The Grenada newsletter

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Material Information

Title:
The Grenada newsletter
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 36 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
A. & C. Hughes
Place of Publication:
St. George's, Grenada, West Indies
Publication Date:
Frequency:
twenty no. a year
semimonthly
completely irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Periodicals -- Grenada   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Grenada   ( lcsh )
Economic conditions -- Periodicals -- Grenada   ( lcsh )
Social conditions -- Periodicals -- Grenada   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Grenada

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1973.
General Note:
Description based on surrogate of: Vol. 11, no. 1 (Jan. 22, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 24157414
lccn - sn 91021217
Classification:
lcc - F2056.A2 G74
System ID:
AA00000053:00249


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Full Text
THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER


All the defendants, with the exception of Richardson, were arrested
soon after the explosion and, on July 21st 1980, were charged with
murder. Richardson was arrested subsequently. The Terrorism
(Prevention) Law, Number 46 of 1980, was made law on October 3rd
1980 with retroactive effect, and the charges now to be answered by
the 7 defendants have been made under this law.

Sources close to the Grenada Law Society expressed concern to
NEWSLETTER with reference to the new rules governing the holding of
this preliminary inquiry. According to these sources, an Act
passed in 1978 provided that, in preliminary inquiries, witnesses'
statements may be handed into the Magistrates Court and there is
no examination and cross examination unless this is specially re-
quested by the opposing barrister.

The sources said this right of request for verbal hearing of
witnesses in the Magistrates Court has been subsequently removed
by amendments and, in certain circumstances, the unchallenged state-
ments of witnesses are admissable in the High Court even if those
witnesses are not present for cross examination.

The Law Society met on December 10th and it was expected that this
matter would have been discussed.

At the sitting on December 7th, 10 statements were tendered to the
Court including statements from medical personnel, eyewitnesses and
relatives who identified the dead persons.

Russel Budhlall and Kenneth Budhlall respectively were originally
represented by barristers Tillman Thomas and Lloyd Noel. These
two lawyers, however, were detained last July for alleged counter
revolutionary activity.

Now, barrister Ben Jones appears for Layne Phillip and barrister
Michael Andrews for the others.

The inquiry has been adjourned-until January 4th.





PRG: MAHARAJ IS LYING

The peoples Revolutionary Government (PRG) has come out strongly
against statements made by barrister Ramesh Lawrence Maharaj, Head
of the Trinidad & Tobago Human Rights Bureau, to the effect that
torture is being practiced by the authorities in Grenada.

According to Mr Maharaj, his Bureau has evidence that two
detainees, Keith and Lyle St Bernard, have had their toes and
fingers broken and have scars where their skin was pealed off with
pliers.
: continued -


Week Ending 12.12.81


Page 9




Page 10 THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER Week Ending 12.12.81


In a statement broadcast over Radio Free Grenada on December 9th, the
PRG accused Mr Maharaj of being dishonest, of being without decency
or respect for his own conscience, and said the Trinidad barrister is
unable to substantiate a single word of the 'garbage' he utters.

The statement said two medical reports signed on December 3rd in-
dicate clearly that both St Bernards are in good physical condition
and mental health with no signs of internal or external injuries.

"According to the medical reports, copies of which were personally
handed over to the 'Guardian' and 'Express' newspapers of Trinidad
& Tobago", the statement said, "none of the two detainees have
either reported sick or that they were tortured inside the prison
since their detention".

The statement said Mr Maharaj has learned the art of fabrication
and lying to the extent that he will sell his own soul to answer
to the dictates of 'imperialism', and it suggested that Mr Maharaj
and "other imperialist lackeys in the region" are "desperate" be-
cause "grass roots democracy" is developing in Grenada and the PRG
has successful programmes which are benefiting the people.

The statement described Mr Maharaj as an "opportunist" and a
"publicity seeker", and said he intended to attack the:Grenada
revolution "through various media rags" throughout the region for
his own personal promotion.

"In spite of Ramesh Maharaj's attack", the statement concluded,
"the Grenada revolution continues to be strong, continues to move
forward, bringing more and more benefits to the people."





NWO HOLDS FIRST RALLY

The National Women's Organisation (NWO) rally held at Queens Park
on December 6th came to an abrupt unscheduled stop when, after
Prime Minister Maurice Bishop had delivered only 7 minutes of his
feature address, there was an electricity power failure.

Mr Bishop had opened his address on a note of humility when he
said the rally was not a day for him or for any other leader of
the New Jewel Movement or of the Peoples Revolutionary Govern-
ment (PRG).

"Today is primarily a day for the fighting women of our country
and their leading organisation, the National Women's Organisation",
he said.

