantilr Drogram It lpJ2. rince then, spproxlaarly tOri.000 'rm-s
rhai beer planen on tre lanl inl;n tr ..r .. ree rfr or t
purryose by the Jewisn Nttlornal oil.





THE JEWISH LEDGER


his tears. The smiles became con-
tagious and in short order they
were delirious with joy. It was a
scene which will remain ineradi-
cably etched on the memories of
those who beheld it, according to
Chaplain Klein, who was there. He
took about forty of the newly lib-
erated men to lunch at the home
of a Jewish family in town and
after a good home-cooked meal
they spent a few hours singing
Hebrew, Yiddish, English and
French songs.
Chaplain Harold I. Saperstein,
one of the network of fifteen Jew-
ish chaplains functioning in
France, observes that "there could
be no better evidence of the
strength of the bonds of Jewish
faith and peoplehood than the re-
ligious services, in which we
gathered together, and the'joy of
our associations. We had no com-
mon language. Soldiers struggled
along in broken Yiddish and halt-
ing French, and civilians in their
limited English. But somehow we
understood each other and felt
that we belonged together."
In a large community of South-
ern France, Chaplain Morris N.
Kertzer was present when the
rabbi "as though risen from the
dead" returned to his congre-
gation on Shabbat Shuvah. "The
congregation was breathless,"
Chaplain Kertzer says in describ-
ing the emotional and overwhelm-
ing scene. "The usually articulate
French Jews were too choked to
find words for their excited happi-
ness."
Chaplain Kertzer led his men in
fervent prayer. "Battle-toughened
men," he writes, "men who had
lived through Salerno and Anzio,
who had driven from Rome to
Florence and Pisa, who had come
ashore upon the Riviera and help-
ed in the push that sent the Nazis
reeling across their own borders,
seemed repaid at this moment for
all their travail and sacrifice.
There was a look of spiritual se-
renity on their bright faces, as this
rabbi of the underground, bought
back from the dead, repeated the
priestly blessing over their young
heads."
It is widely known by now that
chaplains have endured the dis-
comforts, the gross privations all
other soldiers are heir to. They


lead what the troops fondly call
"rugged" lives. However, as Chap-
lain Sandhaus points out, these
very elements go into one's under-
standing of the meaning of total
war. "Now," the chaplain says,
"having been through St. Lo, Car-
entan, Argentan Falaise, Vires
Trevier's and many other places


service. One hundred and thirteen
are overseas, most in active war
theatres. Some have paid the su-
preme price Alexander Goode,
Louis Werfel, Irving Tepper.
Chaplains have discovered that
in the inaccessibility of source ma-
terial, they have had to look to
their congregation for inspiration,


Embarking on Tour of Pacific War Fronts


About to embark on their tour of the Pacific fighting zones on behalf of the National
Jewish Welfare Board, Rabbi Philip S. Bernstein, executive director of the Com-
mittee on Army and Navy Religious Activities (CANRA) of the JWB, confers in
San Francisco, Cal., with his military aide, Chaplain Aryeh Lev of the Office of the
Chief of Chaplains, War Department, Washington, D. C. Rabbi Bernstein and
Chaplain Lev will survey conditions of religious welfare and morale of Jewish troops.


that were headline news recently,
I am beginning to realize what it
is all about. The most eloquent
correspondent can't begin to de-
scribe these scenes of devastation.
They've used the words 'shambles'
and 'rubble,' but those words are
inadequate and I can't help them.
You just have to see to understand
- especially where I am now.

Two hundred and sixty-nine
rabbis are serving as chaplains in


rather than to books and with
stimulating effect. 'All of us share
a sense of guilt because we have
neglected our studies," observes
Chaplain Kertzer. "But the Am-
erican Jewish congregation will
benefit by it; more of us will take
our text from life rather than from
letter and we will be able more
effectively to reach our congrega-
tions."

The overseas chaplain will, it is


the several branches of American clear, be a splendid asset to the


American Jewish community. Un-
dergoing the stress and strain of
war, he has grown tremendously.
He has acquired an intimate un-
derstanding of the thinking of
young men and he has had fre-
quent glimpses into the thought
process of the Gentile young peo-
ple too.
An enormously wholesome de-
velopment has been the blurring
of distinctions among the three
groups within Judaism. There has
been services conducted by Re-
form rabbis which were more tra-
ditional than some by Orthodox
chaplains. If you didn't know the
chaplain's group adherence in
civilian life you wouldn't be able
to categorize him on the basis of
the services he conducts for the
troops, for the rabbis have sub-
merged their own particular views,
without serious consequences, the
better to serve their scattered
flocks.
No appraisal of the service
chaplains render could possibly
overstate the case. Nor has this
been at attempt at appraisal. It
is rather a tribute, an expression
of boundless appreciation for their
remarkable, all-encompassing ser-
vice with the advancing armies of
liberation that these pages have
sought to express. "May it always
be remembered," in the prayerful
words of Rabbi Philip S. Bern-
stein, "that these rabbis were
among the first to bring freedom
to the imprisoned and light to
them that walked in darkness. Let
it never be forgotten that in this
tragic era of the retreat of the hu-
man spirit, Jewish chaplains were
the advancing symbols of libera-
tion for distressed humanity."
v-
Washington (JTA) Only five
thousand Jews have survived in
Germany of the half million re-
siding there before the war, the
State Department reports.. Sev-
eral hundred thousand foreign
Jews are reportedly held in slave
labor camps in Germany.
v
Jerusalem, (JTA) Brig. Gen-
eral Benjamin, Commander of the
Jewish Brigade, disclosed that in
addition to the Brigade there are
23 other Palestinian units on ac-
tive duty in the various theaters
of war.




BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


The Ordeal of the Jews of Paris
By MEYER LEVIN
(Jewish Telegraphic Agency War Correspondent)
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Meyer Levin, author of the "Old Bunch," "Citizens," and other
novels, is now attached to the Allied forces in western Europe as a correspondent of
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency).


y OU go through a battered door-
way on the narrow rue Vieux
de Temple, into a.damp, dim, pas-
sageway, past a few stairways
which, you instantly feel, lead to
all the poverties of Paris. As you
go further along the corridor you
hear a tremulous sound. It is an
uneven note, struggling to come
out of something narrow, and it is
blocked; it a small distant note
out of the mist, out of the past.
Momentarily it breaks its block-
ade, and sounds out strong, full, a


At the end of the corridor is a
wall, with a door leading into a
small, cluttered courtyard. Behind,
is a tenement. The two ground-
floor windows have been smeared
with paint; and a homely star of
David has been drawn on them, in
blue. Inside is the synagogue. It is
the size of an American living
room. One side has been curtained
off, leaving a narrow gallery for
women. In the center of the room
stands the altar; all around, are
benches. On the walls, passages


TEMPLE EMANUEL-EL, BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


ram's horn blast that must be heard
everywhere in the world; during
that instant it breaks through the
corridor into the street and into
Paris with energy and boldness,
with the full confidence of the
prisoner who has overcome all ob-
stacles, and knows that he will live,
and that he has something to give
to the world. Then, with the pe-
culiarity that has marked this
proud and lonely sound from the
time when it was a shepherd's call
in Israel, it chokes down, strang-
les, struggling to rise out again.

You know this sound, for it is
like nothing else in the world. It
is the shofar call, of the Jewish
New Year. And there could be no
truer source for it, this year, than
the inner corridors of the older,
poorer streets of liberated Paris.


from the Torah have been inscrib-
ed. In large letters, is written, Mah
Tov Ohelechah, Yisroael. (How
goodly are thy tents, O Israel).
By candlelight and lamplight you
see the faces of the men, framed
in their white prayer shawls. They
all look aged. There are no chil-
dren in this synagogue, though
Rosh Hashanah is usually a lively
holiday, with youngsters crowding
underfoot, in houses of prayer.
Only, there is scarcely a Jewish
child left in Paris.
Crowded around the altar are
nine or ten leaders of the congre-
gation.. All are small, shrunken,
with hollow faces. One is reading
the service aloud, pausing, at each
"Terua!" for the ram's horn to be
blown. Blow, blow, blow for the
(Please turn the page)


BIRMINGHAM'S

--ONLY--

COMPLETE FUNERAL HOME


THE NEW HOME OF


RIDOUT'S BROWN-SERVICE MORTUARY
In Which Are Located
Crematory Mausoleum Funeral Chapel Ambulances


BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


815 SOUTH 20TH STREET


BROWN-SERVICE FUNERAL


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OPERATING THE FINEST
FUNERAL HOMES IN ALABAMA
AT -

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Birmingham Tuscumbia
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AND THE

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Huntsville

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BIRMINGHAM, ALA.





BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
McKesson-Doster-North-
ington, Inc.
DRUGS
Phone 3-4171 1708 1st Ave. N.
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee

Molton, Allen & Williams, Inc.
REALTORS & INSURERS
2026 North Third Avenue
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


Best Wishes
GREENWOOD CAFE
Established 1911 ,
WE NEVER CLOSE
407 N. 20th Street
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


Best Wishes
HORST'S FLOWERS
"Flowers Express Thoughts
Better Than Words"
Member of F. T. D. Ass'n.
Phone 3-3644 2427 7th Ave., South
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.

Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniverary
HAHN ROOFING & HEATING CO.
INC.
Warm Air Heating
Weir All-Steel Furnace, Automatic Coal
Gas and Oil Burning Equipment
1905-07 AVENUE B SOUTH I'HONE 3-3840
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


Best Wishes
Bloomston's Kosher Market
and Delicatessen
Phone 4-7751 1818 4th Ave., N.
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
Bayliss Machine & Weld-
ing Co.
Phone 3-1244 1001 N. 19th St.
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.

Best wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
NEW SUNSHINE LAUNDRY
AND CLEANERS
"The House of Friendly Service"
2408 Seventh Ave., South
Phone 4-7653
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


Best Wishes
Queen Mattress & Spring Co.
"Sleep On The Queen Quality"
Phone 7-3926 1430 Eighth Ave., North
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


R. G. Snider Concrete Co.
CONTRACTORS
Paving, Concrete and Cement Work
Telephone 3-8403
Office: 1523 5th Ave., S.
BIRMINGHAM, ALA


forgiveness of our sins, blow for
the New Year, the good year, the
year of new life! Terua! Tekiyah!
These are the Jews, among them
the most hunted and hated and
despised, the Jews from Poland,
from Galicia, the Jews who were
foreigners in France and were the
most defenceless, the worst per-
secuted. In this room are men who
lay hidden two years long, in cel-
lars, men who went through the
tortures of the famous fifth floor
at the police prefecture, men who
lived through entire years in the
concentration camp at Drancy.


At Temple Emanu-EI


Rabbi Milton L. Grafman, leader of
Temple Emanuel, Birmingham, Ala.

In them is the great tragic tri-
umph of survival.
From this moment forward, as
the last choked burst from the
ram's horn fades from the air, the
synagogue becomes a house of Job.
The worshippers surround the Am-
erican soldiers who have entered;
their stories begin. It is a mass rec-
itation of horrors of such immen-
sity and depth that they can never
be truly comprehended by those
who have not suffered them. It is
difficult even to look into the eyes
of these survivors as they speak,
for they are already a people apart,
a people who know things we oth-
ers can never know. Happily for
us. But for them, it means an even
greater barrier; an eternal isola-
tion.

Their glories flow into a single
massive atrocity. "They took my


wife and two children, a girl of
nine, a girl of fourteen." "They
took my father, an old man of
sixty-seven." "They came and took
me, in the night." "They took my
wife to Drancy, and from there she
was deported." "They took my
two brothers and their wives. We
don't know what has become of
the children." "They came, they
took, they stripped us naked, they
beat us, they performed abomina-
among us with cigar burns all over
his body, they took, they took,
they sent away." And always "they
sent away," means the death train
from Drancy, means extermina-
tion in the gas chambers of Lublin,
but this they cannot bring them-
selves to say. They say only "they
sent away," leaving open the last
narrow hope, that it was perhaps
only into slavery.

For ten minutes, for an hour, for
an eternity these stories fill the
synagogue; for there is not one
Jew living here but has such hor-
rors within him. And then the mul-
tiple voices become a single voice.
The president of the congregation
takes his place at the altar, and
speaks.

He is like all of them, a little
elderly Jew, unpolished, a plain
man who in the best of times would
be accustomed to the mild insults
and jibes that are always in the
air, for the Jew. His name is Isaac
Yankelovitz,

Now he speaks from the altar,
for his people. He speaks to the
three strong, solid American boys,
who have sought out this back-
yard synagogue. He speaks to
America.

Now he is erect and his eyes are
clear and it is possible to look into
them, they are alive. He recites
the horrors that have become a
litany; and from behind the half-
wall where the women stand there
comes a chorus of sobbing. But
there is no sob in the voice of Isaac
Yankelovitz. It is strong. He speaks
for all of the families broken,
slaughtered; he speaks of the rail-
way cars that were opened and
found filled with dead; he speaks
of the rabbi of this small syna-
gogue, Yisroael Frankfurter, a man
of 78, "a man with a long beauti-
ful white beard, taken away, with


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
Birmingham College of
Music
New Address: 1401 Beech St.
1401 S. 21st Way Phone 3-2619
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
BEAUTY LAND
2224 Highland Avenue
Phone 7-5800
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


Best Wishes

MARK'S HAT SHOP
1803 Third Ave., North
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.



Best Wishes
ROSENBERG'S SHOE STORE
1929 Eleventh Avenue, So.
at "Five Points"
Phone 4-2242
SBIRMINGHAM 5, ALA.



Best Wishes
R. D. Burnett Cigar Co.
Schrafft's and Nestle's
Chocolates
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


Best Wishes
SILVERSTEIN BROTHERS
Established 1911
Wholesale
Ladies', Children's Ready-to-Wear
2220-22 1st Ave., N. Telephone 3-9795
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary

'RED" LICHTENSTEIN

Birmingham, Ala.



Serving All Principal Cities
of Alabama
Birmingham Linen Service
Phones 3-1197-98
2818-26 Sixth Avenue, South
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
Wilson Steel Drum & Metal Co.
MAX WILSON
Oil Drums Scrap Iron -Metals Rags
Steel Drum and Tank Laundry
Office and Yard: 3502 5th Ave., N.
Phone 7-1521 BIRMINGHAM, ALA.

Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
E. E. FORBES & SONS PIANO CO.
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.
For Prices on FINE FURNITURE and
LARGE ASSORTMENT OF GIFTS
Stores at Anniston, Montgomery,
Gadsden and Decatur, Ala.






his wife to Drancy, in February,
1943, and then sent away from
Drancy, in March, and unheard of
since." He speaks of his own sons,
vanished, and of his wife gone
blind with the horror. "But she
will drag herself, blind, on her
knees, through the streets of Paris,
if she can bring help to any one
of those who remain."
For there are no rich, and poor,
remaining. All are destitute. Those
who were hidden in Paris, and
those who are finding their way
home from hiding places through-
out France, if they find their homes
at all, find them utterly denuded;
not a chair, not a dish remains.
They want only to begin to work
again. They want a little help, to
begin. As for the future, these that
remain of Jewry know one thing:
they know they are one people.
These who may have been divided
before as Zionists and anti-Zion-
ists and communists and capital-
ists, as French citizens and as "for-
eigners," the religious and unreli-
gious, these have all been attacked
as one people, they have all been
through Drancy in their own bod-
ies or the bodies of their families.
This is what Isaac Yankelovitz
knows, and this is what he has to
tell, to the Jews of America.
Then the people crowd out into
the courtyard, to tell the American
soldiers more, more. First, that
they are alive. The daughter of
the aged rabbi has been spared,
she is here, alive, she has an uncle,
Rabbi Finkelstein, who was once
the rabbi on the Normandie, and
is now in America; let him know
that she is alive and well. The sis-
ter of Mr. Borenstein, of Dorches-
ter, Mass., wants her brother to
know that she and her four chil-
dren are alive and well, but that
his other sister, Dora, and her
child, Esther, were taken. The sol-


Mayberger's Variety Shop

1031 South 20th Street
BIRMINGHAM ALA.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
LEVY LOAN CO.
2116 Second Ave., North
PHONE 3-3381
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


diers write down as many as they
can, of these messages. All through
the streets of the old Jewish quar-
ter, and also in the rue Victoire,
in front of the great Rothschild
synagogue, American Jewish sol-
diers are taking down messages,
are. listening to the fates of their
people.

The Jews have come to the syna-
gogue, to the congregation, but
they are alone, alone with their
losses. Here, a man tells a group
of American soldiers how he fled


At Temple Beth-El


Abraham J. Mesch is the pres-
ent Rabbi of Traditional Tem-
ple Beth-El, Birmingham, Ala.


from Paris and joined the French
Foreign Legion; he was Polish. He
tells how he hid, how he fled again,
that he could be turned over to
the Germans as a foreigner. He
fought in the African campaigns,
was finally medically discharged,
sent back to the then unoccupied
zone in the South of France, only
to find that he was deportable,
and finally made his way back to
Paris, to learn that his wife and
children had been taken.

Beside him, another begins a
story, "Of my five children, they
took two," but still a third man
cuts in, "A wife and children gone!
what is that? Look at me; I was in
Drancy!" He held out a distorted,
paralyzed hand. And suddenly, dis-
connectedly, he complains, "Do you
know what I had to pay for a
cigarette? A hundred fifty francs!
And when I lit it the guard took
it away from me!"


Then he begins to tell his story
minutely, with dates to the hour
and minute, as they have been
graven on his mind. How they took
him on August 13, 1941, and how
he and many others lay outdoors in
a courtyard in the rain for three
days, until at last they were taken
into the police station and given


a little bread, how they were lined
up before the hated Captain Bren-
ner of the Gestapo, the mention of
whose name raised a chorus of
cries along the street. Yes, Bren-
ner! What has become of him? He
has escaped; but another hated
one, Ritter, the Paris commandant,
(Please turn to page 12)


Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee
LOVETT'S FLOWERS
Two Locations For Your Convenience
2150 HIGHLAND AVENUE-PHONE 7-0828
630 AVENUE F, near ELMWOOD PHONE 7-0436
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.



ALVIN FIXTURE COMPANY
2629 FIFTH AVENUE, NORTH
Phone 3-7760
STORE FIXTURES and RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT
WOOD WORK OF ALL KINDS
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.

... ............ ..................
Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

Alabama Engraving Co.
108 V2 N. 22nd Street Phone 3-7106
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.



Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee
MOVING STORAGE
WITTICHEN TRANSFER & STORAGE CO.
831 N. 19th Street Phone 3-9145
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee
HOME OF "PANSY FOODS"
ALABAMA PACKING COMPANY
"Pansy Foods Radiate Quality"
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA
Address All Communications to P. O. Box 1832
PLANT OFFICES: 21st Avenue & 20th Street. Phones: 3-1270 3-1278
BRANCH OFFICES: 2218 Morris Avenue. Phone: 3-0204


BIRMINGHAM MEMORIAL COMPANY
Designers and Manufacturers of
ARTISTIC MONUMENTS MARLE OR
Opposite Elmwood Cemetery Gates
PHONE 7-2800 W. C. DOBBS, Manager BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


T. L. MOSES, Pres. C. B. SHARPLES, Vice-Pres. W. A. SHELBY, Sec.-Treas.

Commercial Printing Company
Lithographers, Printers, Rulers. Blank Book Makers
1805-7 2nd AVENUE, SOUTH
PHONE 3-4285 BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA









Traylor Optical Co.
F. F. POSTELL, Optometrist
319 North Twentieth St.
Telephone 3-0876
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


BEST WISHES
P. & S. APOTHECARY
Prescriptions & Sick Room Supplies
1032 S. 20th STREET
Phone 3-4249


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
SAVAGE'S BAKERY
FINE BREAD and PASTRIES
2226 Highland Ave. Phone 7-9180
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
Brentnall Furniture Mfg. Co.
Office and Snow Rooms
2803-5-7 Sixth Avenue, South
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


SAM LIGHTER
LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR
MEN'S FURNISHINGS
SHOES FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
2106 Second Avenue, North
BIRMINGHAM ALA.



Electrik Maid Bake Shop
1014 South 20th Street
Phone 7-5871
BIRMINGHAM ALA.



The Progressive Farmer
Raleigh
Birmingham
Memphis
Dallas



The Home of Quality Food
BOHEMIAN BAKERY
and DELICATESSEN
Specializing in Pompernicle and
New York Rye Bread
We Serve Kosher Style Cooking
1804 4th Ave., No. Phone 3-3464
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


Independent
Linen Service Co., Inc.
Home Owned...Home Operated
BIRMINGHAM ALA.


Distributors Operators Manufacturers
Ten Ball
Novelty & Manufacturing Co.
COIN OPERATED MACHINES
1731 Second Avenue, North
Phones 4-3351 and 4-3352
BIRMINGHAM ALA.


BIRMINGHAM-MONTGOMERY, ALA.


Roll of Honor
TEMPLE BETH-OR, MONTGOMERY, ALA.
Jack H. Abraham, Jr. Julian H. Kohn
Sigmund Abraham, Jr. Dolph Leffler
Harold Basch, Jr. Alan K. Levy
Samuel' Baum Arthur Lobman
Philip Bazar Nathan Lobman
Arnold Beck Albert Loeb
Donald Berger Bernard Frank Loeb
Arthur Beringer, Jr. Bertram Loeb
Jack Berlin Henriette Loeb
Harold Bloom Herman Loeb, Jr.
Lester Bloom Jack Loeb
David Bronson James Loeb
Charles Cahn, Jr. Joseph Loeb
Terese Cahn Marx Loeb
Bernard D. Cohn Michel Loeb
Sidney A. Cohn Ralph Loeb, Jr.
Leo J. Drum, Jr. William Loeb
William M. Frank Randolph Lurie
Alan Gassenheimer J. Hart Lyon
Irvin Gassenheimer, Jr. Joseph Marcus
Richard Gassenheimer Marks Marcus
Max Marcus
Beth-Or's Rabbi Morris Marcus
Jo Marshuetz
Emil Meyer, Jr.
Theo L. Meyer, Jr.
Albert Miller
David Monsky
Alan Morris
-. Bernard Mount, Jr.
M. R. Nachman, Jr.
Julian Newbauer
Richard Printz
BA. Irving Rappoport
Herbert S. Rice

H. Leon Rosen






Rabbi Eugene Blachschleger occu- Joseph Rubin
pies the pulpit at Temple Beth-Or,
Montgomery, Ala. Jimmy Sabel

Richard Gibian Mark Sabel
Burton Goldstein Jack Scheuer
Jack Greil Kalman Shwarts, Jr.
Raymond Cooper Greil Leo K. Shwarts
Terry T. Greil, Jr. Marcus A. Solomon
Louis Haas Samuel B. Solomon
A. J. Harris, Jr. Charles Stern
Louis Carl Harris Samuel Schloss
Robert Harris Charles Trum, Jr.
Robert Heilpern Adolph Weil, Jr.
Eugene Heilpern, Jr. Bert C. Weil, Jr.
Louis Herman Clarence K. Weil
Milton Hesslein Robert S. Weil
Robert J. Hesslein Ira Weil
Maurice Kahi Richard Weil
Elias N. Kaiser Roman L. Weil
Harry Katz Doran Weinstein
Albert Kleinberger Herman S. Weisz


Warren Weisz
Edwin S. Wise
Emil Wise
Harold Zyskind
Harold Zimmerman
J. L. Koch

Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
The WEBBER Co.

Complete Outfitters of the Family
M OMERY, : : ALABAMA


Parker-Sledge Hardware
Company
HARDWARE OF ALL KINDS
Wire Cut Any Length -Fishing
Tackle Blue Grass Tools
Shells
13 S. Court St. Dial 2-3806
MONTGOMERY, ALA.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co.
Mirrors, Paints, Wallpaper, Glass
216 Dexter Avenue Phone 2-2971
MONTGOMERY, ALA.


Best Wishes
Strait Laundry and Cleaners
213 Madison Ave. Phone 3-5561
Branch Office:
5 Cloverdale Road Phone 3-1218
MONTGOMERY, ALA.



JAIE ARONOV
AUTO PARTS, TIRES, RETREAD-
ING & VULCANIZING
Cor. Bell, Whitman & Clay Sts.
MONTGOMERY, Alabama


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
TAYLOR
Tractor & Implement Co.
"The INTERNATIONAL Store"
19 Madison Avenue
MONTGOMERY - ALABAMA


Best Wishes
Dixie Office Supply Co.
STATIONERY PRINTING
RUBBER STAMPS
Phones 7381-7382
205 Montgomery St.
MONTGOMERY, ALA.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
Goodrich Silvertown. Stores
Goodrich Safety Silvertowns
Automobile Accessories of All Kinds
1 Bibb Street Phone 2-1661
MONTGOMERY, ALA.


I. J. DORSEY, JR. P. S. MATHIS
Montgomery Marble
Works. Inc.
Marble Granite Bronze
Certified Concrete Burial Vaults
DIAL 3-3516
109-11 N. Lawrence St.
Montgomery, Ala.




MONTGOMERY, ALA.


Roll of Honor
CONGREGATION AGUDAH ISRAEL, MONTGOMERY, ALA.


Isaac W. Allen
Herman Aronov
Hilliard Aronov
Chas. Bauman
Jerome Berlin
Felix Berlin
Leo Bernhout
Julius Brenner
Morris Bell-
Edwin Edelman
Ester Eisenberg
Hymie Ehrlich
Jonas Ehrlich
Nathan Feldman
Eugene Feldman
Morris Feinberg
Leo Finkelstein
Leo Finkelstein
Abraham Frank
Irving Freehling
Rubin Gavant
Dr. Harry Glazer
Sammy Goldblatt
Sydney Golstman
Nathan Glick
Morris Held
Manuel Held
Bernard Horn
Harry Katz


Leon Kermish
Julius Kasover
Sam Klotzman
Irving Lande
Harry Leibovici
Dr. Harry .Meiselman
Joseph Miller
Harry Margulis
Meyer Meyerovitz
Nathan Rubin
Sol Rosen
Isidor Segall
Sigmund Segall
Morris Segall
Manuel Segall
Nathan Speiglar
Philip Stern
Louis Stern
Charles Schulwolf
Sam Shinbaum
Sidney Shinbaum
Max Schulwolf
Bennie Schwartz
Isidor Werfel
Joseph Werfel
Sidney Werfel
Larry Wallock
Harold Zyskind
Norman Goldfield


and Jewish culture, the willing-
ness to make sacrifices thereof, the
delight which our ancestors found
in seeing them preserved and con-
tinued, were a strong and healthy
instinct of self-preservation known
to every individual.
Now we find that the instinct of
self-preservation, the Jewish will
to live is becoming weak and Plro-
phied. There is a carelessness about
Jewish literature; there is little
desire to transmit our highest val-
ues to posterity.
I do not intend to pour any com-
plaints against the laymen of the

Agudath Israel Rabbi


3
I)
r


The Rabbi and His Community
By RABBI SAMUEL S. LERER, MONTGOMERY, ALA.


T HERE is a Midrashic Legend
that the Torah and the Sword
descended simultaneously from
heaven, and that the Almighty is-
sued the following warning to
mankind: "If you observe the com-
mandments contained in the Torah
you will be saved from the Sword.
But, should you fail to abide by
the precept of the Torah the Sword
will destroy you."
It seems that mankind has failed
to heed that warning. As a result,
the Sword dominates the affairs
of mankind and is wreaking havoc

Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
White Chapel Funeral
Home
Ambulance Service Dial 2-3501
MONTGOMERY, ALA.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee


MONTGOMERY, ALA.
MONTGOMERY, ALA.


the world over. It is therefore fit-
ting that we pause at this time to
evaluate the distinctive feature of
the Torah and discover its unique-
ness, and the reason it has been
the beacon of civilization for more
than 3000 years, and also the true
light of its message how it is still
applicable to the problems of our
day.

Throughout the generations our
fathers saw themselves standing
at Mt. Sinai being intrusted with
the treasures of the Torah, and
pledged themselves to hand it over
to future generations. With what
delight and self-sacrifice did they
carry out this pledge. For they un-
derstood that this was the best way
to achieve immortality. They felt
that as long as the culture of their
people existed, the people, too,
would exist. Each generation would
see itself reproduced in subsequent
generations, by bequeathing its
finest thoughts, its finest ideals and
aspirations. The love for learning


Rabbi Samuel S. Lerer occupies the
pulpit at Congregation Agudath Israel,
Montgomery, Ala.
communities, because the Rabbi is
solely to be blamed for this critical
situation. He is no more the Spir-
itual Leader in the community.
We have lost our identity and have
farsaken the purpose of our mis-
sion. The Rabbi, instead of being
the outstanding figure to be cher-


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
Vestergaqrds Seed Store
"SEEDS FOR SUNNY CLIMES"
19 Monroe Street
MONTGOMERY, ALA.

Powell Electric Company
Electrical Contractors
WIRING ELECTRICAL SUP-
PLIES REPAIRS
LIGHTING FIXTURES
"WE DO IT RIGHT"
Dial 3-2738 811 Adams Ave.
MONTGOMERY, ALA.

DR. G. J. PHELPS
VETERINARIAN
108-110 N. Lawrence Street
DIAL 3-2896
Montgomery, - Alabama

Wrecked Bodies, Fenders and Radiators
Repaired or Rebuilt
Work Strictly Guaranteed Wood Work and Upholstering
Montgomery Radiator Company
McGRIFF and DAVIES
DIAL 4116 415 Bibb St.
.-


N I C H


' S


Better Fount Drinks
MONTGOMERY :-: ALA.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary

Leak-Belser-Tucker, Inc.

MONTGOMERY, ALA.


BEST WISHES
Capital City Machine Works
We Repair All Kinds of Machines
Oxy-Acetylene & Electric Welding
600 N. Court Dial 2-2649
MONTGOMERY, ALA.

Best Wishes
Franco's Place
The Tavern Inn
The Tavern Inn Cafe
Church and Lee Streets
MONTGOMERY, ALA.


PATERSON'S
ROSEMONT GARDENS
"Alabama's Leading Florists"
FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Flowerphone 7731 at any hour
300 S. PERRY MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA


Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee

TEAGUE HARDWARE COMPANY
132 COMMERCE ST. Phone DIAL 2-0541
MONTGOMERY, - - - ALABAMA





SELMA, ALA.


- TUSCALOOSA, ALA.


Best Wishes



SELMA, : :


: ALA.


J. P. Parrlsh, Pres. H. W. Gamble, Seet'y.
Josephine K. Tipton, Treas.
HOTEL ALBERT
F. A. CATER, Manager
COOK HEARN, Asst. Mgr.
Remodeled and Refurnished European Plan
SELMA, : ALA.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee

Citu National ?"ank
of Pltna
SELVA, ALA
Member F.D.I. C.


G. C. Blanton C. Percy Davis
Bernard Reynolds
BLANTON & SMITH
Master
CLEANERS, DYERS & HATTERS
We Clean Rugs Cold Fur Storage
122-124 Lauderdale St. Phone 736
SELMA, ALA.


BEST WISHES
The Selma National Bank.
Member F. D. I. C.
SELMA, ALA.



Best Wishes
Bewig Jewelry & Optical Co.1
INCORPORATED
P. O. BOX 76
SELMA, ALABAMA


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
TILLMAN DRUG CO., Inc.
PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS
100 Broad St. Phone 1
SELMA, ALA.


Best Wishes for the Ledger
The People's Bank & Trust Co.
ORGANIZED 1902
Member F. D. I. C.
SELMA, ALA.


TISSIER HARDWA RE CO.
FIRE ARMS :-: CUTLERY :-: BICYCLES
Crockery, Hardware, Farming Implements
WHOLESALE
Retail Dept.
6 & 10 BROAD ST. Selma, Ala.


BEST WISHES
SELMA DELICATESSEN
RESTAURANT
H. E. ISAACS, Owner
Air Conditioned For Your Comfort
Phone 355 225 Broad St.
SELMA, ALA.


ished and admired as the Scholar,
the man of knowledge, a man of
principles to preach his convic-
tions, and to penetrate into the
heart of every individual, he had
commercialized his profession, and
converted his sacred task into just
another trade, and play power pol-
itics, that is why we do not con-
ceive the real importance of the
Rabbi any more. Ask your congre-
gation what has the Rabbi to offer
in order to be liked? The reply
will be, A good speaker (Maggid),
a successful leader (Feurer). Some
will laud the Rabbi for being a
good mixer, a social worker. Yes,
all these are quite essential, and
high merits. But, all these still
don't justify the Rabbi to be wear-
ing the garment of a Rabbi, or to


CONGREGATION
Nace Alhadeff
Saul Alhadeff
Isaac Alhadeff
Morris S. Beton
Salomon N. Beton
Salomon S. Beton
Isaac Capilouto
Morris Capilouto
Albert D. Capilouto
Joe Capilouto
Albert Capouano
Ralph E. Capouya
Isaac Cohen
Si Robert Cohen
Nace R. Cohen


TEMPLE M
Cpl. Aaron Bendersky
Sgt. Jacob Bendersky
Cpl. Rubin Bernstein
T/Sgt. James L. Cash,
T/Sgt. Werner Conn
Adrian Danziger (Navy
Seaman 1st Class Alan
Capt. Julius Eagle
Capt. Joseph Eldodt
S/Sgt. Edward D. Elias
Lt. Edward H. Goldsm
Lt. Stanley Goldsmith
O. C. Leonard S. Hagec
Lt. Charles Hohenberg
Lt. Col. Raymond R. Lan
S/Sgt. Julian S. Leet


be called as such. Is he a Talmid-
Chacham? Did he ever indulge in
the study of the Talmud, or did
he acquire any of the Jewish cul-
ture? And how much of the Jewish
spirit does he possess that would
be sufficient for the nourishment
of his people. The study of philos-
ophy itself does not qualify one
to be a Rabbi any more than it
qualifies one to be M. D. It is the
Jewish Law, the Hebrew Litera-
ture, the Jewish Feeling and the
sublime devotion to his people that
entitles one to stand at the head of
the community and lead them into
destiny. I wish every Rabbi would
render to himself an honest ac-
count of his achievements. A pur-
poseful and thoughtful "Cheshbon
Haneffesh," a Spiritual Reckoning.
(Please turn to page 11)


Roll of Honor
ETZ AHAYEM, MONTGOMERY, ALA.
Ralph A. Franco
Ralph M. Franco
Ned Franco
Ralph M. Hanan
Rubin N. Hanan
Victor Hanan
Max Hasson
Isaac Hasson
Leon Hasson
Joe Piha
Salomon Piha
Morris Piha
Morris Rousso
John Toranto


Roll of Honor
[ISHKAN ISRAEL, SELMA, ALA.
T/5 Morris Lehman
Lt. (j.g.) Marx Leva
Lt. David A. Loeb
Jr. Lt. Leo S. Maas, Jr.
Sgt. Harry Maring, Jr.
) Sgt. Herman Miller
Eagle Private Richard A. Rosenberg
Sgt. Richard A. Rothschild
Private Shuster Siegel
berg Lt. (j.g.) Sam A. Sommers, Jr.
ith Warrant Off. Siegmund R. Sommers
Lt. Max L. Tepper
lorn, Jr. Lt. Milton H. Tepper
Lt. Sol Tepper
dsberger Pfc. Sam A. Threefoot
Barney Yates, C. S. K.


Military authorities released the
first casualty list of the Jewish
Brigade. It discloses that five men
were killed in action, three died
of wounds and 52 were wounded.


WARD DRUG CO.
QUALITY SERVICE
Stationery-Sundries-Seeds
DIAL 2721
Tuscaloosa, Alabama


West Alabama Furniture Co.
PHILCO RADIOS, REFRIGERATORS,
STOVES AND RANGES,
COMPLETE FURNISHERS
2220 Sixth Street Phone 4681
TUSCALOOSA



Central Drug Company
Your Friendly Store
JIMMIE HARRISON
Telephones: 3373-3374
TUSCALOOSA, ALABAMA


BEST WISHES

GATES & COMPANY
Cleaners and Dyers
DIAL 5546
Tuscaloosa, - - Alabama


AUTO PLATE GLASS CO.
Auto Glass Mirrors Store Fronts
SAFETY AUTO GLASS
Our Slogan: Quality and Service First
416 22nd Ave., North of Postoffice
Phone 2002 TUSCALOOSA, ALA.


THE H. & W. DRUG CO.
Service that knows no competition
DIAL 3611
TUSCALOOSA, ALA.



Duckworth- Morris Insurance Agency
GENERAL INSURANCE
RENTALS
LOANS :-: REAL ESTATE
DIAL 2040
Tuscaloosa, Alabama



AVERY'S FOOD STORE
2314-6th St. Dial 4737
1410 University Ave. Dial 2851
TUSCALOOSA, ALA.


BEST WISHES
CRYSTAL LAUNDRY &
DRY CLEANING, INC.
DIAL 4476
Tuscaloosa, Alabama


HOUSE'S GARAGE
Bear Wheel and Frame Machine
A Complete Auto Service
UNITED MOTOR SERVICE
720 Greensboro Ave. Dial 2274
Tuscaloosa, Ala.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee

HENDRICKS & TATE

SELMA, ALA.




TUSCALOOSA, ALA.


He should withdraw temporarily
from the scene of his activities and
try to analyze as objectively as
possible wherein he succeeded,
where errors were made, which
failures can be remedied, which
undertakings should be dropped,
and which new endeavors should
be projected.
The destruction of the great cen-
ters of Jewish learning in Eastern
Europe constitutes an enormous
blow to Jewish religious scholar-
ship. Later generations will be able
to assess far better than we the
extent of the tragic devastation
caused by this war.
Before the war Eastern Europe
was universally known and rec-
ognized as the center of Jewish
learning. The world-famed acade-
mies of Talmud (the Yeshivoth)
played a part in Jewish life more
fundamental and vital than that
of the universities of this country.
The Yeshivoth of Mir, Telz, Sla-
bodka, and many others, are re-
spected in Jewish homes through-
out the world, where Jewish schol-
arship and piety are valued, be-
cause there the students were suf-
ficiently inspired, and reached the

Best Wishes
Perry Creamery Co., Inc.
DIAL 5516 2218 BROAD ST.
TUSCALOOSA, ALA.


M. H. Wilbourne, Jr. James E. Park
COLE SUPPLY COMPANY, Ltd.
Plumbing, Heating and Air Conditioning Equipment
PAINTS : ENAMELS : VARNISHES
520 22nd Ave. Telephone 5561
Tuscaloosa, Alabama

SEWELL HARDWARE &
FURNITURE CO.
JOE SEWELL, -Manager
HARDWARE BUILDING
MATERIAL
2218 Broad St. Dial 2896-7
TUSCALOOSA, ALA.


DEAL LUMBER CO.
Yellow Pine Lumber Dial 4767
TUSCALOOSA, ALA.


BEST WISHES FROM
Tuscaloosa Flower Shop
FOR 21 YEARS
The Dependable Florist
DIAL 3065


highest stage to be able to impart
some measure of learning and love
of Judaism to their congregations
where they were appointed to
serve.
The eclipse of the great Yeshi-
voth throws the responsibility of
fostering higher Jewish learning
upon American Jewry, and it is
the duty of the Rabbi to awaken his
community to be aware of that
responsibility. Let us revitalize the
religious and educational life in
our community. Let everyone un-
derstand how important it is for
every individual to keep at his
home some Jewish-English maga-
zines, papers and books. Let us
intensify the Jewish-Hebrew
learning, and to acquire the spir-
itual enthusiasm. Only through
such practices we shall secure the
perpetual existence of our people.

Prominent Merchant


W. P. Bloom, prominent merchant
and civic leader in Tuscaloosa, Ala.

Roll of Honor
TUSCALOOSA, ALA.
Albert Boernstein
Bert Bank
Harold Bank
Lester Elbert
Isadore Hodges
Arnold Kartzinel
Bertram Klausner
(former rabbi, now chaplain
Eston Bloom
Henry M. Winston
Morton Kravitz
Isadore Pizitz
Leslie Potter
Dave Raymon
Harold Raymon
Archie Rossell


Emanuel Rosenfeld
Bernard Rosenbush, Jr.
Marvin Reuben
Hyman Rosen
Jerome Schweitzer
Morris Sokol
Jacob Solomons
Jake Temerson
Victor Winston
Sidney Ziff
Jonas Spiro, Jr.
Robert M. Holstein


Tuskaloosa Steam Laundry
CERTIFIED COLD STORAGE
FURS, WOOLEN GARMENTS
DIAL 4711-2
Tuscaloosa, Alabama

Best Wishes for the Ledger
FIELDS RADIO SHOP
The Shop of Service
DIAL 5030 BROAD ST.
TUSCALOOSA, ALA.

"Man is the only animal that
laughs and weeps; for he is the
only animal that is struck with
the difference between what things
are and what they ought to be."


Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee


The C


Established 1


ity National Bank
OF -
TUSCALOOSA, ALABAMA
865 :: Oldest Bank In Alabama


Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

JONES & SPIGENER
MORTICIANS
Private Ambulance Service
DIAL 4767 TUSCALOOSA, ALA.


Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee

LOUIS WIESEL INC.
TUSCALOOSA'S BEST
DEPARTMENT STORE




McLester Hotel

ALDEN H. SNOW, Manager

European Plan TUSCALOOSA, ALA.



BEST WISHES


BROWN'S

DEP'T STORE


Ladies' Ready-to-Wear

Dry Goods, Clothing, Shoes
TUSCALOOSA, ALA.
DIAL 3626 2327-2329 BROAD ST.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee



HATTIESBURG, MISS.





ANNISTON, ALA. DOTHAN, ALA.


Aaron
Sidney
Julius
Oscar
Mike A
Milton
Barney
Max Sc
Isadore
Morris
Maurici
Lester
Nathan
Herman
Fred B

A


Hote
Ann
"Cc
A


D


Sul
DOTHy
TE
DO



W. P.

Ground
Phone 2

WE
JEWISH
Dothai

LAUND


Roll of Honor
CONGREGATION EMANU-EL, DOTHAN, ALA.
Kaselsky Marvin E. Rosen
Schreiber Harry Blumenfeld
Kirchik Henry M. Crine, Jr.
Aren'son David Blumberg
Lrenson Nathan Arenson
Magenheim Alvin Bender
Blumenfeld Sam Blumberg
chneider Morris Cohen
Schneider Charles J. Lipsitz
Robinowich Paul Crine
e Kraselsky Joel Mendelson
J. Bloom Irwin Schneider
Schaffer Ben Wengrow
n I. Blitz Daniel Roth
lurk v

NNISTON, ALA. JEWS OF PARIS
EST WISHES (Continued from page 7)
I Jefferson Davis was killed by a Jew of the Paris
Liston's Only. Modern, Maquis. Yes, there are Jews who
Fire-Proof Hotel have just returned to Paris who did
owfrteous Service"
not know this, yet it is true, Ritter
NNISTON, ALA. was killed; there is a company of

OTHAN, ALA. young Jews now in the Milice Pa-
triotique, Jews from the Paris ma-
reme Ice Cream quis, drilling in the French army
AN ICE CREAM CO. as a Jewish company now, and
LEPHONES 725 726 they have named their company
THAN, ALABAMA for a hero.
But there in 1941, in the head-
Best wishes quarters, it was Brenner who lined
Acker & Co., Inc. up the Jews. And when one of
INSURANCCE them stepped out of line, with a
Id Floor, Wilson Bldg. military salute, trying to report
3 Anniston, Ala. that he had served in the German
army in the first world war, Bren-
EXTENDt REETINGS ner whipped out his pistol and
COMMUNITY in DOTHAN shot the man dead. This is related
i Steam Laundry by the ghost of a man with the
Phone 40 for Better paralyzed hand, on the street in
RY AND DRY CLEANING


Houston Marble Works
Granite and Marble Monuments
Coe Triple Tested Burial Vaults
Concrete Lawn Furniture and Sewer Pipe
Phone 307 506 E. Main St.
DOTHAN, ALABAMA

"SERVICE YOU CAN SEE THROUGH"
Dothan Glass Company
Auto Glass Replaced, Mirrors Made
and Resilvered
Best Quality Paints
Phone 325 133 N. St. Andrews St.
DOTHAN, ALABAMA

Quality Cleaning
Is the By-Word at Our Plant.
Bring Us Your Clothes Today.
*One Day Service
*All Work Guaranteed
SWISS DRY CLEANERS
Hansel Kirkland
219 E. Troy Phone 94
DOTHAN, ALABAMA


ate it raw, and how he swelled up,
and became paralyzed, and how the
Jewish doctors in the camp tried
to help him, but could not for lack
of medicines, and how he wasted
away, until finally the official camp
physician ordered him carried out
on a stretcher and released from
camp. How they left him in the
road, cold and unable to move.
How after many hours some pass-
ing Frenchmen dared to take him
into a cafe. And how in the years
that followed he was taken again,
sometimes to Drancy, sometimes
left in the Rothschild hospital in
Paris. And of the things he saw
there. How Brenner would come
through, to pick out quotas of Jews
to "fill up a train." How once a
child lay with broken arms in a

Emanu-EI Rabbi


Rabbi Alfred Wolf now occupies the
pulpit at Congregation Emanu-El,
Dothan, Ala.


CONGREGATION EMANU-EL, DOTHAN, ALA.


front of the synagogue. He tells cast, and Brenner slit open the
how he was taken to.Drancy; and plaster cast and took the child.
there one night he paid his last few How Brenner saw him again and
hundred francs for a cabbage, and (Please turn to page 19)


SAVE AT



DOTHAN, ALA.



Best Wishes on Your 50th Anniversary
WARD-WILSON, Inc.
FUNERAL HOME
PHONE 131 203 W. MAIN ST.
Dotha Alabama


COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.
BOTTLERS OF


Phone 81 312 N. Andrews St.
DOTHAN,-ALABAMA

Best Wishes
Johnson & Wilkerson, Inc.
Funeral Home
411 N. Foster St. Phone 1035
Successors to Fellows and Forrester
Established in 1907
DOTHAN, ALABAMA


Best Wishes
Purity Ice Cream Co.
Lawrence G. Seaborn, Mgr.
501 N. St. Andrews Street
Phone 288 Dothan, Ala.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
Dothan Machine Shop
MACHINE WORK
Portable Electric and Acetylene
Welding
USED MACHINERY
Phone 244 East Troy St.
DOTHAN, ALA.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee

HOUSTON HOTEL
"Southeast Alabama's Best"
DOTHAN, ALABAMA


26 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Graddick Auto Top Co.
Tops, Seats, Covers and Upholstering
Phone 913 513 N. St. Andrews St.
DOTHAN, ALABAMA


You will be assured of Best Clean-
ing in all Wearing Apparel, in-
cluding Hats. Prompt Service.
GARRISON'S DRY CLEANERS
Phone 177. GARMENTS INSURED
Office and Plant: 116 So. Lena St.
DOTHAN, ALA.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
RENEAU SHEET METAL
WORKS
East Troy Street Phone 361
DOTHAN, ALABAMA





MOBILE, ALA.


Congregation Shaarai

Shomayim, Mobile, Ala.
By RABBI BERTRAM W. KORN
Remember the days of old,
Consider the years of each generation.
Ask thy father and he will tell thee,
Thine elders, and they will speak unto thee . .
Deuteronomy 32:7


THE story of the Jewish com-
munity of Mobile may be
traced back almost to the year 1702
when the first settlement was
founded on Mobile Bay by French
colonists serving- under Le Moyne
de Bienville and Le Moyne d'Iber-
ville. They were French and Span-
ish Jews, traders, soldiers, hardy
wanderers seeking a home that
might truly become a home, not
just another ghetto, and not just
another temporary habitat from
which they could be driven forth
at any time at the whim of an au-
tocratic ruler.
But the hopes and prayers of
those first few Jews were doomed
to frustration. The spirit of intol-
erance and fanaticism had not only
not died in Europe; it had spawned
its progeny on the New World. In
Spanish America the fires of the
Inquisition still burned with the
flesh of heretic Jews who refused
to abandon their ancestral faith.
And in Mobile, in 1724, Bienville
promulgated the vicious "Black
"Code" which ordered the expulsion
of all Jews from the district and
sought to establish Catholicism as
the only legally recognized reli-
gion.
How many weary and disheart-
ened Jews there were who set out
upon the disillusioned road of exile
again, we have no way of knowing.
Records from this earliest period
of Mobile's settlement are pitifully
inadequate. But this is significant:
the "Black Code" was not to be-
come the rule and precedent in
Mobile. It may not even have been
enforced, so little do we know.
But we do know that when the
British seized control of the port
on the bay in 1763, there was no
discrimination against the People
of the Book. Jews came to Mobile,
very few at first, but though few,
they remained. They saw the Brit-
ish driven out by the Spaniards in
1783, and still they remained. By
1813, when General Wilkinson
seized possession of Mobile in the


name of the United States, Jews
had become an integral factor in
the commercial and civic life of
Mobile. Every reminder of the
"Black Code" had been obliterated.
Now that Mobile had been
joined to the young republic, Jews
filtered into the Southern seaport
more frequently: Sephardic Jews
who came from South America,
from Amsterdam, from England,
from the states to the north; Jews

Hadassah President


0C~ -



Mrs. Irving Kahn acted as President of
the Mobile, Ala. Chapter of Hadassah.

who had been born in the United
States and whose families had al-
ready achieved social recognition;
immigrant Jews fleeing from the
repressive laws of the German
states and western Poland; Jews
with established business reputa-
tions; Jews with packs on their
backs and a hankering for security;
a famous Jewish physician named
Solomon Mordecai; a prominent
lawyer from South Carolina, Philip
Philipps, who made his home in
Mobile and was to be in years to
come, the first Jew in the United
States to serve as Congressman.
Some became famous; most re-
main nameless and unsung to this
day, pioneers and venturesome lov-
ers of life, who made their way to
(Please turn the page)


st

FIRST NATIONAL BANK
MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
MOBILE B ALABA.MA

Alabama's Oldest Bank-Modern to the Minute



FIRE PROOF
THE CAWTHON HOTEL
"MOBILE'S FAVORITE HOTEL"
FREE PARKING SPACE FOR OUR GUESTS
M. LeROY SMITH, R. H. BLACKBURN
Manager MOBILE, ALABAMA Associate Manager


Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee

^ ^HB^AHB--IM ^^^U~fnrw- ^^^ ^^^- ^^_



SOUTH ALABAMA'S GREATEST FURNITURE STORE
Mobile, Alabama



MARSHALL'S
Electrik Maid Bake Shop
3-S H P S-3
"Taste the Difference" MOBILE, ALA.


A. J. CHEVALIER, President JAMES E. MARTIN, Sec. & Treas.

MARTIN-CHEVALIER
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
110 South Broad Street
MOBILE, ALABAMA


WHITE SWAN LAUNDRY and DRY CLEANING CO.

CARETAKERS OF CLOTHES

907 Springhill Avenue DIAL 3-3641



Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee
INDEPENDENT ROOFING & CONTRACTING CO.
955 Springhill Ave. Dial 3-1571 or 3-1572
F. I. SPAULDING, JR., Manager
MOBILE, ALA.


Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

A. B. C. STEEL EQUIPMENT CO., INC.
MANUFACTURERS OF STEEL PRODUCTS
53-55 North Water St. Phone 2-0566
MOBILE, ALA.


Mobile: Dial 2-6717


Fairhope: Phone 2371





MOBILE, ALA.


Best Wishes

F. W. Woolworth Co.
FIVE AND TEN CENT SPECIALTIES
MOBILE, ALA.


Allen Realty & Insurance
Agency
74 St. Michael Street
Phone 3-3511
MOBILE, ALA.


DIAL 2-5565

Tatum's Pharmacy


51 S. Halliet St.


Mobile, Ala


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
Roche Home Equipment Co.
"The Home of Everything for the Home"
256 Dauphin Street Phone 3-2743
MOBILE, ALA.


BEST WISHES
FLORIDA FISH CO.
Dealers in All Kinds of
SEAFOODS
Dial 3-2791
MOBILE, ALA.

Best Wishes
SCOTT-LUTTRELL TRUCK &
TRACTOR COMPANY
(Incorporated)
McCormick-Deering Farm Operating
Equipment--Int. Motor Trucks
Phone 2-2839 320 N. Royal St.
MOBILE, ALABAMA





The Yellow Cab Co.



Best Wishes

Southern Lithographing Co.
INCORPORATED
LITHOGRAPHERS :: PRINTERS
Phone 3-3318 80 St. Michael St.
MOBILE, ALA.


Best Wishes

Zimlich ORIs
.I ~FLORIST

MOBILE, : : :ALABAMA


Oakdale Ice and Fuel Co.
ICE, COAL AND COKE
HOT OR COLD SERVICE
Dial 2-2671 Broad & Tennessee Sts.
MOBILE, ALA.


Mobile to set up a new life for
their children and grandchildren
and, prophetically, for those of
their coreligionists who would
come in future years, the victims
of an unending saga of hatred and
terror in Europe.
Soon there were enough Jews
in Mobile for questions to be asked
in homes and shops and on the
street corners: "Why should we


There was not a single synagogue
in all of Alabama! They had nei-
ther wealth nor experience, but
they were eager and willing to
work; and they were blessed with
fine leaders, men like Israel I.
Jones, B. L. Tim, the Salomons,
others too, men of vision and ideal-
ism, men of true Jewish spirit, who
would not slacken their efforts
until their dreams became reality.


CONGREGATION SHAARAI SHOMAYIM'S ARK


be without a shul in Mobile? Here
in America we have the freedom
to worship God with the prayers
our ancestors and even our fa-
thers preferred to die for, rather
than renounce. Our children must
be taught these prayers and the
tenets of our faith, the ceremonies
of our Holy Days and the history
of our people. Why should we wait
any longer?"
They had little wealth, these
folk. They had no experience what-
ever in organizing a congregation.


One day early in 1841 a meeting
was called at the home of B. L.
Tim. We have no idea of how many
members of the Mobile Jewish
community attended the meeting;
no minutes were written out for
the searching historical eye to pe-
ruse. But we do know that it was
not only a meeting; it was also a
religious service. One of the men
chanted the ritual, another spoke
briefly on a Biblical text. It was
good, they thought, for brethren
to gather together in unity. That


Best Wishes
GW N'S
Established 1913
ENGRAVERS, WEDDING INVITA-
TIONS, VISITING CARDS,
STATIONERY
South's Finest Greeting Cards
8 So. Conception MOBILE, ALA.


Weatherby Furniture Co., Inc.
412-414-416 DAUPHIN
Corner Hamilton
Pbnnes. 2-3633-3634 Mobile, Ala.

Miss Eula Trussell Miss Olive Trussell
Mexican Gift Shop
29 N. ROYAL STREET
MOBILE, ALABAMA
Art Crafts of Old Mexico and United
States. :: Antiques. Souvenirs.
Est. Thanksgiving Day, 1934

BEST WISHES

Teche Greyhound Lines
Phone 2-1861
201 Government St.
MOBILE, ALA.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee

S. H. KRESS & CO.
5 10 25c STORES
MOBILE, : : : Alabama


BEST WISHES
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING
APPLIANCE CO.
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES
If It Burns Gas We Sell It
2801 Old Shell Road Dial 6-5726
MOBILE, ALA.


Compliments of
Mobile Electric Garage
213 St. Louis St. Dial 2-8716
MOBILE, ALABAMA


DUBOURG PLUMBING &
HEATING CO.
901 So. Washington Ave.
MOBILE, ALABAMA





BOTTLED





IS KOSHER
Keep It In Your Home
Refrigerator

Coca-Cola Bottling Co.

MOBILE, ALABAMA


rgo


,,1 ,,
~i~3c-. =
--- -





MOBILE, ALA.


first service inspired others. Soon
the group was meeting regularly,
and gaining all the while in
strength and determination. They
took for themselves a name from
Biblical lore, Congregation Shaarai
Shomayim (the Gates of Heaven),
reminiscent of Jacob's dream of
the ladder when God promised that
the people of Israel would become
a blessing to the families of man-
kind. Then the first practical step
was taken, June 22, 1841. Four
lots were purchased from the city
authorities for burial purposes.
The group had tested its strength,
had begun a creative work. And
they saw that, it was good to set
the cornerstone of a new Jewish
community.
But a congregation is not organ-
ized in a few hours or even in a
few months. You must plan and
plan, and plan again. For two and
half more years they had to be
satisfied to remain a loosely-knit
band of the faithful, without legal
status, without officers, without a
synagogue, without a rabbi, until
the time for action should come.
Meanwhile they met in private
homes as before and prayed their
prayers and sang their hymns and
rejoiced in the fellowship of their
faith. Gradually more and more of
the Jews of Mobile, some of whom
had undoubtedly remained aloof
at first, joined the original found-
ing fathers; they, too, began to
yearn for a synagogue, a. rabbi,
classes for their children, a center
of Jewish living, an organization
for charitable work.
Finally, when fifty-two families
of the Jewish community had
agreed to give their whole-hearted
support to the project, the congre-
gation was incorporated. The date
was January 25, 1844. The legal
name of the congregation was
Shaarai Shomayim u-Maskil el Dol
(Gates of Heaven and Society of
the Friends of the Needy). Israel
I. Jones, one of the moving spirits
behind the whole organizing pro-
cess, became the first president.
His fellow officers and trustees
were all men of ability, aggressive
men who would share in the work
as well as in the deliberations of
the board.
January 25, 1844 was an impor-
tant day. But it was only one day


out of three hundred and sixty-
five. Officers and a name do not
make a congregation. There were
still to be many months of sober
thought and careful planning be-
fore Shaarai Shomayim really be-
came a congregation. Laymen con-
tinued to conduct Sabbath and
holiday services (and, at times,
daily services) in private homes
for almost three years after the
organization day. Then finally the
two great needs of. the group were
answered at one and the same time.
After long negotiations a syna-
gogue structure was purchased and
a rabbi took over the spirituallead-
ership of the congregation. The

Zionist President


Mr. Joseph Baer served as President
of Zionist Organization in Mobile. Ala.
Also he is prominent in the bitsiness
world there.

building, which had previously
served as the Turnverein Hall, was
located on St. Emanuel street, near
Government. The dedicatory ex-
ercises were held on December 27,
1846, on which day the new rabbi,
Mendes Da Silva, a Sepharic schol-
ar, became the first minister of the
first Jewish congregation in Ala-
bama.
Would that Israel Jones and
Rabbi Da Silva had written day-
by-day diaries of the first years of
Shaarai Shomayim! There are so
many things that must be left un-
said, the spiritual and intellectual
factors of those early years, the
commonplace, matter of fact events
and happenings, of little interest
when they occur but of fascinating
appeal to later generations. Was
the service Rabbi Da Silva con-
ducted in that St. Emanuel street


Synagogue, from the Sephardic
(Spanish-Portugese) or the Ash-
kenazic (German-Polish) minhag?
We know it was orthodox, but
were there any signs at first of a
liberal theological spirit among
some members? How soon after the
founding of the congregation were
classes of instruction organized for


the children? What subjects were
taught? Were there any text-
books? How did the Christian com-
munity react to the first Jewish
synagogue in Alabama? How did
Rabbi Da Silva get along with his
Christian .colleagues in the min-
istry? These questions must per-
Please turn to page 26)


THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR A SAVINGS ACCOUNT IN
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MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK
MOBILE, ALABAMA
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
for Alabama, Its Port-And Progress



Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS CO.

Dial 2-8747 54 N. Royal St.
MOBILE, ALA.



SHOP AND COMPARE
Check the Savings at



Royal at Conti MOBILE, ALA.



Roche Undertaking Co., Inc.

355 Government Street

MOBILE, ALABAMA




IMPERIAL LAUNDRY
Cleans Anything from a
Ribbon to a Rug
ROYAL and STATE STREETS MOBILE, ALA.



A. H. McLEOD & CO.
HARDWARE, PAINTS, HOUSEHOLD UTILITIES
MARINE AND FISHERMAN SUPPLIES
JOHNSON MOTORS CANVAS GOODS
Dial 2-0401
DAUPHIN and WATER STS. MOBILE, ALABAMA


USE NATURAL GAS IT COSTS LESS

Mobile Gas Service Corp.
INSTANT, COURTEOUS SERVICE
Phone 3-1671





MOBILE, ALA. PENCACOLA,


Best Wishes

C. J. GAYFER & CO.

MOBILE, ALABAMA


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
WOJOH N'S
Kodaks, Films and Supplies
16 So. Conception St. Dial 2-6882
MOBILE, ALA.


Best Wishes

W.B. Delchamps Printing Co.
G. J. DELCHAMPS U. DELCHAMPS
62-64 St. Michael St. Dial 2-1342
MOBILE, ALA.


Betbeze Spring Service, Inc.
256 ST. LOUIS STREET
DIAL 2-0491
MOBILE, ALA.


Mobala Coffee Company
Incorporated
Wholesale Coffee Roasters and
Tea Blenders
62 S. Commerce Street
P. O. Box 1082 Phone 2-5706
MOBILE. ALA.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
DEW DROP INN
Phone 6-9134
1808 Old Shell Road
MOBILE, ALA.


7-UP

BOTTLING CO.
MOBILE. ALA.


Jay Pollock Altmayer
Julius Astrachan
Edward Barr
Seymour M. Bauer
Sigmund S. Bauer
Morris Berger
Sidney M. Berkowitz
Jack Berman
Willie Berman
Milton Buchman
Harry Cohen
Joseph Deutchman
Samuel Eichold


Mobile, Ala., Rabbi


Rabbi A. Mauskoff, a graduate of Mercer
University, served in the Army as Chap-
lain during 1943, prior to his acceptance
of the position as Rabbi of Congregation
Ahavas Chesed. Mobile, Ala.


Joe B. Friedlander
Yale Friedlander
Aaron Friedman
Philip Gabriel
Irving Edward Gandler
Sidney Gerhardt
Marvin Gilbert
Arthur Grodsky
Eddie Grodsky
Joseph Gurwitch
James Gutel
Seymour Handwerger
Charles Hoffman
Lewis Hoffman
Ralph G. Holberg, Jr.
Frank N. Jacobson
J. Lee Jacobson
Albert Jaet
Marcus Jaet
Morris Jaet
Irving Kahn
Sam J. Kayser, Jr.
Mark Klein


Milton Klein, Jr.
Irving Koffler
William Kohn
Bertram W. Korn
Irving Kowitz
Joe Kowitz
Milton Leibeskind
Lionel Levy, Jr.
Carl Lips
Alvin Loeb
Joe Loeb
Leon Loeb
H. Z. Lubel
J. M. Lubel
Manuel Lubel
William Mose Lubel
Abraham Machefsky
Jake Machefsky
Alex Maisel
Hyman Maisel
Milton Maisel
Sam Maisel
Gerald S. Marshak
Albert W. Metzger
Harold Meyer
Arthur Miller
David Miller
Joseph Miller
Morris Miller
Simon Miller
Harvey H. Mintz
Ferdinand H. Mitchell
Arthur Olensky
Marvin Olensky
Harry B. Pake
Arthur Prince
Marvin Prince
Jacob Reiss, Jr.
Roy Robinton
Harold L. Rosenblum
Sidney Rosner
Martin Sacher
Jay Marvin Salzman
Herbert G. Schiff, Jr.
Burt Piser Schwarz
Henry A. Schwarz, Jr.
William Smolkin
Melvin Stein
Leon Strensky
Herman Jeffrey Vogel
Philip Weinstein
Edwin A. Zelnicker, Sr.
Edwin A. Zelnicker, Jr.
Samuel J. Zimmern, Jr.
William S. Cox Zimniern
B. M. Zivitz
Sam Zivitz
Sidney Zuckerman
----v-
The trouble with many a fat
man is his daily doesn't.


Roll of Honor

gMobile, Alabama


Best Wishes
LLOYD & FAURIA
FUNERAL HOME AMBULANCE
SERVICE
33 East Gregory St. Dial 3939
PENSACOLA, FLA.


Best Wishes
Mutual Building & Sav-
ings Association
Established January, 1889
"The Oldest Building and Loan
Association In Florida"
PENSACOLA, FLA.


Harrell's Drug Store
The REXALL Store
17 South Palafox Street
Pensacola, Florida


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
THE SALVATION ARMY
Major and Mrs. Railton Spake
14% W. Government
PENSACOLA, FLA.


The Sherwin-Williams Co.
OF GEORGIA
Paints, Varnishes, Lacquers,
V/i \ Leads, Oils, Enamels,
S Brushes and Painters'
Supplies
114 South Palafox Street
St Phone 2300
PENSACOLA, FLA.

Member F. T. D. A.
North Hill Greenery Flower Shop
Quality Flowers and Gifts
Phone 3342 16 W. Garden St.
PENSACOLA, FLA.


Best Wishes for The Ledger
Gulf Life Insurance Co.
JOSEPH BAKER, Mgr.
American National Bank Bldg.
Phone 4838
PENSACOLA, FLA.


STONE'S SUPER SERVICE
Pensacola's Own Complete Service
FIRESTONE
TOM STONE
Phone 2244 5111
Chase and Baylen Pensacola, Fla.


BEST WISHES
RUNYAN MACHINE &
BOILER WORKS, INC.
MARINE REPAIRS OF ALL KINDS
Fuel Oil Engine Specialists
Johnson Outboard Motors and Parts
Phone 6263
PENSACOLA, FLA.


FLA.


Victory Cleaning Co., Inc.
D. G. Hodges, Pres. R. S. Barry, Mgr.
" "Clean as a Breath of Spring"
DIAL 2-8895
1204 SPRINGHILL AVE. MOBILE, ALA.

Bender Welding & Machine
Company
T. J. "LEE" BENDER, Pres.
Oxy-Acetylene and Electric
Welding
All Work Absolutely Guaranteed
Phone Dexter 53 159 N. Water St.
MOBILE. ALA.


ROBERT E. LUTZ
Plumbing, Gas and Steam
Fitting. Job Work a Specialty
Kleen-Heat Automatic Oil Burners
59 Conti St. Phone: 2-3376
MOBILE, ALABAMA





PENSACOLA, FLA.


The First Jewish Senator
By WILLIAM I. BOXERMAN


IN A FEW days a Liberty ship
will go sliding down to the sea
at the great St. John's Shipyard in
Jacksonville, Florida, bearing the
name of the foremost figure in
Florida history and the one man
responsible for the admission of
that state into the Union-David
L. Yulee.
Appropriately enough, the ves-
sel named after the first Jew to
be elected to the United States
Senate will be launched on the eve
of the centennial observance of
Florida's statehood, which 'was
consummated in February 1845,
after long months of arduous pam-
phleteering and speech-making by
Yulee.
. There is another circumstance,
too, which combined with the other
facts of his life makes it most fit-
ting that a steel warship be named
in his honor. The records show
that at a time when statesmen de-
rided the idea of iron vessels, Yulee
again and again on the floor of the
Senate championed their use as a
forward step in navigation.
Some months ago we had occa-
sion to sketch the life of another
Southern leader identified with
Florida history-Judah P. Benja-
min. At the time, we were criti-
cised severely by a writer who
argued that Jewish students of
past events should ignore those of
Jewish parentage who did not


identify themselves actively with
their co-religionists.
We differ sharply with such a
point of view. In the long stretch
of American history, the degree of
a Jew's interest in people of his
own faith is irrelevant to the ex-
ternal world. Far more important
is the totality of the contributions
made by people of Jewish stock to
the mainstream of American life.
In the non-Jewish mind both Ben-
jamin and Yulee irrevocably are
identified as Jews. During their
lifetime they often were targets
for attack on the basis of their
Jewish ancestry. Even so notable
a character as John Quincy Adams,

Pensacola Rabbi


Rabbi Leonard Mervis is the pres-
ent Rabbi of Temple Beth.El, Pensa-
cola. Fla., succeeding the late Dr.
Martin Friedman.

who differed violently with Yulee,
did not hesitate to refer to him
constantly as "the Jew delegate
from Florida."
David L. Yulee was the son of
an -observant Jew, Moses Elias
Levy, who was so zealous about
his faith that for many years he
indulged in heated controversies
in the newspapers of Florida on
the question of religion. Moses Eli-
as had migrated from Gibraltar to
the island of St. Thomas about
1800, and it was there that David
was born, on June 2, 1810. When
David was six, the family moved
to Havana where his father served
as a government contractor sup-


plying troops. In 1818, the boy and
his father came to the United
States on a visit and so impressed
was the elder Levy with America's
free institutions that he prepared
to settle here.
David was sent to an intimate
(Please turn the page)


Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

The Florida National Bank
Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA



Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee




PENSACOLA, - FLORIDA



Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary

SAmerican National Bank
S'Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.
S PENSACOLA, FLORIDA


Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

WATERS & HIBBERT
jFuneral :Ditretorf
Funeral Home: 124 West Gregory Street
Ambulance Service: Phone Dial 6534
PENSACOLA, : : : FLORIDA



SAN CARLOS HOTEL
The Pride of West Florida
Every Room with Bath Circulating Ice Water
Ceiling Fan Radio



STAR LAUNDRY CO.
PENSACOLA, FLA.
"We Appreciate Your Business"
5 S. BRUE PHONE 4101
Plant in rear of Chamber of Commerce Building



PENSACOLA BUGGY WORKS
CHEVROLET DEALERS



PENSACOLA, FLORIDA


"Service and Satisfaction Our Motto"
Barrios & Acosta
110 E. GOVERNMENT STREET
Phone 6363 A. Barrios, Manager
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA





THOMASVILLE,


GA


- TALLAHASEE, FLA.


friend of his father, Moses Myers,
in. Norfolk, Va., to attend school
from 1819., to 1837. Meanwhile,
Moses Levy began purchasing ex-
tensive land tracts in the northern
part of Florida in August 1820,
started sugar plantations, and soon
became one of St. Augustine's fore-
most citizens, recognized for his
generosity in business and social
life.
For unknown reasons David's
education and that of his elder
brother, Elias, who was at Har-
vard, were suddenly cut short in
1827. Returning to Florida, they
both spent the next four years as
managers of their father's Alachua
country plantation.
However, visits to nearby St.
Augustine left Yulee dissatisfied
with his quiet life on the plantation

THOMASVILLE, GA.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
WHIDDON'S FUNERAL HOME
Gordon Avenue and Little Street
W. Fred Scott, President
Henry C. Whiddon, Vice-Pres. & Mgr.
Ambulance Service Telephone 75
THOMASVILLE, GA.

Best Wishes
Cafeteria Fine Foods Banquet Hall
GILBERT HOTEL
Reasonable Rates
Mr. & Mrs. E. R. Gaskins, Res. Managers
H. Gilbert, General Manager
IN THE HEART OF THOMASVILLE
THOMASVILLE, GEORGIA


Best Wishes for the Ledger

Bank of Thomas County
Member F.D.I. C.
THOMASVILLE, GA.


BEST. WISHES
Hotel Tosco
(In The City of Roses)
W. W. UPCHURCH, Prop.
THOMASVILLE, GA.


BEST WISHES

PARK'S BAKERY
113 E. Jackson Phone 54
THOMASVILLE, GA.


BEST WISHES

TERRY'S DRUG STORE
122 N. Broad Phone 108'
THOMASVILLE, GA.


and in 1831, he moved to the city
to study law with Judge Robert
R. Reid. The following year, he
was admitted to the bar, and im-
mediately entered politics, becom-
ing clerk to the territorial legisla-
ture.
Yulee was well. liked and his
ability brought him rapidly to the
front. In 1835 he was elected to
the legislative council from St.
John's county, then to the legisla-
ture two years later and finally,
in 1838, he was named a St. John's
county delegate to the state con-
stitutional convention.
So well did he acquit himself
and so prominent .a part. did he
play in the framing of the consti-
tution that he was chosen territo-
rial delegate to Congress and re-
mained there until Florida, chiefly
through his efforts, was admitted


Prominent


Sam Rosenberg has been one of the
leaders of the Jewish community of
Tallahassee, Fla. these many years.

to the union as a state in 1845-
whereupon he and James D. West-
cott, after a hard fought campaign,
were elected first senators,-from
Florida to Congress.
Until then, he had been just
David Levy; so, on March 10, 1845,
the new-born state showed its
gratitude by naming a country
after him-a county which re-
mains today Levy county, although
its namesake within that year
changed his name to Yulee.
As territorial delegate, Levy had
mingled in 'Washington society-
and fallen in love with the beau-
.. tiful daughter of ExGovernor
Wickliff of Kentucky, who did not
approve of the match. Only upon
Levy's agreement to change his
name did pretty Miss Wickliffe


agree to marry him. Upon his pe-
tition, a Florida State legislative
act granted him the name of Eulee,
which, he pointed out, at one time
was his patronymic. When the act
became law on December 29, 1845,
he immediately began spelling his
name Yulee and he thereafter was
known as David Levy Yulee.

Yulee was defeated for reelec-
tion to the Senate in 1851 by Ste-
phen R. Mallory in one of the clos-
est contests in state history. Four
years later, he regained his seat
to win nation-wide fame as one
of the leading spokesmen of the
southern cause. Early an advocate
of secession if the north refused
to permit the expansion of slavery
to the newer states, Yulee was the
first senator to announce the with-
drawal of a southern state from the
union in tendering his own resig-
nation in 1861.

During the interval between his
two senatorial terms, Yulee had
become interested in state internal
improvements, had drawn up the
"Internal Improvement Act" for
Florida and incorporated the Flor-
ida railroad to undertake construc-
tion of a trans-Florida track be-
tween Fernandina and Cedar Key.
His railroad dreams were des-
tined to postponement.
He took no active part in the
war beyond aiding in the raising
of troops. Nonetheless, repeated
but unsuccessful attempts to cap-
ture him were made by Federal
troops who deemed him one of the
arch rebels.

In such high regard was he held
by his contemporaries that after
Lee's surrender at Appomatox, he
was named by Florida's governor
on the commission delegated to
confer with the president at Wash-
ington for reestablishment of Flor-
ida as a state in the union. How-
ever, en route, he was seized at
Gainesville, Ga., by union officers
and imprisoned in Fort Pulaski.
He remained there for a year be-
fore General U. S. Grant author-
ized his release.

Once again offered a place of
prominence-a return to his seat
in the Senate, Yulee declined. In-
stead, he rejoined his family at
Fernandina and began rebuilding
Florida's ruined railroad system.


Not until 1876, two years after
its name had changed from the
Florida railroad to the Atlantic,
Gulf and West India railroad did
Yulee's railroad become profitable.
Yulee undertook a campaign to
attract immigrants down from
northern cities and encouraged
vegetable farming along its route.

TALLAHASEE, FLA.

Harrell Transfer and Storage
FRANK HARRELL
633 W. Gaines TALLAHASSEE, FLA.
Local and Long Distance Hauling
Georgia, Florida and Alabama
PHONE: 1099


For Prompt Courteous Service Call
VICTORY CABS
PHONE 1010
Corner Monroe Across From
and Call Sts. V Floridan Hotel
Tallahassee, Fla.


'Best Wishes From

The Lewis State Bank
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.
Florida's Oldest Bank


GAS and OIL GOODYEAR TIRES
Phones 321 and 322
PROCTOR & PROCTOR, Inc.
BUICK-Sales and Service -PONTIAC
Opposite Floridan Hotel
Wrecker ServiceDay & Night Storage
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA



'Best Wishes From

Cherokee Hotel
J. A. STILES, Pres. and Mgr.
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA



Capital City Lumber Co., Inc.
A. E. THORNTON, Mgr.
BUILDING MATERIAL
Phone 801 Tallahassee, Fla.



The Capital Stone Co.
Marble, Granite and
Concrete Work
506 West Gaines St. Telephone 774
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA


J. A. CULLEY & SONS
Funeral Directors and
Licensed Embalmers
210 East Pensacola St. Phone 163
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.




FORT SMITH, ARK.


That year, 4,000 crates were ship-
ped from points along Yulee's line
-six years later, the traffic had
grown to 300,000 crates.
In 1876, work was resumed on
a branch road, the Peninsular road,
from Waldo on the main line to
Hawthorn and Ocala. A spur be-
fore reaching Ocala connected with
Silver Springs. Four years later,
200,000 boxes of oranges were be-
ing carried out of the newly opened
area by the line.
From Ocala, the Tropical Rail-
road of Florida carried Yulee's
trains to Tampa to provide con-
nections with steamship service to
Havana.
In 1881, the AG&WI had been
reduced to the simple name of
Florida Transit, but by that time,
Florida's first senator had retired
and had been living with his fam-
ily among his Washington friends
for almost a year. It was in Wash-
ington, in 1884, that Mrs. Yulee
died and it was there, on October
10, 1886, that Florida's first sena-
tor, statesman and railroad builder,
joined her. Both were buried in
Georgetown cemetery. Surviving
him were two memorials to his
vision-the state constitution and
the railroad system whose tracks
today still serve the interior of an
important agricultural and tourist
section of Florida.
----------
London drivers and chauffeurs
enliven many occasions by their
wit and sarcasm. One, seeing a
pedestrain directly in his way,
drew up, leaned out, and very
politely inquired: "I say, Sir, may
I ask what are your plans?"


JEWS OF PARIS
(Continued from page 12)

said, "What, are you still kicking
around?" And how at last libera-
tion came. And he was still alive.
And his wife and child were gone,
and he was alone.
Countless such stories, the Am-
erican, soldiers heard. They heard
accusations of the Vichy French
police, some said they were worse
than the Gestapo, and they heard,
up and down the streets, warm
words from Jews who had been
hidden by French families, Jews
whose children had been saved
and cared for by French families,
heard of priests and nuns who had
taken Jewish children into safety,

Fort Smith Rabbi


Harold Rosenman is the Rabbi at
United Hebrew Congregation, Fort
Smith, Ark.


Roll of Honor
UNITED HEBREW CONGREGATION, FORT SMITH, ARK.


Lewis Daniel, D.D.S.
Davidene Eisen
Julius H. Friedman
Morris Gordan
Clarence Hopp
S. Hyken
Isabel L. Isaacson
Paul Ellis Isaacson
Maurice Kasten
Benjamin L. Katzer
Morris E. Katzer
Burt Lieberstein
George Lumel
Mort Marks
Charles Miller
Theodore Miller


Meyer Nelbert
Simon Nelbert
Ben Pollock
Merle Rips
Adrian Sanger
Ed J. Scholem
Bert Stein
Siegbert Stein
Irvin Sternberg, Jr.
Barney Sugarman
Rabbi Samuel Teitelbaum
Dick Weinberger
Carl Wilson, M. D.
Nicol Wintory
Henry Yaffe, M.D.


heard even of Jews who had been
hidden in monasteries and nunner-
ies. They heard the disputes, too, as
to whether the French Jews had
cared enough about the fate of the
others, the immigrants, but there
were many tales of how the French
Jews themselves had suffered, like
the rest.
There had been perhaps 250,000
Jews in Paris; 400,000 in all
France. Now there remained per-
haps 40,000 in Paris; perhaps an-
other 180,000 scattered through the
rest of France. Several thousand
had escaped abroad; but at least
150,000 of the 400,000 had been


deported or killed, and of these,
three-fourths were the foreign
(Please turn the page)


Best Wishes for the Ledger
First Federal Savings
and Loan Association
of Fort Smith, Arkansas



SCHAER-NORVELL

THE Authorized
GENERAL HAWKINSON
TIRE TREAD
SERVICE
1023 Rogers Ave. Fort Smith, Ark.


1872-1945
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT DEPOSITORY

The First National Bank
SERVING 73
FORT SMITH, ARKANSAS


Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth Anniversary

The Fentress Mortuary
Phone 6178 1805 North A Street
FORT SMITH, ARK.


Congratulations and Best Wishes for Continued Success
THE GOLDMAN HOTEL
FORT SMITH'S LARGEST HOTEL
Excellent Coffee Shop Liquors
JOHN A. ENGLAND, Pres. and Mgr.
FORT SMITH, ARK.


Best Wishes On Your 50th, and Continued Success


Arkansas Valley Trust Company

FORT SMITH, ARKANSAS



YANTIS-HARPER COMPANY
Wheels and Rims Distributors of Complete Brake Service
Trailers and Axles 4r t 0 1t Batteries
B-K Brakes I i.LLUIH Esso Lubrication
Washing and Polishing Products Gasoline and Oils
12th and Garrison Avenue : : : : Dial 9111
FORT SMITH, ARKANSAS


Congratulations and Best Wishes for Continued Success


Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co.

FORT SMITH, ARK.




FORT SMITH


Jews, the Polish and Czech and
Austrian and German Jews who
had come to France between wars.
This, the soldiers heard in the
streets of Paris. They met some
Jews who had escaped, and come
back, with their families. A fur-
rier, who had sealed his doors, and
pushed his children through a tiny
rear window, when the police came
one night. He had succeeded in
saving them. A Turkish Jew, who
was diplomatically immune. There
had been cases.
Some of the soldiers went to the
homes of these people. A few fam-
ilies still had money, and had man-
aged to provide real Rosh Hashan-
ah meals. But mostly the boys
came back, and told how K ra-
tions they themselves had brought
had been the mainstay of the hol-
iday feast. Private Melvin Corren,
of Stockton, California, told how
he climbed to a sixth floor, where
a mother, daughter, and son lived


BEST WISHES FOR YOUR 50TH ANNIVERSARY



911 Garrison Phone 6148
FORT SMITH, ARK.


BEST WISHES
PATRICK SHOE CO.
Good Shoes for Everybody
Since 1878
913 Garrison :- Phone 5221
FORT SMITH, ARKANSAS


WCronu's ifloupr 'Iop
J. H. KRONE, JR., Proprietor
Fresh Flowers & Fancy Plants for All Occasions
We Telegraph Flowers Anywhere
Phone 7164 :-: 4221 GRAND AVE.
FORT SMITH, ARK.


JOS. V. FERRARI & CO.,
INSURANCE
Phone 8181
FORT SMITH, ARK.


CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR 50TH
MANHATTAN CAFE
Next to MILNER HOTEL
604 Garrison Ave.
FORT SMITH, ARK.