.he Prime Minister said the PRG recognizes what he called "the
tremendous achievements and tremendous forward march" of the NWO.
'-st 12 months ago, he said, NWO had set itself an enrolmenPt
-continued




Week Ending 12.12.81 THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER Page 11


target of 5000 women by the end of this year but this figure has
been exceeded and membership of the organisation now stands at over
6500.

Mr Bishop welcomed overseas delegations in Grenada for the rally
and said that, as was evidenced by the "International Solidarity
With Grenada" Conference held here last month, their presence show-
ed that Grenada has many friends.

"The Grenada revolution", he said, "although it is a revolution
being made by people in a small country in size and population,
there is no doubt about it, our revolution is a big revolution on
the international front and has a tremendous number of friends and
a tremendous amount of support."

The Prime Minister had just moved into what appears to be the first
"plank" of his address, the subject of "peoples democracy" when the
power failure occurred. Before he was cut off, however, he did
have the opportunity to state the PRG's attitude towards this sub-
ject.

"The peoples democracy that we are talking about", he said, "does
represent for us in Grenada the be all and end all of our approach
to development."

Immediately before Mr Bishop spoke, the Secretary (Junior Minister)
for Women's Affairs and President of NYO, Mrs Phyllis Coard (who is
wife of Mr Bernard Coard, Minister of Finance, Trade & Planning)
addressed the rally.

Mrs Coard told the rally Grenadians are rebuilding their "shattered
society" and, while colonialism and dictatorship have done all in
their power to prevent organisation of the people, mass organisat-
ions are now being built in Grenada for all the working people.
Fathers' Role
"Today", she said, "we can see many fathers in the home playing a
more active role in caring for their children and, on the other
hand, we see our women daily emerging to play a stronger and more
equal role in the society".

The NWO President said the women of Grenada are going forward but
the struggle is only now beginning, and she highlighted some of the
problems arising from the fact that 45% of the work force are wo-
men and there are nearly 12,000 children under 5 years old in the
country. Available nurseries, she said, can accommodate only
400 of these and, in pre-primary schools, the children are super-
vised from 9.00 am to 2.30 pm only.

"This is a highly dangerous situation to have our children unsuper-
vised", she said, "and this has to be remedied in 1982 because our
children are the flowers and future of our revolution."
coRtinued -




Page 12 THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER Week Ending 12.12.81


Mrs Coard said that, during 1981, by voluntary labour and in coop-
eration with other mass organizations, NWO built 7 pre-primary
schools and 1 nursery. It is recognized that this is inadequate,
she said, but the economic difficulty of providing more schools and
larger nurseries is also recognized.

Turning to the labour scene, Mrs Coard said 5,400 women and 4,100
i.en are unemployed in Grenada which indicates that 57% of unem-
ployed Grenadians are women and, she said, most of these women
have young children.

"This year", she said, "we were able to create 3 Wombn's cooperat.-
ives in the areas of furniture making, a bakery and currants for
cake. But, this is a tiny beginning and this cooperative move-
ment we must step up in the coming year."
Education
The NWO President said more emphasis will have to be put on edu-
cation next year because, in spite of the success of the Centre
for Popular Education, more women than men remain illiterate and
under-educated.

"But, book learning without political understanding leaves us
nowhere", she said. "We all need to understand the history of our
country, the economy of our country, why it is that we are under-
developed, why it is that we are where we are and how we can get
out of the trap of underdevelopment. What we must do to develop
Grenada and we need to understand international situations. We
need, as women, throughout Grenada, to educate ourselves polit-
ically and socially."

Mrs Coard asked her listeners to remember women in other count-
ries where conditions are worse than Grenada. She mentioned
Uruguay, Paraguay, Chile, South Africa, Namibia. Angola, Pales-
tine and Lebanon, and said that, most of all, El Salvador should
be remembered.

"Our brothers and sisters so near to victory in El Salvador", she
said, "who face direct intervention from hundreds of United
States soldiers in El Salvador, at this moment bringing with
them helicopters, tanks and naplam bombs to burn up the poor
children and the women and the men of El Salvador."

Concluding her address, Mrs Coard said women must be conscious
of history and must be prepared to struggle increasingly for it.
The movement of history is forward and continuously moves for-
wiard, she said, not backward.

"i.'e in Grenada are part of that forward movement", she said, "we
:-re certain that the victory of all the peoples of the world will
ome."
continued -





Week Ending 12.12.81 THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER Page 13


Ten delegations from 81-ountries delivered solidarity messages to
the rally and, in addition, there was'a solidarity message from the
Women's International Democratic Federation, membership of which NWO
attained at a recent conference in Prague, Czechoslovakia.




PRG MAKES MINISTERIAL CHANGES

The Peoples Revolutionary Government (PRG) has reallocated certain
ministerial portfolios and made two new appointments.

In the Government Gazette dated December 4th and published on 10th
December, it is announced that-Mr Bernard Coard, formerly Minister
of Finance, Trade, Industry and Planning, has had "Industry" re-
moved from his portfolio. This"subject has been made the re-
sponsibility of Mr Kendrick Radix whose portfolio of Agro-industries
and Fisheries has been renamed "Industrial Development and Fish-
eries".

Mr Radix, who formerly Was also Attorney General and Ministefr of
Legal Affairs' has had this pditfolid'renamed also, and'he is now
Minister of Justice' and Attorney General.

In the Ministry of Defence, which is in the Prime Minister's port-:
folio, two new Deputy Secretaries have been appointed., They:are
Major Ewart Layne and Captain Christopher Stroude. In the PRG,
a "Secretary" holds the status of a Junior Minister.

These appointments and reallocations of.portfolios have effect from
November 26th.





TRINIDAD JOURNALISTS FIND NO EVIDENCE OF REPRESSION

Two Trinidad & Tobago journalists, Mr Keith Subero of the "Express"
and Mr Errol Pilgrim of the "Trinidad & Tobago Review",,,completed a
4-day fact finding mission in Grenada and returned to Trinidad on
December 4th.

Following publication on September 27th of a joint editorial by the
two Trinidad & Tobago dailies, the "Express" and "Guardian" -Messrs
Subero and Pilgrim were mandated by a. meeting.of journalists in
Trinidad to visit Grenada and report.

The editorial charged that there is "growing evidence of emascu-
lationof rights and freedoms in Grenada" since the revolution, and
that "it is no longer possible to misunderstand the pattern of
events (in Grenada) which.has denied freedom of expression and the
right to dissent."
continued -





Page 14 THE GRENADA. NEWSLETTER Week Ending 12.12 .81


The editorial said if the Peoples Revolutionary Government (PRG) did
not fulfil its promises of early elections, wider democracy, a new
Constitution, observance of the rule of law and respect for human
rights, it should be isolated from the rest of.the Caribbean Com-
munity.

Interviewed on Radio Free Grenada on Wednesday December 2nd, the
Trinidad & Tobago journalists said they were impressed with the free-
dom with which Grenadians lived and in an interview reported in the
Saturday 5th issue of the Government owned "Free West Indian" news-
paper, they described as "nauseating the lies that have been spread"
about Grenada.

No Evidence
"We have found no evidence to support any claims of repression, fear
in the society, that violence is being used against the people or
any breakdown of human rights",, they said.

According to Radio Free Grenada, in the course of their invest-
igations, these journalists held talks with the Directors of the
"Torchlight" newspaper which was banned by the PRG in 1979, with
representatives of the Media Workers Association of Free Grenada
and with Grenadian journalist Alister Hughes (NEWSLETTER's Editor)
who is a shareholder in the "Grenadian Voice" newspaper which was
banned by the PRG last June, with the Deputy Secretary for Inform-
ation and with Prime Minister Maurice Bishop.

Messrs Pilgrim and Subero told the "Free West Indian" they were
pessimestic about the willingness of the "Express" and "Guardian"
to publish the results of their mission to Grenada, but they ex-
prressed a commitment to develop independent information networks
through which "the truth about the Grenadian process can get out."





PRG: BARBADOS INCIDENT 4 "MISUNDERSTANDING"

The Peoples Revolutionary Government (PRG) is satisfied that an
incident involving Foreign Minister Unison Whiteman and Barbadian
Customs officials at Grantley Adams International Airport on 25th
November resulted from a "misunderstanding".

Returning to Grenada through Grantley Adams where he expected to
make his connecting flight by LIAT, Whiteman was held up for more
than 2 hours when, insisting on diplomatic privileges, he refused
to permit Customs officials to search his baggage.

A press release issued on December 1st by the Government Inform-
.ation Service said that following explanations given by senior
,arbadian Government officials, the PRG has accepted that the
incident resulted from a misunderstanding.
continued -




Week Ending :12.12.81 THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER Page 15


The release quotes Mr Whitemana.s saying.that Grenada's relations
with Barbados are good and that the incident will in no way affect
them.

This is the first indication-from a member of the PRG that good
relations between Grenada and Barbado ,have been restored. Since
November 4th last year, when Prime Minister Tom Adams of Barbados
publicly called on Prime Minister Bishop to hold elections as had
been promised at the time of the revolution there has been a "war
of words" accompanied by 'incidents' involving PRG Ministers pass-
ing through Grantly Adams and a breakdown of relations.

At a press conference in October, Minister of National Mobilisation
Selwyn Strachan said Mr Adams and Mr Bishop had met in Australia at
the Commonwealth Heads of Government Conference and there had been
"no hostility".

"At the same time", Mr Strachan said then, "it would not be correct
to say there has been a restoration of-normal State relations."





PRG BUYS ANOTHER SHIP

On official of the National Cooperative Agency (NACDA), Mr Andrew
James, said here on Eecember 1st that Grenada is soon to have its
first shipping cooperative.