BEST WISHES FROM

HATTAWAY DRUG CO.
PRESCRIPTION EXPERTS
Fort Smith, Arkansas


in a single small room. They had
some soup, aside from his rations.
An American flag hung from their
back window.
Then late in the afternoon many
of the American soldiers went to
the services in the synagogue of
the Sephardic Jews, on rue St. La-
zare. This was one of the most
aristocratic Jewish communities of
Paris, and here was a beautiful
Romanesque synagogue, with a
great dome, and wide balconies,
and a high central altar, where the
whie-robed cantor sang. There was
a choir, and an organ; and the only
decorations on the white walls of
the synagogue were the flags of
the United Nations.
Then, after the singing of the
Marseillaise, and Hallelujah, after
the cantor had raised his voice and
chanted a blessing for General
Charles DeGaulle, and Winston
Churchill, and Franklin D. Roose-
velt, and Joseph Stalin, and Chiang
Kai-Chek, just as the American
soldiers were beginning to feel this
was a Rosh Hashanah almost like
one might find at home, just then,
the president of the congregation
stepped forward to speak.
He was formally dressed, in
striped trousers, and frock coat.
He wore a silk hat. But his face
was strained and yellow, and his
eyes had in them the look that had
been in the eyes of the Jews in the
little courtyard synagogue on the
rue Veille de Temple.
This was Dr. Modiano Vital, and
he had been arrested in September,
1943, and taken first to Drancy,
then to work at -Austerlitz, then
back to Drancy to wait to be sent
away. From the pulpit of the syn-
agogue, he told how he had seen
Dr.Heilbrenner, professor of chem-
istry at the Sorbonne, brought to
camp. And how Dr. Heilbrenner
had been tortured, how his feet
had been burned, because he had
once been the recipient of an in-
ternational prize, for his work in
chemistry, and a Jew had no right
to win an international prize. Dr.
Vital told how at Austerlitz the
composer, Marcel Lattes, had been
permitted a visit from his wife,
and how, when she was going
away, the composer had stood in
the window and thrown her a kiss.
Immediately, a guard had smashed
his jaw with a revolver butt. He


had been thrown naked into a cell,
for nineteen days, then sent to
Drancy, and from there, "sent
away." From the pulpit Dr. Vital
told how, when at Drancy, he had
been called upon to question chil-
dren as to their identity. Children,
brought to the camp by the truck-
load. "I had to ask them, 'What is
your name?' And often the child
would reply, 'Jean.' He could not
give any other name-for his age
would be, perhaps two years. I
would ask, 'What is the name of
your papa?' And the child would
reply, 'Papa is called Papa.' And
thus, we would put on the child's
armband, 'Name, Jean, father's
name Papa,' and thus they would
be sent away."
From the pulpit the doctor told
of groups who had been sent away
from the Drancy hospital, in De-
cember, 1943, while sick with diph-
theria, and others, while sick with
scarlet fever. He told of aged peo-
ple, "sent away," and "I had to
watch them go, and among them,
one day, I had to watch my own
mother, of 87, sent away."
And speaking from the pulpit of
the aristocratic Sephardic syna-
gogue, Dr. Vital said, as Isaac Yan-
kelowitz had said in the rue Vieux
de Temple: "They who persecuted
us, persecuted us as one people.
This has made us one people. We
must fight as one people, we must
help each other as one people.
Whether we are communists, or
liberals, or orthodox, or Polish, or
French, or Zionists, we are one
people, in what we have been
through, in what we have sur-
vived."
And in still another synagogue,
on the rue de Nazareth, as the read-
ing from the Torah was completed,
two American soldiers were called
to the altar, for the ceremony of
the covering of the scrolls. Sgt.
Nathan Sirot of Chelsea, Mass.,
and Pvt. Kurt Ehrlich, of Birming-
ham, Alabama-a refugee from
Germany-took the Torah, and
while it was bound and covered
again, they held it in their strong
hands:
Copyright 1945, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.
v
----------V----------
When the Tatar curses one, in-
stead of exclaiming. "Go to -!"
as we do, he says: "May you stay
in one place forever!"


BEST WISHES FOR CONTINUED SUCCESS
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OF FORT SMITH, ARK.
TROY McNEILL, Vice-Pres. and Sec'y.
521 Garrison Avenue
Member Federal Savings and
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FORT SMITH, ARK.


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Phone 3433
1001 Garrison Ave.
FORT SMITH, ARK.


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LITTLE ROCK, ARK.


The Miracle of F. D. R.
By DAVID SCHWARTZ


WTOODROW WILSON once
spoke of the mystery of dem-
ocracy unfolding itself in the com-
ing of Abraham Lincoln to the
presidency. Lincoln, at the time he
was projected on the national scene
was a man of relative obscurity.
Seward, Chase, Banks, were all
better known, and yet Lincoln was
nominated and served during the
great crisis of the Civil War, and
somehow Lincoln gave the tragedy
of the Civil War a beauty and a
meaning that it would scarcely
have had otherwise. It was as
though Providence had reached out
from the skies, looked down upon
the American torn by fraticide
and said, "Lo, I will give you a
man who will speak for Me."
Abraham Lincoln was a miracle.
His nomination was a miracle. His
election was a miracle.
And we must have something of
the same feeling as we contem-
plate Franklin D. Roosevelt. Here
was a man who by all superficial
tests, one might have expected,
would long ago have passed out of
the political picture.
At the age of forty, he was smit-
ten with an affliction which would
have downed an ordinary man and
certainly put an end to his political
hopes. And F.D.R. himself appear-
ed reluctant to go on. We remem-
ber how Al Smith begged him to
permit his name to be entered for
the Governorship of New York to
help Smith who was then running
for the presidency. We remember
how Smith got on the telephone
and spoke with F.D.R. down in
Warm Springs, Ga., where Roose-
velt was dreaming of walking
again. "People don't know the
pleasure of wiggling a foot," F.D.R.
then said.
Reluctantly F.D.R. gave his con-
sent to run for the New York gov-
ernorship.
The Republicans had put up as
their candidate for governor, a
Jew, Albert Ottinger. A candidate
other than F.D.R. might have been
tempted to appeal to anti-Jewish
prejudice, but F.D.R. was above
all this. As a matter of fact, Roose-
velt, as I recall it, got no little of
his support from Jews. He was of


course not the known figure he is
today and his victory over Ottin-
ger was by no great margin.
The subsequent steps in his ca-
reer are fresh to all of us. The mir-
acle of his career is that a man who
has a great physical handicap
which might have been expected
to blast a political career, was the
very one to break the powerful
force of the two term tradition in
American politics, and to win a
third and a fourth term in the
White House.
Miracles, too, have, frequently,

At B'nai Israel


Rabbi Ira E. Sanders has been
Rabbi of Congregation B'nai Israel,
Little Rock, Ark., tor many years.

a rational explanation. How is this
to be explained. In part, to be sure,
it is to be explained by the fact
that F.D.R. came to the fore at a
time of crisis and Americans were
averse, as the saying goes, to
change horses in mid-stream.
But that is only a partial expla-
nation. The other part of the ex-
:lanation is to be found in the char-
acter and personality of F.D.R. I
have now and then met people who
are personally acquainted with
F.D.R. and if you ask them for
their personal reactions to the
president, you will find that sooner
or later they will speak of his
"charm."
That is one of the facts of his
personality. A Jew who was com-
plaining to me about the fact that
(Please turn the page)


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary

BAPTIST STATE HOSPITAL
LITTLE ROCK, ARK.

r

Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary

TWIN CITY BANK
Member Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation
North Little Rock, Ark.


Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth Anniversary

Griffin-Leggett Funeral Home
PAUL Y. GRIFFIN, Sec.-Treas. J. HARRY LEGGETT, President
1000 West Capitol Avenue Telephones 2-2112, 2-2113
LITTLE ROCK, ARK.


Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co.
Phone 4-1661 419 W. Capitol
LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS



Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary

PFEIFER BROS.

Department Store
Little Rock, Ark.


Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

MAYFLOWER DAIRY COMPANY
Makers of MAYFLOWER Quick-Freeze Ice Cream


BEST WISHES
Scott-Mayer Commission Co.
.... WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS ....
FRUITS AND PRODUCE
LITTLE ROCK, : : : : ARKANSAS



Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

STANDARD ICE COMPANY
of. Arkansas


Hughes Brinkley
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:-: North Little Rock, Ark.


120 Maple Street


Little Rock
No. Little Rock


Beebe
Cabot


I





LITTLE ROCK, ARK.


Roosevelt named a Jew as Secre-
tary of the Treasury in his cabinet,
I think, points to another quality.
This Jew said, that it was all right
for the President to have named
a Jew as a member of his cabinet,
but he should not have named him
to the Treasury portfolio, but, said
this complaining Jew. "Roosevelt is
self-willed. If he decides on a thing
you can't stop him."

I think this offers a second clue
to the character of Roosevelt. His
will is indomitable.
Now, both of these characteris-
tics have some relationship to his
physical handicap. The man who
is beset by an affliction of this
type, if he would survive, must
acquire sunniness of disposition,
and indomitable will, or he cannot
go on.

To be sure F.D.R. was a genial,
sunny and strong person before,
but I think, the disease which his
enemies have always made an is-
sue against him, has rather helped
to bring out the best in him. It has
made him strong and yet humble,
gracious and humorous as well as
serious.


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"The Shop of Friendly Service"
624-626 LOUISIANA STREET
Phone 4-2231 Little Rock, Ark.



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LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS


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Moses, the Bible tell us, too,
suffered from an impediment.
If I were a mystic, I could elab-
orate on this point. I would say
that in the entire career of F.D.R.
the hand of God is to be seen. I
could point to the further "proof"


And there is something else
unique about Isaac. Isaac has two
sharply distinct periods in his life,
according to the Bible. The second
period, when he bore the name Is-
rael, following his wrestling with
the angels.


TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL, LITTLE ROCK, ARK.


of the miraculousness of his career
in the fact that Roosevelt came to
power in America at the same time
that Hitler came to power in Ger-
many. A Jewish proverb says that
God always provides the remedy
before the disease.
Anti-Semites have sometimes
tried to charge that Roosevelt is of
Jewish descent. Of course, there is
nothing to this, but F.D.R. narrow-
ly did escape having a Jewish
name. It has always been a tra-
dition in the Roosevelt family that
the eldest child should be named
Isaac, and when F.D.R. came along,
he was scheduled for that billing,
but his mother, a Delano, wanted
him named after one of her family,
so it was Franklin Delano instead
of Isaac.
Yet, the name Isaac for F.D.R:
strikes me as particularly felicitous.
Isaac in Hebrew means to laugh.
F.D:R. can laugh and help the
world to a little sunniness-when
the whole face of the world is drab.


EF.D.R. I think, 'b-egai a second
p dri d, of his life, whe .this son of
wealth had to wrestle with afflic-
tion-and learned from it to wres-
tle with the affliction of a whole
people-of a whole world.
And there is another similarity
between F.D.R. and Isaac. Even
the angels, the Bible said, could
not beat Isaac.
Copyright 1945, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.
v
-------V-------
New York, (JTA) The family
of a Jewish G. I. who died in Ger-
many in an attempt to save the
lives of some' wounded comrades
this week received a letter from
Lieutenant General George S. Pat-
ton, Jr., praising the heroism of
their son.


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Member T. D. S. :-: We Deliver Anywhere
Mrs. C. L. TIPTON, Mgr.
Tel. 3-4191 :-: 2017 Kavanaugh Blvd.


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Established 1894
J. W. HUTTON EDWIN WELLS
Owners and Operators
PHONE 4-2565
915 Broadway Little Rock, Ark.


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The Voss-Hutton Co.
Distributors Automotive Parts,
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400 West 6th Street
LITTLE ROCK, ARK.


Best Wishes for The Ledger


Clarence Pfeiter

LITTLE ROCK, ARK.



Kitchen Equipment for
HOTELS and RESTAURANTS
Krebs Bros. Supply Co.
Phone 6133-34 413-15 W. Capitol
LITTLE ROCK, ARK.



L. C. YOUNG, Manager
Young Tire and Service Co.
TIRES
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Vulcanizing Greasing
Phones: 2-1344-3-9950-2-9395
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LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS



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LITTLE ROCK, ARK.

HOSPITALITY BEGINS WITH


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7 UP-ORANGE CRUSH BEV. CO.
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Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

UNION NATIONAL BANK

OF LITTLE ROCK, ARK.
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation




HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, ARK.


SOMEWHERE on the Western
front a group of GIs were stand-
ing outside of a German general
supply store which we were using
as a CP. We were talking about
many things, and one fellow said-
that his home town was never like
this. .. but mainly we were really
watching an elderly German wo-
man whose son was drafted into
the German army, and who now
came shuffling up the muddy dirt
road in front of us.
"I'll betcha she's got a radio
ticker somewhere up in her attic,"
said one soldier, who kept his
hands in his pockets. "Yeah," said
another, "now I'm really wondering
why those Jerry planes came over
pretty low last night." A third GI
who seemed destined to pick the
conversation up from there, inter-
jected, "And what about all those
shells which keep popping away
at us everytime? Somebody's doing
the trick."
The elderly woman passed out
of sight around the bend and the
GIs shifted their eyes to Father
Lauletta who looked like he was
purposely holding his legs back
from full movement as he came
down the road to where we were
standing. Father Lauletta is a jo-
vial sort of guy with a protruding
waist line which seems to bounce
up and down when he walks.
"H'ya, fellas," the Chaplain said,


CONGREGATION
David Diamond
Bernard Fantus
Henry Fantus
Dr. Robert Fantus
Albert Garfinkle
Oscar Greenberg
Harry Gurdin
Adolph B. Kaplan
Eugene Kirsch
Walter Kleinman
Martin Lax
Dr. Jerome Levy
Irving Litman
Eugene Lockwood
Harold Lockwood
Saul Lockwood
Bernard Marks


waving his hand at us. "Good
morning, sir," we said. He smiled
and his dark complexioned face
bulged out as he adjusted his dark-
rimmed eyeglasses.
"Oh, say," said the Chaplain,
addressing himself to me, "I want
you to come to services tomorrow
at ten o'clock at the recreation hall.
Will you be there?" I assured him
that I'd be there. He smiled again
and went inside. In the meanwhile
one of the GIs was puzzled at the
conversation which just took place.
(Please turn the page)

Active Worker


Miss Regina Kaplan is President of
A. B. Rhine B'nai B'rith Women's
Auxiliary, as well as Superintendent of
Leo N. Levi Memorial Hospital, Hot
Springs National Park, Ark.


Roll of Honor
HOUSE OF ISRAEL, HOT SPRINGS, ARK.
Louis Moore
Maurice Moore
Bernard Moretsky
Milton Moscowitz
Rabbi Martin Perley
Sam Phillips
Dr. Allen Pollock
Raymond Ragland
Phillip Reich
.. .. .ichard Reich.
Bernard Rephan
Dr. Melvin Schudmak
Sam Schudmak, Jr.
Bernard M. Silverman
Sam D. Well
Arthur Welcher, Jr.


Jewish Sidelights From the

War Front
By SAUL TRAUB


Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth Anniversary



RETAIL STORES
We Serve the Nation Shop at Sears and Save
HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, ARKANSAS


THE NEW ERA SENTINEL RECORD
Evening Morning
PUBLISHED BY
SOUTHERN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
C. L. PALMER, Publisher
Walter E. Hussman, Asst. Publisher-Robert S. Dean, Editor
Chas. Goslee, General Mgr. John Q. Holder, Advertising Mgr.
HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, ARKANSAS


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H. L. DISHEROON, Manager.
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21 BATHS, $20.25
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HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, ARK.

Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee, and Continued Success

THE LAMAR BATH HOUSE
At the Head of "Bath House Row"
JACK MANIER, Manager
HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, ARK.


Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth Anniversary

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WHITE ATTENDANTS
HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, ARK.
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HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, ARK.





HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, ARK.


"But you're Jewish," the GI said,
searching my eyes for an answer.
"Yes," I finally said, "I'm Jewish
and Father Lauletta is Catholic."
That's just it, I thought to myself.
Here's a Catholic chaplain asking
a Jewish soldier to attend Jewish
services. It was like having a total
stranger invite me to my own
home. And yet, somehow, I was
touched with some magnetic pow-
er, because I was actually going
to attend. It may have been com-
mon to some other person who
went to church every week, but
for me it was something of a rarity
since I was never orthodox in any-
thing, let alone religion. I mention
this here because I am not an athe-
ist in the literal sense of the word.
I was brought up by unorthodox
parents. And I know that they
were not atheists.
The next day was Saturday. It
was a brilliant brisk morning quite
exceptional for this time of the
year. A light, cool breeze powdered
my face as I stepped outside. In
the near distance several enemy
shells burst over the hills, making
a loud noise in the valley below. I


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Furniture of Quality
COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS
Phone 1088 843 Central Ave.
HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, ARK.

"Cleaners of Delicate Fabrics"
PEOPLES LAUNDRY
350 Malver Ave. : -: Phones 716-717
CLEANING, DYEING and PRESSING
Your Garments Are Insured Against Fire
and Tornado, Burglary or Theft
While in Our Care.
Hot Springs National Park, Ark.


"BILL" MUNCRIEF
COMMERCIAL PRINTING
316 Ouachita Ave. Phone 45
Hot Springs Nat'l. Park, Ark.


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Manufacturers
Ice Cream, Bulgarian Buttermilk,
Pasteurized Milk and Cream
Office and Factory:
402-4-6-8-10-12 Third St.
Phones 79-792
ROT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, ARK


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510 OUACHITA AVE. !:- Phone 74
Hot Springs Nat'l. Park, Ark.


walked down the dirt road to the
place where we were to meet.
Our "Synagogue" was a long
stone building of rough finish
which the civilian community once
used as a town meeting place. Sev-
eral German speaking people lived
in the houses nearby, and one wo-
man was washing clothes in a
stream which flowed through the
hills.
I walked inside the building.
Some GIs were seated around a
table reading magazines while oth-
ers found it advantageous to study
the Stars and Stripes, Army daily.
In the far corner of the room I saw


Hot Springs Rabbi


Rabbi Frank Minsker serves as the spirit-
ual leader of Congregation House of
Israel, Hot Springs, Ark.


Father Lauletta in conference with
some of the boys. He motioned for
me to come over. "I'm glad you
came," he said to me. "At ten
o'clock we'll start the services."
Ever since Father Lauletta began
arranging services for the Jewish
boys I always wondered why, and
now I said to myself I'd find out.
"Father," I asked trying to ap-
pear serious, "Why is it that you're
interested in the Jewish boys?
Here you've gone out of your way
in order to arrange for our ser-
vices." The chaplain did not an-
swer immediately. He fingered his
eyeglasses, but he was thinking.
You can always tell a person when
he's far away spiritually. "Do you
want an answer?" he said. I re-
plied by motioning my head.
"Well," he said, "I find it enjoya-
ble to be among you. And then you


boys need it. Do you know," he
went on, "that all religions have a
close kinship? That passages from
the Holy Scriptures are identical
with passages from your Torah." I
nodded my head although I was
surprised. "I'm a chaplain. I know
what it is not to have a spiritual
guide."

About ten minutes before ser-
vices a rosy-cheeked radioman
came into the hall and was greeted
by Father Lauletta. "Good morn-
ing, father," said Pfc. David Eich-
ler of 21 Essex street, New York
city. "We have just about eight
minutes before we start, so I better
tell you what this week's passage
will be." Eichler who speaks with
a foreign accent was born of or-
thodox parents in Czechoslovakia,
but had managed to escape from
the Germans. "The Torah laws says
for us to speak of Abraham and his
life." Eichler took Father Lauletta
on the side. In a few minutes Fa-
ther Lauletta called the congrega-
tion in and everyone took their
seats. I was in the front row. There
was one prayer-book available to
our row. "I will first read the
prayers in Hebrew," said Eichler,
while he stepped up in front of
the congregation, "and then it will
be repeated in English."
When the services were over
"Chaplain" Eichler called upon
Father Lauletta. "A chaplain we
need no introduction to," Eichler
said.
Chaplain Lauletta came to the
front of the Jewish boys and lifted
his voice, "Men," he said, "I'm a
Catholic chaplain. I know that you
boys have a strong passion to hold
your own services. I want you to
know that I appreciate all the ef-


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HOT SPRINGS, ARK.


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Hot Springs Nat'l. Park, Ark.


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HOT SPRINGS, ARK.



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Memorials, Monuments, Vaults,
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Phone 48 Cor. 5th St & Greenwood
Hot Springs National Park, Ark.


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631 Central Phone 438
HoT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, ARK.


Congratulations and Continued Success

GROSS MORTUARY
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Ambulance Service .
Phone 29 : : : Hot Springs Nat'l. Park, Ark.



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HOT SPRINGS, NAT'L PARK, ARK.





TEXARKANA, TEX.-ARK.


forts you can put into making this
service your service." We all look-
ed with eagerness as he spoke
about Abraham and his biblical
virtures. Father Lauletta had stud-
ied the bible from top to bottom,
and now he poured his learning to
those soldiers seated in the con-
gregation. I glanced back at the
other boys in the rear. They were
listening in appreciation to a man
who knew and understood the his-
torical plight of the Jewish peo-
ple. And he was a Catholic.
When the chaplain finished the
boys went off in twos and threes.
There was Pfc. Samuel Alazraki of
130 West 183rd street, New York
city, who said that it was really
something to watch. Then Pvt.
William Zimmerman was stand-
ing outside with Pvt. Irving Clark.
Both boys come from New York
city. When I asked Pvt. George
Gross of Orwell, Ohio, what he
thought of Chaplain Lauletta he
smiled and said, "He's really on the
ball with us."
Father Lauletta joined the
Chaplain's Corps while we were
still on maneuvers in Tennessee.
He has been with the same unit for
two and a half years and in that
time he became one of the most
appreciated individuals in the Di-
vision. His way of understanding
the gestures and idiosyncracies of
all types of people, especially in
the army where you are apt to
find them, has made him "one of
the boys" to the men on the front
lines.
Prior to army life Chaplain Lau-
letta held the Ass't. Pastorate of
The Most Precious Blood Church ,

Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
Southern Ice Company
-AND--
Southern Creameries
TEXARKANA, U. S. A.

FIREPROOF
125 ROOMS 125 BATHS
HOTEL McCARTNEY
Hotel Mc Cartney Co. : W.A. Mc Cartney, Jr. Mgr
TEXARKANA, U. S. A.


WM. PETERS & SON
Wholesale and Retail Distributors of
GLASS
GLASS FOR AUTOMOBILES,
WINDOWS, STORE FRONTS
12th and Texas Ave. Phones 547-2523-W
TEXARKANA, U. S. A.


of New York city, and held num-
erous posts in the Bronx, Pitts-
burgh, and Rome.
He received his training at the
St. Anthony Seminary in Catskill,
N. Y., and the St. Francis Semi-
nary of Lowell, Mass. At one time
Father Lauletta went to Rome to
take a post-graduate course in
philosophy, a subject which he is
well versed in. He is 35 years old
and of medium build and finds it
interesting to study people. Says
he, "It is the greatest religion on
earth to understand your fellow-
man."
Copyright 1945, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.
DUTCH MINERS SHELTER
JEWISH CHILDREN
New York. Among the Hol-
landers who for four years risked
their personal safety by giving
shelter to Jewish children, the
mine workers and officials of the
state-owned coal mines in south-
ern Limburg province have merit-
ed a place of honor, according to
an article in one of the free news-
papers published in the district.
"Many of these laborers and em-
ployees took it upon themselves to
care for one or more children
whose parents had been sent to
Poland or elsewhere," the paper
stated.
Now that these Jewish children,
and also the children of non- Jew-
ish patriots .who had fallen into
disgrace with the Nazis, have come
out of their hiding places, the
management of the mines has is-
sued an order that the workers
shall be indemnified for the hu-
mane care they have given these
fugitive waifs, and are entitled to
receive an extra financial allow-
ance for "dependent members of
the family." The measure will be
retroactive but will not apply to
people who have received remun-
eration for the children's board
under German occupation. The
Netherlands Information Bureau.

New York, (JTA) The ex-
Mufti of Jerusalem, wanted by the
Allies for punishment as the or-
ganizer of two Nazi-inspired anti-
British revolts in the Middle East
and as the founder of Hitler's
"Moslem Legion" in Europe, will
seek to gain sanctuary in the Holy
Moslem city of Mecca, according
to information received here from
authoritative Middle East sources.


Roll of Honor
MOUNT SINAI CONGREGATION,
TEXARKANA, U. S. A.

Selig Danziger
Louis Feinberg
Stern Feinberg
Harry Friedman
Melvin Kusin
Hyman Sklar
Mendel Sklar
Morris Sklar
Ralph Wexler


JUDGE LOUIS JOSEPHS


Judge Louis Josephs is President of Mount
Sinai Congregation and an honored
citizen of Texarkana, U. S. A.


Congratulations and Best Wishes From
STANDARD PAINT CO.
INTELLIGENT
PAINT AND DECORATIVE SERVICE
Phone 206 204 E. Broad
TEXARKANA, U. S. A.


"Say It With Flowers"
PRYOR'S FLOWERS
MISS LENA MARPLE, Mgr.
Member Florist's Telegraph Delivery
Association
911 Main St. Telephone All Hours 2032
TEXARKANA, U. S. A.


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GRUPELL CLEANERS
Phone 947 11th and Walnut Sts.
TEXARKANA, U. S. A.
-j

Texarkana Business
College
MRS. L. R. NASH, Pres.
Largest and Best in Texarkana
Trade Territory
TEXARKANA, - -U. S. A.


BEST WISHES

BUHRMAN-PHARR
HARDWARE COMPANY
TEXARKANA, U.S. A.


Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

HOTEL GRIM
Outstanding in Texarkana, U. S. A.
E. D. BAILEY, Manager



Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth Anniversary

EAST FUNERAL HOME
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
PHONES 468 and 469 : : SIXTH AND OLIVE STS.
TEXARKANA, U. S. A.


35th and State Line Telephone 2161
Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee


A.C.Grigson Marble & Granite Works
Texarkana, U. S. A.


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S. H. KRESS & CO.
5-10 and 25 Cent Store
TEXARKANA, U. S. A.





PINE BLUFF, ARK.


KOBERLEIN BAKERY
-Makers of-
BIG DANDY
BREAD and CAKES
WM. KOBERLEIN, Proprietor
210-212 Walnut Street Phone
PINE BLUFF, ARKANSAS


176


Best Wishes on Your 50th Anniversary
SHELL-ROSS COMPANY
Phone 410 223 Walnut
PINE BLUFF, ARK.


BEST WISHES
The Sherwin-
Williams Co.
of Texas
521 Main Street
PINE BLUFF, ARK.


Best Wishes
COFFEE CUP
SEE IT PREPARED by WHITE CHEFS
OPEN DAY and NIGHT
Cor. Main and 5th Sts.
PINE BLUIF, ARK.


REST WISHES
FOX BROS. HARDWARE CO.
"OVER 61 YEARS OF RELI-
ABLE SERVICE"
415 Main Street
PINE BLUFF, ARK.


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HALE'S MEN'S SHOP
Phone 100 322 Main St.
PINE BLUFF, ARK.



RALPH ROBINSON & SON
S. MORTICIANS . .
218-20-22 West Barraque St.
Pine Bluff, : : : Ark.


HOTEL JEFFERSON
"A Home Away From Home"
J. W. HILL, Proprietor
Outside First Floor
Sample Roorts, Coffee Shop
PINE BLUFF, ARKANSAS


BEST WISHES

O. K.
Ice Cream & Candy Co.
721 Main St. Pine Bluff, Ark.


There Is Nothing Accidental
About QUALITY
Clark's Seafood Grill
114 W. 5th Street
PINE BLUFF, ARK.


Rabbi Morris Clark is Pine Bluff,
Ark., spiritual leader and Rabbi of
Congregation Anshe Emeth.
Stanley Kahn
Bernard Levi
Leo Levi
Harry Levine
Max Levine
Harry Phillips
Itzy Riesenberg
Joe Riesenberg
Louis Riesenberg
Mannie Riesenberg
F. M. Rosenberg
Harry Rosenberg
Burton Schlosberg
Harry Schlosberg
Milton D. Sherman
Lester Silbernagel
Basil Slaughter
James Smedley
Daniel Stein
Maurice Udes
David H. Weil, Jr.
Haskel Wolff
Mercer Wolff


Roll of Honor
CONGREGATION ANSHE
EMETH, PINE BLUFF, ARK.
Charles Baim
F. R. Bloom, Jr.
Abe Bramn
Meyer Bram
Ruben Bram
Harold Davis
Reginald Eilbott, Jr.
Cassius M. Eiseman
Richard J. Eiseman
Jack Eisenkramer
Edward Festinger
Monroe Festinger
Arnold Fink
Ira Gershner
Leon Goldberg
Clarence Hanf '
At Anshe Emeth,


176


CONGREGATION SHAARAI
(Continued from page 15)

force remain unanswered and yet
we must not feel that we know
little of those early years. For, es-
sentially, the story of any religious
communion, whether it be Jewish
or Christian, is the same story: of
organizing and re-organizing, test-
ing various techniques in the pur-
suit of lofty ideals, of reaching out
for new avenues of effective ac-
tion; in brief, it is the story of men
and women and children who at- -
tempt to plan their lives, commu-
nal and personal, by Divine stan-
dards.

As the years passed other rabbis
succeeded Rabbi Da Silva in the
ministry of Shaarai Shomayim.
They served faithfully and devo-
tedly, ministering to the personal
needs of their congregants with
the same high idealism that in-
spired them to preserve inviolate
the principles of their ancient
faith. Each new generation of
members carried with it the im-
print of the character and person-
ality of these spiritual leaders and
each new generation, in its turn,
produced lay leaders, dedicated in
heart and mind and soul to the di-
rection of congregational affairs,
consecrated to their faith and their
people. As Shaarai Shomayim grew
in stature and assumed a place of
dignity and honor in the city of
Mobile as a congregation, so did
its members become leaders in
every kind of civic, philanthropic,
.cultural, and humanitarian endea-
vor. The fame of many passed be-
yond the confines of Alabama and
reached the farthest corners of the
nation as a whole. For us to recite
the contributions of members of
Shaarai Shomayim to the life of
American Jewry and of America
in general would require years of
patient research and hundreds of
pages. Though we cannot achieve
this here, it is well for us to re-
member that Shaarai Shomayim
was the firm foundation upon
which these abiding contributions
were built, and that the events of
the last hundred years are a mir-
ror in which we may see the re-
flection of Jewish devotion to God.


GILMORE
PAINT AND SUPPLY CO.



PAINTS
716 Main Street Phone 2666
PINE BLUFF, ARK.

National Economy Plumbers
EVERYTHING IN PLUMBING
PLUMBING REPAIRS OUR SPECIALTY
Built-In Cabinets, Tile Walls, Floors and Fire Places
214 WEST BARRAQUE ST.
Phone 84 :-: Pine Bluff, Arkansas


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Luft's Service Station
Lion Products, Tires, Batteries
5th and Pine St. Phone 126
PINE BLUFF, ARK.


Pine Bluff Building
Material Company
We Appreciate Your Patronage
208 W. Second Phone 230
R. P. "Dick" McGille, Mgr.

Best Wishes on Your 50th Anniversary
Taylor's Poultry Market
L. W. MORGAN, Owner
POULTRY AND EGGS
Quality-Service
Phone 984 1121 Main St.
PINE BLUFF, ARK.

-Best Wishes on Your 50th Anniversary
Smith Battery & Electric Service
WILLARD STORAGE BATTERIES
1015 W. 15th Phone 1022
PINE BLUFF, ARK.





I Ls, if OLA


NEHI BOTTLING CO.
PINE BLUFF, ARK.


Best Wishes on Your 50th Anniversary
Commercial Printing Co.
106-114 West Barraque Street
PINE BLUFF, ARKANSAS


Best Wishes on Your 50th Anniversary
THE PERDUE COMPANY
PRINTING
Office Equipment-Office Supplies
Phone 218 207-209 West Second Ave.
PINE BLUFF, ARK.

BEST WISHES
O. H. HARDIN
FURNITURE CO.
Complete House Furnishers
Pine Bluff, Arkansas







A S we awaited Sylvia Sidney
on the set of "Blood on the
Sun," the old German song, ',Wer
Ist Sylvia?" kept drumming
through our mind . and as we
watched her do a scene the ques-


YOUNG'S
LAUNDRY and CLEANERS
MAIN at 10th PHONE 1235
PINE BLUFF, ARK.



Woodfield Plumbing Co.
ORY WOODFIELD, Owner
Phone 1308 219 W. 2nd
PINE BLUFF, ARK.



Pine Bluff Tire & Rubber Co.
Truck and Passenger Tires Recapped
DAYTON THOROBRED TIRES
PINE BLUFF, ARK.



LESLIE DRY CLEANING
"There Is No Substitute for Experience"
807-9 Linden St. Telephone 187
PINE BLUFF, ARK.



Unique Cleaning Service
"RAISES THE STANDARD"
307 W. Barraque Phone 374
WALTER RICHARDSON, Manager
PINE BLUFF, ARK.


Smith Butane Equipment
Hardware & Furniture Co.
"Everything for the Home"
3rd and Pine Sts. Phone 2551
PINE BLUFF, ARK.


Best Wishes on Your 50th Anniversary
Pine Bluff Fish Market
W. E. DEAM, Owner
FRUITS and VEGETABLES
and Country Produce
300 N. Cedar Phone 1969
PINE BLUFF, ARK.

Best Wishes on Your 50th Anniversary
GEORGE HESTAND
Pine Blujj's Largoejs Home Owned Food Stor
GROCERIES FRESH MEATS AND FEEDS
Cor. Pullen and Cedar St. :-: Phone 787
PINE BLUFF, ARKANSAS


WELCH MOTOR CO.
Oldsmobile Sales and Service
One Stop Precision Service
Phone 5500 5th and Pine Sts.
PINE BLUFF, ARK.


tion repeated itself. Who is Syl-
via?
Miss Sidney has returned to
Hollywood after an absence of five
years. That is a news item a
bare fact. There is more to it than
just a return there is a revita-
lized personality. As we observed


and Davis follow to plow deep
and lasting furrows, leaving the
playful white-caps to lesser talent.
"Please, oh, please," she begged,
"permit me just this one chance
to look beautiful in a picture ..
and then . then I'll be all sombre,
grizzly characters in the theatre


Three Refugee Brothers

Fight on Distant Fronts


Richa Piit Mtirlin (Gerhard
Three refugee brothers who'fled from Hitlerism to find haven in the
United States are now serving their new country in different branches
of the armed forces and in different theatres of war. Richard Nellhaus,
22,'is a paratrooper stationed in England; Martin, 19, is serving in the
Pacific; Gerhard, 21, is a Flying Fortress gunner who was recently
promoted to the rank of Lieutenant after completing 35 missions in
Italy. The Nellhaus family, residing in Roxbury, Mass., adjusted them.
selves socially and economically to their new life with the aid of the
National Refugee Service. When they first arrived here, the father,
Rabbi Dagobert Nellhaus, could not immediately find a position as a
rabbi. In order to sustain his family, he worked.for a while as bench
hand in a shoe factory. Before they joined the armed forces, the three
brothers were, respectively, a truckman, a high school student, and a
scholarship student at Harvard University. NRS is a beneficiary of
the United Jewish Appeal.


her piquant presence among the
cast, we had :A:intuition that here
was a new Sylvia -,cqne who had
.been htiden *fote,'eari -T-"`'i Un-
known Sylvia. She had been the
drudge, the slavey, the gangster's
mnoll in an endless parade of pic-
tures and plays like "Street Scene,"
"American Tragedy," "Big House,"
and others.
Here is a -sparkling person -
glamorous, petite, dainty yet
spirited. Here is a fun-loving
Sylvia who laughs spontaneously,
musically. A Sylvia divested of
that tragic after-the-rain expres-
sion.
Thinking of a long career ahead,
we had :the temerity to suggest
that an actress of her ability
ought to set sail to a course of
character-acting such as Garson


PINE BLUFF, ARK.


WHO IS SYLVIA
By HELEN ZIGMOND
Hollywood


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubitee

DAVIS HOSPITAL

1111 West 12th Street Phone 3700
PINE BLUFF, ARK.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary

Standard Lumber Company
Manufacturers of
LUMBER, MILL WORK, SASH and DOORS
Jobbers of
GLASS, SHINGLES and ROOFING
PINE BLUFF, ARK.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee

C. FINKBEINER
WHOLESALE PACKERS
301 Mulberry Street PINE BLUFF, ARK.
-___*


if they want me to. For once in
my career I'm deliriously happy-
I have a whole wardrobe of gorge-
ous gowns in this picture!" (She
is playing the part of a Eurasian
in the Jimmy Cagney production,
"Blood on the Sun.")
As she swished about in a long
green-gold gown covered with a
gold cloth coat, bunches of shim-
mering red and white jewelry set-
ting off her black hair, it was easy
to get her point. She looked like
a golden butterfly with black-
tipped wings. Those ugly roles
she used to play in clothes ever
more dingy "It was like serving
a sentence ten years in a prison
apron! ',,
An actress longs"to be beauti-
ful," she said. "That's why she
becomes an actress to escape
into make-believe."
She told how a few days pre-
(Please turn the page)


List Laundry
DRY CLEANERS
Phone 146 :-: 201 EAST BARRAQUE
Pine Bluff, Arkansas


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Bush Service Station
12th and Cher:y Sts. Phone 1300
PINE. BLUFF, ARK.


HELP SPEED THE DAY TO

VICTORY BUY BONDS





HELENA, ARK. YAZOO CITY, MISS. BROOKHAVEN, MISS.


viously she had lunch at the Clif-
ford Odets' menage. The play-
wright was glowingly describing
his latest work, proud of his in-
genuity in achieving simplicity.
His star would wear but one dress
through the entire story. At this
point Sylvia exploded, "She'll hate
you! By the time that picture is
finished, she will literally hate
you!"

HELENA, ARK.

BEST WISHES
Nicholls Printing Co., Inc.
PRINTERS STATIONERS
Looseleaf & Filing Systems
Office Outfitters
Phone Main 896 Helena, Ark.


Best Wishes for the Ledger

DIXIE FURNITURE CO.
219 Cherry Street
Phone Main 93 Helena, Ark.



Best Wishes for the Ledger
Helena National Bank
OF HELENA, ARK.
Member Federal Deposit Ins. Corp.


Best Wishes for the Ledger
Phillips National Bank
HELENA, ARK.
"ROLL OF HONOR BANK"
Member: F. D. I. C.



Best Wishes
S. H. KRESS & CO.
5, 10 and 25c Store
HELENA, ARKANSAS


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Phone Main 1057-198 IARTH
HELENA, ARK.
Phone West 6
WEST HELENA, ARK. **;- 0


Best Wishes for the Ledger
E. T. WALKER
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Office and Shop 503 OHIO ST.
Postoffice Box 186
Phone Main 316 Helena, Ark.


The Yiddish Sylvia
Jimmy Cagney approached the
set. They greeted each other ban-
teringly in Yiddish. Jimmy is an
Irishman Yiddish by environ-
ment he was brought up on New
York's East Side. His Yiddish has
a "Litvichki" flavor, says Sylvia.
And Jimmy claims hers has all the
dialects Litvak, Russian, Galit-
zianer, and so on. .He stands,
studying her make-up ... quips,
"Du kickst vie eine Chinkie!" And
she flashes, "Far vos nit?" im-
plying that the Jewish heritage is
adaptable to any background.


Did she learn Yiddish from her
parents, we ask? No, not at all.
She learned Yiddish at the age of
six as a necessary expedient in
order to talk to her grandmother.
Grandma was strictly Old World
(sheitel and all) and would speak
no English.
The Wife Sylvia
She has never played on the
Yiddish stage, though she married
Luther Adler, of the Yiddish
Theatre "royal family." That five-
year episode in matrimony is now
at an end her role as a wife was


not a happy one. It takes two to
play the scene, and Luther, it
seems, was the little man who
wasn't there. They are separated,
though not yet legally. Luther
contends divorce is not the Adler
tradition. But scrutinizing the
vital statistics it appears the tra-
dition must have skipped a couple
of generations.
Anent, this matter of Adler tra-
dition, Sylvia couldn't resist rela-
ting this incident. Luther, one
bright Yom Kippur morning, was
strolling down Hollywood Boule-
vard and met an acquaintance, an


actors' agent. The latter, bound for
Rabbi Magnin's Temple, coaxed
Luther to accompany him. The
actor, usually Temple-shy, hesi-
tated finally consented. Pre-

BROOKHAVEN, MISS.


State Bank & Trust Co.
The Bank of Friendly Service
Organized 1936
Member Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation
BROOKHAVEN. MISS.


BROOKHAVEN
BANK & TRUST COMPANY
BROOKHAVEN, MISS.
Member Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation


Brookhaven Creamery Co., Inc.
Brookhaven Fancy Creamery
Butter
Whole Milk, Condensed Milk, Sweet
Cream Whole Milk Powder,
Dried Buttermilk, Skimmed
Milk Powder
BROOKHAVEN, MISS.


Best Wishes for the Ledger
ABRAMS MERCANTILE CO.
Distributor
HAPPY FEEDS
in Red Ball Bags
BROOKHAVEN, MISS.


SYAZOO CITY, MISS.

BEST WISHES
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Exum & Williams
Insurance of All Kinds
Phone 80
YAZOO CITY, MISS.


BEST WISHFS
THE GOYER COMPANY
GROCERIES DRUGS
Wholesale Only
YAZOO CITY, MISS.



Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee

DELTA NATIONAL BANK
MEMBERS
Federal Reserve System. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.
YAZOO CITY, MISS


Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee


BANK OF YAZOO CITY
Member of F. D. I. C.

YAZOO CITY, MISSISSIPPI


Temple B'nai Sholom, Brookhaven, Miss.




JACKSON, MISS.


liminary services were dull, but
began to pick up when the rabbi
rose for his sermon. His theme-
the Jews would not be apologetic
of their Jewishness. "In your
veins flows the blood of a Spin-
oza!" he exhorted. "In your veins
flows the blood of an Einstein. In
your veins flows the blood of a
Jacob Adler!" he climaxed. Luther
gasped, blushed, then broke down
and sobbed. He never went there
again such a beautiful coinci-
dence could not possibly occur
twice.
The Mother Sylvia
Her marriage, however, has left
her one real joy Jody. When
you speak of her young son, you
discover Sylvia in her deepest,
most sincere role. Jody is a nick-
name. His legal appellation is
Jacob P. Adler! after his grand-
father. With such a theatrical
heritage he must be dramatically
inclined. Well, she said, it's a
little early to mark his talent, but
whenever she can stop him doing
"Hamlet," she tries to interest him


in "Snow White." Mother Goose
songs bore him, but Richard Tau-
ber goes over big. He attends
nursery school, but has already
had a considerable taste of show
business toured cross-country
with Mommie and Daddy in "Jane
Eyre." He spiels off all the names
of the cities he has been in, and
has very definite idaes about
hotels. Jody is an inexhaustible
subject. Obviously this mother
role is one of her best.
Sylvia, the Actress
To Jimmy Cagney, her pro-
ducer and co-star, she is a "great
actress." He believes he has dis-
covered the real Sylvia and in-
tends to cast her in roles that will
do her justice. She is a strong,
positive character. He has scarce-
ly ever played opposite anyone so
thoroughly versed in the theatre
. . she inspires him to his best
acting.
She was on the stage at the age
of 16, and was an almost instant
success. At 20 she had too much
(Continued on page 35 )


Temple Beth Israel, Jackson, Miss.


Roll of Honor
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL, JACKSON, MISS


David H. Rice
Andrew Orkin
Adolph J. Orkin, Jr.
Stanley Orkin
Lazar Cohen
Bernard Cohen
Leonard Cohen
Marvin Cohen
A. Lehman Engel
Max Berman
Roger Rosenfield
Louis Swerdling
William Schwartz
David Waterman
Irwin Gerald Waterman


Emanuel Bernstein
John Hart Lewis
Raymond Oppenheim
Ruth Oppenheim
Myron Hirsch
Mrs. Myron Hirsch
Louis Gardner, Jr.
Isidore Lewine
Meyer Falk
Max Brod
Abe Rotwein
Conan Millstein
Stanley Lovett
Joseph King
Emanuel Crystal


Washington (JTA) The De- ended in a mistrial last fall, it was
apartment of Justice expects to be learned here, but difficulties in
ready by the end of April to re- finding a judge may compel fur-
sume the mass sedition trial which their postponements.



JACKSON DAILY NEWS
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI
Mississippi's Greatest Daily Newspaper
85c Month $10.40 Year


H. L. White, President L. C. Gilbert, Manager

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JACKSON, MISS.


Best. Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
PARAMOUNT THEATRE
MAJESTIC THEATRE
CENTURY THEATRE
Jackson, Miss.


Best Wishes

S. P. McRae Company,
INC.
Jackson, Mississippi


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Etferebge
CLEANERS
Dial 4-4413 Jackson, Miss.



Jackson Hardware Co., Inc.
"Everything in Hardware"
DIAL 2-0'711,
JACKSON, : MISS.


BEST WISpiBS "-
FRANK T. -SCOTT
CLERK OF THE CHANCERY COURT
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI



PURSER BROTHERS
The House of Better Printing
PRINTERS :: ENGRAVERS
DIAL 2-3288
JACKSON, MISS.


JACKSON GLASS & MIRROR
CO., INC. ,
Auto Glass-Mirrors and Resilvering
Picture and Mirror Framing
225 East South St. Phone 3-2701
JACKSON, MISS.



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DIAL 2-2616
Dudley Phelps, Gen'l Mgr.
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI


"Say It With Flowers"

Capital Floral Company
LINDSEY CABANISS, Manager
Flowers For All Occasions
Phones 3-2405,3-2611 :-: Jackson, Miss.

PAINT GLASS WALLPAPER
For "EVERY PURPOSE"
Capital Paint & Glass Co.
401 SOUTH STATE ST.
Dial 4-6617 Jackson, Miss.


Henry Morgenthau, Jr. e The

Voice of the Refugee Board

By MURIEL LEVIN


T is not generally known, but
Henry Morgenthau, Jr., for
twelve years Secretary of the
Treasury, is the weighty voice be-
hind the War Refugee Board.
A tall, shy man whose relations
with the press and consequently
the public have been awkward.
Morgenthau is the type of admin-
istrator who fosters initiative in
the experts he harnesses for the
Treasury Department, though he
maintains the whiphand through-
out. Legendary are the daily
meetings of his "9:30 group." Ga-
thered at a round table every
morning, each of his assistants in
turn .has a chance to voice his

At Beth Israel


Rabbi Meyer Lovitt serves the mem-
bers of Congregation Beth Israel at
Jackson, Miss.

problems and gripes, and the
group, very much dominated by
6lVIogenthau, seeks ways out of
dilemnas.
It was not at one of these meet-
ings that the idea of the War Refu-
gee Board was advanced, accord-
ing to Herbert E. Gaston, senior
Assistant Secretary of the Treas-
ury, upon whom Morgenthau leans
heavily for public relations. But
it might well have been, and it was
this willingness to listen to his un-
derlings that resulted in his being
approached' by a group of young
Treasury Department aides, among
whom were Randolph Paul, then


general consul, and John W. Pehle,
a specialist in charge of the foreign
funds control.
They knew, too, that Morgen-
thau, son of a distinguished Jewish
lawyer and philanthropist, who
made a fortune in Bronx real es-
tate, has had a well-developed
"social conscience" since his teens
when his desire to improve social
conditions drew him to work at the
Henry Street Settlement in New
York. Later, when he had forsaken
real estate and banking for farm-
ing in upstate New York, he and
his young wife, Elinor Fatman, a
niece of the Lehmans, furnished
East Fishkill Township with its
first clinic, organized a small mo-
bile library, and ran a crusading
farm magazine.
Appalled by the terror in Eur-
ope, brought into focus for them
through their dealings with refu-
gees here whose funds they con-
trolled, the Treasury Department
aides broached to Morgenthau the
idea of U. S. action to save the Jews
from the fate decreed by the Nazis.
They talked fast and often and
sold Morgenthau the bill of goods.
He agreed to talk to the President.
The Roosevelts and the Morgen-
thaus have been friends for more
than thirty years. In 1912 when
Roosevelt was a New York State
Senator, Morgenthau, Sr., whom
Wilson later appointed U. S. Am-
bassador to Turkey, was chairman
of the finance committee of the
Democratic National Committee.
It was at Democratic headquarters
in Manhattan, then, that the two
men met, and they began to see
a good deal of one another a few
years later when bbth were coun-
try squires in Duchess country. All
during Roosevelt's serious illness
the Morgenthaus were around.
Then, in 1928, Morgenthau parti-
cipated in gubernatorial campaign
tours, and went to Albany with
Roosevelt, first to head his Agri-
cultural Advisory Committee,
which drafted farm-relief meas-
ures, and later to act as Conser-
vative commissioner. He followed
Roosevelt to Washington in 1933


Best Wishes
WHARTON & ROBERTS
Agents
Established 1890
Insurance
201 North Lamar Street
JACKSON, MISS.


I. S. BARNES, INC.
Paint, Wallpaper and Hardware
Natural Gas Appliances
424-426 W. Capitol Street
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI


McKay Plumbing Company
ORIOLE GAS RANGES
Plumbing Repairs
124 N. LAMAR ST. DIAL 4-6528
Jackson, Mississippi


Best Wishes
DAVIS
SEED and FEED STORE
519 E. Pearl Dial 2-0853
JACKSON, MISS.


CONEY ISLAND GRILL
AIR CONDITIONED
QUALITY FOOD SERVED
Since 1920
Phone 2-2218 113 N. Lamar St.
JACKSON, MISS.


Best Wishes

Central Drug Store
700 N. Mill St. Dial 2-0148
JACKSON, MISS.


Jackson Monument Co.
WEST CAPITOL STREET,
Opposite Cedarlawn Cemetery
P. O. Box ':95 Dial 2-2084
One of the Largest and Most
Modern Plants South
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI









Best Wishes
W. S. HAMILTON W. E. BLAKE
Sanitary Poultry Market
Under New Management
POULTRY EGGS
JACKSON, MISS.


Best Wishes
S. J. Butler Lawn Mower Shop
Lawn Mowers Repaired
Keys of All Kinds
124 S. President Dial 4-8416
JACKSON, MISS.





JACKSON,


as chairman of the Federal Farm
Board. He quickly consolidated
all government farm lending agen-
cies into the Farm Credit Admin-
istration, which soon was lending
millions to farmers.
He became Roosevelt's Secre-
tary in January, 1934, when Sec-
retary Woodin resigned because of
ill-health just three months after
Morgenthau had been appointed
Under-Secretary of the Treasury.
His relations with his boss have
continued to be intimate, despite
-the "models of formality" by
which he communicates with the
White House. Both families visit
one another and make merry to-
gether.
Just how Morgenthau convinced
his old friends is something that
he has not revealed. But on Jan-
uary, 1944, the President set up
by Executive Order a War Refugee
Board consisting of the Secretary of
State, the Secretary of the Treas-
ury and the Secretary of War, to
rescue from the Nazis as many as
possible of the persecuted minori-
ties of Europe. He stressed that
"it was urgent that action be taken
at once to forestall the plan of the
Nazis to exterminate all the Jews
and other persecuted minorities in
Europe."
Appointed acting executive di-
rector was one of the young Treas-
ury Department aides, John W.
Pehle, whom Morgenthau granted
leave of absence from his regular
post. The WRB office was set up
in the Treasury Department build-
ing, and drew much of its person-
nel and equipment from that De-
partment.
Whether or not Morgenthau di-
rectly dictates the day-to-day
policy is a moot question, but the
Secretary is kept fully informed
of what is going on at every mo-
ment. There is little doubt that
he of the three Board members
plugs, backs, fights for WRB. When
the President's policy on immigra-
tion to the United States appeared
a little hazy, Morgenthau and Pehle
were seen crossing the street from
the Treasury Department to the
side entrance of the White House.
Next press conference, the Presi-
dent's policy on immigration to
the United States appeared a good
deal less hazy, and in the not too
distant future he announced the


establishment of Fort Ontario as
an "emergency refugee shelter."
One thousand refugees were to be
admitted to the United States as a
talking point before the rest of the
world, for the WRB had been
severely hampered by having our
country's failures thrown in its
face.
When it appeared that some-
thing might be done for the Hun-
garian Jews through Admiral
Horthy's offer to the International
Red Cross to release those with
entrance visas to Palestine and
elsewhere, the British provided
bottlenecks. Morgenthau, on a
tour of war theatres to investigate
currency matters, hied himself to
the top man in England and l-
ed turkey. In short order,- the
United Stats'and ..Great Britain

Business Leader


Isidore Lehman is one of the most
prominent leaders in the business
world of Jackson, Miss.
issued a statement accepting
Horthy's offer. Unfortunately,
mass deportations were resumed
after a shake-up in the Hungarian
cabinet, and so his efforts appear
to have been of little avail.
Meanwhile, the progress of the
war in Europe has been solving
many of the War Refugee Board's
problems. Employees are opti-
mistically placing bets that they
will be out of jobs within a few
months, for the fall of Hitler
means finis for the. War Refugee
Board.
But it looks very much as
though Morgenthau may remain in
Washington for another four years.
Anyway, the odds are with him.
Copyright 1945, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.


Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

Mississippi Baptist Hospital
CORNER NORTH STATE AND MANSHIP STREETS
Phone 4-4471 Long Distance 4-9340
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI


The Mississippi Paper for Mississippi People
85c Per Month $10.40 Per Year
Published Every Day in the Year
DAILY CLARION LEDGER
JACKSON, MISS.
Mississippi's Leading Newspaper for More Than a Century


-Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth Anniversary

' HOTEL HEIDELBERG
J. H. WOODARD, Manager

JACKSON, MISS.




JITNEY JUNGLE

Save a nickel On a Quarter

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI



SERVING THE PUBLIC SINCE 1901
JACKSON STEAM LAUNDRY
I. LEHMAN, President
LEHMANIZED DRY CLEANING
JACKSON, MISS.



Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee


KENNINGTON'S
STYLE QUALITY
JACKSON, MISS.



Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee
RITTER FOOD STORES
JACKSON, MISS.
Where the Best Costs Less
7 STORES IN JACKSON
One in Your Neighborhood


GEORGE PAPPAS JOHN PAPPAS
TRY THE
JEFFERSON GRILL
Jackson's Newest and Most Modern Restaurant
KANSAS CITY STEAKS OUR SPECIALTY
238 W. Capitol JACKSON, MISS. Opposite Edwards Hotel


MISS.




GULFPORT, MISS. -- JACKSON, MISS.


Menuhin Had A Date In Paris
By MELVIN SALZMAN


yEHUDI Menuhin made a date
with General de Gaulle last
year to play in Paris as soon as
the French capital was liberated.
A few weeks ago he kept that
date and the people of Paris
were treated to the rare sight and
sound of a distinguished Jewish
musician playing the work of a
distinguished Jewish composer:
the violin concerto of Felix Man-
delssohn.
It marked the first time in more
than four dreary years that a Jew
had appeared on a concert stage
in France or that music by a Jew-
ish composer had been heard in a
Paris concert hall.
"However, there were not many
Jews in the audience that attend-
ed the concert," Menuhin said.
"So many have disappeared. I
could find no traces of many of
my friends.
We spoke to the young violinist
a few days after he had returned
by plane from Europe, following
a tour of Paris, Brussels and Ant-
werp.
Seated in a dressing room in
Carnegie Hall, where he was prac-
ticing for a performance of the

GULFPORT, MISS.


'est Wishes For The Ledger



GULFPORT, MISS.


'Best Wishes
Hogue Lumber & Supply Co.
Wholesale and Retail
Lumber and Building Materials
Phone 1840 GULFPORT, MISS.


D RINK---


IN BOTTLES
Coast Coca-Cola Bottling Co.
GULFPORT, MISS.


ABAZZI BROS.
RAGS, WASTE PAPER, IRON, Etc.
Scrap Material of All Kinds ..
BOUGHT & SOLD
Phone 314 :-: Gulfport, Miss.


Mendelssohn concerto he was to
give that night with the New York
Philharmonic, Menuhin tried to
answer my questions as to what


once again." The fact of libera-
tion was still so new when he was
in France and Belgium that the
people appeared to be a bit dazed
by their new freedom.
Although there were no Jewish
musicians performing publicly, the
Jewish and non-Jewish popula-


ISAAC M. WISE LIBERTY SHIP


well known Jewish musicians re-
mained in France and Belgium,
but he found great difficulty. Most
of them have disappeared; either
killed, deported or just coming out
of hiding.
The few that remain, he said,
are amazed at their good fortune
in surviving the German terror.
A well known Belgium Jewish
pianist, DeVrees, was so anxious
to get back onto a concert stage-
in any fashion that he volun-
teered to turn pages during Menu-
hin's concert in Antwerp. And De
Vrees was more fortunate than
most. He was sheltered all during
the occupation by non-Jewish
friends and even had a piano on
which to practice.
Everywhere he went, Menuhin
said, people grabbed him by the
hand and told him: "You don't
know what it means to hear music


tion clung to music for the spiritual
solace it afforded them and as a
link with their pre-war cultural
life, Menuhin was told. Through-
out the occupation concerts were
given regularly.
Those few Jews in the musical
world who were not immediately
molested by the Germans refused
to accept any favors, Menuhin
found. Lazar Levy, who taught
piano at the Paris Conservatiore,
left his post voluntarily when the
Germans came, and they were able
to secure no replacement for him,
although there were collaboration-
ists among the French musicians.
Men like Pablo Casals, the
'cellist, and Jacques Thibaud, the
violinist, did not submit to the
Nazi blandishments, and were still
in the good graces of the French
people, Menunin learned. Other
musicians, however, such as Alfred
Cortot, the pianist, had "co-
operated" and were "done for" as
far as patriotic Frenchmen were
concerned.
Besides his concert in Paris,
(Continued on page 34)

JACKSON, MISS.

"BETTER SERVICE"
555 Tire and Service

Co., Inc.
JOE T. DEHMER, President
Phone 4-6555 Jackson, Miss.


JS X OF COURSE

WHERE QUALITY AND PRICE MEET IN HAPPY ACCORD









JACKSON, - -MISSISSIPPI


Congratulations and Best Wishes
On Attaining Your Fiftieth Anniversary

THE ROTISSERIE

JACKSON, MISS.




GREENWOOD, MISS.


Best Wishes
MAMELLI'S OPTICAL SHOP
"Your Eyes Are My Business"
DR. J. D. MAMELLI
EYES TESTED GLASSES FITTED
Phone 372 216 Howard St.
GREENWOOD, MISS.


Colvard's Bakery
Bakers of Cream Bread
Cakes and Pies
Phone 703 418 Howard
GREENWOOD, MISS.

For Everything a Department Store
Carries

Fountain's
The Delta's Greatest Store
GREENWOOD, MISS.

WILLIAMSON PAINT &
WALLPAPER CO.
Distributors DeSoto 100% Pure
Paint
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
11 Howard St. Phone 803
GREENWOOD, MISS.

BEST WISHFS
BARRY & BREWER
GENERAL INSURANCE
W. S. Barry, Jr. David J. Brewer
Phone 141 221 Howard
GREENWOOD, MISS.


BEST WISHES
DE LOACH'S LADIES'
READY-TO-WEAR SHOP
312 Howard Phone 20
GREENWOOD, MISS.

Mary L. Quinn Jesse J. Quinn
Greenwood Sheet Metal
Works
SHEET METAL ROOFING
Phone 677-J 805 Henderson St.
GREENWOOD, MISS.


BEST WISHES
Delta Steam Laundry
Dry Cleaning Department
Phone 833
Greenwood, :-: Mississippi


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
THE
TRIANGLE GROCERY
Phone 615 415 Howard St.
GREENWOOD, MISS.



Jitney Jungle
Save a Nickel On a Quarter
GREENWOOD, MISS.


Roll of Honor

CONGREGATION AkAVATH
RAYIM, GREENWOOD, MISS.

Charles Bennett
Jerome Bennett
David Braslow
Isidore M. Braslow
Sol Braslow
David Brody
Robert D. Cohn
Harry Diamond
Simon Diamond
Louis N. Davidson
Leon Dickoff
Marvin Henry Fink
Abe Frey
Simon Fried
Meyer Gelman
Milton Gertz
Irving Goldberg
Isaac Goldberg
Louis Goldberg
Aron Gordon
Joe Hyam
Laurie Hyam
Julius Hyman
Alvin Kahn
Morris Kahn
Bernard Kantor
Sol Kantor
Adolph Kaplan
Gustave Kaplan
Dr. H. J. Kaplan
Dr. Max Kaplan
Barney Kornfeld
Leslie Kornfeld
Earl Levitt
Marshall Levitt
Oscar Levitt
Bernard Mayer
Herald Mayer
Roy Mayer
Frank Orlansky
Louis Orlansky
Gerard Peltz
Julius Peltz
Gerald Rayman
Luther Rayman
Sam Rayman
Richard Rich
Charles V. Resenblu-m
Bernard Schneider
Walter Schwartz
Abe Siegel
Paul Siegel
Philip Siegel
Charles Stern
Lester Yalowitz
Bernard Yolles
Dr. Morris Zangwill
v


BUY WAR BONDS


Jerusalem, (JTA) A group of
233 Yemenite Jews arrived here
from the Joint Distribution refu-
gee camp in Aden, where some of
them have been for years, await-
ing permission to enter Palestine.
The camp is now almost empty,
but about 500 to 700 other Jews
from Yemen are stranded in the
desert, suffering from hunger and
disease, because they are not able
to immigrate here.
v
Washington, (JTA) The State
Department in a survey of dis-
placed populations in Europe made
public this week, disclosed that
not more than 5,000 "non-Aryans"
are left in Germany.


REST WISHES
Greenwood Grocery Co.
Wholesale Grocers
GREENWOOD, MISS.


BEST WISHES
Hotel Greenwood Leflore
Greenwood's Newest Hotel.
Reconditioned Modern Comfort-
able Air Cooling System
GREENWOOD, MISS.


BEST WISHES
Anderson Drug Store
HOBSON ANDERSON,
Registered Pharmacist
Phone 1313
Cor. Fulton and Market Sts.
GREENWOOD, MISS.


BEST WISHES
FROM

TO) 70anth of ( reentoob

GREENWOOD, MISSISSIPPI

Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth Anniversary

Leflore Bank & Trust Company
Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

GREENWOOD, MISS.


Best Wishes
FROM

Bank of Commerce
Organized 1904 : Member of F. D. I. C.
GREENWOOD, MISSISSIPPI



DRINK D DELICI0 US
-AND-
REFRESHING
COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY
GREENWOOD, MISSISSIPPI


LEE FUNERAL HOME
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
Phone 1181 : : : 100 East Church Street
GREENWOOD, MISS.


Oeat liltbe of Whittington Dry Goods Co., Inc.

WHOLESALE
Dry Goods, Notions and Furnishings
Long Distance Phone 540 GREENWOOD, MISS.









GREENWOOD, MISS. -


CLARKSDALE,


Roll of Honor


Mau
Sam
Bern
Ben
Mary
Sam
Lous
Stan
Hern
J. L
Arth
Jaco
JuliN


TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL and B'NAI B'RITH LODGE,
CLARKSDALE, MISS.
rice Aaronson Nathan Katz
Abrams Irwin Kaufman
>ard Adelson Caesar Kerstine
Auerbach Alvin M. Labens
in Bacharach Max A. Ladt, Jr.
Baker Charles Levine
Baskin Harold Lee Levine
ley Baskin Julius Levy, M. D.
ian Binder Ralph Levy
amar Block Harold Lipson, Jr.
tur L. Bloom Charles Marcus
b Bloom Robert Louis Marcus
an S. Bloom Leo A. Marks, Jr.


Morris Bernhardt
Phil Cassell
David Califf
Bernard Cohen
Leon Dickoff
Sol Leon Frank
Charles Friedman
Robert S. Friedman
Herman Gronauer
Stanley Hirsch
D. H. Hirschberg
Irwin Jacobson
Louis Jacobson
Ira Y. Kantor
Leon Kantor
Philip Kantor


iAL CRO8
F COLA
2 FU LL
DELTA NEHI BOTTLING CO.
GREENWOOD. MISS.

Best Wishes
FROM
Warner Wells Insurance
Agency
All Forms of Insurance
Greenwood, Miss.


BEST WISHES

Jordan & Co.
FURNITURE
GREENWOOD, MISS.


BEST WISHES
J. D. Lanham Supply Co.
Plumbing, Heating & Electrical
Supplies
Phones 1 and 2 Greenwood, Miss.


BEST WISHES
PAY CASH-PAY LESS!
B & R DEPT. STORE
HONEST QUALITY HONEST
PRICES HONEST VALUES
215 Carrollton
GREENWOOD, MISS.


At Beth Israel


Rabbi Benjamin Kelson serves the
congregation of Temple Beth Israel,
Clarksdale, Miss.


Abe May
Bernard Mayer
Harold Mayer
Roy Mayer
Nathan Okun
Milton Raines
Ben Rappport
Eddie Rappaport
Melvin Rappaport
Sam Rappaport
Joe Louis Sack
Harry Lee Salamon
Cecil Saloman
Sam Schwartz, Jr.
Irwin Shankerman
Irwin Sebulsky
Norman Sebulsky
Leon Segal
Jake Silverstein
Jerome Silverstein
Jerry Silverstein
Irwin Simpkins
A. B. Small


Isadore Small
Sonny Smith
Bernard Tonkel
Daniel Tonkel
Arnold Turner
Bernard Yaffee
Herman Yaffee
Mose Wander
Sam Wasserman
Isidore Weiner
Dave Woolbert

V
-----v-----~

A DATE IN PARIS
(Continued from page 32)
which was arranged by the gov-
ernrrent for the benefit of war
refugees, and his concert in Ant-
-werp, Menuhin played in Brussels
and gave two concerts near Ver-
sallies for American troops. The
Antwerp concert, he revealed,
took place about three miles from
the battle lines.

His entire trip took only five
days, which kept him scurrying,
he said, but he hopes to return to
Europe in the near future, when
the situation is more stabilized, for
a more liesurely tour.
Meanwhile, he expects to fill a
busy concert schedule this season,
at the same time, sandwiching in
performances for troops stationed
here.
Copyright 1945, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.

Best Wishes for The Ledger

POSTOFFICE CAFE
"The Pride of Clarksdale
SAM LARIGAKIS, Prop.
Clarksdale, M'ss.


BOB KREMSER
Sheet Metal Works
Automatic Heat-Floor Furnaces
Attic Ventilation
Phone 13 320 E. Second St.
CLARKSDALE, MISS.


DIXIE CHEVROLET COMPANY



First In Service
121 DELTA AVENUE
Phone 1550 :-: Clarksdale, Miss.


Best Wishes for The Ledger
COAHOMA COUNTY BANK
& TRUST COMPANY
Member F. D. I. C.
Resources Over $4,000,000.00
CLARKSDALE, MISS.


MODERN AIR-COOLED
ALCAZAR HOTEL
ONE OF MISSISSIPPI'S BEST
DAN J. LEONARD, Mgi.
Clarksdale, Miss.


Best Wishes for The Ledger

DELTA GROCERY &
COTTON CO.
Wholesale Grocers Cotton Factors
CLARKSDALE, MISS.


BEST WISHES

Haggard Drug Store
PHONE 29
CLARKSDALE, MISS.



Tb)e Notwer uop
"Flowers for All Occasions"
Wedding Bouquets, Pot Plants, Corsages
Funeral Designs, Decorations
Day Phone 377 :-: Night Phone 776
310 Yazoo St. Clarksdale, Miss.


BEST WISHES
YEP! We Have Fine Baked Goods
ALL'S PASTRY SHOP
Phone 80 247 Delta Avenue
CLARKSDALE, MISS.


BEST WISHES

WADE HARDWARE CO.
WHOLESALE
Greenwood and Clarksdale, Miss.


BEST WISHES
Clarksdale Printing Co.
"Your Stationer for a Quarter Century"
PHONE 26
CLARKSDALE, MISS.


BEST WISHES
Cash and Carry Cleaners
HAROLD BECK, Proprietor
TELEPHONE 760
CLARKSDALE, MISS.


MISS.


Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee
J. H. JOHNSON & CO., INC.
GENERAL INSURANCE
YOUR BUSINESS IS HIGHLY APPRECIATED
Serving the Public Continuously for 50 Years
CLARKSDALE, MISS.





VICKSBURG, MISS.


Near Erfurt, Germany (JTA) -
Dr. Bela Fabian, president of the
dissolved Hungarian Independent
Democratic party, accused the
Germans of killing 5,000,000 Jews
at Oswiecim extermination camp.


BEST WISHES

Cox Motor Coaches

VICKSBURG, MISS.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
Vicksburg Laundry and
Cleaners
Phones: 1-162 Vicksburg, Miss.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee

FIRESTONE
STORES
Phone 142 1412 Washington
VICKSBURG, MISS.

JOHN D. EVANS Telephone 671
RYAN COAL COMPANY
DISTRIBUTORS
Dogwood, Montevallo Red COAT
Ash, Brilliant and Galloway CO L
WASHINGTON and FIRST EAST STS.
VICKSBURG MISS.


COMPLETE DAIRY SERVICE
Pennebaker Dairyland
VELVET ICE CREAM
1200 Openwood Street
Phone 697 Vicksburg, Miss.


Allen's Dairy Products Co., Inc.
Grade "A" Pasteurized Dairy Products
ICE CREAM IN ALL FLAVORS
We Deliver
Phone 311 : -: VICKSRURG, MISS.

Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
R. C. Wilkerson, Inc.
General INSURANCE Agents
Provision Brokers
first National Bank Bldg. :-: Phones 67 and 68
VICKSBURG, MISS.

Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
BROOME'S FLOWERS
Phone 220-J 803 South St.
FARMER'S SEED & SUPPLY. CO.
Phone 144 1517 Washington St.
VICKSBURG, MISS.

Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
SAL MARX
INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS
*I Know My Policies"
Phone 126 :-: Merchants Nat'l Bank BI'dg.
Vicksburg, Miss.


Roll of Honor
TEMPLE ANSHE CHESED, VICKSBURG, MISS.


Evelyn Lustberg
Earl M. Basinsky, Jr.
Fred X. Brownstein
Isadore Feder
J. M. Fried, Jr.
Saul Fried
David B. Fried, Jr.
Leo Joseph Fischel
Paul Milton Goldfarb
Harold Gotthelf, Jr. ::
Ned. Gotthelf
Rolf Gundy, Jr.
Chas. Beer Hirsch
Rolf Jacobs
Edwin Murvin Jacobs
Clarence Kestenbaum
Milton Klein
Sam Klaus, Jr.
Max Klaus
Sylvan Klaus
Reginald Kahn
Eugene Rose, Jr.
Nathan Levy, Jr.
David Friefeld
Wilfred Rostein


WHO IS SYLVIA
(Continued from page 29)
money, and too much fame. It
was too great a load for young
shoulders. She looks back on those
days with the cynicism of an old-
timer. Good things came to. her

Vicksburg Rabbi


Rabbi Stanley R. Brav, of Temple
Anshe Chesed, Vicksburg, Miss., also
takes an active part in other Jewish
activities.

too quickly, too easily. Today, at
34, she can meet success with a
better balance. Outwardly she's


Waldon Klaus
Leonard Lang
Jimmie Laudenheimer
Paul Levy
Henry Levi
Nathan B. Lewis
Francis Leyens
Ivan Lustberg
Alfred Lustberg
Seymour Metzger
Marion Metzger, Jr.
Arthur Meyer.
Leonard E. Nelson
Joseph Rostein
Maurice Sadol
Milton Sadol
Dan Teller
Leonard Warren
Edgar Willis
Cedric Feibleman, Jr.
Max M. Feibleman
Herman Cohen
Herman Jacobs
L. E.' Block


an ingenue with her girlish figure,
pretty, petite features. But she is
more than that. She has keen
insight and understanding that
come with years in the theatre.

She doesn't like being called "a
great actress." Her real claim to
fame is being "the best chopped-
chicken-liver maker in the world!"
-And she adds, "I also render my
own chicken fat!"
Whether she remains in pictures
this time depends on John Q. Pub-
lic. Will the fans discover in her
a new Sylvia? the real Sylvia? But
then which is the real Sylvia?
Copyright 1945, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.


east wli~bef
A. J. MARTIN
tlonumentre
VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI


BULK GARDEN AND FIELD SEED
FUL-O-PEP FEED
Jackson Seed & Feed Store
1414 Washington St. Tel. 666
Vicksburg, Miss.



Vicksburg Serv-Ice Co.
Ice & Modern Ice Appliance Sales
Phone 500 : 1600 Washington
VICKSBURG, MISS.



VOELLINGER FLORAL CO.
MRS. OTTO VOELLINGER
"Say It With Flowers"
COLBERT HOTEL BUILDING
Phones: 1739 1835
Vicksburg, Mississippi



DAVIS GRILL
HOME OF FINE STEAKS
Air-Conditioned. 1408 Washington St.
Open All Night Phone 2655
Vicksburg, Miss.


BEST WISHES
Established 1898
P. L. HENNESSEY & BRO.
INSURANCE
REAL ESTATE :-: RENTALS
Vicksburg, Miss.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
WILSON F. CARROLL, Agent
GENERAL INSURANCE
Phone 1170
309-10 Merchants Nat'I Bank Bldg.
VICKSBURG, MISS.


DRINK





COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. VICKSBURG, MISS.




STATIONERY and BOOKS

MISSISSIPPI PRINTING CO.
Cor. South and Mulberry Sts. Phones 360-361
VICKSBURG, MISS.




VICKSBURG, MISS.


The Survivors of Bachenwald
By MEYER LEVIN
(Copyright, 1945, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.)
(Jewish Telegraphic Agency War Correspondent)


(EDITOR'S NOTE: Meyer Levin,
Jewish Telegraphic Agency correspon-
dent in Germany, spent over a week
at the Buchenwald concentration camp
immediately after its liberation by
Allied troops. There he spoke to Jews
from all over Europe who had sur-
vived the Nazi massacres. In the fol-
lowing article, he gives the stories of
some typical survivors.)
ALL week I have been talking
to Jews who survived the
greatest mass murder in the his-
tory of mankind. Each one owes


ly reflects their minds. It is a
composite image of trains running
three-tracked into smoking crema-
toriums, of remote Polish villages
whose mudruts were filled with
human bodies, of a German officer,
playfully lining up a group of
Jewish children, patting their
heads until they were precisely
one head behind the other and then
putting a single bullet through the


Temple Anshe Chesed, Vicksburg, Miss.


his continued existence to a suc-
cession of miracles, accidents, over-
sights. My mind has become in
the faintest way like their minds;
I am beginning to understand how
they feel. No one who has not
been through their experience can
ever understand them, for these
people have gone through a sieve
of death four years, five years, six
years continuously Tons of ash-
es, the ashes of seven million of
their people, have gone through
the sieve, and these few are the
last bits of cinder and stone some-
how adhering to the mesh.
My mind, after this week, faint-


line, of a woman holding her baby
aloft over her head while savage
police dogs ripped her apart, and
through every image I see the
brown, earnest, undeniable eyes of
a survivor who tells me this, and
over each image is stamped the
ever-recurring line, "I saw it, I
saw it with my own eyes."
I have taken down some typical
survivor stories. Here is the story
of one man. By his appearance,
you would not have believed he
could survive a single week of
hardship. He is small, and small-
boned, like a slum-bred 13-year-
old boy; he has an intellectual face,


"The Friendly Bank"


First National Bank

and Trust Co.
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

Vicksburg, Mississippi



Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth Anniversary


The Vicksburg Infirmary

1022 Harrison Street

PHONES 545 and 546



Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth Anniversary


Mercy Hospital-Street Memorial
(FORMERLY VICKSBURG SANITARIUM)
Phone 2800

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI




O'NEILL-McNAMARA HARDWARE CO.
HEADQUARTERS FOR EVERYTHING IN
UP-TO-DATE HARDWARE
SPORTING GOODS AND FARM IMPLEMENTS
GIFTS
Largest Distributors in Mississippi
PHONE 1070 VICKSBURG, MISS.


FRANK J. FISHER

Funeral Home

Phone 95


VICKSBURG,


: : : : MISSISSIPPI





NATCHEZ, MISS.


widening upward from a delicate
chin to a broad forehead; he wears
glasses. His name is Mordecai
Striegler, and though he is not yet
30, it is a name that was begin-
ning to be known in Jewish litera-
ture.
Striegler lived through the
bombing of Warsaw; that is now
only a remote overture to horror.
As the German Army approached
Warsaw, he helped build barri-
cades, and fought with the Polish
resistance on the barricades, but
no sooner had the first Nazi tank
pierced the barrier than the Poles
themselves pointed him out, cry-
ing. "Jew." He was loaded onto
a truck ,taken to a jail, kicked,
slugged, urinated upon; then the
Nazis took a razor blade and cut


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee

S. H. Kress & Co.
5-10-25c STORES
NATCHEZ, MISS.


Best Wishes
Natchez Equipment Co.
INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER
Motor Trucks & Farm Equipment
Phone 210 209 Main St.
NATCHEZ, MISS.

Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
ESTABLISHED BUSINESS IN 1883
Salvo & Berdon Candy Co.
Manufacturing Confectioners
Factory and Office: 110-112 S. Wall St.
NATCHEZ, MISS.

Best Wishes on Your Fiftieth Anniversary
B. G. Newman Paint Store
Yes, Sir-BLP Mobile Paint,
Roofing, Wall Paper, Glass
Phone 931 121 S. Commerce St.
NATCHEZ, MISS.


BEST WISHES
TOPS GRILL
FAMOUS FOR STEAKS and SALADS
NATCHEZ, MISS.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee

PEOPLES
ICE CO.
Natchez, Miss. Phone 783


Tom L. Ketchings Co.
PRINTING BINDING RULING
OFFICE SUPPLIES
Telephone 336 200 S. Pearl St.
Natchez, Mississippi


small swastikas upon his cheeks
and forehead not too deep -
just-enough for the blood to trace
neat red lines. The marks are still
there.
For a few weeks his company
of Jews was sent out to work. The
City's gas reservoirs were aflame;
they had to climb around the
smoke-choked reservoirs. to fight
the fire, 24 hours on end. Many
died; he survived.
The survivors were crowded into
a boxcar; Mordecia came to his
first labor camp, at a place called


Natchez Rabbi


Rabbi Harry Caplan, Rabbi of Temple
B'nai Israel, Natchez, Miss.


Roll of Honor
TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL
Natchez, Miss.
George Abrams
Lawrence Abrams
Milton Abrams
Heiman Cohn
Abie Frishman
Jake Frishman
Fred Geisenberger
Carl H. Goldberg
Morris S. Goldberg
Herbert Heilberg
Alfred Millstein
Jack Millstein
E. F. Preis
Edwin G. Preis
L. K. Preis
Elliot Rubin
Simon Shiff
Marion Simon
William Stein, Jr.
Cassius Tillman, Jr.
Clifford Tillman
Elaine Ullman (Wave)


Praga. I haven't got the names
of these towns spelled correctly, as
they are remote, difficult, Slavic
names; but it is all the same, they
are. all places of blood and extinc-
tion. In each place there were
the daily lineups for inspection of
those fit to live, the random mas-
sacres, the pointing finger you
to this line, you to that line, and
presently the first line would be
mowed down, the second line
marched off to work.
"I don't know how many times
I went through such lines, how
many different ways I escaped af-
ter I had been put into the death
group. Sometimes the inspections
were at night; they would come
into the barracks and line us up,
under searchlights, under reflec-
tors, they would line us up naked
and have us turn before them, in-
specting us from all sides, and if
they saw a blemish on a man, he
went to the deathheap. I looked
stronger then."
From the first camp, he escaped,
together with a dozen others. They
made their way on foot, 60 miles
to the Russian border. There,
near Treblinka, they were trapped
in the half-mile area between the
Russian and German borders.
Within a few days, 60,000 Jews,
trying to flee Poland, lay there in
the narrow neutral passage, with-
out food, without shelter. One
night Mordecai crept into a village
on the German side, seeking food.
He was caught. Again, forced


labor, this time building a bridge
at Malkine. And queerly, when the
job was done, they let him go
home. We went to Warsaw, res-
(Please turn the page)
BEST WISHES
H. F. Byrne Company
Department Store ..
700-706 FRANKLIN STREET
NATCHEZ, MISS.

Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
EVANS-BYRNE-METCALF
INSURANCE AGENCY
INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS
P. 0. Box 164 : NATCHEZ, MISS.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee

COLE & Co.
NATCHEZ, MISS.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee

SA.i :ii i iA


517 Main St.


Natchez, Miss.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
Chris. Maier & Son
FLORIST AND NURSERY
We Telegraph Flowers Everywhere
Phone 1442 NATCHEZ, MISS.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
Natchez Ice Company
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
ICE
Phone 1471
NATCHEZ, MISS.


ALLISON H. FOSTER

FUNERAL HOME

Natchez, Miss.



Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth Anniversary

City Bank & Trust Company
MEMBER F. D. I. C.

NATCHEZ, MISSISSIPPI


2 OUTSIDE ROOMS CIRCULATING ICE WATER
125 WITH BATH IN EVERY ROOM
EVERY ROOM WITH CEILING FAN

EOLA HOTEL
CLARENCE C. EYRICH, Manager
NATCHEZ, : : : : : : MISSISSIPPI




MERIDIAN,


cued a suitcase full of manuscripts,
got on a train for the town where
his parents lived Zamelsch,
near Lublin.
Mid-journey, SS men halted the
train, hauled out the Jews stripped
them, pushed them with bayonets
through the streets of a wayside
town. "I still have the bayonet-
marks on my back. Everything
was gone, my manuscripts I saw
flying in scaps in the wind. Then
blood was all over my eyes and I
saw nothing. The bayonets push-
ed me and I stumbled onward and
they kept kicking and beating me,
all naked, and then I fell in a gut-
ter and they thought I was dead."
When the SS had finished their
sport and gone, a few village Jews
came out of hiding. One recog-
nized Mordecai Striegler, carried

At Beth Israel


Rabbi William Ackerman serves the
congregation of Temple Beth Israel,
Meridian, Miss.