Mr James did not disclose its size or the price paid, but he said
a ship, the "Mary A", has been purchased and will be used to trans-
port produce to regional markets.

On the following day, a release from the Government Information
Service gave the size of the ship, a trawler, as 62 tons and said
it had been purchased from a shipping agency in Trinidad & Tobago
for TT$115,000.

This is Grenada's second effort to go into the shipping business.
In May last year, the Peoples Revolutionary Government (PRG) paid
EC$201,000 for the 148 nett tons freighter "Albertross III" after
it had been seized in Grenada and sold by the Registrar of the
Supreme Court to satisfy debts incurred in Trinidad.

At that time, the then Minister of Agriculture, Unison Whiteman,
said the boat had been purchased to ease the problems of local
farmers caused by the lack of refrigerated cargo space for their
produce.. The "Albertross III" was to be refrigerated, he
said, and the aim of the PRG is to own a fleet of refrigerated
cargo ships to solve the problem of safe transportation overseas
of the island's produce.


- continued -





Page 16 THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER Week Ending 12.12.81


"Albertross III", however, did not go into service. The ship devel-

oped mechanical trouble and parts had to be sent abroad for repair.
The boat is no longer in Grenada and it is believed that it has been
sold.





MNIB SETS UP MARKETING & SHIPPING DIVISION

The Marketing & National Import ihg Board (MNIB) has established an
Export Marketing & Shipping Division which will identify markets for
Grenada's non-traditional agricultural products and products of the
Agro-industrial plant which produces a variety of nectars, fruit
juices and jams.

Two MNIB officials, Messrs Earl Gibson and Keith Hayling are now on
an extended trip making final arrangements for the marketing of these
goods in Trinidad, Curacao, Guadeloupe and other Caribbean territor-
ies.

Early in December, it was disclosed that the National Cooperative
Development Agency had purchased a 62 ton trawler, the "Mary A",
and this boat is to be made available to the new MNIB Division for
the transport of Grenadian produce regionally.

A MNIB official said that exports of "egg plants" (Solanum Melongena)
to the United Kingdom has exceeded 50,000 Ibs to date, and this
figure is an increase over last year's total of 33,000.





TUC CONSIDERS AMENDMENTS TO COMPENSATIONACT

The Executive of the Grenada Trade Union Council (TUC) met on 10th
December to consider certain amendments to the Workmen's Compensat-
ion Act as proposed by the Peoples Revolutionary Government (PRG).
The amendments are as a result of proposals made to the PRG follow-
ing the TUC Convention of September 26th last.

Also arising from TUC proposals, the TUC Executive considered
legislation proposed by the PRG to create "Agency Shop" conditions
for trade unionists in Grenada.

Under these conditions, when a Union has been recognized by an
employer, that employer must deduct from the pay of any non-union
member of his staff, for payment to the Union, a "service contri-
bution to that Union equal to the admission fee plus regular member-
ship subscription".

X source close to the TUC told NEWSLETTER that persons who do not
belong to a Union which has been recognized, and who enjoy the bene-
continued.


i


_ _




Week Ending.12.12.81 THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER Page 17


fits of that Union's bargaining, should be made to pay for that
service.





SWWU/GSA SIGN AGREEMENT

The Seamen & Waterfront Workers Union (SWWU) has signed an Indust-
rial Agreement with Grenada Shipping Agents Ltd (GSA) which gives
dock workers and stevedores a 371%0 wage increase over 3 years.

The Agreement, which wasi signed on November :12th and which has
effect from January 10th 1981, provides: for an across-the-board
increase of 20% in the first year, 10% in the second and 7 % in the
third.

GSA is a Company representing the'4 Shipping Agents operating at
St Georges port, and'the Agreement is binding on them all.

The new Agreement provides that, whren a worker is called out,-his
guarantee of 5 hours wages has been increased to 8, and the allow-
ance of 75 cents per ton of dangerous cargo has been increased to
$1.00.

In addition the number of 1,300 hours to be worked to qualify for
annual leave has been reduced to 1,000, and workers with over 10
years service will get 15. d~ys annual leave instead of the regular
10.

GSA and SWWU have agreed that the provisions of the statutory Work-
men's Compensation Ordinance are inadequate and have instituted an
accident insurance scheme which pays, in the event of death, 2
years'twages with a minimum of EC$15,000.

The scheme also makes provision for payment in the event of perm-
anent total disablement, permanent partial disablement and temporary
disablement. In the case of the last mentioned, workers will
receive pay for a maximum of 104 weeks, 52 at full pay and 52 at
half pay.





COST OF LIVING

The Central Statistical Office announced this month that there has
been a fall in the prices of carrots, dry pigeon peas, split peas
and men's shirts. These falls, however, have been insufficient
to offset increases in the prices of men's and ladies' leather
shoes, cigarettes, taxi fares and electricity, and there has been
a rise in the retail price index.