BEST WISHES
Southern United Ice Co.
10th St. and 17th Ave.
Phones 520-1922
MERIDIAN, MISSISSIPPI


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
Rayner Drug & Paint Store
"It Pleases Us to Please You"
Phones 306-307
23rd & Front Sts. Meridian, Miss.


Best Wishes for The Ledger
Hemming Insurance Agency
1011-12 Threefoot Bldg. Phone 327
MERIDIAN, MISS.


him home, and nursed him for
several weeks. While in that town,
Striegler saw Jewish prisoners of
war, taken as part of the Polish
army, herded into the fields and
massacred by the thousands. But
these passing, incidental massacres
are a continuous underflow in his
six years of walking through death.
He left that town, and made his
way home. There, he and his fa-
ther were seized and put to forced
labor. They dug tanktraps on the
Soviet border. "We were digging
as close to the border as that wire
is to us," he said, pointing to the
fence a few yards away, which
still remains around the Buchen-
wald camp. "The Ukrainian
guards had a little game. They
would tell a few Jews to go pick
up a board that lay just by the
wire. When the Jews reached the
board, the guards would shoot
them, saying they were trying to
escape into Soviet territory." So
hundreds more were killed.
Mordecai was learning how to
escape from such camps. It was
not too difficult, in those first
years. He managed it again,
though his father remained, and
never returned. But there was no
escape from Germany's Europe.
Eventually, he wandered home,
and a new labor order awaited him.
He obeyed, as his mother and sis-
ters would have been seized,
otherwise. Later they were taken,
and gassed and burned, but in
1940 death seemed not yet certain.
This time he was sent to farm
labor, digging ditches in swamp-
land. After 21 weeks, he was al-
lowed to live at home, having only
to walk nine miles daily to a forc-
ed job. Then another labor camp
and a year of slaving on coal piles.
"And then they began to Jew-
clean the area. The herding began
again, and the mass shooting. They
herded us to Prohovnyeh, there
was a field, there was a selection
again of the few thought fit to
work, the others were told to lie
down on the field, and this .time
I was among them. Machine guns
began to shoot into the field; in
the dust, in the screaming, I ran
to the other group, to those
selected for labor."
He' lived, again. But in 1942
the Germans decided to clean all
(Please turn the page)


Roll of Honor
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL, MERIDIAN, MISS.


Wm. Ackerman, Jr.
Donald Adler
Joe Abrams
Wm. Blum, Jr.
A. L. Cohn
Isodore Drovin
Nat Feltenstein
Sam Feltenstein
Maurice Froelich
Edgard Feibelman
S. Goldberg
Alexander Loeb
Robert Loeb
Bert Love
Miriam Love
Wm. Lerner, Jr.
Sam Lischkoff
Lee Meyer
Sam Melnicoff
J. S. Meyer
Harold Meyer
Richard Meyer
Harry Meyer
Alfred Rosenbaum
S. A. Rosenbaum
Maxwell Rafkin
Lewis Rothenberg
Rita Rothenberg
George Rosenfeld
Wilbur Pelle
Leo Stann
Rachel Stann
Abe Netter
M. R. Strauss
Paul Oppenheim
Al Rose
Marshall Threefoot
Irving Weizenhoffer


Best Wishes for the Ledger

RUSH INFIRMARY

MERIDIAN, MISSISSIPPI


Massey's Drug & Seed Co.
PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS
Promptness : Purity : Accuracy
PHONE 3704
Corner 4th St. 22 Avenue
MERIDIAN, MISS.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary

White Star Laundry
The Home of the Family Wash
MERIDIAN, MISS.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
Abraham's Cash Grocery
WOODIE ABRAHAM, Prop.
Delicatessen a Specialty
KOSHER MEATS & DELICATESSENS
Phones 464 and 1628 2400 Seventh St.
MERIDIAN, MISS.


WEIDMANN'S
RESTAURANT
HENRY A. WEIDMANN
MERIDIAN, MISS.


CLASSIC DRY CLEANERS
Clothes Fully Insured Against Fire
and Theft While in Our Possession
PHONE 3880
Opp. TEMPLE THEATRE
MERIDIAN, : : : MISSISSIPPI


Serve

Hardin's Butter Krust Bread
And You Serve the Best
MERIDIAN -:- MISSISSIPPI


IN MERIDIAN, MISS.,
it's

The Meridian Star
DAILY and SUNDAY
Above 18,000 Circulation


BEST WISHES

Sinclair Floral Company

Phones: 1131 and 1132

MERIDIAN, : : : : MISSISSIPPI


MISS.





HATTIESBURG, MISS.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniveftary

Yellow Cab Co.
Next to Bus Depot
Prompt : Safe : Courteous
Phone 1300 Hattiesburg, Miss.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
Quigley's Funeral Home
Funeral Directors and Morticians
Phone 2141 805 Hardy St.
HATTIESBURG, MISS.



Leaf Hotel
Hat'tiesburg, Miss.
WM. H. SPARROW,
Manager

SBest Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
Waldoff's
Department Stores
Phone 1986
HATTIESBURG, MISS.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
THE ROSE SHOP
LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR
Fashion Center for Women and Misses
HATTIESBURG, MISS.



FORREST HOTEL
B. C. YOUNG, Manager
Hattiesburg, Mississippi
Headquarters for B'nai B'rith


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
Commercial Stationery Co.
Bank-Court House-Office Supplies
Job Printing
HATTIESBURG, MISS.


The, DIAMOND SHOP
Phone 2455 Forrest Hotel W. Pine St.
"Largest Diamond Merchants in
Mississippi"
HATTIESBURG, MISS.







Grade "A" PASTEURIZER MILK and
SMOOTH FROZEN ICE CREAM
HATTIESBURG CREAMERY
HATTIESBURG. MISS.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee

m i iiiii ii


HATTIESBURG, MISS.


the remaining Jews of the Lublin
area, centering them for slaughter
in the Ishbitza ghetto. "Our camp
was put on the march. We had
to go 15 miles, in a column ten
abreast. They told.us to run, and
they rode alongside the column and
fired into it, all the time, our com-
rades dropped around us and we
'filled up to ten abreast and ran,
and they shot, shot, shot." He
lived through that, too.
Then came days of orgiastic
massacre. Jews from the entire
region, families on wagons, women
pushing their badies in carts, train-
loads of Jews, columns of Jews
on foot were herded into the town,
by the hundreds, by the thousands,
and they were butchered any-
where, on the streets, in fields, in
the square. They were shovelled
into mass graves some still
alive. "They shot, shot, shot. I
saw a German officer go up and
look over a pretty little girl of 13
who had just been taken off a
train. Then he calmly took out
his bayonet knife and ripped up
her body. I saw this."
Mordecai lived. He worked in
a munitions factory 16 months.
Again, the Russians approached,
and the slave workers were eva-
cuated. This time he was taken
to Buchenwald, where he lived for
ten months. Much has been
written about Buchenwald, where
starving men lay two deep, on four
layers of shelves, and the dead


Roll of Honor
HATTIESBURG, MISS.

Chaplain Arthur Brodey
Herbert Adler
Leonard Auerbach
Walter J. Dreyfus, Jr.
Aubrey L. Buchalter
Maurice J. Buchalter
Oscar Buchalter
Harold Cohen
Max Cohen
Stanley Cohen
Robert Dreyfus
Abe Finkelstein
Herbert R. Ginsberg
Sidney N. Ginsberg
David Horwetz
Lee H. Groner
Dan Handleman
Sidney Handleman
Sam Kelsey
Martin Lamden


were pulled out from under the
living, every morning; survival in
Buchenwald is the last accident of
the bit of carbon adhering to the
mesh.
Yes, Mordecai walks alive today,
carrying in his mind the remain-
ing images of the millions of Jews
he saw die, and all the ways they
died.
*
We are seated in the best build-
ing in the camp. It is a clean, tiled
laboratory, nicely appointed, mod-
ern in every respect. This was the
hygiene institute of the Waffen SS,
and here a worthless experiment
in typhus serums was carried on;
936 men of the camp were injected
(Continued on page 42)

District Past President


Best Wishes for the Ledger
Evans-Drummond Drug Store
Phone 41
HATTIESBURG, MISS.


CITIZENS BANK
OF HATTIESBURG
Serving Hattiesburg and South Mississ-
ippifor more than a quarter century.
Member:
F. D. I.C. Federal Reserve System
HATTIESBURS, MISS.


Adler Furniture Company

Furniture and House Furnishings

HATTIESBURG, MISS.



F KLING T
L 0 R I S
SOUTHLAND
SUE HALL
Flowers for all Occasions
Member T. D. S, Telephone 675
HATTIESBURG, MISS.


First National Bank
Resources Over $16,000,000.00
Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.
Hattiesburg, : Mississippi


Best Wishes
EISMAN'S
519 MAIN STREET
Where Exclusive Styles
Meet Popular Prices
HATTIESBURG, MISS.

Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
Hattiesburg
Shoe Rebuilders
612/2 North Main Street
Finest Quality Work at
Reasonable Prices
HATTIESBURG, MISS.


B. L. P. Paints
GOLDSMITH'S SPORTING GOODS

Heidelberg Paint Company,
Incorporated
F. LHeidelberg
IATTIESBURG, MISS.


Best Wishes
Golden Rule Bargain House
FURNITURE
Chas. H. Scovill & Sons, Props.
FURNITURE RETAILERS SINCE 1914
HATTIESBURG, MISS.


Mr. Gus Marks, Past President of Dis-
trict No. 7, I. O. B. B., is still active in
commercial work in Hattiesburg, Miss.

Alvin London
Sam Levine
Arthur Levey
Harry I. Mark
David Nathan
Paul Sackler
A. D. Katz
Norman Waldoff


STANDARD DRUG STORE
"NOTHING BUT THE BEST"
619 Main Street
PHONES: 11-1946
HATTIESBURG, MISS.


Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee

HULETT UNDERTAKING CO.
Established 1910
MODERN FUNERAL HOME AMBULANCE SERVICE
PHONE 48 BAY STREET HATTIESBURG, MISS







Roll of Honor
B'NAI ZION CONGREGATION, SHREVEPORT, LA.


Paul D. Abramson
Wm. Blumberg
Wm. Braunig
Samuel Abramson
Ben Blumberg, Jr.
G. M. Bodenheimer, Jr.
W. J. Becker
M. J. Block
Lawrence Braunig
Stanley Bernstein
Elias Bodenheimer
Henry Leon Brenner
Lionel Flaxman
Morry Goldstein
Wm. B. Goldstein
August Goldstein, Jr.
Albert Goldsmith
Leonard Greenfield


Ansel Harris
Lester Haas
Ralph Kern
Laurence Kern, Jr.
Roy Kern
Albert Kelly
Harry Kelly
M. A. Levy
Ben Levy, Jr.
Jack Levy
Philip Ben Lieber
Herman Meyer
August Loeb
Paul Manasseh
Percy Meyer, Jr.
Herman Loeb
James M. Manhein
Chas. Williams


Temple B'nai Zion


Joe Murov
Harold Murov
Alex Perretz
Armand Roos
Ben Sour
Archie Simon
Janice Simon
William Singlust
Stanley Willer
Alvin Willer
Frank Kaplan
Marion D. Sorkin
Sam Loeb
Albert M. Dreyfuss, Jr.
Sigmund Florsheim
William Dubov
Harry N. Trifon
M. E. Kahn
Albrecht Strauss
Jacque L. Wiener
Floyd Roos
Seymour Van Os, Jr.
John M. Meyer
Lee Harold Groner
Edw. Ben Groner


Herman Willer
H. Rosenzweig
James Siess
Ben N. Levy
Malcolm Feist
Jule H. Dreyfuss
Samuel Freyer
Lazer Murov
Norman Michel
Abie Murov
Leo Kendziora
Alfred Zeve
J. L. Solomon
Albert J. Schnitt
H. Wolbrette, Jr.
Frank Zuzak
Rabbi David Lefkowitz
Henry Katzenstein
Tillie Meyer
Ralph Segall
Harold Levy
Sidney Levy
David Lemkowitz
Carl Solomon
Edgar Szaffer


.SHREVEPORT,. LA.


Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee


PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS BUILDING

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS PHARMACY

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS LABORATORY


803 JORDAN ST.-SHREVEPORT, LA.


.3


BEST WISHES


for Continued Success










Tri-State Hospital Inc.



Willis-Knighton Clinic


PHONE 4175


2622 GREENWOOD ROAD

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA




SHREVEPORT, LA.


B. Segall, Jr.
Seymour Van Os, Sr.
Sam Vedlitz
Irving Selber
Sam Weisman
Aubrey Weiner
Hamilton Benson
Louis Zeve
Marion B. Cahn, Jr.
Lionel Eltis
Seymour Florsheim, Jr.
Carroll Feist
Bernard Frank
David Felsenthal

I
CONGREGATION A(
Abe J. Abramson
Harry Abramson
Leon Abramson
Sam Abramson
Sol Abramson
Isadore Abrams
Jerome Abrams
Malcolmn Abrams
Albert Alden
Raphael David Atlas
Milton Beychok
Max Brandt
Jack Bernard Brandt
Nat Brandt
Harry E. Brandt
Sam Brandt
Sylvan Brody
Joe Brownstein
Jake Chapman
Milton Chapman
Morris Coppersmith
Jake Cullick
Louis Cullick
Jonas Epstein
Irving Falk
Meyer Falk
Louis Frumer
Herman Gardsbane
Paul Gardsbane
Meyer Gelfand
Walter Gershovitz
Elliott Ginsburg
Ralph Ginsburg
Herman Gold
Jack Gold
Abe Goldberg
Melvin Goldberg
M. M. Heller
Isadore Horowitz
George Jacobson
Sidney Jacobson
Harold Katz
James Katz
Sol Katz
David Kaufman
Norman Kesilman
Z. Harry Kovner


Marion B. Cahn, Sr.
David Flesh
Clarence Perretz
Ben R. E. Phelps
Henry Roos
Jules Fogel
Marion Groner
Florence Wile
Hyman Manhein
Abie M. Levy
Joe Weinstock
Jacob Mandel
Chas. Meyer
Jos. M. Murov


oll of Honor
GUDATH ACHIM, SHREVEPORT, LA.
Danny Lincove
Gershon Marcus
Isadore Maritzky
Leon Miller


Shreveport's Acting Rabbi
. :: ...,,.. .: -. . .


Rabbi Alfred Stanley Dreyfus is the Acting
Rabbi of B'nai Zion Congregation, Shreve-
port, La., replacing Rabbi David Lefkowitz,
Jr., now serving as Chaplain in the
United States Army.


Irwin I. Muslow
Marvin L. Muslow
' Jeremiah Renov
Manuel Renov
Max Renov
Morris Ritman
Abe Rozeman
Charlie Rubenstein
Nathan Rubenstein
Sam Rubenstein
Albert Sklar
Fred Sklar
Jake Silverman
Samuel Steckol
Carl Strausman
Willie Vediltz
Morris Velinsky
Paul Velinsky
Jacob Wolchansky.


CENTENARY COLLEGE
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Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

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with typhus, and ninety percent
of them died. But that is another
story already told. Today, this
neat laboratory is an office. Meet-
ing here is the Jewish self-help
committee, representing some 5,-
000 Jews, including nearly 1,000
boys between three and eighteen,
liberated at Buchenwald.
For a week, I have talked with
survivors of the German exter-
mination campaign, in which I am
convinced more than seven million
Jews were destroyed. For six
months, I have sought out the rem-
nants of Israel in France, Belgium,
Holland, even the few who were


Shreveport Rabbi


Rabbi Leo Brener is Rabbi of the conser-
conservative congregation, Agudath
Achim, Shreveport, La.

found in German cities, as we have
penetrated the land.
These four men, as well as any
in Europe, typify what remains.
Max Munk is a businessman from
Czechoslovakia; Tybor Heine is a
metal dealer from Frankfort; Willi.
Jelliareh is a Baker from Vienna;
Mordecai Striegler is a writer from
Warsaw, about whom I have al-
ready written. There happens to
be no French representative here
as the French are busy with im-
mediate repatriation plans; these
others must meanwhile remain.
Yes, it is difficult for them not to
resent the French, who can leave
so soon.


For no matter how we will talk
of the unity brought through suf-
fering, and there is such a unity in
Spirit, the fact remains that in
the physical world there is no
common way of life for these peo-
ple, and hence they always seem
divided against each other. Here
in this room, more ironically than
ever before, one is reminded of the
old saying: If there are two Jews
left in the world, they will still
disagree.
It is the old, old problem: Do
the Jews belong to their lands of
residence, or are they Jews. The
slaughter of seven million Jews as
Jews has not provided an answer.
For here in this room Mordecai
Striegler, stunted, emaciated sur-
vivor of six years in twelve Jew-
murder camps, begins to tell how
even in Buchenwald, at night, in
secret in the barracks, some Jews
were able to carry on a kind of
cultural existence. They recited
Jewish literary works to each
other, they held meetings, they at-
tempted to teach the young boys
in the camp the rudiments of Jew-
ish history.
But the other men wave this
aside. It was nothing. It was in-
significant, according to them. "We
must admit," Munk says, "that this
occupied only a few minds."
Striegler is offended. "You
other Jews never knew of it be-
cause you were not interested,"
he declares. "It is we Polish Jews
who carried the burden of our cul-
ture, of our existence as a people,
always.
They make peace, and continue
in their discussion of immediate
problems: But the old wound has
been shown, still open. Later, we
go to see the surviving children,
and Striegler remarks resentfully,
"You see, they are not lodged in
one place as Jewish children, but
they are placed according to their
land of birth: They are grouped
as Czechs, as Hungarians, as Poles,
as Lithuanians. Each nationality
tries to seize as many as it can
claim, for all these nations have
been sapped, and they will need
men, and even these few last re-


THE SURVIVORS OF BUCHENWALD
(Continued from page 39)


Congratulations On Your Golden Jubilee

E. T. OAKES
224 First National Bank Bldg.
SHREVEPORT, LA.



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Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth Anniversary
Directors: C. H. Thurmond; T. E. Wimberley; T. C. LLindsey; H. T. Sloan
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maining Jews can add a breath
of Life, for them."
Yes, Striegler is a zealot, an in-
tense Jewish Nationalist, and ino
man in the world has paid so much,
no man has a greater right to his
conviction. I have heard this same
dispute in Paris and in Maastricht,
in Toulouse and in Brussels: What


Sisterhood Worker


Mrs. Walter Woolens has served two
consecutive terms as President of Tem-
ple B'nai Zion Sisterhood, Shreveport,
La.

shall be done with these few re-
maining children, these orphans?
.To clear Jewish Nationalists the
answer is incredibly obvious and
undeniable: These, at least, are
owed a Jewish upbringing in Pal-
estine.
But in each land there are sur-
viving Jews who say, No, the
children of France must be brought
up in French institutions, though
as Jews, and the same for Bel-
gium, and so it goes.
I hold no brief. I can only tell
what I have found. It is, to me,
the end of the Jewish people as a
cultural force in Europe. This
split down to the last survivors is
a fine indication of psychic de-
struction completed with physical
destruction.
As long as there were sufficient
numbers, the schism had its com-
pensation: It stimulated thought,
and passion, and self-examination:
There was growth in both direc-
tions: The Jewish Nationalists
created a beautiful Yiddish and
Hebrew culture, in Philosophy,
Law, Art, Letters, and the Hy-


phenated Jews created complete,
if hybrid culture in each land:
Their genius flowed in the sciences,
as with-Freud, and in every litera-
ture.
But now that the numbers are
gone, the Schism is a last aggra-
vating wound; as an identifiable
energy in Europe, the Jew ceases
to have a being.
There are as yet no complete
statistics, but massively the re-
sults are plain. From eight to ten
million Jews lived in Europe. I
have found at best a quarter of a
million survivors. Most of these
are in France, but this does not
create a French Jewish life as
among them are Jews from Poland,
Germany, Holland, and all other
lands, who fled Westward, and
somehow saved themselves there.
The largest Jewish community
is now in Paris, and in it are many
brave, strong-minded men who are
attempting 'to revitalize the folk
life. There are groups of young
people bending every energy to
find a way to go to Palestine.
There are groups of young Jews
offering their lives to fight as
French Jews. There are groups of


Prominent Citizen


Mr. A. B. Freyer is a prominent citizen
of Shreveport, La., and is Co-chairman of
the National Conference of Jews and
Christians in Shreveport, La.

young Socialist Jews offering their
lives in the Economic cause, as one
final solution. The survivors are
still in their separate lanes, driv-
ing their separate ways.
And every day, in the official
journal of France, one may turn
(Please turn the page)


Best Wishes for Continued Success
CQNTINENTAL-AMERICAN BANK & TRUST CO.
"The Friendly Bank of Shreveport"
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
Member Federal Reserve System



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TELEPHONES 2-8618-9
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AMBULANCE SERVICE
1809 MARSHALL STREET TELEPHONE 2-0348
SHREVEPORT LOUISIANA


Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth Anniversary

CITY MARKET, INC.

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HOME-OWNED STORE
1602-04 Marshall Street Phone 7112-7113
SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA


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JERSEY GOLD
CREAMERIES, INC.
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P. O. Box 1405 Shreveport, La.


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WHITE
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Phone 6178 Shreveport, La.


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Security Jewelers Company
405 Texas St. Shreveport, La.


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ROSENBLATHS
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PHIL ROSENBLATH
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ALLEN MONUMENT
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W. P. ALLEN, Pres.
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Phone 2-2356 217 Texas Street
SHREVEPORT, LA.


Oriental Rug Cleaning Company
EXPERT WEAVERS OF
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Phone 3948
SHREVEPORT, -.- LOUISIANA


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to the back pages and read the
small type notices of legal change
in name; everyday there are Co-
hens and Levys who become Du-
pres and Lascelle. The conversion
of French Jews to Christianity, in
this period, is not rare.
The surviving Jews who once
lived in Poland, Germany, Hun-
gary, universally declare that they


Civic Leader


Marx M. Levy, former president of
B'nai Zion Temple, is one of the lead-
ing civic and business leaders of
Shreveport.

could never live again in those
lands. Not one family is whole.
Every survivor tells of a mother,
a brother, a child, hauled away,
burned," or slaughtered before his
own eyes. Not one mind is whole.
*Sitting in this laboratory, with
these four men, you hear again
the common analysis:
"Everyone of us, every remain-
ing Jew of Europe," Munk says
slowly, "has a sickness within him,
a dark spot on his heart. We have
lost our belief in life.
And yet, for these few thous-
ands who remain, a way of life
must be found. Though each de-
clares he wishes to return "home"
for a few days, a few weeks, only
to find out if any of his people by
the remotest chance escaped alive;
none wants to resume life in his
native land.
"Some of us," says Striegler,
"have already declared they would
commit suicide rather than go back
and live among people who helped


destroy us. After all we have sur-
vived, we would kill ourselves
rather than live there again.
Meanwhile this committee in
Buchenwald has listed the first
needs of the survivors. This, they
address to the Jews of the world.
They ask for some means of con-
tact with their living relatives in
allied and neutral lands.
They ask for somejsort of papers,
since all are without papers or
documents of any kind.
They ask for some regulations
as to their citizenship status, as
all Jews were declared Stateless
by the Germans.
They ask for the creation of an
agency to arrange for the emigra-
tion of those who do not wish to,
or cannot return to their former
place of residence.
They ask for care of the surviv-
ing orphans.
Like all Jews of Europe, each
among these four men had tried
to escape. Max Munk had a pass-
port to Mexico: Willi Jelliareh still
carried a paid-up ship ticket to
Cuba. "Perhaps these will still be
recognized. Perhaps we still can
go."

Active Leader
-Active Leader---
Active Leader


Ed Klein, Shreveport attorney, is past
president of the Shreveport Chapter of
B'nai B'rith and a member of the board
of trustees of B'nai B'rith Zion Temple.


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Shreveport, La.



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LOE DECORATING
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TOM T. LOE, Owner
1800 Highland Ave. Phone 2-7405
SHREVEPORT, LA.


PAT BELCHER
POULTRY and EGGS : PRODUCE
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Phone 7-4421 :: 2434 Southern Ave.
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SHREVEPORT, LA.


The Ancient Mountain Jews

of Russia
By ABRAM KHAVIN


B URIED deep in the Caucasus
in the territory of the Daghes-
tan Soviet Republic, there exists an
ancient Jewish community of
whom comparatively little is
known. Referred to usually as .the
"mountain Jews," these people
have been living in the Caucasus
for more than 2,000 years, and,


Sisterhood Past-President

".'*^ illilBBB?


ing to the Jews in the newly liber-
ated territories. Leah Khanduka-
yeva, a superintendent in the fa-
mous Buinaksk Cannery, said to
me: "Although we speak different
languages, we consider ourselves
to be flesh and blood of the Jewish
people."
Discussing the present life of the
mountain Jews, who lived in in-
describable poverty and ignorance
before the Revolution, she cited
as an example a prosperous col-
lective nearby, almost wholly com-
posed of mountain Jews and also
the many Jews employed in the
cannery whose products are sought
for throughout the Soviet Union.
Up to ten or fifteen years ago few
could be found in industry.
In the past quarter-century the
mountain Jews have also developed
their own intellegentsia and Leah
Khandukayeva mentioned the
names of a number of her breth-
ren in Buinaksk who are highly


Organist


Mrs. Armand Roos has served several
terms as president of the Sisterhood
of B'nai B'rith Zion Temple,
Shreveport, La.

according to legend, are descend-
ants of the Jews led into captivity
by the Babylonian king, Nebu-
chadnezzar.
Recently, I had occasion to visit
the Daghestan Republic and there
I met many of these mountain
Jews. Although they look very
much like their Moslem neighbors,
they can be distinguished by their
biblical names, such as Hannah,
Leah, Rachel, Miriam.
Interestingly enough, although
they have had little contact with
European Jewry, they consider
themselves an integral part of
world Jewry and were eager for
news of the life and culture of the
Russian Jews in the European sec-
tion of the USSR.
They showered me with ques-
tions about what has been happen-


Mrs. Joseph Silverbure has been
organist of Temple B'nai Zion,
Shreveport, La., for many years.

respected physicians, journalists
and technical experts. With pride,
she told me also of how valorously
her tribesmen were fighting on
the various battlefronts.
In the last three years many
Jews from Bessarabia, Odessa, the
Crimea and other sections of Rus-
(Please turn to page 47)


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Funeral Service Insurance
Ambulance Service
Phone 3-7181 1212 Louisiana Ave.
SHREVEPORT, LA.

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Phone 3-8667 611 Texas St.
SHREVEPORT, LA.

3 Phones 7-4411
GLADSTONE GROCERY
3118 Gilbert Street
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FREE DELIVERY
C. M. ANTHONY, Proprietor
SHREVEPORT, LA.

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Congratulations and Best Wishes for
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BINSWANGER & CO.
Incorporated
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512-514 Crockett Street Phone 5289
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510 Fifth Street at Marshall Street
TELEPHONE 2-2139
Shreveport, Louisiana





SHREVEPORT, LA. MONROE, LA.


Major General Rose a Fighter

For Freedom
By BEN SAMUEL
(Copyright, 1945, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.)


B RIGADIER General Maurice
Rose, 50, who never directed
his tank groups from the rear, but
always led them personally into
battle died in action on the Ger-
man front. Thus ended a career
of military exploits which extend-
ed over two World Wars.
Born in Middletown, Conn., in
1895, the general never forgot the
early teachings of his.father. The
Reverend Samuel Rose, who will

Best Wishes for The Ledger

LEMAN'S
Greeting Cards For All Occasions
408 Milam Phone 6326
SHREVEPORT, LA.


"Shreveport's Greatest Clothiers"
Since 1857

M. LEVY CO.

SHREVEPORT :: LOUISIANA


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Kings Credit Jewelers
701 Texas Street
SHREVEPORT, LA.


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Incorporated
BIGGEST BREAD BAKING CAPACITY
IN LOUISIANA
210-212 Market St. Telephone 5283
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Phone 4933 REAL CHOP SUEY
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be 90 years old next month; taught
his son always "to demonstrate the
love of liberty." Mourning the
general's loss, in addition to his
friends and relatives, are the men
of the old 89th division in Denver,
who recall him as a hard-fighting
officer but remember him now, as
they knew him in battle, in World
War I, as a "good-hearted guy."
As a boy, Maurice Rose spent a
non-military life in Denver, where
his family settled when he was


three. He attended
School there and weni
ado University. He
the Hebrew School


19 Years Temple


posts in various parts of the
country. When the United States
entered World War II, he was
brigade executive officer of the
First Armored Division.
Sailing to the Mediterranean
with the First Armored Division in
1942, he led the Second Armored
Division into action in North Af-
rica and saw them through the
North African and Sicilian cam-
paigns. It was General Rose who,
at Bizerte, handed General Boro-
weitz, ex-idol of the Prussian mili-
tary, the Allied unconditional sur-
render terms. And it was Rose
who carried the unconditional sur-
render terms that day to Nazi Gen-
eral Fritz Krause.


SEast High Known to his men as an aggres-
t on to Color- sive, devil-may care, action-loving
also went to fighting man, Rose stayed with the
at the Beth Second Division and went before
his tanks during the Normandy in-
S y vasion, riding ahead as they
thundered across France and bat-
tled their way all summer toward
the German border.
Only recently General Rose led
eleven members of his staff in a
hand to hand pistol fight against
Thirty Germans. He was leading
6 his division on an advance into
Germany when he died. He had
S successfully generalled them
S- through the Ruhr, where they
spearheaded the closing of the
trap on 110,000 Germans. His
tanks were on the road to Berlin
when enemy fire cut short his life.
He is survived by his wife and
their son, Roderick, in Denver.


Henry Haas has been secretary of Temple
B'nai Israel, Monroe, La., the past 19 yehrs.

Hamedrosh Hagadal Synagogue,
and his father, a Hebrew teacher,
hoped that his career would de-
velop along religious lines.
In 1916, however, the Hebrew
scholar suddenly turned military
and left college to join the First
Colorado Cavalry on the Mexican
border. He was commissioned a
second lieutenant at 21 at Camp
Funston, Kansas. During World
War I, he went overseas with the
89th division and fought with them
in Argonne and major campaigns
in France.
Peacetime found Rose still in
pursuit of an army career. He
served in Panama and at army


He held awards for valor in both
World Wars, having distinguished
himself on numerous occasions
"above and beyond the call of
duty." The War Department rec-
ords credit him with the Legion of
Merit, Bronze Star Medal, Silver
Star and Oak Leaf Cluster, Purple
Heart and Oak Leaf Cluster, and
the Distinguished Service Medal.
He received the Distinguished
Service Medal for "a duty of great
responsibility," according to the
War Department citation, as Com-


manding General of the Third
Armored Division in Europe.
"Major General Rose," the cita-
tion states, "superbly directed his
command to many decisive victor-
ies. In a series of sweeping drives
down the Normany Peninsula, his
(Please turn to page 48)

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FIRESTONE STORES
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Phone 505
MONROE, LOUISIANA
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Allbritton Electric Company
KILIE ALLBRITTON, Owner
Lighting Fixtures :: Electric Supplies
Telephone 1744
105-107 So. Grand St., MONROE, LA.



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04. CROWlAy
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WEST MONROE LOUISIANA


Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth Anniversary

Davis-Lawhead Funeral Home
AMBULANCE SERVICE
Phone 2020 1008 Jackson Street
MONROE, LA.


~s~6





MONROE, LA.


Roll of Honor
TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL, MONROE, LA.


Melvin Annish
Kurt Ackerman
Saul Adler
Isaac Atkinson
Arthur Auerbach
Jack Ansell
Arnold Ablon
Arthur Bauer
Sherck Bogan
Julius Cahn
Hessel Cahn
Eugene Cahn
Stewart Doernberg
Selwyn- Dante
Henry Florsheim
Harold Fink
Paul Fink
Roland Fink
Maxwell Fink
Milton Gorn
Ben Graber
S. K. Heninger, Jr.
Hiller Hessdorfer
Cramer Haas
Morris Haas
Henry Haas, Jr.
Henry Hoexter
Joe Isaacman
Louis Kusin
David Kaplan
Joe Kern
Mourice Khourt


At B'nai Israel


Fred K. Hirsch has been the rabbi of
Temple B'nai Israel, Monroe, for the
past 16 years.


Lester Kranz
Simeon Lieber
Leonard Lemle
Sackman Marx
Howard Marx
Frederick Marx
Joe Marx, Jr.
David Marx
Charles Marx
Gerold Michael
Sylvan Masur
Louis Masur
Jack Masur
Stanley Mintz
Maurice Raphael
Morimer Raphael
Jack Selig, Jr.
Jacob Seligman
Ernest Strauss
Helmut Strauss
J. L. Stern
Harry Silverstein
Sol Snyder
David Snyder
Louis Smith
Charles Titche
Leon Titche
Harold Wilenzick
Bernie Wilenzick
Louis G. Weil
Annette Lieber
Bess Orchard

ANCIENT MOUNTAIN JEWS
OF RUSSIA
(Continued from page 45)
sia have come to Daghestan for
refuge. Some of them settled in the
town of Buinaksk and have proven
a great asset to its industries.
The refugees were welcomed by
people of all nationalities residing
in the Caucasus, but a particularly
warm reception was given them
by the mountain Jews; who gladly
shared their homes and food with
the newcomers.
The mountain Jews can sit for
hours enthralled by the story of
Odessa, Kishinev and other large
Jewish cultural centers. In this
manner the European Jews are
brought closer to their brothers
and sisters of the mountain tribes
and have learned much of their
traditions and the great changes
which have been wrought among
them in recent years.
Copyright 1945, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.


Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee

HOTEL FRANCES
250-ALL OUTSIDE ROOMS-250
Air Conditioned Coffee Shop, Grill, Cocktail Lounge and Bar
E. C. Gibson, Mgr. MONROE, LOUISIANA



Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

F. STRAUSS AND SON, INC.
313 Walnut Phone 61
MONROE, LA.



Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth, Anniversary

SLAGLE-JOHNSON LUMBER CO., INC.
Wholesale and Retail
BUILDING MATERIALS and MILL WORK MANUFACTURERS
Phone 295 MONROE, LA.


Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth Anniversary

MONROE ICE DELIVERY
Telephone 96 521 Trenton Street
WEST MONROE, LA.



Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee




MONROE, LA.



Congratulating the Jewish Ledger on Its Fiftieth Anniversary

CENTRAL SAVINGS BANK & TRUST (0.
"As Time Goes On"

MONROE, LOUISIANA ,



DRINK




COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. MONROE, LA.



M. KAPLAN & SON
Line Pipe and Well Casing-Structural Steel-Fabricating
Dealers in Industrial Plant Materials
Phone 942 Corner Ninth and Adams Streets
MONROE, LOUISIANA




MONROE, LA.


BEST WISHES
Trousdale, Wright & Girault,
Inc.
GENERAL INSURANCE
SINCE 1896
Phone 10 130 So. Grand St.
MONROE, LA.


Best Wishes for the Ledger
The Strand Theatre
The Rialto Theatre
WEST MONROE, LA.


Best Wishes for the Ledger

BERT COVERDALE
TAX ASSESSOR
MONROE, LA.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
LANHAM ELECTRIC CO.
If It's Electrical We Have It
Phone 3488
You Phone Us-We'll Wire You
110 JACKSON -MONROE, LA.

BEST WISHES
Martin Marble &
Granite Works
NONA E. MARTIN, Mgr.
Jackson at Catalpa St.
MONROE, LOUISIANA


Best Wishes
Louisiana Candy Co.
Phone 157 202 S. 5th
MONROE, LA.

Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary

Hinckley's Electric Service
Phone 4460 P. O. Box 654

810 So. Grand St. MONROE, LA.


Best Wishes for the Ledger
D. M. CARROLL
Retail Distributor
Arkansas Fuel Oil Co.
Phone 1643 MONROE, LA.


E. R. Kiper Hardware
& Supply Company
INCORPORATED
Pumps, Machinery and Hardware
Telephone 2852
116 DeSiard St. Monroe, La.

BEST WISHES
Monroe Auto Top & Body Co.
Dependable Automobile Service
BODY AND FENDER REPAIRS
Seat Covers :: Wrecks a Specialty
Opposite Court House
Telephone No. 620 :: 105 Wood Street
MONROE, LOUISIANA


MAJOR GENERAL ROSE FIGHTER FOR FREEDOM
(Continued from page 46)


division consistently overcame
stubborn enemy resistance to con-
tact British forces near Fromentel,
thus closing the Falaise Gap and
sealing the fate of innumerable
Germans. He skillfully led his di-
vision from the Seine River to the

Civic Leader


F. Strauss takes an active part in the
civic and business life of the city of
Monroe, and is also one of the leaders
in Jewish communal affairs.

Siegfried Line, liberating many
French and Belgian villages and
towns along the route. In spite
of acute supply difficulties, he
pushed forward relentlessly, giv-
ing the Germans no respite and in-
flicting heavy losses in men and
material upon the enemy." His
"inspiring leadership, tactical
skill and great valor" were lauded
on that occasion. During the at-
tack on the Siegfried line, he "ex-
posed himself to enemy observa-
tion of the situation and enabled
himself to lead the attack from a
better vantage point."
The Silver Star award, conferred
onhim for organizing the members
of a reserve unit and leading them
into battle in the vicinity of Mak-
nassy, Tunisia, was accompanied
by a citation which praised Rose
for proceeding "to the forward
most observation point," where he
"rallied the men, encouraged them,
and. by complete disregard to
enemy machine gun and shell fire,
set an example which reflects the


finest traditions of our armed
forces." The award citation fur-
ther stated that Rose's action he
was a colonel at the time was
"all the more noteworthy as Col-
onel Rose was not on the field of
battle for this purpose."
The Legion of Merit was
awarded for his part in directing,
at the head of his unit, "the ex-
pansion of the Sicilian bridgehead"
and a sustained offensive of ap-
proximately 160 miles, which cul-
minated in the fall of Palermo.
General Rose was the eleventh
American general officer killed in
action in this war.
V---

Past President


Percy Sandman, active in Jewish
communal life of both Temple
B'nai Israel and B'nai B'rith.

Paris, (JTA) A cache of Jew-
ish literary and art treasures
stolen by the Germans from all
over Europe was discovered this
week at Hungen, Germany, by a
unit of the Third Army led by a
Jewish lieutenant who fled from
Austria six years ago, it was re-
ported here. The art treasures in-
clude hand-written manuscripts
dating from the fourteenth cen-
tury.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee


H. H. BENOIT
STHE PRESENT
MAYOR of the CITY
of MONROE


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary


Monroe Steam

Laundry

PHONE 103

DRY CLEANING
DYEING, PRESSING
and HAT RENOVATING

Monroe Louisiana


Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee


Durrett Hardware & Furniture Co., Inc.
PHONES 500-171
MONROE AND WEST MONROE, LA.


A.-





ALEXANDRIA, LA.


Roll of Honor
TEMPLE GEMILUTH CHASSODIM, ALEXANDRIA, LA.


Homer Adler
Lee Jay Adler
Rabbi Albert G. Baum
Leon Bialy
Leon I. Birge
Marc Birge
R. C. Bauer
Morris D. Bohrer
Noah Bohrer
Raymond Broida
Lee Caplan
Marion Dover
Max Dover
Sylvan Fox
William Fox
Marvin Ettinger
Sam C. Gainsburgh
Julian Goldberg
Stanley James Goldstein
Aubrey Hirsch
Joel M. Hirsch
John Hirsch
Leopold Hirsch
Jerry Horn
Geo. J. Ginsberg
Gustave Kaplan

THE SABBATH
The Jewish Publication Society
of America has added one more
valuable and enjoyable volume to
its large number of books through
the publication of. "The Sabbath-
the.Day of Delight" by Rabbi Ab-
raham E. Millgram, Director of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel foundation at
the University of Minnesota. The
author has treated his subject,
the Day of Delight, delightfully.
He has delineated the institution
of the Sabbath in such a way as
to make it equally attractive to
both the scholar and the reader of
popular literature. In addition to
the history of the Sabbath as an
institution, he sets forth the tra-
ditional as well as the reform
ritual for the day and discusses
the problems which confront the
modern Jew with regard to Sab-
bath observance. Furthermore he
offers numerous suggestions for
making the Sabbath more mean-
ingful and enjoyable. In line with
these suggestions, the author pre-
sents a wealth of charming and en-
tertaining material, such as songs,
stories and anecdotes, all calcul-
ated to enhance the delight of the
Sabbath observance.
Not the least among the merits
of the book is the part in which


Milton S. Kaplan
Nathan Kaplan
Louis Lesler
Malcolm A. Levy
Solomon Levy
Sol Mayer, Jr.
Arnaud Michel
Leon Mykoff
Merritt O'Brasky
Laurence Orlov
Eugene Pincus
Harold, Posner
Bernard S. Pressburg
Ralph Robbins
Arthur S. Rosenthal
Mires Rosenthal
Howard S. Rose
Alvin B. Rubin
Harold Rubin
Ralph Tucker
Earl M. Weil
Leon E. Well
George C. Weill
Sam Weiss
Leon Wolf


Prominent Worker


Hon. Morris Shapiro, prominent attor-
ney, takes an active interest in Jewish
activities at Alexandria, La.
Rabbi Millgram evaluates the Jew-
ish contribution to civilization
through the Sabbath. For, he
shows clearly how the Sabbath
idea helped to make the people of
the world conscious of the innate
dignity of man and of every man's
equality before God, pointing out
the fact that, despite the failure
of nations of antiquity to group its
meaning, the Sabbath was among
the earliest institutions to be
adopted by both Christianity and
Mohammedanism.


Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

SECURITY NATIONAL BANK
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM
Member F. D. I. C.
ALEXANDRIA, LA.


Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee
Stop At the South's Finest Hotel

HOTEL BENTLEY
AIR CONDITIONED
Coleman J. Hudson, Manager ALEXANDRIA, LA.


ESTABLISHED 1875
JOHN KRAMER & SONS
FUNERAL HOME
404 FOURTH STREET DIAL 6648
AMBULANCE SERVICE


BUILD WITH
CARROLL QUALITY LUMBER
and
CERTIFIED BUILDING MATERIALS

THE CARROLL LUMBER CO, Inc.
DIAL 4804 1050 Washington Street ALEXANDRIA, LA.


P. C. TAYLOR'S Alexandria Marble & Granite Works

Monuments, Tombstones, Slabs, Vases, Iron Fence,
Granite, Marble and Stone Building Material

DIAL 4534 1120 Parke Ave. P. 0. Box 291 Alexandria, La.


Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, LOUISIANA














;:,







W. G. BOWDON, Mayor and Commissioner
of Public Health and Safety
W. A. McLEAN, R. W. BRINGHURST,
Commissioner of Finance Commissioner of Streets
and Public Utilities and Parks





ALEXANDRIA, LA.


I Was At Maidanek
By RAYMOND A. DAVIES
(Jewish Telegraphic Agency Correspondtnt in Moscow)
(as Told to Victor H. Bernstein of PM)


(EDITOR'S NOTE: Raymond A.
Davies, Jewish Telegraphic Agency
correspondent in Moscow, was one of
the few American correspondents tak-
en to see the huge extermination
factory erected by the Nazis at Maid-
anek in Poland. Mr. Davies has just
returned home, one of the first cor-
respondents to bring an eye-witness
account of the horrors of Maidanek.
We re-print his account as he gave it
to Victor Bernstein, foreign editor of
the New York newspaper PM).

I want to tell only what I saw.
Where things were told to me-
where interpretations were placed
upon things I will state so plain-
ly, so that you will know what I
saw with my own eyes and what
came to me second-hand.


ORINK 5
REG. U.S. PAT. OrrFF.


STEHR AUTO BODY
WORKS
See us about Awnings and Furniture
619 Second St. Dial 9826
Alexandria, La.


BEST WISHES-
Auto Parts & Battery
Service Co.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
Fifth at Jackson-At the
Carburetor Sign
Phone 4843 ALEXANDRIA, LA.


Best Wishes
AMERICAN CLEANERS
Phone 8006 1703 Lee St.
ALEXANDRIA, LA.


ANGELENE BLU-RIBON
Ice Cream Pasteurized Milk
Blu-Ribon Dairies
C. R. WILSON, Proprietor
Jackson and Ninth Streets
Lee & Turner Sts.
Dial 7722 Alexandria, La.


About 40 correspondents were
flown to Lublin, Poland, from
Moscow by Soviet authorities. At
Lublin we got into U. S. made
jeeps and were driven along the
road to Chelm. About one and
one-half miles from Lublin we saw
that the road was lined with barb-
ed wire. At intervals appeared
insulators of the kind commonly
used where wire is electrified.
We drove along this fence for
about a mile and swung left into
a gate. From this spot we could
see the whole Maidanek camp.
There were grey barracks reach-
ing as far as eye could see 'Way
back we saw a grey sky. Sur-
rounding the camp was the' wire
fence, and at intervals were wood-
en watch towers.
We drove perhaps 800 yards
along a wire-enclosed passage and
made several right turns. We
came to a U-shaped structure. The
first room in it was perhaps 60
feet long, 20 feet wide, 6 1/2 feet
high. It was a shower room; 72
shower outlets were visible.
We entered another room, per-
haps 40 by 30 feet. It had a square
opening in the ceiling. There was
only one door to the room. The
jamb of the door was insulated all
around the door opening, so when
the door was closed, it was air-
tight.


Leader


Will Hochbaum, one of Alexandria's
prominent business men, has been a
leader of Alexandria's Jewish congre-
gation for many years.


Our Soviet guide told us prison-
ers were given showers first, then
herded into this room, and the
"cyclone" gas in the shape of
crystals which evaporated into
poison gas on contact with air -


Temple Worker


Best Wishes
Commercial Insurance Agency
A. H. PETRIE, Mgr.
Phone 8832
ALEXANDRIA, LA.


Order from Standard and get what
you want and when you want it.
Standard Printing Co., Inc.
PRINTERS, STATIONERS and
OFFICE OUTFITTERS
Dial 4422-4424 Alexandria, La.


JOHN C. ESKEW
JOHN ESKEW MOTOR CO.
DODGE PLYMOUTH
Alexandria, La. Dial 5838


Morris J. Weiss, active business
leader and communal worker in
Alexandria, La.


Ouarantp TanI & Trust Co.

I *
of 0lexanbria, Ia.



ICE SERVE ICE DELIVERY, INC.

ICE FOR ECONOMY HEALTH AND HAPPINESS

1040 Murray St. Dial 3217-3817 Alexandria. La.




Ask for---


Cotton's Cakes

They're Delicious


~R(

~aui




NEW IBERIA, LA.


was dropped by the Germans
through the opening at the top of
the room. The showers, our guide
said, made the gas work quicker;
it opened the victims' pores.
'We saw several other smaller
rooms. All were hermetically seal-
ed. Typical was one with pipes
running around the wall, about
three feet above the floor. I fol-
lowed the pipes to their- source.
They led to tanks of carbon mon-
oxide gas.
I asked our guides why the Naz-
is used two different kind of gas.
The Soviet officials guessed that
perhaps there was sometimes a
shortage of one gas or another, so
the "slaughter house" was equip-
ped with both.
We got into the jeeps again and
drove on through a camp street,
past barracks, and up a gentle
slope. On either side were fields


Bevst Wishes For The Ledger
THE
State National Bank
OF NEW IBERIA, LA.


The Secret of Creole Seasoning!
TRAPPEY'S PEPPER SAUCE
Gives food a peppery tang-a de-
lightful flavor-identified only with
good Louisiana cooking. Use it in
the kitchen or on the table-you'll
like it.
B. F. Trappey's Sons, Inc.
NEW IBERIA, LA.


S MYRTLE GROVE
ON THE TECHE
TILLY'S NURSERIES
Specializing in EVERGREENS,
SHRUBS, TREES and FLOWERS
NEW IBERIA, LA.



EDGAR P. FOLSE
Manufacturer and Dealer in
SASH, DOORS, LUMBER AND
BUILDING MATERIAL
Phone 938 New Iberia, La.


'Best Wishes For The Ledger
From
One of the Leading Institutions
of New Iberia and Jeanerette


38efst wBiobe2
THE NEW IBERIA HARDWARE CO.
(The Voorhies Store)
Gas, Electric and Kerosene
Refrigeration
PHONE 224 NEW IBERIA, LA.


of cabbage and tomatoes. The
fields were covered with greyish
dust. -. Some of the reporters
thought the vegetables looked ex-
ceptionally lush. I didn't think so.
I was a farmer once, and this stuff
appeared to me burned out, like
stuff that's been over-fertilized.

At one point we passed a huge
mound of what looked like fertil-
izer. How big? Oh, perhaps
several times as large as a good-
sized room. The Soviet official
told us the pile consisted of human
ash and manure mixed. It looked
exactly like the grey stuff cover-
ing the fields. Our guides told us
that no less than than 400,000 bod-
ies could have produced such a
pile of ash.

We came to the top of the slope,
left our jeeps, and walked toward
the tall chimney. The place
smelled awful. Have you ever
smelled a rotting corpse? The
stench was everywhere.

Near the chimney I saw five
brick furnaces. Each was perhaps
the height and width of a moder-
ate-sized oil burner, but much-
deeper. Into the door of each fur-


nace ran two rails, and on the rails
of a flat vehicle which looked like
a stretcher. The stretcher could
be shoved along the rails into the
furnace.

'The furnaces were full of ash.
Most of it was powdery stuff, un-
identifiable. But I saw some larger

Layman Pastor


Mr. Abe Hirsch has conducted
Friday evening services in Temple
Gates of Prayer, New Iberia, La.,
for the past 20 years.


Temple Gates of Prayer, New Iberia, La.


pieces readily recognizable as
Roll of Honor charred bones.
NEW IBERIA JEWISH COMMUNITY In front of the furnaces were


Joe Brooks
Saul Brooks
Joey Davis
Dan Davis
Jacob Hirsh
Winfred Hirsh
Harold Wormser
Robert Lewald


(Please turn the page)


New Iberia National Bank
The Largest Bank in
Iberia Parish
NEW IBERIA, . LOUISIANA


EVANGELINE FUNERAL
HOME, INC.
C. LANDRY, Pres. O. A. OUBRE, Sec'y.
DALTON BABINEAUX, Mgr.
Two Ambulances with Attendants
READY DAY AND NIGHT
Phone 88 St. Peter St.
NEW IBERIA, LA

Albert Estorge Ed. L. Estorge

s torge wrug Co.
IMPORTERS
Wholesale Druggists and
Manufacturing Chemists
128 and 132 MAIN ST. New Iberia, La.


'Best Wishes For The Ledger
PFISTER JEWELRY
CO., INC.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
NEW IBERIA, LOUISIANA


'Best Wishes For The Ledger

People's National Bank
New Iberia, - - Louisiana


Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee
FIRESTONE HOME &
AUTO SUPPLIES
PATOUT BURNS, Owner
Firestone
NEW IBERIA, LOUISIANA


HOTEL FREDERIC
PATOUT BROTHERS, Proprietors
Mrs. Y. A. PATOUT, Manager
All Outside Rooms
Steam Heat & Elevator
European Plan $1.50 Up
In the Heart of the Evangeline Country
Free Parking Space NEW IBERIA, LA.


DELAUNE'S LOTION
for
Athlete's Foot and Ringworm
Delaune's Laboratory
NEW IBERIA, LA.


Best Wishes
The Oak Office Supply &
Printing Co., Inc.
113 Iberia Street Phone 1462
NEW IBERIA, LOUISIANA


JACQUEMOUD FUNERAL HOME, INC.
LADY EMBALMER
AMBULANCE SERVICE NIGHT AND DAY
R. J. JACQUEMOUD, Manager
Iberia and Washington Sts. : Day and Night Phone 16-J
NEW IBERIA, LOUISIANA




OPELOUSAS, LA. LAFAYETTE,LA.


small piles of rotting corpses. Some
had arms and legs cut off. Our
Soviet guides told us this was done
in order to cram more bodies into
the furnaces at once. The furnaces,
we were told, could normally take
five bodies an hour, but the gas
chambers could kill quicker than
that. It looked to me like the
Nazis had ,a problem there.
Near the furnaces was a con-
crete platform surrounded by a
wall about two feet high. On the
-platform were 50 or 60 corpses in
various stages of putrefaction.
I got the ashes near the furnaces.
The cyclone gas crystals I picked
up near the gas chambers.
About 500 yards from the fur-
naces was another barrack build-
ing. You must have read of this:
it was chockful of clothes, shoes,
orthopedic legs and arms, bras-
siers, girdles, suitcases every-
thing imaginable, separated and
piled neatly. There were several
thousand Catholic bibles.
In the office of this building I
saw some letters in German.
Typical was a letter from a Ger-
man boy a member of the
Jugend writing, I think, from
somewhere near Munich. He said
his group needed so many shirts,
so many trousers, so many pairs of

OPELOUSAS, LA.


PLANTERS TRUST and

SAVINGS BANK
OPELOUSAS, LOUISIANA


Congratulations
MOURET PACKING CO.
BEEF AND PORK PACKERS
U. S. Inspected Est. 387
OPELOUSAS, LA.


shoes. He added: "Please don't
send us anything bloodstained."
It was from this warehouse that
I picked up the shoe and teddy
bear. The teddy bear was one of
a little pile of dolls stacked in a
corner of the warehouse. Not far
away was the piles of suitcases,
many with names printed on them.
Most of the names seemed to me
those of Austrian or German Jews.
I also saw the camp hospital,
where I picked up the vial of
Evipan. Most interesting was a
ledger apparently- kept by the
Nazis of admissions. I remember
roughly the entries for March.
There were about 20,000 entries of
17 different nationalities, down
to "seven Albanians." Russian
names headed the list; the French,
as I remember, came second. There
were apparently no Jews on the list.
I was told the Nazis didn't bother
with names of Jews; they were
given numbers for day-to-day
identification only. I was told the
Nazis kept no permanent record
of Jewish victims.
From the camp we were driven,
in the jeeps, to nearby Trempitzky
forest, a wonderful pine forest. It
was good to get away from the
stench of Maidanek. But at one
point in the forest road our caval-
cade stopped and the smell was
with us again.
The Russians had uncovered a
mass burial ground. I saw maybe
400 bodies in a huge trench. I saw
the remains of one woman who
still clutched an infant to her
breast. The infant's skull was
cracked, but there was no mark
of violence on the woman. The
Soviet doctor told us that "the
only conclusion to be drawn was
that the woman was buried alive


ST. LANDRY BANK & TRUST CO.
OF OPELOUSAS
OFFICERS: Morris A. Hirsch, President; Allen Dezauche, Executive Vice-Pres.;
J. P. Barnett, Vice-Pres.; L. T. Castille, Vice-Pres.: N. M. Childs, Cashier;
L. E. Castille, Asst. Cashier; C. J. Budd, Asst. Cashier.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS: J. P. Barnett, Avie Bordelon, Allen Dezauche, Morris
A. Hirsch, Sidney Bertheaud, L. T. Castille, O. A. Lahaye,
B. L. Sanders, Chas. Bourque, Jr.
OPELOUSAS LOUISIANA


MRS. L. L. DANEL, President DR. P. A. LE BOURGEOIS, Sec.-Treas.
MRS. P. G. LE BOURGEOIS, Vice-President
THE DANEL LUMBER CO., Inc.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
PINE AND CYPRESS LUMBER and BUILDERS' SUPPLIES
Lumber, Shingles, Sash and Doors, Mouldings and Finishes, Hardware and
Paints, Wallboards and Plaster, Oak Flooring
ASBESTOS CEMENT SHINGLES OPELOUSAS, LA.


. . if she had been gassed, she
could not have kept hold of her
child."
It was in this Trempitsky forest
where, as you probably have been
told already, the Soviets say the
Nazis killed 18,000 Jews in one
day. On this day, according to
witnesses, the camp loudspeakers
played Strauss waltzes hour after
hour while volleys of shots came
from the forest.
It was the Trempitsky forest
burial trench that I picked up the
bit of brown paper, with its
scrawled message. It was lying
near the body of a young boy, per-
haps 10 years old. The paper is
months old, now, but you can tell
where it has been by the smell.
The wind-up of the tour was an
interview with a minor Nazi camp
official whom the Russians had
captured. I do not know exactly
how to describe him. Shall I say
he looked like a typical German
butcher? I suppose that is a pre-
judiced statement. He was big and
gross-featured.
Here are some of the questions
I and other correspondents asked
him, and the answers he gave:
Q. Did you kill people in the
camp?
A. Yes.
Q. Did you poison them with
gas?
A. Yes.
Q. Did you bury them alive?
A. It sometimes happened.
J. Were the victims picked from
all over Europe?
A. I suppose so.
Q. Did you personally help kill
people?
A. Absolutely not. I was only
the paymaster in the camp.
Q. What did you think of what
was going on?
A. It was bad at first, but we
got used to it.
Q. Do you know the Russians
will hang you?
A. (Bursting into tears) Why
should they? What have I done?
Copyright 1945, Field Publications
V
London, (JTA) American
Jewish soldiers who are stationed
in East Anglia have made a dona-
tion of $200 to the Norwich syna-
gogue in memory of their fallen
comrades. The Norwich syna-
gogue was destroyed by bombs.


Congratulations
The First National Bank
Member Federal Reserve System
Member F. D. I. C.
LAFAYETTE, LA.



Best Wishes

Lafayette Building Ass'n.
Lafayette, Louisiana


Best Wishes
Established 1897
P. KRAUSS, Inc.
Jewelers
LAFAYETTE, LOUISIANA


'Best Wishes
J. Alfred Mouton, Inc.
Brokers Real Estate Insurance
105 W. Vermilion, Opp. Post Office
PHONE 142
LAFAYETTE, LOUISIANA


Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee

CLAUDE C. COLOMB
Insurance, Real Estate and Bonds
PHONE 192
LAFAYETTE, LOUISIANA


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
Firestone
Home & Auto Supplies
LEO KNIGHT, OWNER
400 Jefferson St. Phone 772
LAFAYETTE, LA.



Huval Baking Co., Inc.

Evangeline-Maid French Bread
Phone 876
LAFAYETTE, LA.


'Best Wishes
General Office Supply Co.
622-624 Jefferson St. Phone 945
Office and School Furniture Supplies
Typewriters and Adding. Machines
Sales Service Rentals
LAFAYETTE, LOUISIANA


Congratulations
SHAMROCK DAIRY
PRODUCTS CO.
LAFAYETTE, LA.



United Hardwore & Paint Co.
H. C. Voorhies
Everything in Hardware and Paints
SERVICE and QUALITY
LAFAYETTE, LOUISIANA





LAFAYETTE, LA. LAKE CHARLES, LA.


A FourYear Nightmare

By RO CHANANINA
(Copyright, 1945, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.)


EDITOR'S NOTE: Ro Chananina,
Jewish Telegraphic correspondent, ip
Brussels, lived in Belgium during the
German occupation. She is one of
the few if not the only Jewish
correspondent to have lived under the
Germans for four years and survived
to give an intimate, detailed account
of what German rule meant.
A LLIED soldiers who have visit-
ed the homes of Belgian Jews
in the months since this country
was liberated have been puzzled-
although too polite to say so at
the fact that after hearing about
the Nazi despoliation and exter-
mination of Belgian Jewry, they
found Jews in Brussels who were
fairly well dressed, Jewish homes

LAFAYETTE, LA.

Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee
EDGAR G. MOUTON
REALTOR, OIL LEASES
and ROYALTIES
Phone 759 626 South Buchanan St.
LAFAYETTE, LOUISIANA


MIKE DONLON
REALTOR-INSURANCE
RENTALS
Next to Post Office Phone 44
LAFAYETTE, LA.

Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee
Patrick E. Mouton
Insurance Agency
INSURANCE
Telephone 1830 113 W. Vermillion St.
LAFAYETTE, LOUISIANA


which were more or less furnish-
ed, and the inhabitants of these
homes making some sort of a liv-
ing.
They do not know that 27,000
Jews were deported from Belgium,
most of whom will never come
back. Nor do they know that those
pitifully few survivors who do
come back will find themselves
paupers.
The Jews of Belgium suffered
relatively less from the Nazi
scourge than their brethren in
other countries although the
thousands of deportees who died
in German camps'would find such
a comparative evaluation of mis-
ery rather ironic. There were sev-
eral reasons for this.
One reason was the fact that
Belgium, under the occupation, was
ruled by a military rather than a
civil government. The command-
er, Gen. von Falkenhausen, al-
though a Prussian militarist, was
not a Nazi and tried desperately
to save his face and something of
his so called German soldier's hon-
or by being a little less severe than
his fellow rulers in other occupied
countries.
The main reason, however, was
the protecting hand that was
stretched out from Malines, the seat
of Cardinal von Roy, the gallant


and worthy successor to the late
Cardinal Mercier of World War I
fame, and the fact that all classes
in Belgium, even those who were
not particularly friendly to Jews,
united in their efforts to fight the
common enemy.
And still another reason, and not
the least by far, was the fact that
the Jews of Belgium unlike
those in Holland, for instance -
were mainly natives of Poland,
Russia or the Balkan countries and
as a result of generations of per-
secutions had more resiliency and a
greater capacity to bear sufferings
and privations.
The Nightmare Begins
The nightmare of the four years
of German occupation can be di-
vided into three periods: from the
invasion until the first anti-Jewish
Measures in the Autumn of 1941;
from the beginning of the anti-
Jewish persecutions until the order
to don yellow Mogen Davids was
issued; and from the donning of
the yellow stars until the libera-
tion. The last was by far the most
horrible period.
On the 10th of May, 1940, when
the German forces launched their'
drive into the Low Countries, a
mad exodus of Jews from Belgium
began. People fled without any
destination in mind, taking their
possessions in a handcart or, if
lucky, an automobile, pursued by
the specter of what had happened
to the Jews of Germany, Poland,
Czechoslovakia and Austria.
A small part of the fugitives
were fortunate enough to reach
England, but most crossed the
border into France, and for a few
days believed they were safe. But
then France surrendered, and only
those who were quick enough, and
had sufficient means, to reach the
south of France had a temporary
respite; the others were caught be-
hind the German lines.
So for weeks and months, during
the wonderful Spring and Summer
days of 1940, thousands of Jews
wandered through the forests of
northern France, sleeping in hay
stacks, or in ditches, not knowing
what to do, whether to try to cross
the demarcation line into unoccu-
pied France or return to Belgium.
And then the first pioneers, Jews
and non-Jews, who had gone back
(Please turn the page)


Congratulcations

First National Bank
LAKE CHARLES, LA.
Established 1889


Best Wishes for Your Fiftieth
Anniversary
Calcasieu Building and
Loan Association
LAKE CHARLES, LOUISIANA


Powell Lumber Co.
Manufacturers of Calcasieu Long
Leaf Yellow Pine Lumber
Wholesale and Retail
LAKE CHARLES, LOUISIANA


'Best Wishes
Our Laundry Uses Permutit
Softened (Rain-Soft) Water
Lake Side Laundry
DRY CLEANING BEAUTIFUL
Dial 5755 LAKE CHARLES, LA.


Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee
UNITED GLASS COMPANY
Glass of All Kinds
PHONE 3034
1222 RYAN STREET
LAKE CHARLES, LOUISIANA


Congratulations
Banister's Termite Control Co.
Complete Pest Control Service
Licensed and Bonded with State of La.
PHONE 8495
Lake Charles Lafayette Opelousas


Congratulations
Bradley's Machine Shop
ELECTRIC-ACETYLENE WELDING
AND GENERAL MACHINE WORK
Phone 3841 520 Ann Street
LAKE CHARLES, LA.

Congratulations on Your Golden Jubilee
Swift Service Auto Supplies
-THOMAS J. NAVARRA
AUTO REPLACEMENT PARTS
Tires Tubes Accessories
133 RYAN ST. PHONE 5000
LAKE CHARLES, LA.


Congratulations
When In Need of Printing Think of
Port Printing & Supply Co.
Telephone 2929 31 Broad Street
LAKE CHARLES, LA.


Solari Marble & Granite Works
MONUMENTS -MEMORIALS
"Mark Every Grave"
East Broad St. DIAL 4345
LAKE CHARLES, LOUISIANA


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
THE DAILY ADVERTISER
T. M. CALLAHAN, Editor and Manager
PUBLISHED EVERY EVENING EXCEPT SUNDAY BY
THE LAFAYETTE ADVERTISER-GAZETTE, INC.
THE DOMINANT NEWSPAPER OF SOUTHWESTERN LOUISIANA
LAFAYETTE, LOUISIANA

Best Wishes

THE NEW

GORDON HOTEL
"In the Center of Lafayette On the Old Spanish Trail"
LAFAYETTE, LOUISIANA


Best Wishes

EVANGELINE HOTEL
LAFAYETTE'S FINEST.
J. C. EBERHART, Manager




LAKE CHARLES, LA.


into Belgium to find out what was
happening, returned and told stor-
ies of how the Germans were not
so bad after all, of Jewish children
getting bread from German sol-
diers and that no differentiation
was being made between Jews and
non-Jews.
The fugitives, tired and hungry,
and helpless, thought of their com-
fortable homes, of everything they
had left behind them, of the
children becoming little savages
without schooling of the coming
Autumn, they lulled their fears by
telling themselves that, after all,


Gordon Drug Store, Inc.
The Rexall Store on the Busy Corner
LAKE CHARLES' OLDEST 'AND
LARGEST DRUG STORE
Phones DIAL 2738-4253
LAKE CHARLES, LOUISIANA

BEST WISHES
SHEPPARD'S
BUTTER NUT BREAD
Radiant Baked
LAKE CHARLES, LA.

'Best Wishes
Lake Charles Florist
FLOWERS BEAUTIFUL
Telegraph Delivery
Dial 5922-7814 516 Broad St.
LAKE CHARLES, LA.


this was Western Europe, the Ger-
mans would not dare to do what
they had allowed themselves to do
in their own country and in East-
ern Europe. They would be afraid
of public opinion in England and
America, etc. And thus the Jews
fell into the trap and returned
home.
For some months it seemed that
they had acted wisely. Certainly,
there was an atmosphere of ten-
sion and fear; there was already
the trembling at the sound of the
door-bell, the fear each night of
what the next morning would


Roll of Honor
TEMPLE SINAI, LAKE CHARLES


Jack Baron
Isaac Eskenezy
Robert J. Fry
Harold Greenberg
Marvin Greenberg
T. Harris
Julian Heimendinger
Wm. C. Kaufman, Jr.
Jake Kushner
Dr. Louis Kushner
Wm. David Kushner
Bernard Levy
Ivan Mayer
Jules Reinauer
SLloyd Riff
Dan Wise


bring. But, with the exception of
some minor incidents, the Ger-
mans did not concern themselves
especially with the Jews. In fact,
they even took the trouble of send-
ing a commission to unoccupied
France, where many large Jewish
diamond merchants had found
temporary refuge, to ask them,
gently, to come back and re-estab-
lish the Belgium diamond industry.
But the diamond merchants, al-
.ready far from home and in rela-
tive safety, firmly declined the
offer.
The First Anti-Jewish Measures
The first anti-Jewish measure
came in the Autumn of 1940: the
Germans ordered that all Jews in
Belgium must register, purely as
an administrative matter, they ex-
plained. They set up a "Juden-
register" office in every town hall
and, at the same time, established
a "Judenrat," a council which


Congratulations on Your Fiftieth
Anniversary
The
Calcasieu MARINE National
BANK
Capital and Surplus $750,000.00
LAKE CHARLES, LOUISIANA


Congratulations
Lake Charles Bank
& Trust Co.
LAKE CHARLES. LA.


"WE HAVE THE RECORDS"
Levingston Bros. Abstract Co.
Incorporating Mayo Title Guaranty Inc.
ABSTRACTS PREPARED
TITLES INSURED
Established 1902
LAKE CHARLES, LOUISIANA

A Good Cleaner Is Your Best
Guarantee
CALL 9444
FRANK HARMON'S
CLEANERS, PRESSERS, DYERS
S AND HATTERS
431 Kirby St. LAKE CHARLES, LA.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee

Calcasieu Insurance Exchange
Members Writing
Standard Protection Capital Stock Company Insurance
LAKE CHARLES, LA.



Craft.Rushworth, Ltd.
R. T. CRAFT, President and Manager
Plumbing and Heating-Full Line of Electrical Supplies
Plumbing Fixtures, Lighting Fixtures
DIAL 4934 318-320 BROAD STREET
LAKE CHARLES. LA.

Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
ED TAUSSIG
Sales and Service
Ford Mercury Lincoln Zephyr V-12
Broad at Bilbo DIAL 4567
LAKE CHARLES, LA.


Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee

KRAUSE & MANAGAN,
INCORPORATED

Building Materials

7 LUMBER YARDS IN LOUISIANA

* Crowley Lafayette Jennings
* DeRidder Lake Charles New Iberia
Sulphur
General Office 1823 So. Ryan St.
LAKE CHARLES, LA.
--------=-|=~- I |


Temple Sinai, Lake Charles, La.


4.

. J .. ,
!:\ .:


8'7
. ~..




BOGALUSA, LA.


would act as liason between the
Jewish population and the German
masters.
Those who were prominent in
Jewish life, and who had a repu-
tation to lose, flatly refused the
Germans' offer to name them to
the "Judenrat." So the Germans
appointed some unknown people,
some of whom had lived in the
country for only a few years.
While some of them undoubtedly
acted in good faith, others accept-
ed because it was the only way to
safeguard their persons and their
families.
It cannot be denied that in the
years that followed, especially at
the time of the dreadful concen-
tration camp at Malines, that some
Jews were saved as a result of the
intervention of the council and that
some of those who were deported
did get parcels, clothes and medi-
cal assistance through its efforts.
But I doubt that on the whole
it was worthwhile, that without
the Jewish Council the Germans
could have accomplished all the
things they did. For we know now,
and we have seen it proved many
times, that the so called marvelous
German organization was nothing
but a myth. And, although, as I
said, some Jews were saved, in
most cases the council was help-
less.
Once the register of Jews was
installed in every town hall and
the "Judenrat" was established,
the Germans ordered that all Jews
had to have the word "JEW"
stamped in large red letters on
their identification cards. This
alarmed the Jewish community
once again, and many tried to flee
to unoccupied France, selling their
belongings for what they could get
in order to pay the exorbitant fees
asked by the smugglers. A few
succeeded in getting across the
demarcation line, but many were
caught, since a lot of the smugglers
worked with the Gestapo. And of
those who did succeed many were
caught when the unoccupied zone
was overrun by the Germans.
Those who were too lazy or too
fearful or who lacked means,
stayed.
The Belgian authorities, as long
as they did'not belong to collabor-
ationist organizations, were very
helpful to the Jews. The Belgian


non-Jews recovered from the
shock of the occupation long be-
fore the Jews and began to organ-
ize resistance.
And here I must pay tribute to
Edmond Lambert, who was in
charge of the "Judenregister" in
Antwerp. This man, with twenty-
five years service in the town hall,
with his wooden, typical clerk's
face, with his cold unmoved voice
and his profound knowledge of
Belgian law, proved to be a match
for the Gestapo chief Holm, a red-
faced shouting Nazi.
The almighty Boche found that
he was up against something he
was powerless to change. He tried
everything: yelling, intimidation,
violence and even prison, but fin-
ally had to release Edmond Lam-
bert after three months, for lack
of evidence, and even to restore

Civic Leader


C.~
t'

,.; c..



k3


E. Berenson is active in the civic
organizations of Bogalusa, La., as
well as being a leader in the Jew-
ish community.
him to his office, for nobody but
Lambert was so thoroughly ac-
quainted with his files and docu-
ments. Even a German could not
shoot a man for not finding a
document immediately although
the delay in many cases saved a
man's life.
I do not know how many Jews
saw through the clever, though
dangerous, game that Lambert was
playing. Perhaps, the time will
come when Belgian Jewry will be
able to express its gratitude to
good men like Lambert who were
not exceptions in this small coun-
try.
(Please turn the page)


Columbia Street


Phones 149-150


M. MARX SONS



Hardware and Building Material


Plumbing and Electrical Fixtures


Authorized Dealer



Fairbanks-Morse Products



"We Have It, Will Get It, Or It's. Not Made"



BOGALUSA, LA.


. -.


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary







Gaylord Container



Corporation






Wrapping Paper, Bags,

Corrugated and Solid

Fibre Shipping Cases




BOGALUSA, LA.




BOGALUSA, LA.


In 1941 the Gestapo began a ser-
ies of anti-Jewish actions which,
although the Jews did not realize
it at the time, heralded the com-
plete destruction of Belgian Jewry.
Lulled into a sense of false se-
curity because of the failure of the
Nazis to invade England, the resis-
tance of the Red Army and, later,
America's entry into the war, many
Jews thought that it would not be
long before the Nazis would be
defeated and therefore, there was
no point in trying to flee to un-
occupied France. A few young
men crossed into France and then
into Spain from which they went
to the United States or Canada and
joined the Allied armies. But
this, of course, was impossible for
families with children.
Shortly after Passover, 1941, the
large synagogue in Antwerp and


did not cut them off from contact
with the free world. There was
hardly a person in Belgium who
did not listen to the London or
Moscow radios despite the severe
punishment if found out, and the
Jews were supplied with their
daily quota of heartening news by
non-Jewish friends and trades
people.
In the latter part of 1941 a whole
series of anti-Jewish measures
were introduced: Jews were barr-
ed from public places such as
parks, swimming pools, theatres,
etc. They were ordered to turn in
their commercial registers which
meant that they could no longer
carry on any type of business.
Diamond dealers were forced to
surrender their stock in this
manner the Germans obtained four
billion francs worth of diamonds.


by chance, with the first Allied
1,000-plane bombing of Cologne,
and the Jews remarked, in an at-
tempt to keep up their spirits, that
it was better to be alive in Bel-
gium wearing a yellow Mogen
David, than dead under the ruins
of Cologne. What they did know
was that death by bombing would
have been preferable, to the fate
that lie ahead of them.
The Belgian population went out
of their way to avoid noticing the
yellow star. The only common
exceptions were persons like
priests who used to lift their hats
and bow deeply when a person
with a yellow badge passed, or
shopmakers who hurried to serve
a customer wearing a star, or peo-
ple who arose in street cars to give
their seats to elderly men or
women wearing the star.
The Jews were determined that
if they had to wear the star, they
would make the best showing pos-
sible. Therefore, before they went
out they carefully brushed their
clothes, shined their shoes and
made certain that they looked as
neat as possible. This occasioned


some mild anti-German jibes in
several newspapers, which com-
mented on the number of well-
dressed Nordic-appearing persons
going about the city with yellow
star, while members of the Wehr-
macht, wearing the swastika
slouched around in shabby clothes.
But, of course the stars were
only a prelude. They were fol-
lowed by orders instructing the
Jews to report for work in Ger-

Best Wishes for Your Golden Jubilee
Bogalusa Scrap Co.
J. MOSS, Proprietor
P. O. Box 651
Bogalusa, Louisiana


BEST WISHES
HOTEL REDWOOD
Air Cooled-Beauty Rest Mattresses
THE NEWEST AND MOST MODERN
HOTEL IN THIS SECTION
Joe Newman, Prop.
BOGALUSA, : : : LA.


Bogalusa Steam Laundry
"Send It to the Laundry"
Fancy Dyeing a Specially : Modern Dry Clear:ng
Phones: 364 365
BOGALUSA, LOUISIANA


many houses in the Jewish quarter
were burned down. Shop windows
were smashed and passing Jews
were assaulted in the streets. A few
days later an order was issued
stating that because of their "re-
sponsibility" for the violence no
Jew was allowed to be in the
streets of Antwerp after 7 o'clock.
Those caught out after that were
sent to concentration camps. A
little later the curfew order was
extended to all of Belgium.
At the end of June the Jews
were ordered to surrender their
radios to the authorities. But this


Jewish teachers were restricted to
teaching only in Jewish schools.
Nazis Try To Establish Ghettos
Once this all-embracing moral
and economic ghetto had been es-
tablished, the Germans decided to
establish a real and visible ghetto.
Jews in Antwerp, Brussels and
Charlesroi were ordered to move
into a designated Jewish quarter
which could be sealed off from the
rest of the city, and surrounded by
patrols at night. But this plan was
foiled by the unwillingness of the
Belgian authorities to cooperate.
Around this time, the decree re-
quiring Jews to don a yellow star
was issued. The decree coincided,


Congratulations On Your Golden Jubilee
E BERENSON M. A. BERENSON
BERENSON BROTHERS
PHONE 197

Bogalusa, La.



Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee


The Bogalusa Stores Co.

BOGALUSA, LOUISIANA




DRINK


BOGALUSA COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO., Ltd.
BOGALUSA, LOUISIANA



Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary


Cohen's Furniture Store
J. COHEN
"Everything to Make Home Life Comfortable"
PHONE 171 BOGALUSA, LOUISIANA


Beth Israel Synagogue, Bogalusa, La.




BATON ROUGE, LA.


Esnard
WHAT TIME IS IT 7
YOUR JEWELER
DIAL 4224
142 THIRD ST. BATON ROUGE, LA.


WE APPRECIATE
YOUR PATRONAGE

W. T. GRANT CO.
Baton Rouge, Louisiana


BEST WISHES
Owl Drug Store
COMPLETE LINE OF TRUSSES
1314 N. Boulevard
Phone 5373 Baton Rouge, La.'


Flower Store, 447 Main Street
DIAL 4414

Scheinuk Roseland Florist
Baton Rouge, Louisiana


BEST WISHES.
Gladden-Edgerton
Oil Co.
Main and Ninth Sts. Dial 8833
BATON ROUGE, LA.


BEST WISHFS
I. M. CAUSEY &
COMPANY, Inc.
501 GOVEINNMENTST. 654 MAIN ST.
BATON ROUGE, LA.


Kidd's Paint & Glass Co.
PICTURE FRAMING
Paints, Brushes, Glass, Wall Paper
222-24 LAUREL STREET
Dial 4929 Baton Rouge, La.


Lobdell Hardware Co., Inc.
Wholesale and Retail
SPORTING GOODS and BUILDER'S SUPPLIES
TOOLS : -: CUTLERY
Dial 8271 1261 North Boulevard
BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA


Congratulations
Yaun Welding and
Boiler Works
Day Phone 3-1746
Night Phones 2-0927 3-2928
122 North St., BATON ROUGE, LA.


BEST WISHES
State Roofing and Supply Co.
C. R. TOWNSEND, Owner
Eternit Asbestos Shingles & Siding
Phone 5868 1443 Myrtle St.
BATON ROUGE, LA.


many, bringing with them extra
clothes, shoes, a blanket and food
for ten days. At this point a
rivalry developed among the Ger-
mans as to who was to get the
Jews. The Todt organization,
which wanted to use them as slave
laborers building fortifications,
battled the Gestapo which wanted
to take them to the concentration
camp at Malines from where they
were deported to their death. Oft-
en, one person received two invi-
tations in one day.
For a time some Jews were still
fooled by the summons to report
to Malines, thinking that, after all,
they would only be used for forced
labor. However, when aged peo-
ple and babies were also ordered
to report, it became clear even to
the most optimistic that they were
slated for deportation and death.
They stopped reporting voluntari-
ly and the Gestapo instituted
mass round-ups.
Gestapo Vans Tour Streets -,
Big vans, operated by Belgian
Nazis, rumbled through the streets
and babies were snatched out of
their perambulaters, invalids out
of their beds and, sometimes, wo-
men and children were dragged
away in the middle of the night
without having opportunity to
take any clothes or food.
The raiders broke into restau-
rants and cafes looking for Jews.
They invaded hospitals and nur-
sing homes. They seized people
from schools and asylums. Some-
times children were taken from
school or the streets while their
parents remained at home. Par-
ents instructed their children to
seize the hands of any passing
peasant when they saw the dread
Gestapo car approaching. Some-
times children were left in sealed
houses when the parents were
dragged away and their cries could
be heard by the neighbors. If a
brave man was among them, he
broke into the house and rescued
the child. Other times the babies
were left to starve.
By this time, the panic became
general. The Jews looked about
for help and it was forthcoming.
The authorities provided them
with false papers, the patriots with
hiding places, the convents opened
their doors, and in hospitals and


insane asylums doctors signed
certificates attesting to the illness
of "Mr. Jones" or "Mrs. Jansen."
Children were adopted by farmers
or taken into monasteries. Men
were placed in castles and town-
houses as servants, valets or gar-
deners.
Women of a Difficult Character
Jewish women who were re-
ferred to in phone conversations or
letters as "women of a difficult
character" were given jobs as
cooks, governesses, maids. The
consul of a large neutral country
had a Jewish woman and child in
his service for more than two
years. When I remarked to him
once, jokingly, that that was not
a neutral act, he replied with a
bitter laugh: "God .only knows
how neutral I am."

Prominent Leader


CBest Wishes From

LATIL'S
Dial 4731 326 Third St.
BATON ROUGE, LA.


MUSIC MART
BALDWIN PIANOS :-: INSTRUMENTS
Everything for the Musician
248 MAIN STREET :-: DIAL 6561
BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA

OASH OR CREDIT
DIAMONDS :: WATCHES
FINE JEWELRY

GORDON 'S
316 Third Slreet BATON ROUGE, LA.

DRINK



"The Coffee with no Regrets"
BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA


ORTLIEB PRESS
BETTER PRINTING
Dial 3-1838 109 St. Ferdinand
Baton Rouge, Louisiana


Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary

Louisiana Creamery, Inc.
Baton Rouge, La.


Best Wishes
Picadilly Cafeteria
Coffee Shop
214-3rd Dial 8202
BATON ROUGE, LA.


Baton Rouge Yellow Cab Co.
(INCORPORATED)
301 LAFAYETTE STREET'
DIAL 8811 Baton Rouge, La.


Congratulations
BRAUD'S GLASS COMPANY
GLASS OF ALL KINDS
Dial 7377 First and Main Sts.
Baton Rouge, La


Tobias-Gass Company, Ltd.
General Merchandise & Cotton Buyers
Bicycles & Accessories
HARDWARE, GROCERIES, ETC.
Dial 8818 and 3-1955
1967 North St. Baton Rouge, La.