- continued -




THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER


With a base of 100 taken as effective in January 1979, the index
stands at 167.7 in the current month. This represents an increase
of .05 over November and an increase of 47.4 or 39.4% since January
1981.

Figures published for different categories of items show that, in
1981, Food increased by 44.1%, Alchohol and Tobacco by 41.8%,
Clothing & Foorwear by 43.2%, Housing"by 82% and Fuel & Light by
31.5%.


INTERIM RETAIL PRICE INDEX
January 1979 = 100


Food
Alcohol & Tobacco
Clothing & Footwear
Housing
Fuel & Light
Furniture & Appliances
Household Supplies
Transport (etc)
Miscellaneous

All Items


Dec 1981
170.8
153.2
181.2
114.1
189.1
171.3
169.8:'
195.6
146.5

167.7


Nov 1981
171.3
152.8
175.1
114.1
186.0
-171.4
169.8
191.5
146.5

167.2


Jan 1981
118.5
108.0
126.5
105.4
143.7
106.2
156.0
134.0
108.3

120.3


.B- --- -.


The current year has not been a peaceful one for
the world. The threat of nuclear destruction
looms large, the Middle East continues to seethe,
conflicts escalate in Latin America,
Africa and other parts of the globe. -
and, in our Caribbean, the tactics
of "big-power" politics spill over J
into the region and provoke tensions. .

As we celebrate the birth of the Prince
of Peace at this time, the producers e
and printers of the GRENADA NEWSLETTER ,
wish their subscribers and friends a rJ!ii t)\
full measure of personal peace in thi sl1/j
Season, and pray that 1982 will bring new
hope for universal love and harmony.





Alis BHghes Cynthia Hughes
S 14th December 1981


Week Ending 12.12.81













N NEWSLETTER
Volume 9 Number 10
For The Week Ending December 12th 1981
9th Year of Publication - 261st Issue




COARD ANSWERS BUSINESSMEN

Deputy Prime Minister Bernard Coard said here on.December 12th
that, apart from military manoeuvers designed to threaten the
Peoples Revolutionary Government (PRG), "imperialism" has.re-
cently launched a two pronged propaganda assault against the
Grenada revolution.
Delivering the feature address at the opening ceremony of the
National Youth Organisation (NYO) Congress, Mr Coard said the
two prongs of the assault are, first, a charge that the PM is
practicing torture and, secondly, that Grenada's economy has
collapsed.

With reference to torture, Mr C-oard referred to a charge by the
Trinidad & Tobago Human Rights Bureau that two detainees, Keith
and Lyle St Bernard, have had their fingers and toes broken and
their skin pealed off. The Deputy .Prime Minister said the
Bureau had made a serious mistake in namimg two specific people
because their cause would have been better served if they had
continued ,to make vague charges of torture as they have in the
past.

"This was a serious error", Mr Coard said, "because it's hap-
pens that those two people (the St Bernards) have been appear-.
ing in Court every week. pr the past three months, in the open
High Court of Grenada, where hundreds of Grenadians can see
them walking in and out of Court evpry day."

Mr Coard said the St Bernard's friends have been visiting
them and the doctor has been seeing them every day and, in
being specific,. those who made the charges of torture have'
exposed themselves.
continued -

irtodurd Prlntedi by Alittr t &y Cynthia Hughe
P () Box 65, St.UGorges, Grenada, .Ost Tidies


. . ,




Page 2 THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER Week Ending 12.1i2.8


The Deputy -rime Minister (who is alo Minister of Finance) said it
has been charged that Grenada's economy has' collapsed,, but he asked
his listeners to remember that Grenada now ha' free secopaary edu-
cation, free medical care and "people are writing us from other
CARICOM territories begging tjoi Bcome to do eye transplant and other
eye operations ...."
Concrete Benefits
'Wh~' they are trying to do is destabilise the masses in the rest
of the Caribbean", he said. "They are not going to destabilise
the masses inside Grenada because the masses inside Grenada are
feeling theconcrete benef its of theg~oeyolution."

Mr Coard said that, in every revolution, there are those who stand
to lose as the revolution progresses and., when the PRG took over
the importation of rice, cement and sugar, it meant lower prices for
the masses but lower profits for "those profiteers and exploiters
who used to control those items before."

The Deputy Prime Minister referred to an "article" in the Trinidad
"Express" newspaper, copied~from the GRENADA NEWSLETTER, and
Mr Coard called NEWSLETTER's Editor, Alister Hughes, "a member of
the local ruling class before the revolution, from a number-one
ruling-class family in Grenada, born to rule, they thought."