Herbert S. Benjamin is one of
the prominent communal workers
in Baton Rouge, La.
A large part of the underground
movement which had spread
throughout the country after 1940
worked to save as many Jews as
possible. Young and able-bodied
Jews joined the maquis and hid
in the mountainous part of Bel-
gium in the Ardennes. Others
joined the resistance movements in
the towns and cities. When they
were caught by the Germans, they
were, of course, executed like the
others, but, at least, they died
fighting.
A special tribute must be paid
to the Catholic clergy which, act-
ing by an unwritten and unspoken
order of Magr. Van Rooy, did their
(Please turn the page)




BATON ROUGE, LA.


utmost to save Jews without fear
of prison or concentration camps.
They travelled throughout the
country with children and took
girls into convents and hospitals as
nurses aides. Many of them had
to doff their clerical clothes and
go into hiding like the Jews.
Even a royal voice was raised in
behalf of the Jews. Queen Mother
Elizabeth tried on several occas-


Capital Rabbi


"POP" OF THE U. S. S. FRANKLIN


By BEN
AW HEN enemy bombs struck the
USS Franklin, Electrician's
Mate Second Class George F. Sha-
piro was in the electric repair
shop. Two bombs had hit. Shapiro
made his way forward toward the
wardroom.
There were two hundred men
trapped in that room. The bulk-
heads had closed automatically.
Smoke was seeping in. The men
had small hope of being rescued.
When we spoke to George last
week and asked him what they
did in that room, he said, "we just
sat there and prayed, I guess. Then
when the smoke was getting heavy,
Lt. Gary suddenly appeared in a
'breather.' He took us out ten at
a time through the air uptakes.
When we got out, we found the

Temple President


SAMUEL
officer, but he was told he was too
old for a combat commission. He
had won five varsity letters at City
college, and in the light of his
athletic record, he was offered an
athletic instructor's commission.
But George, at forty-three, didn't
feel old at all. He turned down the
instructor's commission, and went
into the navy as a "boot."
He went to school for a while,
then was assigned to the Franklin.
The .crew of the Franklin used


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Landscaping, Shrubbery, Flowers
Wedding and Party Decorations
Funeral Displays
Phones: 3-9258 Night: 3-7830
3809 Government St.
BATON ROUGE, LA.


Best Wishes From

H. C. PAULSEN & SON
DRUGGISTS
3rd and Main Phone 6808

Baton Rouge, La.


to call George "Pop." The nick-
name came about not only because
of his age, but because the men
used to go to him for advice all
the time. They gave him a lot of
respect. It was "Pop," too, in the
absence of a Jewish chaplain on
board ship, who used to conduct
services. Every Friday night he'd
hold a service in the ship's library.
"Well, I wasn't the only one who
did that," he said. "It was Ginde
who used to make sure we'd have
everything to celebrate the holi-
(Continued on page 67)


Capitol Radio Company
"We are Equipped to properly
Service any Make Radfo
Philco Auto Radios, Philco Battery
and all Electric Radios
PHILCO REFRIGERATORS
J. F. Burnett
1290 Main St. Dial 3-3177
BATON ROUGE, LA.



CHAMPAGNE BROS.
Paint & Glass Co.
Dial 2-1250 454 Main St.

. ;qpAl P Baton Rouge, La.
Ibiit


Rabbi Walter G. Peiser is the
spiritual head of Congregation
B'nai Israel, Baton Rouge. He also
takes an active part in the work
sponsored by the Louisiana Sister-
hoods for Jewish students at Louis-
iana State University.

ions to intervene in behalf' of the
Jews, and once even appealed to.
Hitler.
Thus, for over three years the
Jews lived a hunted life. They
were never secure because the
Gestapo had an army of spies, and
persons who had escaped detec-
tion for many months would grow
just the least bit careless and find
that they had been betrayed. It is
sad to relate that even a small
number of Jews were among these
Gestapo informers and a repulsive
individual named "Jacques" would'
tour the streets in a Gestapo car
pointing out the Jews. This man
alone cost the lives of hundreds,
and maybe thousands of Jews.
In this manner the Jews of Bel-
gium lived for four years, until
that glorious day in September,
1944, when the victorious Ameri-
can and British troops broke into
our country and drove out the in-
vader.
'auI 'aOuasv ,JIldult ral0L IlqSaT 'gV61 qfITJISdo


Al. M. Weiss is President of Temple
B nai Israel and also prominent in
business and Jewish activities.

flight deck on fire. I joined a fire
control party. Men trapped by the
fire had to jump overboard to save
their lives. Most of them were
picked up later by destroyers.
Then the Santa Fe came alongside
and I helped tie her up to our ship.
A gangplank was heaved across
and a lot of the men were ordered
to leave ship."
George could have left the ship,
but he and many others stayed
aboard the Franklin.
Recently, when the Franklin re-
turned home, he was among the
survivors.
Two years ago George Shapiro
tried to enlist in the navy as an


Congratulations On Your Golden Jubilee

HARRISON PAINT CO.

D:al 3-6555 631 Main St.
BATON ROUGE, LA.



WOLF'S BREAD
EVERY DAY
EVERY MEAL
BATON ROUGE, -- -:- -:- LOUISIANA



Best Wishes On Your Fiftieth Anniversary

PEERLESS LAUNDRY
1229 NORTH BOULEVARD

Dial 3-2855 : : : : Baton Rouge, Louisiana



Congratulations On Your Golden Jubilee


ICE SERVICE, INC.

135 South 15th Street


BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA





BATON ROUGE, LA.


Roll of Honor
BATON ROUGE JEWISH COMMUNITY


Paul Bartmess
Herbert Benjamin, Jr.
Charles Bombet
Leon Bombet
Adolf Botnik
Leon Brown
Sam Brown
Shirley Botnik
Hal Cohn
Heiman Cohn
Joe Cohn
Joseph Dainau
Ernst Dampf
Jack Dekro
Leon Eagle
Joseph Edelman
Leonard Edelman
Leon Geismar, Jr.
Stanley Gilman
Richard Goldberger
Harry Goudchaux
Arnold Harr
Lee Herzberg, Jr.
Joseph Hollander
Alfred Hirsch
Edward K. Hirsch
Harry Kahn
Byron Kantrow
Sol Karpe
Hans Kaufman
Ernst Kober
Harry Krintzman
Albert Landry
Edgar Levy, Jr.
Raoul Levy, Jr.
Albert Maas
Charles B. Maas, Jr.
Lawrence Mann, Jr.
Max Marks


Paul Marks
Louis Marcus
Buffington Mayer, Jr.
Charles Mayer
Maurice Mayer, Jr.
Julien Mendelsohn
Bernard Michelson
Julius Michelson
Jack Millstein
Hermann Moyse, Sr.
Hermann Moyse, Jr.
B. E. Nelkin
Ralph R. Perlman
Lee Pollack
Sam Pominsky
A. M. Posner
Gerald Posner
Harvey Posner
Bernard Pressberg
Erich Reich
Lowell M. Roseman
Bertrand Rosenbaum
A. M. Rosenthal, Jr.
Jules Rosenthal
Victor Sachse
Mike Safer
Joseph Saltz
Joe Schendle
Bernard Schmulen
Fred Siegel:
Leon Siegel
Raymond Siegel
Joe Silverberg
Leonard Stander
Manfriend Sternberg
Jay Washauer
Dorothy Warrick
Simon Weill
Arnold Winkler


Temple- B'nai Israel, Baton Rouge, La.


Baton Rouge Business College
Member by Invitation
National Association Accredited Commercial Schools
DIAL 5454



FOR FURNITURE

KORNMEYER'S
Dependable Home Furnishers Since '80
BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA


Established 1865
RABENHORST
FUNERAL SERVICE
Member by Invitation National Selected Morticians
Dial 6831
825 GOVERNMENT ST. BATON ROUGE, LA.



ROCK OF AGES

MEMORIALS

LOUISIANA MONUMENT CO.
DIAL 9766 BATON ROUGE, LA. 3560 Greenwell Springs Rd.



Congratulations On Your Golden Jubilee

Capitol Stores, Inc.


BATON ROUGE, LA.


-:- NEW ORLEANS,LA.


BEST WISHES

PEOPLE'S LAUNDRY, INC.
'It's a Pleasure to Please You"
DIAL 5656
800 Jackson Road : Baton Rouge, Louisiana



Congratulating Our Jewish Friends on the Ledger's Golden Jubilee

BART-WELL CO.
"BART-WELL is your BUY-WORD"
Phone 7020 401-407 Lafayette Street
BATON ROUGE, LA.


Congratulations On Your Golden Jubilee
J. E. Ortlieb Printing Co.
"Thirty-Four Years Continuous Service"
532 FLORIDA ST. PHONE 6336
BATON ROUGE, LA.




NEW ORLEANS, LA.


*


*


CONGRATULATIONS TO THE JEWISH LEDGER

ON ITS FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY

ROBERT S. MAESTRI, Mayor


JESSE S. CAVE
Commissioner of Public Finance

DR. FRANK R. GOMILA
Commissioner of Public Safety


JOSEPH P. SKELLY
Commissioner of Public Property

FRED A. EARHART
Commissioner of Public Utilities


I


1 I I L




NEW ORLEANS, LA.


With Best Wishes

Edgar H. des Bordes



CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR GOLDEN JUBILEE

ROBERT H. KAMMER
INSURANCE
Kammer Insurance Agency
717 Canal Bank Bldg. RA 5239


Use BROOK
Waterproofed TARPAULINS
Call
BROOK Tarpaulin Co., Inc.
429 Celeste St. RAymond 4169


BEST WISHES FOR YOUR 50TH ANNIVERSARY

MINTZ & MINTZ
-FURNITURE-
RA. 4495 At 541 to 547 Baronne St.


"The Last Word In Appetizers"
DICKEY'S POTATO CHIP CO.
Machine Made-Of Finest Materials
"Never Touched by Human Hands"
"You'll Want More and More"
W. W. DICKEY, Prop.
1407 Canal St. RAymond 3720

BEST WISHES
Crawford & Reed
WHOLESALE FLORISTS
CH. 5861 3220 Washington Ave.
NEW ORLEANS, U. S. A.

Established 1884
GOODMAN & BEER
EXPORTERS AND IMPORTERS
WHOLESALE GROCERS
Ask for the Best
"AUTOCRAT" and RED BALL
Pure Food Products
416-420 S. Front Street


Louisiana Electrotype Co., Inc.
ELECTROTYPES STEREOTYPES
MATS
732 Poydras St.
NEW ORLEANS, LA.


Best Wishes to My Jewish
Friends
GEORGE REYER
Superintendent New Orleans Police
Department



4fiai on Ajouff
3nc.
218 CHARTRES STREET
New Orleans, - - La.


A Soldier To His Former Teacher
Letter written by a Jewish soldier to his former teacher at Com-
munal Hebrew School, New Orleans, La.


Tuesday, 14 Nov. 1944.
To my Dear Teacher:
Pardon my phrasing the saluta-
tion in such a manner. I would
have liked to have written it in
Hebrew, in more suitable words.
Due to censorship I must write to
you in English.
I read your letter, and was most
happy to hear from you. Many was
the time when memories would
come back to me. Yes! memories of
school on Clio Street and then on
Josephine Street. Our Saturday
prayers, and our social affairs.
How well I recall all those mo-
ments. What I wouldn't give to be
able to walk up the steps of the
school once again. To walk into
your class and see the map of Pal-
estine hanging on the wall just as
it was when I was attending
classes.
I had no trouble reading your
letter. You are such a good teacher
that your pupils can't help but re-
member everything they learned.
As for myself-I've been in the
Army since April '43. First, I was
in an Anti-Aircraft outfit, then I
was transferred to my present
company. It is a Quartermaster
Salvage Repair Company. Our duty
is to repair, inspect and renovate
shoes, clothing and textile equip-
ment. At present, I'm working in
the shoe section, inspecting shoes.
I was stationed in Hawaii for a
while. I visited Honolulu, and the
Jewish Welfare. It is situated right
below the Schul. They have only
one Schul there. It is as big as our
School Schul. Same type of bench-
es and stage. There aren't many
Jewish residents, only servicemen,
and quite a few young married
couples from the East working in
Pearl Harbor. I had Passover ser-
vices there. The supper was at-
tended by three thousand service
men. What a crowd!
At present, I'm in the Mariana
Islands. The island I'm on is a typ-
ical South Sea island, with plenty
of rain daily. It is very hot here
at all times. No such thing as sea-
sons, only Summer. The natives
are still not allowed to leave their
protective area. They must wear
an identification ribbon, in order


to tell the soldiers what they are.
Our food is all dehydrated. Haven't
had a glass of milk since I left the
States a year ago.
We have services every week.
I attend them faithfully. When one
is in a place like this religion comes
natural to him. I conducted ser-
vices on the ship coming over here.
A Protestant Chaplain helped us.
He got us Jewish prayer books,
and even saw tb it that we had a
place where to conduct our ser-
vices. I'm sure that you would have
been proud of your pupil. I was
surprised myself, for I thought that
I had forgotten most of what I've
learned at the Communal Hebrew
School.
I have a feeling that each and
every one of your pupils that have

Touro Synagogue


Emil W. Leipziger is Rabbi at Touro
Synagogue.
gone to war, if and when they re-
turn, will be the most religious
men that you had ever hoped for.
When one is far away from home,
and so close to danger, it is the
Almighty that is very close to him
at all times.
I join in prayer that this war
may end soon, so that I may be
able to be back home with my
people and you.
Give my regards to Mrs. Lis-
itzky, and of course, to your
daughter and her family.
I remain, your pupil, who owes
you a debt that he cannot repay.
Some of your wisdom and teach-
ings. (Signed) Jules.


BEST WISHES FOR YOUR 50TH ANNIVERSARY

Canal Loan & Jewelry
Company
914 Canal Street


CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR GOLDEN JUBILEE

Security Loan Office
We Carry a Complete Line of
LUGGAGE
RA. 8508 124 S. Rampart St.


CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR GOLDEN JUBILEE
COHEN JEWELRY CO., INC.
Diamonds, Watches & Jewelry


CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR 50TH

Jos. Portnoy
MEN'S WEAR
2 STORES
700 Canal St. 1008 Canal St.



Serve the Friendlier
fea BEER


M. G. LOUBAT
DISTRIBUTING CO.
1122 S. Claiborne Ave. CA 2178



COOK'S CONFECTIONS
Manufacturers of
Cook's Sweetheart Pecan, Peanut,
Cashew, Almond and Walnut
Flakes-Maple Pecan
Pralines
714 ST. LOUIS ST. MA. 8265


The Sweetest Shops in Town

KATE LATTER'S
CANDY SHOPS
RA 5359 121 Baronne


vioney to Loan
507-513 S..Rampart St.


RA. 6456'




NEW ORLEANS, LA.


"NOTHING TO LOSE BUT OUR ILLUSIONS . "

By RABBI ABBA HILLEL SILVER


W HAT our people have sought
to establish through the long
and weary years of our dispersion
is a Jewish State. It is a Jewish
State that Zionism was created to
achieve. It is that which Herzl
and Nordau and Pinsker and Hess
and the myriads of Jews of our
generation .and the unnumbered
generations before them worked
and prayed for. This is the real-
istic solution of the diaspora prob-
lem. Comfortable Jews in com-
fortable lands may prefer other
solutions and the soothing re-
frains of pleasant lullabies. Sooner
or later they are awakened, like
the Jews of Germany in our day
and like so many Jewish commun-
ities before them, to the shock and


a radical change in our position is
not made. This change cannot be
brought about by the civil emanci-
pation of the Jews in this or that
state, but only by the auto-eman-
cipation of the Jewish people as a
nation, the foundation of a colo-
nial community belonging to the
Jews, which is some day to become
our inalienable home, our father-
land." All that has happened to
the Jewish people in the last 60
years, and more especially all that
has happened in the last 10 years,
only serves to underscore the in-
evitability of Pinsker's conclusions.
It is of a Jewish State that we
must speak today, with clear and
unmistakable speech, even trum-
pet-tonged, lest in this strident,


Congratulations On Your Golden Jubilee

H. GRABENHEIMER & SONS, INC.
Wholesale Liquors Dealers and Importers
633 Tehoupitoulas Street Phones: RA. 6108 6033
NEW ORLEANS


Best Wishes On Your 50th, and Continued Success

THREE SISTERS
INCORPORATED
1029 Canal Street
NEW ORLEANS 16, LA.


REAL ESTATE AND INVESTMENTS

D. MARSIGLIA
REALTOR
714 UNION STREET RAymond 1226


ESTABLISHED 1887

The Ferd Marks Insurance Agency, Limited
Fire, Tornado, Marine, Liability, Automobile, Plate Glass, Burglary,
Accident and Health, Workmen's Compensation Insurance and Bonds
712 UNION STREET NEW ORLEANS, LA.


horror of an unanticipated and un-
prepared for reality. All Jews
share a common destiny. How
brief the intervals of our tranquil-
ity, how frequent and prolonged
the years of our disquietude! There
is a definite pattern to our experi-
ence in every land. There is no
solution to the Jewish problem
custom-tailored to each individual
country, each community or each
class of Jews. More than sixty
years ago, Leo Pinsker, shaken out
of his assimilationist dream by the
Russian pogroms of his day, de-
clared: "Our future will remain
insecure and precarious so long as


clamorous day our voice and the
precise intent of our urgent cause
be drowned out.
It is not helpful at this moment
to dilate on how long it will take
to set up such a Jewish State in
actual running order. We need the
political decision NOW! It is quite
self-evident and elementary that a
transitional period will be requir-
ed, and a Jewish majority, before
the full apparatus of a free and
democratic Jewish State can be
brought into operation. But all
such reasonable exposition of self-
evident truths at this time only
serves the purpose of our adver-


Beth Israel Synagogue, New Orleans, La.


d" L


Congratulations On Your Golden Jubilee


NEW SOUTHPORT CLUB

FORMERLY JEFFERSON INN





New Orleans' Newest and


Most Modern Club




AIR CONDITIONED




NEW ORLEANS, LA.


BEST WISHES FOR YOUR 50TH ANNIVERSARY

Dental Supplies, Inc..
G. H. SCHWING, President
RAymond 6231
Suite 634 Audubon Bldg.


BEST WISHES

PELICAN ICE CO., Ltd.
1550 ST. LOUIS ST.
RAymond 4193


BEST WISHES FOR YOUR 50TH ANNIVERSARY

O'Brien Paint Manufac-
turing Co., Inc.
NEW ORLEANS, LA.


F. J. ORFILA CO., INC.
Steamship and Tourist Agency
Representing All Steamship Lines
221 BARONNE ST. Strand Bldg.
Phone RAymond 7397
NEW ORLEANS. LA.



Gordon's
930 Canal Street
JEWELERS OPTICIANS


Established 1871
The Hartwig Moss Insurance
Agency, Ltd.
WESTERN UNION BUILDING
Carondelet, cor. Perdido
W. IRVING MOSS, President
ARTHUR S. HUEY, Vice-Pres.
EDWARD C. BARKER, Vice.-Pres.


CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR GOLDEN JUBILEE

HENRY KRAAK, Florist
1425 ELEONORE STREET
UPtown 1198



VORIES BAKING CO.
1544-1546 Tchoupitoulas Street
PHONE RAYMOND 5153
New Orleans, La.


CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR GOLDEN JUBILEE

LENFANT'S
1915 Canal St. GA. 8019
WE NEVER CLOSE


series who seize upon it as proof
that Zionist leaders themselves
favor delay and do not really ex-
pect a Jewish Commonwealth and
may be satisfied with much less.
These leaders are roundly praised
for their statesmanlike forbear-
ance, patience and tact, and from
underneath this elegant cloak of
praise often dart the deadly rapier
thrusts at the heart of our Move-
ment. That is how we have been
imposed upon time and time again!
If we succeed in obtaining a de-
claration now from the proper
authorities that it is proposed to set
up Palestine as a Jewish State,
then, whether it takes three or
five years to complete its imple-
mentation is of secondary impor-
tance. If we do not obtain such a
positive declaration NOW, then
the time element is altogether ir-
relevant, and whatever concessions
in terms of immigration schedules
are made ,are, politically speaking,
of little moment. They may be
only indices of defeat, for such
schedules will most probably be
fixed to insure a permanent minor-
ity status for us in Palestine.

Refugeeism May Yet Defeat
Zionism
It is not for us AT THIS TIME
to stress Palestine as a place of
refuge for homeless Jews and con-
centrate in this brief, tense hour of
fugitive political opportunities,
when the great bell of history is
tolling for us the final summons,
on immigration certificates for
refugees if what we have in
mind is national restoration and a
Jewish State. The Arabs are not
deceived by such a maneuver. The
world is not moved to greater ex-
ertions in our behalf when we
speak of saving refugees instead of
building a Jewish State. The
world was not greatly moved by
our desperate pleas in behalf of
our millions of doomed fellow-
Jews now lying dead in their
nameless graves, many of whom
might have been saved. The great
democracies heard the tortured cry
of a dying people. They wagged
their heads in sympathy and then
proceeded to speak in the barren
legalism of constricted hearts of
their inability to intervene in the
domestic affairs of other nations
and of their own inviolate immi-
gration laws.


Those who tell us to forget or
forego our national claims at this
time so as to reenforce our refu-
gee claims are talking sheer non-
sense. Thus far the refusals have
stood as adamant against our
humanitarian pleas as against our
national demands. Let it be re-
membered, too, that it was the
NATIONAL rather than the phil-
anthropic appeal the political
necessity for normalizing the
status of world Jewry once and for
all by the establishment of a na-
tional home which captured the
imagination of the great statesmen
of the first World War who were
responsible for the Balfour De-

Beth Israel


Uri Miller is Rabbi at Congregation
Beth Israel

claration and Mandate. Let it also
be remembered that the classic text
of Zionism is a 'ook called "The
Jewish State." In 1917, Dr. Chaim
Weizmann declared: "We have
never built our Zionist Movement
on the sufferings of our people in
Russia or elsewhere. These suffer-
ings were never the cause of Zion-
ism. The fundamental cause of
Zionism was, and is, the ineradi-
cable national striving of Jewry to
have a home of its own-a nation-
al center, a national home with a
national life. And this remains
now stranger than ever."
Refugeeism may yet defeat
Zionism! Our undying sin will be
if we fail to understand the poten-
tials of this great hour and if we
sink our clear, resplendent politi-
cal vision of national rebirth in the
(Please turn the page)


BEST WISHES FOR YOUR 50TH ANNIVERSARY
FROM

Hiller Jewelry Co.

MAgnolia 3465


BEST WISHES FOR CONTINUED SUCCESS

'Sutton's Gift Shop
RA 1042 718 Canal St.


BEST WISHES FOR YOUR 50TH ANNIVERSARY

KELLY & ABIDE CO.
DRY GOODS
222 Chartres St. RA. 9480

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR GOLDEN JUBILEE

MAX BRESSLER

407 POYDRAS ST.


CONGRATULATIONS

Dixie Machine Weld-
ing & Metal Wks.
1031 Annunaiation St.


OUR BEST WISHES

ANTIN'S
JEWELERS



BEST WISHES FOR CONTINUED SUCCESS

GREEN'S



CONGRATULATIONS

MARINE EXCHANGE
RA. 6772 531 Canal St.
NEW ORLEANS, LA.


BEST WISHES FOR CONTINUED SUCCESS
CHARLES TOLMAS, INC.
Real Estate Business Chances
"Property Exchange Specialists"
342 Baronne St. Phone RA 6389


CONGRATULATIONS

From

A FRIEND





surging and engulfing waters of
philanthropy.

A Decision Now
It is not for us to talk of parti-
tion or bi-national if we really
mean a Jewish State. No one
spoke of partition or bi-nationalism
when there were only fifty-five
thousand Jews in Palestine in 1917.
Why should one speak of it today
when there are over six hundred
thousand Jews and the ration of
Jew to Arab is far greater than it
was then? Neither the Declara-
tion nor the Mandate contemplated
the creation of an Arab state in
Palestine or of an Arab national
home. Such Arab states were


in the night, and boatloads of them
perished miserably within sight of
the land of Israel, having been de-
nied the right to land on its shores.
We would be a majority in Pal-
estine today were it not for the
interference of the Mandatory
power. The creation of a Jewish
State would by now be a matter
of course. Therefore we must now
ask that the primary and original
purpose of the Mandate be re-
affirmed forthwith, that it be im-
plemented, and that its implemen-
tation be assured by giving the
Jewish people control over immi-
gration. Moreover, the country
should at once be placed under a
special administration, on which


Anshe S'fard Synagogue


S*... ,~- ., ,


contemplated and have in fact been
established by the Allied Nations
elsewhere in the Near East. It was
the clear intention, and the Royal
Commission Report of 1937 con-
firms it, to convert the Jewish Na-
tional Home into a Jewish State
as soon as the conditions for a
Jewish State actually existed. Such
conditions would undoubtedly be
in existence today if it were not
for the legally and morally un-
justifiable policy of the MacDonald
White Paper which arbitarily re-
stricted Jewish immigration during
recent years when hundreds of
thousands of our people were
clamoring for admission into Pal-
estine, and when many of them
were forced to the indignity of
smuggling themselves into their
own National Homeland as thieves


the Jewish people shall have pre-
ponderant representation corres-
ponding to its overwhelming stake
in the country, to insure its econo-
mic development and the rapid
absorption of new settlers, and the
establishment of the Jewish State.
This is the only kind of "transi-
tional period" which can lead to a
Jewish State. The Jewish Agency
must be vested forthwith with gov-
ernmental powers to plan and to
set up the appropriate apparatus
for mass immigration which must
follow immediately after the war.
Appropriate policies, economics,
fiscal, industrial, agrarian must be
studied and devised. The post-
ponement of a decision as to the
status of Palestine until after the
end of hostilities is thus a severe
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THE JEWISH LEDGER


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We Specialize in Permanent Waves,
Hair Dyeing and Iacials
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1018 CANAL STREET

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR GOLDEN JUBILEE
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BOSTON, MASS.
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203 Carondelet RA. 7201

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inary planning and organization,
and it may seriously affect the
flow of immigration after the war,
and the country's ability, through
unpreparedness, to absorb it.
The call for a "decision now"
which we made last year and
which now seem to be muted,
was thus dictated by sound judg-
ment and practical intelligence. It
was not due to the impatience of
impractical political extremists.
To postpone the decision is to pro-
long the crisis, to permit the Arab
opposition, now rapidly organizing,
to consolidate itself still further,
and to defeat all efforts at intelli-
gent planning for a difficult post-
war reconstruction.
We may not succeed in our ob-
jectives. "I am not bound to suc-
ceed," declared Abraham Lincoln,
"but I am bound to live up to what
light I have. I am not bound to
win, but I am bound to be free."
Ours is the duty to live up to what
light we have, to the guidance of
our history and the great lessons
of our experience and to give to
the statesmen of the world our best
judgment as to how our problem,
which is also a world problem, can
best be solved, to the hurt of none
and the blessing of all.
It is not our duty to propose par-
tial solutions. The statesmen of
the world may prefer partial solu-
tions in the hope of insuring peace.
This, you will recall, was the
Munich complex. Lack of vision
and courage may again postpone
the just and definitive decision.
This will undoubtedly acerbate the
political conditions in Palestine
and in the Near East. But this is
beyond our control. What is with-
in our control is the resolve to
make known our cause to the world
and to demand justice at the bar
of history. We must ask nothing
that is unjust and unreasonable.
We must accept nothing that is
unjust and unreasonable. We have
no right to renounce our historic
and religious hope which has fed
and sustained the spirit of our
people through all these long and
weary centuries. No Jewish leader
has been given or will be given
the mandate to make such a re-
nunciation. The messianic hope of
Israel cannot be bartered away for
an immigration quota, desperately
as refugee Jews need the haven


of Palestine and desperately as we
want them to go there.
Another White Paper?
It has been rumored that the
Arabs are about to make a gener-
ous gesture and consent to addi-
tional Jewish immigrants on con-
dition that they, Moslem and
Christian Arabs, shall remain in
the majority. I am not inclined to
credit this rumor, for such gener-
osity is in violent contrast to their
customary intransigence. But
whether the rumor has substance
or not, from the point of view of
our national rebirth what matters
is not whether we have 600,000
Jews or a million Jews in Pales-


Anshe Sford


Moses I. Goldberg is rabbi at Anshe
Sfard Synagogue.

tine, but whether we have a ma-
jority. If with a million Jews we
still remain a minority, our pri-
mary objective is not obtained.
There is no national Jewish State.
There is no internationally recog-
nized Jewish nation. We remain
as we have through these two
thousand years, a minority every-
where, and our universal minority
status.has been at the root of our
universal insecurity. Minority
rights, even under international
guarantees, are of little value, as
the experience of our people in
Eastern Europe between the two
world wars amply demonstrated.
We are different from all other
minorities in the world. Each of the
other minority groups has a fath-
erland somewhere where themain
body of its people lives in its own
(Please turn the page)


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:




THE JEWISH LEDGER


home. The Jewish minorities have
no national homeland anywhere.
Thus when minorities are hard-
pressed, arrangements can be
made for their transference back
to their original homes. Transfer-
ence of a Jewish minority can only
mean consignment to exile or to
extermination camps. The found-
ers of our movement, time and
again warned, as did Nordau, that
"we must at any price become a
majority in Palestine." Their
kingly dream was at all times that
of a Jewish State made possible in
a democratic world by the achieve-
ment of a Jewish majority. Brit-
ish and American statesmen, too,
thought in terms of a Jewish Na-
tional Home and a Jewish State.
Lloyd George, who was Prime
Minister of Great Britain at the
time of the Declaration, testified
'that "the idea was and this was the
interpretation put on it (the De-
claration) that a Jewish State
would be established as soon as
the Jews had responded to the op-
portunity afforded them by the
idea of a national home and had
become a definite majority of the
inhabitants." Mr. Winston Churc-
hill, who was Secretary of State
in 1920 exultingly visioned "on the
banks of the Jordan a Jewish State
which might comprise three to
four million Jews."
The very essence of the millen-
ial hope of our people would be
denied and rejected by any formula
which would make unattainable a
Jewish State in Palestine. It
would also be a disastrous retreat.
The peace conference at the con-
clusion of this war, far from con-
summating, would actually be
nullifying the political gains which
the Jewish people achieved at the
close of the last war. What may
be contemplated, if these or simi-
lar rumors have any substance, is,
I am afraid, another White Paper
- a final payoff, and liquidation
of. the Zionist Movement.
The real purpose of the Mac-
Donald White Paper, you will re-
call, was not the restrictive figure
of 75,000 additional Jewish immi-
grants, but as it clearly and speci-
fically states: "His Majesty's
Government now declares un-
equivocally that it is not part of
their policy that Palestine should
become a Jewish State." This is


the lethal dose of the White Paper
and a revision of the quota figure
upward from 75,000 to 375,000 is
not its antidote. The McDonald
White Paper was a product of that
disastrous Munich era when the
rights of other smaller nations
were also sacrificed and other
solmn international commitments
were scrapped. Munich led to the
Second World War. It has been
the high hope of all that a victory
of the United Nations will undo the
mischief of Munich and will rectify
the wrongs which were there and
since perpetrated. What was ruth-
lessly taken away will be right-
fully restored. Will this principle
of reparation and restoration be
applied to all peoples, except the
Jews? Are the promises to the
Jewish people alone to be ignored
and dishonored? Is our loyalty
alone to go unrequited, our sacri-
fices unrewarded, and our dead
forgotten? .


Temple Sinai


Dr. Julian B. Feibelman is rabbi at
Temple Sinai.

The road ahead is hard. The
odds are against us. The odds
were always against us. They were
strongly against the Maccabees,
against our ancestors at the Red
Sea striking out for freedom,
against the scattered and strug-
gling Jewish communities fighting
for survival in the dark ages. The
odds were against the first Jewish
pioneers who broke ground for the
first Jewish colony and against
those who first drained the malar-
ial marshes and swamps of the


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THE JEWISH LEDGER


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Emek. But they all had the cour-
age of their dreams and therein
lay their invincible strength.
The Correct Course.
We believe that the solution of
the problem of Jewish national
homelessness is imperative, for the
sake of the peace of the world. Any
historic people which will be de-
nied a minimum of national secur-
ity and independence after the
war will endanger the success of
the international order which will
be set up. In the delicately-poised
international order of tomorrow,
the Jewish people must not remain
a people without status and with-
out a national home. Against its
own will and without any deliber-
ate action on its part, it will be-
come a focus of political tension,
conflict and distress which may
endanger the peace of the whole
Middle East.
We, too, possess inalienable
rights as a people, the right to life,
liberty and the pursuit of happi-
ness. We have not yielded on these
rights for two thousand years, al-
though the world chose to ignore
and to denyj them. The Jewish
people, for its own salvation and
for the peace of the world, now
asks that no obstacle be put.in its
way to repossess itself of these
rights, to reconstruct its national
life in its historic home, and to
quicken'to new life an ancient and
honorable people.
Copyright 1945, Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, Inc.
---------- v----
"POP" OF THE FRANKLIN

(Continued from page 58)
days like Passover. He'd send to
the Jewish Welfare Board for the
supplies. Ginde was killed in the
attack. And there's Harry L. Wie-
ner (SSML, 3/c, Dorchester, Mass.)
On the trip back to the states my
duties didn't give me much time
and he took over. Only we didn't
have the crowd we used to have.
We used to have about fifteen men
at services, which is pretty good,
considering there were about forty
to fifty Jewish boys on board."
George told us about the first
service held after the bombing at-
tack.
"It was the Friday after," he
said. "There were just six of us
there. Some had been taken off,
some we didn't know what had
happened to them. Now we know.


Ginde's dead. Irving Fishman S.
2/c, Dorchester, Mass.), Morris
Bocheneck (SK 1/c, Brooklyn, N.
Y.)-both dead. Paul Fineberg
(AM 2/c, Dorchester, Mass.), Mor-
ton Mittleman (MM 3/c, Bronx,
N. Y.), Herman Tucker (SSML
3/c)-they're all missing. And
there are others. But the six of us,
we felt we had to hold the service,
even if we didn't have a "minyan."
We held it on the flight deck and
we were sad, but we pere proud,
too, because somehow holding our
Jewish service on the damaged
flight deck of 'Big Ben' meant a
great deal to us, both as Americans
and Jews."
George is a New Yorker. All his
life he's been a confirmed bachelor.
But recently he proposed to Miss
Sylvia Hannes of the Bronx, and


Chevra Thilim


Irving L. Goldman is Rabbi at Congrega-
tion Chevra Thilim, New Orleans, La.

they're engaged. The marriage will
have to wait a while, though. With
nine other men who served on the
Franklin, George is scheduled to
tour the country to deliver indus-
trial incentive talks to war workers
all over the country. It won't be
the first time his occupation will
consist of talking. He used to be
an insurance salesman for the
(Continued on page 69)


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W HAT follows here should be
an editorial, but it isn't. It is
a congeries of reflections. Who
wants to write (or for that matter,
to read) an editorial on these hot
days of Summer in the subtropics?
I'll just fall into the natural som-
nolence of a Tamuz afternoon, and
muse, reflect and meditate.
Summery as is the day, however;
not so is the season of the writer's
career. That is at late fall or early
winter, for the writer is a Rabbi
ordained forty-five years ago at the
Hebrew Union College with the
class of "naughty-naught" and the
first bit of wisdom with which he
desires to reassure and console
himself and to instruct the reader
is this: "The first forty-five years
are the hardest."
Where the next-the easier clus-
ter of forty-five years are to be
passed, he does not rightly know.
A few of them, perhaps, in the
.community which he has tried to
serve since 1913 with whatever
modest capacities were his;-the
rest of them, in-well it doesn't
matter, he has friends in both
places.


One's lost youth always has a
place in reminiscent musing. In
few professions is extreme youth
an asset. In the Reform Rabbinate,
it is a noble estate. Graduating
in the early twenties, the young
Rabbi is placed at once in a posi-
tion of great responsibility and
leadership. The adoring Congre-
gation marvels at his intelligent
grasp, the flights of oratory, his
fund of knowledge, his influence
with the "goyim"-qualities far
beyond his years. He accepts the
adulation, not without some mis-
givings but with an inner glow.
The writer recalls such honey-
mooning in his own career, and
how pleasant it was, yet he re-
members that now and then the
inflation of his youthful ego was
punctured by incidents of pointed
humor, as when the inevitable
"schnorrer" approached him with
the query: "I want to see your
papa!"-as when a passing tele-
graph messenger called to him with


the startling request-"Say, kid-
what time is it?"

There is one thing consoling
about this unique status of youth
in the Reform ministry. It doesn't
last forever. Time and experience
change this falsely based, emo-
tional relationship between Rabbi
and moonstruck congregation after
a few years of trial and error. Then
not only the Rabbi's conscience
but the Kehillo's judgment seem
to whisper to him, "Rabbi, be your
age!" and then he begins really to
serve.

The writer was once accidental-

Gates of Prayer


Nathaniel S. Share is Rabbi at Con-
gregation Gates of Prayer, New
Orleans, La.
ly but strangely made aware why
he was chosen for the Rabbinate.
Dr. Louis Grossman of Temple
Bethel, Detroit, had marked him
for special attention, adding to the
already finished private Cheder
Hebrew instruction, the greater
discipline of Hebrew grammar,
from Qual to Hispual, from pars-
ing easy bits of Genesis to the
analysis of the more challenging
structure of Psalms. This had gone
on but for a short time when its
avowed purpose was revealed. The
writer was to be directed to the
ministry! One day he overheard
a friend of Dr. Grossman ask
(memory doesn't reveal whether
(Continued on page 70)


RUBENSTEIN 'S


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THE JEWISH LEDGER


Tolerance Is Stressed
"If only enough attention were
given to the value of human re-
lations . if only we could live
with two great principles in our
minds--the Fatherhood of God,
and the Brotherhood of Man--I
sincerely believe that there would
be no room for war, strife, or per-
secution."
The man who uttered these
truths was Julian Feibelman, Rabbi
of Temple Sinai.
Typical of many of his faith,
this leader of reformed Judaism
in New Orleans is wise, kindly
and tolerant, the epitome of his
teaching from the pulpit of his
beautiful synagogue.
The Jewish population of New
Orleans is comparatively small;
there are but six synagogues, three
orthodox, and three reformed, in
the whole of the metropolis. Re-
formed Judaism, while clinging
firmly to the ancient faith, is
rather more liberal.
Tells of Services
Reformed Judaism believes in
mixed congregations, mixed choirs.
Girls as well as boys have a part
in the confirmation services.
"You know," said the rabbi, "it
rather amuses me to have those
of other faiths listen to one of
our services, and find, much to
their surprise, that every word of
it is acceptable to them, and that
they may learn as much from our
teachings as they get from the
pulpits of their own churches.
"We all have far too many se-
rious misconceptions of each oth-
ers' religions and methods of wor-
ship. For instance, there are many
people who still firmly believe
that our religious teaching preach-
es against Christ. We certainly do
not. To us, Christ is a Sublime
Man, coming from the direct line
of old prophets long revered by
Judaism."
Beautiful Temple
The huge Temple with its curved
walls, and carved wooden ceiling
is an architectural delight. Over
the massive Italian marble "al-
tar," or ark, as it is called, a great


red lantern, "the perpetual light"
burns continuously in honor of
the dead. The scrolls of the law,
the five books of Moses the
Prophet, from which passages are
read at each service, are lodged
behind carved bronze doors which
slide back to reveal them, velvet
wrapped, their handles covered
with triple silver crowns, mounted
with tiny bells. Their Hebrew
script is penned by hand upon
fine parchment.
Chief tenets of the Jewish faith
are briefly: belief in God as a
Father of all men, a profound
sense of duty towards mankind,
and a sincere effort towards spir-
itual development. In the Temple
house, attached to the synagogue,
is a pretty little classroom, or kin-
dergarten with blackboard walls,
and small red tables and chairs,
where classes are held that young
Jewish children may be taught the
faith from their earliest years.
The ancient custom of the lighting
of candles in every faithful Jew-
ish home on the Sabbath commem-
orates the first of God's creations,
light.
Custom Explained
Explaining the custom, the Rabbi
said, 'The mother of the home
blesses the lighted candles by
placing her hands above them,
saying, "May our home be conse-
crated by Thy light." At a family
gathering the father of the home
asks the blessing of God upon the
work of the family, and thanks
Him for His gifts of food, ma-
terial and spiritual blessings
throughout the week."
Speaking of the strict yearly
fasts of the faithful, the Rabbi
said, "We do not fast to afflict
the soul, but rather that the pains
of hunger may give us sympathy
and understanding of those in the
world who must go hungry day
after day."
To the Jews, as may well be
seen from the history of New Or-
leans, charity, and the sharing of
worldly goods, is a prime duty of
the Jewish faith.-New Orleans
Item.