Mr Coard criticized the news story (see NEWSLETTER for week ending
24.10.81, Page 3, "Businessmen Disagree With Coard") which was
based on reaction of Grenada's Commercial Community to the Min-
ister's public statements, and he called Mr Hughes a "number one
twister, distorter, liar ...."

In an interview in October, Mr Coard had said Grenada's economy
was in "relatively good shape", that "there will be rapid growth
in the economy over the next three years", and "the country has
managed to withstand a severe economic crisis by diversifying its
economy".

Sectors of the Commercial Community interviewed by NEWSLETTER
disagreed with this and said, while there have been welcome
improvements to the infrastructure, these could not be class-
ified as diversificationss" to the economy. They said also
the construction trade is very bad, that the Business Community
is achieving negative growth and that it is a "dream" to talk of
rapid growth over the next three years.

Answering these statements, Mr Coard said the PRG has initiated
the "beginnings of serious progress" in the building of the
island's infrastructure and, over the next three years,"tremend-
,us advarces'".will be seen in this connection.

That is a fact", he said, "and'no amount of imperialist propa-
-.-.nda is going to change that fact." continued -


__ ^_




THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER


The Minister of Finance said he has "preliminary data" from the
International Monetary Fund (IMF) with reference to Grenada's
economy which, he said, "will make it very hard for imperialism and
their stooges and lackeys like Alister Hughes to deal with."

According to the IMF, Mr Coard said, Grenada had "growth rates" of
5% in agriculture, forestry and fisheries 'in-1981, 20% in mining and
quarrying and 14.5,. in the construction industry which, in the case
of the last figure quoted, is over and above a 208% growth in 1980.

The Minister said the IMF had estimated originally that Grenada's
economy would have negative growth in 1980 and 1981, but it has now
been determined that the island's economy grew by 3.1% in 1980 and
2% in 1981.
Less Profits
Some Grenadian businessmen certainly have less trade and .profits
than before, Mr Coard said, and this is because the National Import-
ing Board has taken over some EC$8 to EC$9 million in trade in basic
items. The benefits from this go to the people in -the form of
cheaper prices, the Minister said, and the businessmen are confusing
their own economic situation with that of the State.

"These exploiter elements who are the sources-of Alister Hughes'
misunformation and propaganda destabilization in the area of the
economy", he said,"'clearly believe that what is good for them is
good for the county. and what is not good for them is not good for
the country."

The Deputy Prime Minister said the economy must have the highest
priority in 1982 and beyond, and he urged the NYO to give this sub-
ject serious consideration in their deliberations at the Congress.





NUTMEG INDUSTRY IN WORRYING SITUATION

Grenada's 6,938 nutmeg growers have received a "bonus" of BC$3.1
million dollars in a pay out this month, but the prospects for the
immediate future of their Nutmeg Industry are dim.

The Report and Financial Statements of the Grenada Cooperative Nut-
meg Association (GCNA),published on December 2nd, show that, for
the Nutmeg Year ending 30th June last, the gross income of the
Association has fallen from EC$11.8 million to EC$9.7 million as
compared with 1980, andthe trading surplus has fallen dramatically
by over 76% from the 1980 figure of EC$2.1 million.

GCNA is the ,sole exporter of Grenada's nutmegs and mace, and the
system is that, during the trading year,.produce is purchased from
the growers and, at the end of the trading year, a "bonus" is paid
from the trading .surpus.continued -
-.continued -


Week Ending 12.12.81




THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER


The last good year GCNA had was 1978 when there was a trading surplus
of EC$4 million to be paid to growers as a "bonus". In 1979, the
surplus fell to EC$2.8 million and the Nutmeg Board took EC$1.4
million from its reserves and paid a "bonus" of some EC$4.3 million.


STATEMENT OF TRADING AND SURPLUS DISTRIBUTION
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30TH. JUNE 1981


Gross Income
Cost of produce from growers
Gross profit for year


Direct Expenses
General & administrative Expenses
Cess reserve for the year



Operating Income


1981
EC$9,786,726
4,031,079
5,755,647


3,189,423
1,337,050
976,496
5,502,969

252,678


Other Income/(Expenses)
Interest 182,993
Gain on sale of fixed assets 9,999
Gain/(loss) on exchange (7,013)
Miscellaneous 8,163
.Bad debts recovered/(written off) 10,675

Trading Surplus for Year 457,495


Add: Transfer from Reserve


2,642,505

EC$3,100,000


1980
EC$11,839,998
42113-517
7,726,481


3,606,355
1,103,551
1,182,776
5,892,682

1,833,799


275,854
29,495
30,561
5,877
(31,108)

2,144,478

1,855,522

EC$4,000,000


In 1980, there was further deterioration. The trading surplus
fell by nearly 25% to EC$2.1 million and, again, the Board drew
on reserves to make the bonus EC$4 million. Growers were
warned, however, that this transfer from reserves left the "cash
liquidity position of the reserve fund at an unconfortably low
leve 1."

At the end of June 1980, the close of the Nutmeg Year, GCNA had
EC$4.5 million in cash assets, of which over EC$4 million was
earning interest in fixed deposits. By the end of 1980,
however, shortage of ready cash forced the board to reduce its
fixed deposits to EC$2.5 million, and total cash assets had then
dropped to EC$2.9 million.

When the books were closed on June 30th last, it was disclosed
that the trading surplus was only EC$457 thousand, and the
Board decided to make a further transfer from reserves. The
-sum of EC$2.6 million has been taken, making the "bonus'.' BC3.1
con inue -


Week Ending 12.12.81


Page 4,




THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER


million and reducing the cash assets to just over EC$1.5 million.

According to the report sent by the GCNA Board to nutmeg growers,
the poor performance of the Industry has been caused by three fac-
tors. First, there is the world wide economic recession which
is affecting the Food Industry and thus, says the Board, "the demand
for these spices has continued to decline alarmingly."

Secondly; the Board says, "because of the tight money market and
high interest rates in the industrialized countries, spice traders
have been reluctant to carry inventories and buying has been on a
hand to mouth basis;
ANNUAL PRODUCT ION


The other factor put
forward by the Board
is competition from
Singapore and Indo-
nesia.Indonesia pro-
duces some S70 of
the world'sl supply
of nutmegs, Grenada
supplying nearly all
of the remainder,and
for some time now,
GCNA has been making
efforts to have mar-
keting arrangements
with Indonesia.

Early in 1979, GCNA
Manager Mr Robin
Renwick visited


Annual Average
Years Ended
?Oth June
1951 1955'
1956 1960*
1961- 1965
-'1966 1970
19171 -" 1975 *
S1976 1980

Year Ended
30th June
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981


Nutmegs .(Ibs)
Equivalent
Shelled
5,0i1,159
1,192,979
1,548,151
2, '80,909
4,027,174
'5,178,569



4,103,968
6,719,400
4,454,405
5,128,778
5,486,294
5,300,836


Mace (lbs)
Equilalent
Cured
692,508
176,355
237,809
397,573
540,136
659,887



534,660
923,497
568,139
625,467
647,672
532,129


* Hurricane "Janet" 22nd Peptember 1955


Indonesia and had talks with Government officials, producers and
exporters in that country with a view to effecting arrangements,
but there have been no further developments.

Indonesia, unlike Grenada, has no statutory body handling all ex-
ports and, in addition to considerable smuggling of nutmegs to
Singapore, the problems to be overcome include the resistance of
private Indonesian exporters to what they regard as Government
"interference".

A source close to the Industry told NEWSLETTER that, in tonnage
shipped, the July to October sales in 1981 are no less than during
the same period last year, but the market has declined further and
prices are not as good.

Interviewed by NEWSLETTER, GCNA Manager Mr Robin Renwick said there
can be no doubt that the Industry is facing one of its worst
periods since the Association was established in 1948. "Nutmeg
continued -


Week Ending .12.12.81 .


Page 5




THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER


growers should be very thankful that the Association. does exist at this
time", he said, "because they are able to face this difficult position
collectively."

Mr Renwick said that, under the present adverse circumstances, the
existence of GCNA is seen to be fully justified, and he thought that,


EXPORTS & AVERAGE PRICES


Sales
Nutmegs
(Ibs)


5,819,417
6,145,449
4,533,499
3,970,239
3,572,700


Average
Market
Price
Per lb

$2.2461
2.3518
2.3803
2.4813
2.2698


Sales
Mace
(ibs)


740,790
549,500
576,350
665,915
491,640


Average
Market
Price
Per lb

$3.0146
3.0497
2.8832
2.9863
3.4118


Total
Value
EC$


15,304,760
16,128,777
12,453,067
11,839,998
9,786,726


without the cooperative approach and the provisions which have been
made through the years for just such a situation as this, nutmeg
growers would be much worse off now.


DESTINATIONS, QUANTITIES, PERCENTAGES


Year Ending 30th June 1981


Destinat ion
Holland
West Germany
U.K.
U.S.A.
Argentina
France
Spain
Belgium
Canada
Italy
Cuba
Sweden
Jamaica
Norway
Jordan
Suriname
Denmark
Guyana
Trinidad
Dominica
Barbados
Montserrat
Martinique
St.Thomas
Guadeloupe
St Kitts
Virgin Gorda


Nutmegs (Ibs)
924,000
796,320
512,324
318,080
239,680
192,640
176,960
147,840
129,640
33,600
24,640
22,400
13,440
8,960
7,467
5,973
.4,480
3,733
2,682
2,539
2,315
1,120
821
747
149
133
17
3.572.700


%
25.80
22.29
14.34
8.90
6.71
5.39
4.95
4.14
3.63
.94
.69
.63
.38
.25
.21
.17
.13
.10
.08
.07
.07
.03
.02
.02
.h