Rabbi Sees Brotherhood

As World Need

By ELIZABETH KEATING


POP
(Continued from page 67)
Equitable Life Insurance Com-
pany.
This is the second war in which
George has seen action. He was in
the Infantry in World War I.
George came here from Russia
when he was eight years old. He's
held a variety of odd jobs. Once
he was a street car conductor. Af-
ter he graduated from college, he
played professional football for
the Flatbush Giants,.5 When the
war's over he wants to go into the
automobile business. He worked in
that business before.
His athletic record at City Col-
legt was exceptional. He was on
the varsity teams in football, polo,
track, swimming and wrestling.
We asked him why he turned
down that athletic instructor's
commission when he joined up.
"I didn't like what the Nazis
were doing. I wanted to see some
action-and I sure saw it."
Copyright 1945, Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, Inc.
--------V---------
JEWS IN THE POST-WAR
WORLD
A most helpful and timely book
dealing comprehensively with the
Jewish question has just come off
the Dryden Press of New York.
It bears the title, "Jews in the
Post-War World," and its authors
are Dr. Max Gottschalk and Mr.
Abraham S. Ducker.
The book reflects both the vast
fund of information on the part
of the authors and their ability
to convey their information in an
easy, fluid and pleasant manner.
The value of the book is further
enhanced by the objectivity with
which the authors treat their sub-
ject.
A clear idea of the scope and
purpose of the book and the sort
of knowledge the authors have ad-
mirably succeeded in imparting
may be-gained from the headings
of the various chapters. They are:
I. The Two World Wars: A Com-
parison and a Contrast.
II. How the Jewish Community
Prepared for Peace During World
War I.
III. Europe Between (the) Wars.
IV. The Position of the Jews in
the Post-War World.
V. Palestine in the New World.
VI. Relief, Reconstruction, and


Migration.
VII. Jewish Survival in the De-
mocracy of the Future. S.
v
---v------

JEWS IN SPORTS
By HASKELL COHEN
T HE New York Yankees are back
in town and the scribes with
the team on its recent western tour
are raving about Hank Greenberg.
Our old side kick in Italy, Tom
Meany of PM, doesn't hesitate to
put his sign of approval on Han-
kus. Tom feels that once Hank gets
the feel of things and works his
way into shape the Bronx Buster
will walk away with the home run
title in the American League des-
pite the fact that he has missed
about half the season.
At this writing Greenberg has
hit three lusty home runs in less
than ten games. He has been hand-
icapped by two bad charley horses
in both legs. Even while he was
forced to take it easy due to the
aching muscles Hank continued
with his tedious pushups. It is this
sincerity and drive that makes
Greenberg a winning player. Mem-
bers of the Detroit official family
feel that if he doesn't play a game
the rest of the season he is a good
investment.
*
A few weeks ago we wrote ad-
vising to watch the fate of Herman
Barron at the PGA Golf tourna-
ment at Dayton, Ohio. Herman led
the New York qualifiers and darn-
ed if he didn't shoot his opening
round at Dayton in a low figure
bracket of 68. Herman has threat-
ened many times but never has
come through. Perhaps this is the
year he will come into his own.

Last week we ran into an old-
time fighter in Moe Myers of Al-
bany. Moe must be close to seven-
ty-five now but he doesn't look
it. We saw him at the Albany ball
park collecting tickets. For a man
of his age he is spry and chipper
at the gate and nobody beats him
out of an admittance.
Copyright 1945, Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, Inc.
V
-~-------V----------
Jerusalem, (JTA)-Military au-
thorities here released the first
casualty list of the Jewish Brigade.
It discloses that five men were
killed in action, three died of
wounds and 52 were wounded.




THE JEWISH LEDGER


THE FIRST FORTY-FIVE YEARS-THE HARDEST

(Continued- from page 68)


in approval or doubt) "Why are
you preparing this lad for the Rab-
binate?" The answer came prompt-
ly-"Haven't you noticed what a
pious deacon he has always seem-
ed?"-Vocational guidance experts
please note. In the early days of
your art, an Emersonian preacher
stole a march on you and enriched
(well-maybe) enriched the min-
istry by intuition. And parents of
adolescent boys take care! Watch
your young hopeful's demeanor.
Cultivate in him the aspect of sa-
voir faire, the poker face, the mien
of precocity-but unless you want
to rob the Law, Medicine, or De-
partment Store Management of a
genius-don't let that boy of yours
cultivate the manner of the "pious
deacon!"
It was G. K. Chesterton of whom
it was said that he often saw things
as one who "stands on his head."
He, it was, who created the inap-
posite phrase-"tremendous tri-
fles." History and personal careers
are replete with tremendous tri-
fles which influence the future. It
was the writer's "pious look"
which destined him for the Rab-
binate. Another trifling episode of
his very tender years turned him,
carefully reared in an Orthodox
home, into the Reform camp. His
family then was connected with
K. K. Shaaray Tzedek-one of the
oldest of the Orthodox Synagogues
of Detroit. The time was Yom Kip-
pur afternoon. The writer-then
a lad of nine-had sat long beside
his father, engrossed in devotion.
From where he sat he could see his
Mother in the women's gallery. A
yearning seized him to be with
her. He acted on the impulse and
made his way to the stairway lead-
ing to his goal, but he had made
but a short rung or two of the
climb when he was gruffly thrust
back with angry words by the
Shammas known in the early an-
nals of that Congregation as "Jake
the Bouncer."
Heartbroken the frustrated lad,
rushed out of the Synagogue and
registered a vow in Heaven that
he would never again set foot in
that benighted place, nor any one
like it. A childish vow-but a deep


frustration-one of those tremen-
dous trifles which helped to chan-
nel future thought and purpose.
So the Editor leaves the subject


with the admonition "Ye Syna-
gogues-be careful of your Sham-
mosim"-and leaves it, too, with
the hope that if all these musings
seem too ephemeral, the reader
will charitably say-"It's Summer
-mayhap the writer has a touch
of the sun!"


pie" tender young eyes that are in youi


Have Enough Light-
to give a feeling of cheerfulness with no glare
or shadows Buibs in any lamp by which eyes
are used should add up to at least 100 watts.


For Easy Seeing -
light must be plentiful, soft and diffused, like
light in the shade of a tree. Instead of a
pool of light in one spot, have some general
illumination throughout the room.


Havana, Cuba, (JTA) Jewish
refugees from Belgium, who have
done a remarkable job in the dia-
mond industry here, employing
about 1,000 Jews and 1,500 Cu-
bans, are not eager to return to
their native country.


Without Eyestrain
Get shades for fixtures or portable lamps in
which bare bulbs are causing glare and eye-
strain. Replace blackened bulbs that give poor
light and waste electricity.



a"" I"nEA"Publie eviee


Sone

of the FOUR OUT OF TEN

who Need Glasses By College Age ?


The answer may depend on the protection you give his eyes. A needlessly
large proportion of eye troubles can be traced to eyestrain caused by poor light.
Glare and spotty lighting are eyesight's chief enemies. Don't let them "crip-


I I I I~ _





THE JEWISH LEDGER


"WHEN I GET OUT.. ."
(Jewish GIs,Look At the Future)

By RUTH KARPF


T HE soldier patients at Halloran
General Hospital have a lot of
time on their hands. Especially
when they are past the "litter"
stage. When they can walk to chow
and life begins to revolve around
"birdies," (birdies are stamps that
certify attendance and participa-
tion in the various phases of the
hospital's education and recondi-
tioning program), they have.time
for a lot of things-time to write
letters and time to gripe-time to
read and time to play endless games
of poker-time to sit around and
chew the fat with buddies, and
time to think-about-about get-
ting out . about what it will be
like . about what they are going
to do.
Outside the Jewish chaplain's
office a few soldiers are milling
around. They are talking .about
points. Every soldier is talking
about points these days. Once it
was chow and girls. Now it's
points. A few lucky ones who have
made the required 85 are gloating-
ly kidding their less fortunate bud-
dies. The talk is .all about getting
out. And the Thinking?
I walked around and spoke to a
few of them, picked at random.
"What are you going to do sol-
dier, when you get out?"
"What do you think the world
should look like,-the world you
have sweated this out for?"
Pfc. Arak, Irving Arak of New
York, was the first I spoke to. He
spent 8 months overseas, holds the
Purple Heart, a Bronze Star. He
got that for helping to capture and
hold a bridge outside Metz-no one
ever thought they could hold it.
Arak got shot up pretty badly.
He figures on a year and a half of
hospitalization. He doesn't think he
will be able to go back to his old
trade of shipyard work.
"I guess I'll set myself up some
sort of a' business. I don't know
what line. There's no use making
up my mind on that now. I'll see
what business conditions are when
I get out. A year and a half is a
long time."
Arak doesn't want anything spe-
cial when he does get out. A chance
to make a living, give his wife a


nice home and his little daughter
an education. And the world?
"They have the right idea at San
Francisco and at Dumbarton Oaks.
Now they've got to make it work.
If the world turns out like they
want to make it, that sounds okay
to me."
T/5 Harry Blitz has more spe-
cific ideas. He used to be in the
haberdashery business in Detroit.
Was overseas for 24 months.
"If we spend half of the money
we spent on war, on peace-a lot
of people would be better off."
Blitz thinks that the government
should do more to look after peo-
ple in the lower income brackets,
build better homes, more schools,
more parks. For himself, all he
wants is to go back home and live
with his wife without having to
go away or move around all the
time, raise a family.
"Me, all I want right now is a
widow with three kids," Pvt. Max
Sabel grinned. "I'd just make the
quota then." Sabel spent 17 months
overseas, in the Pacific theater,
38th Infantry. Seriously, he hasn't
made any real plans yet. He'd like
to get married-if he finds the
right girl. He hasn't decided what
trade he wants to go into yet, but
he is sure he can always make a
living. And if nothing else breaks
he can always go back into busi-
ness with his brother-they ran
a watch supply outfit together be-
fore the war.
About the way the world is run
he has only one pet gripe. "They
should find a new way of running
colonies and mandates. They
should be run by a real United
Nations set-up, .a set-up that hon-
estly work to get them ready for
their independence. All people
should have a country of their own
and be given a chance to run it."
First Lieutenant Irving Danziger
of Brooklyn, has no specific
thoughts on what the world should
look like. "This thing is so big,"
he says, "and one thing you learn
in the .army is that the individual
is only a minute pebble in a gigan-
tic machine. I think we should
leave the running of the world to
experts. Only we have to make


quite sure that we train and get
the best of them."
Danziger is 40, married, and has
two children. He wants to go back
to his dental practice as soon as
he can.
"I don't want anything special.
Just what all people want. A de-
cent living on American standards,
economic security for my family, a
chance to bring up my children
the way I think children should
be raised-yes, and a fair deal for
everyone who has suffered by this
war. As for myself, I feel I have
done all I could. When I get out,
my life should belong to my family
again, don't you think?"
Lt. Tenser, who is 27 and single,
and who enlisted in the army two
weeks after Pearl Harbor, feels
much the same way. "All I want is
to live a normal contented, every-
day life. I don't want the world to
do any more for me than it did be-
fore I went in. I was doing all right.
I think that we should try and see
to it that everybody gets a fair
chance, though. Oh, and yes, one
thing I think the world owes us
is to prevent war."
Sgt. Alvin Kass doesn't quite
see it that way. With 30 months
overseas and six campaign stars
on his ETO ribbon he has enough
points to get out. He hasn't any
very definite personal plans. Be-
fore the war he worked in his fa-
ther's furniture business in Albany.
But his father died while he was
in France, and the business was
dissolved. So he doesn't really
know. He thinks he'll take it easy
for a while-take a delayed honey-
moon with his wife whom he mar-
ried on a short furlough, and then
he'll look around, see what gives.
"For myself there's one thing I
want and that's to be left alone.
Not to be told when to get up, and
when to eat, and when to sleep and
when to do this and that and the
other. I don't want to be pushed
around any more, by anybcdy-
except my wife."
But Kass has some very definite
ideas on what the world owes to
his buddies. He thinks that all mu-
nicipal, state and federal councils
should be supplemented by a suf-
ficient number of GIs from over-
seas to make their voice and their
vote count'. He thinks veterans
should be given full-time advisory


jobs to governing and administra-
tive bodies, "until the last GI has
been taken care of. It's the only
way to make the people who run
things know what we really want.
If a discharged soldier gets a
raw deal, if he gets shoved around,
if he finds he can't get anywhere
because he can't figure out or get
around some red tape-he can't
talk to his congressman or his
mayor, or his alderman. Most GIs
wouldn't even know how to go
about it. But they do know how to
talk to a buddy-a guy who they
know has been in the army, has
been overseas. He can speak their
language. If they really mean to
give GIs a fair break that's what
they should do."
Some of the soldiers who sat
around agreed to that. "Yeah," he
said, "that's a good idea." But
others didn't feel that way. "Who
the hell wants to be bothered. We
can look after ourselves."
I spoke to the chaplain about it,
Halloran's here-there-and-every-
where Lt. Blumenthal. What did
he think they wanted. "It's hard to
generalize," he said, "but I'll try.
One thing they all want, everyone
of them is That White Slip-the
discharge. As a matter of fact they
concentrate on getting out so much
that very few think of what they
want when they do get out. The
white slip is their horizon.
"But I will say this. Most of
them are pretty confident they can
make a go of it. 'I've been on two'
beachheads and came out alive.
Nothing can hurt me any more
now.' That's the way they figure
it. A lot of them want to go back
to their old jobs. Some want to use
the skills the army taught them.
A few want to take advantage of
the GI Bill of Rights and go to
school. And that includes a lot of
older men. Of course, the real
problem are the men who have
been wounded so that they cannot
go back to their old trades or pro-
fessions. They have to be retrained.
We owe them that. And it can be
done. We had one man here, an
artist. His right hand was incapaci-
tated. He was retrained to paint
with his left. He is better now than
he ever was."
"There is one thing more I know
they all want. They want to take
it easy for a while when they get




THE JEWISH LEDGER


out. Sit back and relax and learn
again how a soft collar feels and
a tie you've picked out for your-
self. War hasn't changed these
men. They are the same guys that
went in. War has just expanded
them. War has made them react to
a lot of things they never had to
react to before. War has made de-
mands on them. They've met them.
And they'll meet any demands
peace makes on them, too."

----- v- ------

The only religious way to think
of death is as part and parcel of
life; to regard it, with the un-
derstanding and the emotions, as
the inviolable condition of life.-
Thomas Mann.


BERLIN JEWS APPEAL FOR
AID TO JEWISH COMMUNITIES
ABROAD
By Henry Bradley
BERLIN, (JTA) Leaders of the
few thousand Jews remaining in
Berlin today appealed to Jewish
communities abroad to send them
assistance, especially medical sup-
plies. The appeal was made by Dr.
Erich Zwilsky, head of the Jewish
Hospital here, which has become
an informal center for Jewish
matters.
The greatest problems, aside
from the financial ones, which face
the hospital in its attempt to care
for the Jews returning from con-
centration camps and others in
need of help are the shortage of


doctors and nurses and the lack of
medicaments. There are now ten
doctors in the hospital, but they
lack instruments and medicines,
which has reduced their useful-
ness.
During the first days of the Rus-
sian occupation, before order was
restored, the hospital was not ex-
cluded from the general looting,
and many beds, linens and drugs
were lost. The X-ray apparatus,
however, is intact, although no
films are available and there is a
small quantity of radium on hand.
The building itself requires urgent
repairs, because of bomb damages,
but the Berlin city council has re-
fused to grant funds for the re-
pairs.


Dr. Zwilsky, who was familiar
with all misery of the Berlin Jews
under the Nazis, since the Jewish
Hospital was the only institution
allowed to treat them, said that
about 2,000 committed suicide, be-
tween 1938 and the time the city
was captured, to avoid deportation.
One day, he said, twenty-two sui-
cides were brought to the hospital.

~-----v-------

New York, (JTA) An analy-
sis of Catholic, Jewish and Protes-
tant pronouncements on the moral
principles of a just world order,
showing general agreement on the
necessity for a world-security or-
ganization, was made public here
by an interfaith committee.


70% of America's Zinc and 40% of America's Lead/j7

Are Produced in Kansas City Southern Territory

With final victory, the output of these vital metals from the greatest
lead and zinc center of the nation will again be transformed into
things for good living by the metal, paint, electro-chemical and
pharmaceutical industries. To facilitate that conversion, industry will
find-along Kansas City Southern Lines-all the requisites of profitable
processing and manufacture-coal, oil and natural gas;
iron, antimony, limestone, salt, sulphur, mercury and
many other minerals and metals, together with skilled
manpower and fast, convenient transportation to do-
mestic and foreign markets...a complete combination
for the "know how" of progressive manufacturers.

YOUR INQUIRY STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL
Address F. T. Ridley, Director of Development, Kansas City
Southern Lines, Kansas City Southern Building, Kansas
City 6, Missourt, for Information and Cooperation. u


.I
''

I ~I ~1






.,..

~a"c~




THE JEWISH LEDGER


LA LOUISIANE
CRYSTAL DINING ROOM
New Grill and Bar
Open Every Day From 11 to 11
Except Wednesday
725 IBERVILLE ST.


KOSHER C3 Products of all
kinds will be handled at your request.
BROADMOOR
Bakery and Delicatessen
ERNEST A. JUDICE, Proprietor
3919 WASHINGTON AVENUE
Phone CH. 4I8 Next to Tivoll Theatre


TIRES and TUBES
Recapped, New and Used
PLENTY ALL SIZES
VulcaniLsng-Quiek Iervice
Bring Your Certifclate
and Be Fitted Immedaltely
TIRE HOSPITAL
210 CANAL GA. I5Il


ERNST FOOD MART
3901 Washington Ave.
Phones JAckson 0381
Now Orleans' Most Modern Food Store


DRINK THE
WRIGHT ROOT BEER
Bottled By
ROYAL PRODUCTS INC.
JA.3961 :-: 3321 TCHOUPITOULAS ST.


The
CRASTO GLASS CO.
Window Glass Rough Rolled
Glass Wired Glass P 1a t e
Glass Mirrors Store Fronts
Structural Glass Safety Glass
RA. 1513 333 St. Joseph St.












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Asher Laundry

Cleaning & Dyeing

1309 Music St. Fr. 149


NATIONAL ROOFS
NEW REPAIRS
RESIDENTIAL and COMMERCIAL
ROOFING SIDING
National Roofing Co.
JA. 7755 s-i s261 s. Clalberne


i'T IN SOCIETY
Please send social items for insertion in THE JEWISH LEDGER to 608 Dryades St.
Phone: MAgnolia 2253


Departing for the east the past
week was Mrs. Irving Carashick,
the former Irene Bernstein. Mrs.
Carashick will visit in Norwich,
Conn., and New York before re-
turning in the early fall.
Mrs. Carrie Lurie left this week
for Birmingham, Ala., to visit her
son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and
Mrs. Sidney Friedman.
Mrs. Oscar Gomez has returned
to New Orleans after a visit to her
mother, Mrs. Edward Schloss, in
Baton Rouge, La.
Mrs. Helen Leeds went recently
to Mobile, Ala., where she will
visit her brother-in-law and sister,
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Lowenstein.
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Hochstein had
as their guest recently their son,
Mr. Samuel Hochstein, who has
since returned to his home in Bir-
mingham, Ala.
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Mimeles,
with their young children, went
this week to Covington, La., where
they have leased a home for the
remainder of the summer season.
Mr. and Mrs. Laz E. Levy and
their daughter, Miss Tess Levy,
have reopened the family home
on Nashville avenue after having
spent a part of the summer at
Lookout Mountain, Tenn.
Leaving recently for the East
were Mr. and Mrs. Sie Mendelson,
who went to Yonkers, N. Y., to
spend the remainder of the sum-
mer as guests of Mrs. Mendelson's
brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and
Mrs. Reuben Koftoff.
Mrs. Joseph Sternberger II, who,
with her young children, spent the
month of July here with her pa-
rents, Mr. and Mrs. Lester Barnett.
returned to her home in Memphis,
Tenn.
Mrs. Jesse Stern has been re-
joined at the family home on
South Johnson street by Mr.
Stern, who has been on the West
coast, visiting their son, Lt. (j.g.)
David Stern, United States Naval
Reserve, and Mrs. Stern. and also
his mother, Mrs. B. Stern. the lat-
ter at her home at San Francisco,
Cal.


Mrs. Emma Rosenman left this
week for San Antonio, Tex., where
she will visit her son and daugh-
ter-in-law, Master Sergeant Louis
Rosenman, United States Marine
Corps, and Mrs. Rosenman. Ser-
geant Rosenman has recently re-
turned from foreign duty, and is
now on furlough.
Mrs. Louis Yuspeh was hostess
Friday afternoon at a luncheon
party given in honor of Miss Max-
ine Meltzer, a bride-elect of Sun-
day. Mrs. Yuspeh entertained at
an uptown center, having as her
guests prospective members of
Miss Meltzer's bridal party and
out-of-town visitors here for the
wedding. The luncheon was one of
the delightful events of the week-
end.
Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell Kuper-
berg, with their son, Robert, of
Miami, Fla., reached New Orleans
recently for a week's visit. They
were joined here by their son,
Mr. Joel Kuperberg, United States
Naval Reserve, who came from the
Gulf Coast, where he is attending
basic engineering school, to spend
the week-end with them. Mrs.
Kuperberg is a sister of Mr. Sie
Mendelson of this city.
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Goodman,
with their young son, Philip, left
for Memphis, Tenn., to visit Mrs.
Goodman's mother, Mrs. H. L.
Pachter. Mr. and Mrs. Goodman's
daughter, Miss Gloria Goodman,
has been in Memphis with her
grandmother since the early part
of the summer. Their son, Mr. Vin-
cent Goodman, United States Na-
val Reserve, left recently for the
Great Lakes Naval Station, in Il-
linois, to attend school.
Mr. Mathew W. Lieberman ar-
rived this week from his home in
Chicago to join Mrs. Lieberman
and their son, Mr. David H. Lieb-
erman, who are guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Lucien Zilberman, at their
residence on Jena street. The mar-
riage of Mr. David Lieberman and
Miss Maxine Meltzer, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Maurie Meltzer of
this city was celebrated Sunday.


VALENTINE'S


IIn IIi -wuaoor-ulmunon
Distributed hb
New Orleans Paint & Color Co., Inc.
700 Baronne. cor. Girod Phone RAymond 3388


St. Reqis Restaurant
123 Royal & 3500 Airline Highway
AIR CONDITIONED
Club breakfastt Table b'Hete Dillerf
Chlken In the Rollh
Charcoal trolled Steaks -- 24-Hrl. serviie


TILE
FOR ALL PURPOSES
Newest Colors & Duiatn
Eugene J. Zimmermann
RA. 8255 -:- 1721 CARONDELET ST.


Amann Typewriter Co.
SERVICE SALES SUPPLIES
Phone RAymond 5959
HOWARD AMANN
437 BARONNE ST.



Ramelli Coal
Is Best, Cleanest. Cheapest,
Hottest
PHONE RAYMOND 6188


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Use Quality

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THE JEWISH LEDGER


) HOLMES
The "Quality" Department
Store of New Orleans Invites
Your Patronage and
Assures
SATISFACTION
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BIENVILLE HOTEL
On Historic St. Charles Avenue
300 Modern Fireproof Rooms
New Orleans, La.



B. MANHEIM
"'U Antique lrrasurt ~Soue
OF THE SOUTH
Buying & Selling of Antiques
403-9 ROYAL STREET
Phone RAymond 6562

MONARCH SHEET METAL WORKS
C. POLMAN, Proprietor
Automobile Fenders Repaired
RADIATORS AND LAMPS
Automobile Fenders Made to Order
Installn New Colls I Radiators Our Specialty
PHONB MAgnolls 1313 921 JULIA STREET


LETELLIER-PHILLIPS
PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Paper Manufacturers'
Supplies
High-Grade Wiping Cloths
New Orleans, La.
Phone RA. 3000-5665




E1*1*rtLube

IP~l
DEDNERIC OW,
72 9.LIOREAE
RA. 136
LU `3 Y-fl I-16V


Capt. Samuel K. Cohn, medical
corps, Army of the United States,
and Mrs. Cohn, left here last week-
end for Birmingham, Ala., where
they are visiting Capt. Cohn's
mother, Mrs. Jeanette Cdhn. They
spent last week on the Gulf coast.
Capt. Cohn is now on leave, hav-
ing returned to this country about
a fortnight ago after duty overseas.
Mrs. Cohn, the former Miss Mil-
dred Hiller of this city, has been
making her home here with her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Hil-
ler, at their residence on Audubon
street, during Capt. Cohn's absence
in foreign service.
Mrs. S. J. Besthoff, Jr., has re-
turned to Plainfield, N. J., where
she and Major Besthoff, Army of
the United States, make their
home, after spending several weeks
here with her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Otto Mayer, and Major Best-
hoff's mother, Mrs. Joe Bloom. She
was entertained at a round of in-
formal parties during her stay in
her home city. Mrs. Besthoff was
accompanied East by Mrs. William
B. Burkenroad, Jr., who will visit
her and Major Besthoff in Plain-
field, and after which she will join
her daughters, Misses Peggy and
Jane Burkenroad, who are mem-
bers of a summer colony at Camp
Vega, in Maine. They will then
return South at the close of the
camp.
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Meltzer
were hosts Saturday evening at a
dinner party given complimen-
tary to their daughter, Miss Max-
ine Meltzer, and Mr. David H. Lie-
berman of Chicago, whose mar-
riage was celebrated Sunday. They
entertained at a downtown center,
following the wedding rehearsal,
having as their other guests pros-
pective members of the bridal par-
ty. Later in the evening Saturday
Mr. and Mrs. Lucien Zilberman
and the latter's brother and sister-
in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Morris R.
Rosen, were co-hosts at a cocktail
party in honor of Miss Meltzer and
Mr. Lieberman.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Levy have
had as their guests at their home
on Audubon street their son-in-
law and daughter, Boatswain's
Mate Second Class Allen Shindler,
United States Coast Guard, and
Mrs. Shindler, who came from
Mobile, Ala., where they reside,
and who spent a few days with


them before leaving for Philadel-
phia, Pa., to visit Mr. Shindler's
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hyman
Shindler. Mr. Shindler is on leave,
and he and Mrs. Shindler will re-
turn here in a fortnight for a sec-
ond visit to Mr. and Mrs. Levy be-
fore going back to Mobile. Mr. and
Mrs. Levy's daughter, Mrs. Charles
F. Dufour, who, with her young
daughter, Barbara Elaine, has been
visiting here, will leave shortly to
rejoin Lieutenant Dufour, United
States Naval Reserve, in Georgia.
Mr. and Mrs. Barney Fertel with
their children, Isadore and Nor-
man Shepard, have just returned
from Chicago and New York,
where they visited for several
weeks. Accompanying them on
their trip were Mrs. Fertel's father,
Mr. Joseph Pailet, and also her
sister, Mrs. Jacob Weiss.
Miss Fannye Bloch has as her
guest at her home on Broadway
her brother, Mr. Herman Bloch,
who reached here this week from
his home in Alexandria, La.
Major Carl Rabinowitz, Medical
Corps, Army of the United States,
has rejoined Mrs. Rabinowitz and
their young daughters at their
home on Nashville avenue, follow-
ing his return to this country from
overseas duty.
Major Arnold Siegel, Army of
the United States, arrived here
from his post in Kentucky, to re-
join Mrs. Siegel and their young
son for a short stay before ac-
companying them the middle of
next week to Louisville where they
will make their home. Mrs. Sie-
gel's mother, Mrs. Alphonse Levy,
will also go to Louisville to reside.



Claiming attention Sunday was
the marriage of Miss Maxine Shir-
ley Meltzer, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Maurice Meltzer, to Mr. Da-
vid H. Lieberman, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Matthew M. Lieberman of
Chicago, which was celebrated in
the evening at 7 o'clock at a down-
town center, and with Rabbi Na-
thaniel Share of Gates of Prayer
synagogue officiating.
Following the ceremony there
was an informal reception.
Mr. Lieberman and his bride
left later in the evening on a short
wedding trip, after which they will
go to Chicago to reside.


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THE JEWISH LEDGER


OUR SALUTATION
(Continued from page 2)
to its interest and advancement.
With this laudable purpose in view
we invite contributions from those,
who are in a position to serve so
worthy a cause, and through the
medium of this paper disseminate
such doctrines as in their judg-
ment would best educate the rising
generation in all things appertain-
ing to Judaism. Subjects of interest
and entertaining topics will also
be a special feature of this paper
and recognizing the fact that there
is among our co-religionists of both
sexes, a great deal of local literary
talent it affords us much pleasure
to offer them the use of our col-
umns.
The tone of this paper will be
dignified in every particular; noth-
ing can possibly induce us to lower
its standard in the estimation of
those, whose favorable opinion, we
aim to acquire and shall strive to
maintain.
Questions will be discussed in a
general way without indulging in
personalities, or seeking to trespass
upon, or in any manner attempt-
ing to ignore the rights of others,
in their exercise of individual
opinion. We may err-and who has
not-but we trust that a generous
public will be magnanimous in its
verdict and accord us, at least, the
sincerity of our opinions.
We shall at all times, and under
all circumstances, to the best of
our ability, direct our pen in op-
position to that which we deem to
be wrong, and in support of that
which we conceive to be right.
These are the outlines of the
principles we have adopted for the
government of this paper, simply,
yet clearly expressed, and are pos-
itively sacramental.
Unpretentious in our undertak-
ing-we offer nothing startling.
We neither expect to revolutionize
sentiment nor change the current
of events but merely desire to add
our mite towards the general wel-
fare of Judaism and be a co-labor-
er in her cause. And though we are
sensible that, that Judaism which
has successfully outlived the pre-
judices of ages, will continue to
live and prosper whether this, or
any other paper, stands or falls,
still the consciousness of that fact
shall not debar us from the privi-


lege of contributing to such life
and prosperity. The Jewish Ledger,
full of youth and vigor, now makes
its bow to the public and enters
upon its career of journalism with
the firm determination of faithful-
ly observing the principles herein
enunciated.
The rose so loved must bud before it
bloom,
And yonder oak that spreads so wide a
gloom,
Beneath whose arms the flock and herds
repose,
His full grown honors to an acorn owes.
-V
IT HAPPENED AT THE U.S.O.
This past Sunday the USO-
JWB at 1634 Clio street celebrated
the third anniversary of the Waves
at the weekly breakfast canteen.
By request of the eighth naval dis-
trict this USO was asked to pre-
sent a program for this section.
The entire program was directed
by Joe Nedd who also acted as mas-
ter of ceremonies. His wit and
speed has what it takes to keep the
service men and women in high
spirits.
(Please turn the page)
V--
TOMBSTONE DEDICATION
A tombstone will be dedicated
to, the memory of the late Morris
Karno (Karnofsky) on Sunday,
August 12, at 2:30. The dedication
will take place at the Chevra Thi-
lim cemetery on Canal street. All
friends are invited to be present.


V")
Jacob Israel passed away Mon-
day, July 30. Funeral services were
held Monday, July 20 with inter-
ment in Gates of Prayer cemetery,
Rabbi Nathaniel S. Share offici-
ating. He was the brother of Leon
Israel, Mrs. Miriam Abes and Mrs.
E. Hiller.

'"I
Charles Mandlebaum passed
away Wednesday, July 25, at
Brownwood, Tex. Funeral services
were held Monday, July 30 with
interment in Jewish Burial Rite
cemetery, Rabbi Uri Miller offici-
ating. He was the brotherof Joseph
Mandlebaum of this city, Harry
and Israel Mandlebaum of Law-
rence, Mass., Jack Mandlebaum of
Los Angeles, Calif., Dr. Sarah B.
Sidis of Miami Beach, Fla., and
Mrs. J. M. Fadiman of New York
city.


Military Training Under Government Officers
THE OPEN AIR SCHOOL

GULF COAST MILITARY ACADEMY
"Send US the BOY and we will return YOU the MAN"
Session Begins September 7. GULFPORT. MISS



JEWISH CALENDAR

5705- 1945
Rosh Hashonah (New Year)....- ..........-.. Saturday, Sept. 8
Fast of Gedaliah ...........-...---.................Monday, Sept. 10
Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) __...-.........Monday, Sept. 17
1st Day of Tabernacle ............................... Saturday, Sept. 22
Sh'mini Atzeres ..... ..... ....................... Saturday, Sept. 29
Simchas Torah ................................. Sunday, Sept. 30
tRosh Chodesh Cheshvan.................. Sunday, Oct. 7
Rosh Chodesh Kislev .._.....- .........--------... Tuesday, Nov. 6
1st Day of Chanukah-....-....-... ....-.....---. Friday, Nov. 30
Rosh Chodesh Tebet .................. ............. Wednesday, Dec. 5
Fast of Tebet...........-............. ... ....... Friday, Dec. 14
tObserved the following day. *Also observed the previous day.



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THE JEWISH LEDGER


CONTENTS
The Jewish Chaplain Symbol of Liberation, By Arthur W
Editorial, By Rabbi Jerome Mark ----.... ----__-_ .. ---..
Our Salutation, First Editorial of The Jewish Ledger.--
Embarking On a Tour of Pacific War Fronts, Illustration -
The Ordeal of the Jews of Paris, By Meyer Levin --_- ___-- ...
Roll of Honor, Temple Beth-Or, Montgomery Ala. ----------
The Rabbi and His Community, By Rabbi Samuel S. Lerer-
Roll of Honor, Congr. Agudah Israel, Montgomery, Ala. --._.
Roll of Honor, Congr. Etz Ahayem, Montgomery, Ala..---.- -
Roll of Honor, Temple Mishkam Israel,. Selma, Ala._____.


Roll of Honor, Tuscaloosa, Ala...____-------.-----
Roll of Honor, Congr. Emanu-El, Dothan, Ala.


Congregation Shaarai Shomayim, Mobile, Ala., By Rabbi Ber
K orn ...... .. --------.. ------------ ----------------.---
Ark of Congr. Shaarai Shomayim, Mobile, Ala., Illustration-
Roll of Honor, Mobile, Ala... - _.. -- ------___---_______ _
The First Jewish Senator, By William I. Boxerman ---- -


Roll of Honor, United Hebrew Congr., Fort Smith, Ark._
The Miracle of F. D. R., By David Schwartz -----
Jewish Sidelights from the War Front, By Saul Traub -
Roll of Honor, Congr. House of Israel, Hot Springs, Ark.
Dutch Miners Shelter Jewish Children .------.------.-____
Roll of Honor, Mount Sinlai Congr., Texarkana, U. S. A..
Roll of Honor, Congr. Anshe Emeth, Pine Bluff, Ark. --
Who Is Sylvia, By Helen Zigmond ..-------........ ---..


Three Refugee Brothers Fight On Distant Fronts, Illustratio
Roll of Honor, Congr. Beth Israel, Jackson, Miss. --------_ -
Henry Morgenthau, Jr., the Voice of the Refugee Board, By I
Levin -.- .--.... -....- --- ------ .---
Menuhin Had a Date In Paris, By Melvin Salzman ----------


Roll of Honor,
Roll of Honor,
Roll of Honor,.
The Survivors
Roll of Honor,
Roll of Honor,
Roll of Honor,
Roll of Honor,
Roll of Honor,


Congr. Ahavath Rayim, Greenwood, Miss.-
Temple Beth Israel, Clarksdale, Miss.----
Temple Anshe Chesed, Vicksburg, Miss..,-
of Buchenwald, By Meyer Levin ----------
Temple B'nai Israel, Natchez, Miss. ---.--
Beth Israel, Meridian, Miss. --------------
Hattiesburg, Miss. -.. -.... -------------...
B'nai Zion Congr., Shreveport, La.--
Congr. Agudiath Achim, Shreveport, La.--


GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX


ayne___ 1 Alexandria, La. --
S 2 Anniston, Ala. .--------
2 Baton Rouge, La. -
Birmingham, Ala.-----
4
Bogalusa, La. .--...---.-
--- 5 Brookhaven, Miss.
----------- 8 Clarksdale, Miss. .
--------9 Dothan, Ala. -_---
9 Fort Smith, Ark. --
.- ------10 Greenwood, Miss. ..--
10 Gulfport, Miss ----.---
Hattiesburg, Miss. -
Helena, Ark. .__.. ---. -
.... 12 Hot Springs, Ark. -----
tram M. Jackson, Miss. .--
-----------13 Lafayette, La. _--
----- 14 Lake Charles, La. ---
.---- 16 Little Rock, Ark.. --
1----17 Meridian, Miss. ------
----.------ 19 Mobile, Ala. --.....----
---- 21 Monroe, La .....
------23 Montgomery, Ala. -
_-- -- 23 Natchez, Miss. ..-.----
------.... 25 New Iberia, La. ------
.-- -.--.- 25 New Orleans, La. -
--------- 26 Opelousas, La. .-------
---...---.. 27 Pensacola, Fla. -
n -- 27 Pine Bluff, Ark.. ----
-.--------.29 Selma, Ala. ..------.. --
Muriel Shreveport, La. -


33
-..----.-------. 34
--.- --.------ 35
.--..-..-------.. 36
....--------. 37
.-.-. ----...... 38
--.--......39
-----..-- 40
------ 41


The Ancient Mountain Jews of Russia, By Abram Khavin....
Major General Rose-Fighter for Freedom, By Ben Samuel ...-----
Roll of Honor, Temple B'nai Israel, Monroe, La ..-- ..... -- ------------.
Roll of Honor, Temple Gemiluth Chassodim, Alexandria, La..-------
I Was At Maidenek, By Raymond A. Davies .---- ----..- ------
Roll of Honor, New Iberia, La. ---....... ..._--- -.--..... ..---- i
A Four-Year Nightmare, By Ro Chananina -. ..--..-- .- -----..- -.
Roll of Honor, Temple Sinai, Lake Charles, La .....----- .... ....-
"Pop" of the U. S. S. Franklin, By Ben Samuel ----- ----- .........
Roll of Honor, Baton Rouge, La.--------------------.- --...-.... .-- -----i---
A Soldier to His Former Teacher, Letter of a Jewish Soldier .-------.
Nothnig to Lose But Our Illusions, By Rabbi Hillel Silver -----....-.. I
The First Forty-Five Years Are the Hardest, By Rabbi Emil W.
Leipziger ------------- --------------- I
Rabbi Sees Brotherhood as World Need, By Elizabeth Keating (
Jews In the Post-War World, Book Review.-- ---. -------..
Jews In Sports, By Haskell Cohen --. ... --- -- ..
When I Get Out- Jewish GIs Look at the Future, By Ruth Karpf_
Berlin Jews Appeal for Aid to Jewish Communities Abroad, By Henry
Bradley .. ..
In Society .. ,
Jewish Calendar


15
46
17
49
50
51
53


Tallahassee, Fla. ...
Texarkana, U. S. A. -
Thomasville, Ga. -----
Tuscaloosa, Ala.
Vicksburg, Miss. -----
Yazoo City, Miss. ---


IT HAPPENED AT THE U.S.O.
This Sunday the breakfast club
will honor the Coast Guard on its
150th anniversary. All service per-
sonnel are invited. All during the
week there is some type of enter-
tainment: Monday, games; Tues-
day, dance; Wednesday, string


---------49, 50
-.... ---.- 12
------ 57, 58, 59
.--------.------------ 5, 6, 7, 8
.--,------- -----...-.-.- 55, 56
---------28
.--.....---- --- .....- ----..-- 34
-------------- 12
--------- 19, 20
...------ 33, 34
-...---- 32
--------. 39
.--- - 28
..............------------ 23, 24
----- 29, 30, 31, 32
--------- 52, 53
... . ... ... ... .... 5 3 5 4
. ------------ 21, 22
...--I.. ........-- -- ...-..... 38
------- 13, 14, 15, 16
-...---.-------..--.. 46, 47, 48
-------- 8, 9
-------- 37
---------- 51
60 to 76
--------- 52
16, 17
----------26, 27
--- -- 10
-------- 40 to 46
----------- 18
25
---------- 18


quartet; Thursday, watermelon
party; Saturday, dancing class fol-
lowed by dance; Sunday, break-
fast canteen and motion pictures.
In order to keep us informed and in
order for us to keep you informed of what
your USO-JWB is doing, send all contri-
butions for this column to Colman Ezko-
vich c/o USO-JWB, 1634 Clio Street, New
Orleans 13, La.


Extend Your Greetings for

ROSH HASHONAH
Throughout the South
IN THE JEWISH LEDGER
Send your holiday greetings to your relatives and friends in the New
Year Edition of THE JEWISH LEDGER, which will be published Friday,
September 7. and will reach all subscribers before the New Year.
You may write your own greeting if you like, or select one of the four
styles given below. The charge is only $1.00 for each greeting. Send your
remittance to The Jewish Ledger, 608 Dryades Street, New Orleans, La., by
Tuesday, August 28, or phone MAgnolia 2253, mentioning style number.
STYLES
1. M r. and M rs.... ............................. 3. M r. and M rs................... ........
wish their friends both far and and family wish their friends
near a Happy and Prosperous New health, happiness and prosperity in
Year. the coming year.
4. Mr. and Mrs. .......... .............
2. M r. and M rs..... ................. take this means of extending
and family extend to their friends greetings and hearty good wishes
sincere wishes for A Happy New for A Happy and Prosperous Nel'
Y ear. Year to their friends far and ntar.


I__: -


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