Mace (lbs)
2,240
277,720
163,300
2,940







29,760

-


2,240


2,240







11,200
1


A01~lr


Year
Minded
June
30th

1977
1978
1979
1980
1981


.45
56.49
33.22
.60







6.05




.45


.45







2.29


Week Ending 12.12.81


AMI




THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER


PRG PROPOSES INVESTMENT CODE

The Grenada Chamber of Commerce has been asked by the Peoples Revo-
lutionary Government (PRG) to study and comment on an "Investment
Code" which has been prepared by the Industrial Planning & Invest-
ment Promotion Unit of the Ministry of Finance, Trade, Industry &
Planning.

The document is a comprehensive one which not only sets out the PRG's
policy towards investment, but is a "Handbook" of useful information
for the investor. Giving details and statistics .relative to such
areas as transportation, communications, population and the economy,
the Code also outlines the procedure to be adopted by would-be inves--
tors and indicates the type of venture the PRG thinks "could be es-
tablished on a profitable basis."

Outlining its policy towards foreign investment, the PRG's Code says
it accepts the principle of a tri-partite economy consisting of a
Public Sector, a Cooperative rector and'a Private Sector, the Public
Sector being engaged in revenue earning and production ventures,
both on its own as well as' with local and foreign capital.

"However", the Code says, "the critical importance that the tole of
the Private Sector will have to play in the industrial development
of the economy will not :e looked, notwithstanding consideration
that the activity of any private enterprise should be comparable and
be identified easily with the economic policy of the country".

Foreign investment, according to the Code, from both the capital and
technological points of view, is welcome but will be assessed on a
number pf principles. 'Long term investments will, generally, be
regarded more favourably, and 'foreign investment' should mean, in
fact, that foreign funds are invested.

Investments should, wherever possible, take advantage of Grenada's
surplus labour, new investment activities should have the effect of
reducing the cost of living and foreign investment that utilises
local raw materials will be favoured.

With reference tV repatriation of profits, dividends and capital,
the Code points out that there is a withholding tax of 20% on divi-
dends to non-residents, and in addition, the paying Company must
bear the foreign exchange tax of 5% payable on all transactions
in foreign exchange.

Generally, non-resident shareholders will nbt be permitted, for the
first 5 profitable years, to repatriate more than 75% of their share
of after-tax profits and, in what appears to be the condition after
the first 5 profitable years, the Code says that, in the event that
"foreign shareholders choose to repatriate more that 75% of divi-
dends, a 10% 'toll gate' tax will be imposed."
continued -


Week Ending 12.12.81




Page 8 THE GRENADA NEWSLETTER Week Ending 2.21.81


"New venture capital invested in Grenada, irrespective of source,
which has been transferred through normal banking channels", the Code
says, "may be repatriated after 2 years, less income repatriated in
the same period. The balance in excess, excluding any profits,
may be remitted over a phased out period not exceeding 5 years."

The Code says also that the foreign investor will be permitted to
repatriate the full proceeds from the disposal of his investment.
Control
In the interest of maintaining effective control over the perform-
ance Of the economy, the PRG reserves the right to exclude the
Private.Sector from certain specified activities. These include
the development of public utilities, radio/television stations,
national airlines, telecommunications networks and trading in ceri
tain basic commodities.

On the other hand, exclusive local participation or local majority
participation is reserved for nationals only in certain areas of
economic activity. These include retail and distributive
trading, restaurants, travel agencies and real estate development.
According to the Code, this applies to future investment' only, all
existing arrangements being allowed to continue.

The Chamber'of Commerce was scheduled to meet shortly to discuss
the Code and make its comments and recommendations to the PRG.





PRELIMINARY HEARING INTO BOMB INCIDENT BEGINS

The preliminary enquiry into charges arising out of bomb blast
killings at a rally at Queens Park, St Georges last year began in
the St Georges Magistrates Court before Magistrate Lyle St Paul on
December 7th.

Charges were laid on July 28th against Layne Phillip, Russel Budh-
lall, Roland Budhlall, Kenneth Budhlall, Eddie Richardson, Fitslyn
Joseph and Grace Augustine and, if convicted, these defendants face
possible death sentences.

The bomb exploded on June 19th 1980 at a rally called to honour
two National Heroes, Alister Strachan and Tubal Uriah 'Buzz'
Butler, and it was placed under a platform on which were seated
Prime Minister Maurice Bishop, Governor General Sir Paul Scoon
and other dignatoiies.

No one on the platform was hurt, but three people in the vicinity
of the bomb were killed and several others were injured. The
dead are Lorraine Charles,13, and Laurice Humphrey,23, both of
home died on the spot, and Bernadette Bailey, 15, who died on
.;uly 21st. continued -




Full Text